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Smith and Young Families of northern Rhode Island



Hi. My name is Dan. I was born in Rhode Island but grew up in a military family and moved a lot. I live in
the Southeast now, quite a ways from R.I. and my relatives and deceased ancestors. I have always
been interested in my family's history since my teens. I am a member of the New England Historic
Genealogical Society (http://www.newenglandancestors.org/) and the Rhode Island Genealogical Society
(http://www.rigensoc.org/). If you are doing genealogical research in New England and Rhode Island,
I highly recommend joining these two excellent organizations.

This web site lists some of my Smith and Young Family ancestors of northern Rhode Island and their
allied families that I have been researching. The Smith and Young Families were primarily located in
the Town of Smithfield, R.I. The allied families include Chillson (Chilson), Flynn, Laramee (Laramie/Larmie),
Colwell, Harris, Knight, Greene (Green), Loomis/Lomas, Jenckes, Wilcox, and Seamans. This web site is
dedicated to my late mother, her parents, and all living and deceased relatives. All of the gravestone pictures
on this web site were photographed by Dan. Unless otherwise noted, older portrait pictures are courtesy of
my great-grandparents.


For the Young Family, click here.




Some of my Immigrant Ancestors to New England


Christopher Smith (Bef. 1610 - 1676) (Providence, Rhode Island)
Thomas Angell (Bef. 1619 - Bef. 1694) (Providence, R.I.)
Thomas Arnold (Abt. 1599 - 1674) (Watertown, Massachusetts and Providence, R.I.)
John Russell (Abt. 1608 - 1694/5) (Marshfield and Dartmouth, Mass.)
Joseph Jenks (Abt. 1603 - 1683) (Lynn, Mass.)
Benjamin Herendeen (Abt. 1618 - 1687) (Providence, R.I.)
Walsingham Chilson (Abt. 1613 - Aft. 1669) (Salem, Mass. and Saco, Maine)
Thomas Harris (Bef. 1610 - 1686) (Providence, R.I.)
Chad Browne (Bef. 1611 - Bef. 1663) (Boston, Mass. and Providence, R.I.)
John Greene (1651 - 1729) (East Greenwich and Warwick, R.I.)
William Hopkins (Bef. 1610 - 1684) (Roxbury, Mass.)
Henry Matteson (1646 - 1690) (East Greenwich, R.I.)
William Wardwell (1606/7 - 1670) (Boston, Mass., Exeter, N.H. and Wells, Maine)
Robert Colwell (Bef. 1610 - Aft. 1670) (Providence, R.I. and Long Island, New York)
Joshua Winsor (Bef. 1610 - 1679) (Providence, R.I.)
Roger Williams (Abt. 1604 - 1683/4) (Founder of Rhode Island, Providence, R.I.)
Richard Tew (Bef. 1610 - 1673) (Newport, R.I.)
John Francis Flynn (1841 - 1920) (My Irish Line: New York City, Mass., and Smithfield, R.I.)
Nicolas Dehornay dit Laramee (Abt. 1710 - Bef. 1790) (My French Canadian Line: Normandy, France to Quebec, Canada)
Richard Knight (1603 - Abt. 1680) (Hampton, N.H. and Newport, R.I.)
Edward Wilcox (1603/4 - Bef. 1660) (Portsmouth, R.I.)
Thomas Seamans (Abt. 1660 - Bef. 1750) (Swansea, Mass.)
Matthew Irons (1615 - 1661) (Boston, Mass.)
Deacon Edmund Rice (Abt. 1594 - 1663) (Sudbury, Massachusetts)
Thomas Lawton (? - 1681) (Portsmouth, Rhode Island)


Note: I have many more female lines that I have yet to look at, so the above list is just a starter.





For R.I. burial locations listed on my web site, check the Rhode Island Historical Cemeteries Transcription Project
web site.
The transcription project is a voluntary effort by genealogists in Rhode Island to compile all of the
historical cemeteries in Rhode Island with gravestone inscriptions. Rhode Island has the highest
concentration of historic cemeteries per land area in the nation. Although a small state, Rhode Island
has taken the national lead in terms of identifying its historic cemeteries with the RIHCTP. The
transcription project web site is an excellent tool for R.I. genealogists in possibly finding the burial
locations of ancestors. I have used it successfully several times myself. John Sterling was the primary
leader and organizer for the R.I. Historical Cemeteries Transcription Project and was its director for over
a decade. He has published several excellent books on historic cemeteries for select townships in R.I.
Roger Beaudry did much of the field work for northern Rhode Island for the RIHCTP. Special thanks to both
of these men. Thanks also to the several other project volunteers of the RIHCTP.

One flaw with the RIHCTP is the "Telephone Pole" Navigation System for each cemetery. GPS technology has
made the "Telephone Pole" system obsolete. Charlene and Bob Butler of West Greenwich are currently
identifying and inventorying all of the existing historic cemeteries in the Town of West Greenwich, R.I.
They have "rediscovered" several "missing" cemeteries in West Greenwich and are recording GPS coordinates
for each cemetery. As I have some West Greenwich families in my family tree, I have benefited from their
research. "Google Earth" is a very useful program to use when plotting or investigating historic cemeteries
in Rhode Island or New England (see John E. Sterling, "Google Earth: A New Tool for Cemetery Research" in
the June 2008 issue of "Rhode Island Roots," R.I.G.S.). I will attempt to include GPS coordinates for
historic cemeteries listed on my website. This process will take some time, so please be patient.





A Note on Rhode Island Historic Cemeteries
There are well over 4,000 historic cemeteries in the great State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
Most of them are small family plots on the old farm homesteads, but the ownership and access issues of each
cemetery are unique. Several modern landowners and most of my living relatives do not understand the legal
implications of these small vestiges of our families' heritage. I would estimate that about half of these
old historic cemeteries were reserved legally out of the old homestead farm by land deed or probate (wills).
Sometimes, our family attempted to reserve the cemetery out of the old farm, but didn't do it quite right
legally, as is the case of the Oliver Smith Lot (NS048) in North Smithfield, Rhode Island (see my legal
headache with this cemetery below). Doing the title research on each cemetery takes a lot of time and effort,
in addition to the regular genealogical research that is required for all of our Smith and allied families.
For those of my relatives who are sitting in Rhode Island and other New England states and aren't contributing
to the research, you can directly help out by taking some INITIATIVE and helping clean up our family cemeteries
that are listed below! The more of you who help out, the better. Your ancestors cannot climb out of their final
resting places and clean up their own graves! Remember, if it were not for the struggles of your ancestors, you
would not be here!










Places I love to do Research at:


Rhode Island Historical Society Library, Providence, R.I.
Definitely my favorite. Superb collection of genealogies, microfilm, town histories for R.I. and New England States.
The manuscript collection here is truly outstanding. I could literally spend years in this place just working on my
personal families. The library staff have always treated me well.


Rhode Island State Archives, Providence, R.I.
My second favorite. Another excellent collection of records, especially military (Revolutionary War and Civil War).
The state workers here have always treated me well. The location is a bit difficult in terms of parking, but I like to walk,
so I park on the east side of Providence and walk in. The State of Rhode Island should invest more tax dollars in this
worthy facility.


New England Historic Genealogical Society Library, Boston, Massachusetts
One of the best Genealogical Libraries in the country. Excellent collection of genealogies, microfilm, town histories,
and manuscripts. Not easy to get to in downtown Boston (I take the train up from Providence, R.I. and walk in). Most of
the libary staff are friendly, and some of them are national class (Fellows of the American Society of Genealogy).


Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, D.C.
Another excellent Genealogy Library, one of the best in the country. Many genealogies, town histories, some microfilm.
The Rhode Island Collection here is very good (a lot of it was donated by DAR members since the early 1900's), just a notch
below the RIHS Library in Providence. I take the metro in to downtown and walk in.


National Archives Building, Washington, D.C.
I have spent some time here researching the Rhode Island Revolutionary War Continental Line Regiments and other New England
Regiments. Lots of muster rolls, pay rolls, etc. on microfilm. A researcher can also view Civil War personnel records in
person after getting a researcher card.


LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah
Regardless of what you think of the Mormon religion (as a descendant of Roger Williams, I think toleration of religions is in
good order), the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints built this superb library near the Mormon Temple complex in
downtown Salt Lake City in Utah. Genealogy is important to the Mormons because they believe that followers of their church
need to baptise all of their deceased ancestors in the Mormon faith. I have been to the LDS Family History Library once, and
have to say, it is first-rate. What sets this library apart is the world class Microfilm Collection. Land deeds, probate records
Town Council records of most of the Rhode Island towns are here. There I was in Salt Lake City looking at Smithfield, R.I. Town
Council records from the late 1700's. But that's not all, as there are several English, Canadian, and European microfilm records
as well. The library also has a good genealogical books collection, but the microfilm collection here is simply amazing.


Rhode Island Town Halls
Primarily, I look up land deeds and probate records at the town halls. For Smithfield, R.I., the post 1870 records are
at the Smithfield Town Hall at Georgiaville, R.I. The early 19th and 18th century records for Smithfield, R.I. are at
the Central Falls City Hall. The staff at Central Falls are nice and the collection is good, I just hate the location.
Some of my favorite R.I. Town Halls include Smithfield (Georgiaville), Scituate, Glocester, East Greenwich, West Greenwich,
and Coventry.





Places I hate to do Research at:


Rhode Island Judicial Archives Center, Pawtucket, R.I.
I have been here a couple of times. A researcher goes up to the second floor in an ugly old mill building in
downtown Pawtucket and is greeted with a large glass wall and scowling state judicial clerks ("What do you want?????").
The whole set up here is very researcher unfriendly. The surviving judicial records (several are unfortunately missing)
need to be professionally restored and preserved. The records should be microfilmed, and a large room set up for
researchers with microfilm readers. The surviving judicial records should be indexed, and the index should be made
available on the Internet. The archivist was nice to me, and did mail the surviving records that I was interested in.
However, the State of Rhode Island needs to invest some money in this facility and make it more research friendly.
It is quite a shame, as there are many records here that are valuable to researchers that are sitting and deteriorating
in this old mill building.


Providence City Archives, Providence, R.I.
This is the Providence City version of the normal Rhode Island Town Hall. Unfortunately, unlike the typical
Rhode Island Town Hall, this one is not particularly research friendly. The location is the top floor of the
Providence City Hall downtown. The research area is small and cramped. Searching for Probate Records and Land
Deeds is a pain because you have to get a City Archives Clerk to pull each Land Deed or Probate Volume for you.
If you want to look at several land deed records, this procedure will take you some time. The City Archives clerks
were not particularly friendly during my visit.




















A Recommended Reading List for our Smith and Allied Families:



Richard H. Benson, "The Arnold Family of Smithfield, Rhode Island," (Boston, Massachusetts: Newbury Street Press, 2009)
Excellent genealogy of the Thomas Arnold Family of Smithfield which our Smith Family is directly related to through Thomas3 Smith below.
Richard Benson should have won the "2009 Donald Lines Jacobus Award" for this work, but Richard was robbed by our illustrious FASG member from
Rhode Island who is a Brown University graduate with a liberal political agenda! This FASG member gave away the Jacobus Award to
Eric Grundset et al.'s pathetic "Forgotten Patriots" book which has a TON OF ERRORS in the Rhode Island section! When an author
like Grundset (who knows absolutely nothing about Rhode Island Genealogy!) calls several white Rhode Island soldiers "colored" in his
work when they were clearly white by available Census records and the genealogical literature, that is RACISM in my book!
Be wary, reader, of Brown University, its alumni, and their radical left-wing political agenda and spin-doctoring of Rhode Island's History!



Dr. Patrick T. Conley, "Rhode Island's Founders from Settlement to Statehood," (Charleston, South Carolina: The History Press, 2010)
Dr. Conley is an alumnus of Providence College and the University of Notre Dame; he has produced several historical volumes which I recommend.
This particular work introduces the reader to some well-known and lesser-known historical figures from early Rhode Island up to the
Revolutionary War.



Jim Ignasher, "Remembering Smithfield Sketches of Apple Valley," (Charleston, South Carolina: The History Press, 2009)
Jim is an excellent local Smithfield, Rhode Island historian and has produced a highly recommended work here. The Town Poor Farm,
Smithfield Fire Department, Smithfield Police Department sections are great.



Ronald J. Onorato, "American Institute of Architects Guide to Newport," (Providence, Rhode Island: American Institute of Architects Rhode
Island Chapter, 2007)

I love old buildings, and Newport, Rhode Island has its share of them. This handy guide has good maps and photos of the building of interest;
the book is designed to be held easily in your hands in the FIELD where you may view the buildings in person!



William McKenzie Woodward, "American Institute of Architects Guide to Providence," (Providence, Rhode Island: Providence Preservation Society/
American Institute of Architects Rhode Island Chapter, 2003)

Similar comments as the Newport Guide apply to this book.



Eric B. Schultz and Michael J. Tougias, "King Philip's War: The History and Legacy of America's Forgotten Conflict," (Woodstock, Vermont:
The Countryman Press, 2000)

Our ancestors in the late 1600's were greatly effected by this brutal conflict in southern New England. Eric's and Michael's book has good
maps and directions to modern historical sites where the fighting took place.



Betsey Ann White, "Three Holes in the Chimney, or a Scattered Family," (Newton, Massachusetts: self-published, 1886)
A little known work which gives a good picture of the Quaker Culture of northern Rhode Island. The characters in the
book are based on real people from Lincoln, Rhode Island. You can download this book online on Google Books.



Dean Crawford Smith, "The Ancestry of Emily Jane Angell 1844-1910," (Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1993)
Our early Christopher Smith Family is covered in this book as well as the Youngs of Smithfield and several other northern Rhode Island
families. This book won the "1993 Donald Lines Jacobus Award" and deservedly so!



The Arcadia "Images of America" Series
Excellent series of old photographs from various towns across America. I recommend the following:



Ken Brown, Sr., Jim Ignasher, and Bill Pilkington, "Smithfield," (Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing, 2008)



North Smithfield Heritage Association, "North Smithfield," (Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing, 2003)



Patricia Zifchock Mehrens, "Burrillville," (Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing, 1996)



Thomas E. and Barbara A. Greene, "North Providence," (Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing, 1996)



Charles E. Savoie, "Lincoln," (Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing, 2004)



Charles E. Savoie, "The Lower Blackstone River Valley," (Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing, 1997)



Scituate Heritage Room Committee, "Scituate," (Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing, 1998)



Raymond A. Wolf, "The Lost Villages of Scituate," (Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing, 2009)



East Greenwich Historic Preservation Socity, "East Greenwich," (Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing, 2006)



Dr. Kathleen A. Swann, "West Greenwich," (Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing, 2011)




















If you have stories, anecdotes, pictures to share on any of the families on this web site, please email me at the link
on the bottom of this page. I always enjoy hearing from distant relatives.





I'll start with my Smith Line first. Some of the branches are not complete, and more research is required.
The two major Smith Families of northern Rhode Island are the John Smith the Miller Family and the
Christopher Smith Family. The John Smith the Miller Family is covered well in Charles William Farnham's
genealogy of John Smith in "Rhode Island History," volumes 20-24, 1961-1965 (also available in:
"Genealogies of Rhode Island Familes from Rhode Island Periodicals," Volume 2, Genealogical Publishing Co.,
1983). After several years of research, I have found that my Smith Family descends from the
Christopher Smith line.

There are no comprehensive genealogies of the Christopher Smith Family that have been published yet.
Thus, research on this family can be slow and tedious, and the excellent work of Farnham on the
John Smith the Miller Family should be consulted frequently to eliminate potential Smith candidates. The
early part of my Smith Family is based upon Dean Crawford Smith's "The Ancestry of Emily Jane Angell"
(1992), pp. 466 - 479, John O. Austin’s "Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island" (1887, 1969),
pp. 376 - 379, and Barbara J. Nichols' "Smith/Mitchell Genealogy" (1994) in the R.I.H.S. Library. The
descendants of Joshua Smith are based on my own research.

I have not listed the names of living relatives or their parents for privacy reasons. Thanks to my late
cousin Ted for information and several good leads on the old Smith Family. I'm sorry that you couldn't
see all of the results. Thanks to my cousin Wendy and my late grandmother for help with the modern Smiths.
Thanks to my cousin Michael, who researched the Nancy Smith (1827 - 1900) and Edwin P. Williams
(1833 - 1906) line. Thanks to Patricia Wood of Pascoag, R.I. for researching the Ephraim Smith (1790 - 1854) line.
Thanks to Mr. Eayrs and son for information and digitizing their excellent collection of photographs of the Eayrs
and Smith Families.

We descendants of Jencks Smith (1837-1910) and Lenora Harris (1847-1930) have a second line of descent from the
Christopher Smith Family through the Thomas Jenckes Family, see Jacob4 Smith below.





Smith Family




Christopher1 Smith    
b. Abt. 1600’s in England
m. Bef. 1625 in England    Alice ( ? )    b. Abt. 1600’s in England    d. Bef. October 3, 1681 in Providence, R.I.
d. June 1676 in Newport, R.I.
burial: unknown (presumably in Newport, R.I.)


Christopher Smith immigrated to Providence, R.I. from England in the late 1640’s. He obtained land just north of
Providence along both sides of the Mooshausick River. He was a Quaker and was moderately wealthy based on early
Providence tax records. Christopher served on the jury for the Providence General Court in the 1650’s, and also
served as a constable in the 1650’s. He obtained more land in the 1660’s and 1670’s. With the outbreak of King
Philip’s War in 1675, most of Providence was abandoned. Less than 30 men stayed behind, including Christopher’s
son Edward Smith and Roger Williams. On March 29, 1676, after meeting peacefully with Roger Williams, the
Narragansett sachem Canonchet led his warriors to the mostly abandoned Providence and put the town to the torch.
None of the remaining Englishmen were killed in the attack, but the town of Providence was virtually destroyed
with Christopher Smith’s house also going up in flames (Eric Shultz and Michael Tougias, "King Philip’s War,"
The Countrymen Press, Vermont, 1999, pp. 282 - 283). Christopher had evacuated to Newport, R.I., but died in
June of 1676.


children:
Susanna2 Smith (Abt. 1625 - Aft. 1663)
Benjamin2 Smith (Abt. 1631 - 1713)
***Edward2 Smith
Thomas2 Smith (Abt. 1635 - 1670)





Susanna2 Smith   (Christopher1)  
b. Abt. 1625 in England
m. Bet. 1647 - 1650 in Providence, R.I.?    Lawrence Wilkinson    b. 1620’s in England    d. August 9, 1692 in Providence, R.I.
d. Aft. 1662 in Providence, R.I.?


children:
Samuel3 Wilkinson ( ? - Aft. 1727)
Susanna3 Wilkinson (1652 - bef. 1672)
John3 Wilkinson (1654 - 1708)
Joanna3 Wilkinson (1657 - ? )
Josias3 Wilkinson ( ? - 1692)
Susannah3 Wilkinson (1662 - ? )




Benjamin2 Smith   (Christopher1)  
b. Abt. 1631 in England
m. Abt. 1660 in Providence, R.I.    Lydia Carpenter    b. ? in Providence, R.I.    d. October 1, 1711 in Pawtuxet, R.I.?
d. December 23, 1713 in Pawtuxet, R.I.

Benjamin was an assistant to the Governor from 1666 - 1673, in 1675, in 1686, from 1689 - 1690, in 1696, in 1698, and from
1700 - 1704. He was also a Deputy to the General Assembly from 1670 - 1671, from 1673 - 1674, in 1680, in 1682, and
from 1684 - 1685. Benjamin and family lived in Warwick, R.I.


children:
Benjamin3 Smith (Abt. 1661 - 1730)
Joseph3 Smith (Aft. 1661 - Aft. 1705)
William3 Smith (1664 - 1745)
Simon3 Smith (Aft. 1661 - 1712)
Lydia3 Smith (1668 - 1741)
Elizabeth3 Smith (Abt. 1672 - 1718)





***Edward2 Smith   (Christopher1)  
b. Abt. 1630’s in England
m. May 9, 1663 in Providence, R.I.    Amphillis Angell    b. Abt. 1644 in Providence, R.I.    d. Aft. 1694 in Providence, R.I.
d. November 8, 1693 in Providence, R.I.
burial: unknown (presumably in Providence, R.I.)


Edward immigrated to Providence, R.I. with his father Christopher in the late 1640’s. He served as the Town
Sergeant of Providence in 1661, and as a deputy to the General Court from the 1670’s to 1680’s. Edward served
on the Providence Town Council in the 1670’s and 1680’s. He worked as a farmer in Providence. His final service to
the town of Providence was as a magistrate in 1693. Edward’s wife Amphillis was the firstborn child of Providence
immigrant Thomas Angell.


children:
Alice3 Smith (Abt. 1664 - 1739)
Edward3 Smith (Bef. 1670 - 1726)
Amphillis3 Smith (Bef. 1670 - Aft. 1704)
***Thomas3 Smith
Christopher3 Smith (Bef. 1680 - Abt. 1758)
Benjamin3 Smith (Bef. 1680 - 1749)
Joseph3 Smith (1680 - 1733/34)





Thomas2 Smith   (Christopher1)  
b. Abt. 1635 in England
m. Abt. 1659 in Providence, R.I.    Ruth Wickenden    b. Abt. 1630’s in Providence, R.I.    d. January 16, 1670 in Pawtuxet, R.I.
d. January 16, 1670 in Pawtuxet, R.I.
burial: unknown

Thomas was a tailor in Warwick, R.I. He lived next to his brother Benjamin. He died tragically by drowning in the
Pawtuxet River during the night of January 16, 1670 when he fell out of his row boat. His wife Ruth tried to save him with
a stick, but she was pulled into the river also. Neither Thomas nor Ruth could swim, and they both drowned.


children:
John3 Smith (Abt. 1661 - 1683)
Thomas3 Smith (1664 - ? )
William3 Smith (1667 - Aft. 1715)
Joseph3 Smith (1669 - 1739)






Alice3 Smith    (Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. Abt. 1664 in Providence, R.I.
m. May 20, 1684 in Providence, R.I.    Joseph Whipple    b. Abt. 1662 in Providence, R.I.    d. April 28, 1746 in Providence, R.I.?
d. July 20, 1739 in Providence, R.I.?
burial: North Burial Ground (PV001), Providence, R.I.


children:
John4 Whipple (1685 - ?)
Jeremiah4 Whipple (1686 - ? )
Joseph4 Whipple (1687 - ? )
Amphillis4 Whipple (1689 - ? )
Sarah4 Whipple (1691 - ? )
Susanna4 Whipple (1693 - ? )
Freelove4 Whipple (1694 - ? )
Alice4 Whipple (1696 - ? )
Amey4 Whipple (1699 - ? )
Christopher4 Whipple (1701 - ? )
Mary4 Whipple (1704 - ? )
Christopher4 Whipple (1706/7 - ? )






Gravestone of Alice (Smith) Whipple (1664 - 1739), wife of Col. Joseph Whipple, in
the North Burial Ground in Providence, R.I. Inscription reads “In Memory of
Mrs. Alice Whipple, wife of Col. Joseph Whipple. Born in Providence and Died
July 20 Anno Domini 1739. Aged 75 years.” Grave location from John E. Sterling,
"North Burial Ground: Providence, R.I.: Old Section 1700-1848," R.I.G.S. Special Pub.
No. 5, 2000, p. 12.






Grave of Col. Joseph Whipple in the North Burial Ground in Providence, R.I.
Joseph was the son of original immigrant John Whipple (Abt. 1617 - 1685), who is
buried nearby. Grave location from John E. Sterling, "North Burial Ground:
Providence, R.I.: Old Section 1700-1848," R.I.G.S. Special Pub. No. 5, 2000,
pp. 12 - 13.






Edward3 Smith    (Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. Bet. 1665 - 1670 in Providence, R.I.
m. Bef. 1700    Mercy Mowry    b. Abt. 1680 in Providence, R.I.    d. Aft. 1741 in North Kingston, R.I.?
d. November 9, 1726 in Providence, R.I.

Edward was a farmer in Providence, R.I. He was involved with several probate cases for the Town of Providence.


children:
Edward4 Smith ( ? - Aft. 1733)
Alice4 Smith ( ? - Aft. 1741)
Sarah4 Smith ( ? - Aft. 1748)
Martha4 Smith ( ? - Aft. 1759)
Abraham4 Smith ( ? - ? )
Mercy4 Smith (Abt. 1714 - 1799)
Amey4 Smith ( ? - Aft. 1749)
Freelove4 Smith ( ? - 1766)
Rachel4 Smith ( ? - Aft. 1753)
Mary4 Smith ( ? - 1741)
Anne4 Smith (Abt. 1719 - 1810)





Amphillis3 Smith    (Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. Bet. 1660 - 1670 in Providence, R.I.
m. Bef. 1703    Noah Whipple    b. ? in Providence, R.I.    d. November 10, 1703 in Providence, R.I.
d. Aft. 1704 in Providence, R.I.?

Amphillis was the second wife of Noah Whipple and had no children with him.





***Thomas3 Smith    (Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. February 19, 1671 in Providence, R.I.
m. Bef. 1697    Phebe Arnold    b. November 5, 1672 in Providence, R.I.    d. Aft. 1741 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. September 2, 1741 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: unknown (probably at the Friends Burial Ground at Union Village, North Smithfield, R.I.)


Thomas lived in Providence until 1710 - 1720, when he bought land in the modern day Woonsocket area near
Providence Road. The first permanent settler of Woonsocket was John Arnold, son of Richard Arnold, who had
established a saw mill at Woonsocket Falls by 1666. John Arnold built the first house in Woonsocket in 1712 which
still stands on Providence Street ("History of Woonsocket" by E. Richardson, Woonsocket, S.S. Foss,
Printer, 1876, pp. 33 - 41). Thomas Smith was a Quaker and was one of a group of eight Quaker men who bought half
an acre of land from Eleazer Arnold in 1708 for the existing Lower Society of Friends meeting house which
was built in 1703 (Early Records of the Town of Providence, Vol. 20, pp. 284 - 287). The Lower Friends Meeting
House still stands in Saylesville in Lincoln, R.I. Thomas’ wife Phebe Arnold was the daughter of the same
Eleazer Arnold, who built the stone ender Eleazer Arnold House (built 1687), which still stands on the Great Road
in Lincoln, R.I. After his move to the Woonsocket area, Thomas would sell part of his land for the establishment
of the Upper Society of Friends Meeting House which was built in 1719 in modern day Union Village, North Smithfield.


children:
***Thomas4 Smith
John4 Smith (1700 - 1752? )
Phebe4 Smith (1703 - ? )
Mary4 Smith (1705 - ? )
Hannah4 Smith (1707 - ? )
Daniel4 Smith (1709 - 1784? )
Ruth4 Smith (1712 - ? )






Original Smithfield Town Copy of Thomas3 Smith's Will courtesy of Central Falls City Clerk's Office.
Click on picture for a larger view.






Continuation of Thomas3 Smith's Will courtesy of Central Falls City Clerk's Office.
Click on picture for a larger view.






The Lower Society of Friends Meeting House was built in 1703 on land owned by
Eleazer Arnold. This original meeting house is preserved as the small ell in the back of
the current structure. A congregation of Quakers still meets here over 300 years
after the Smithfield Society of Friends was first established. The Lower Meeting House
in Saylesville (Lincoln), R.I. acted as the Monthly Meeting House for all of northern R.I.

A historic cemetery dating from the 18th century lies behind the Meeting House. In the
1700’s, it was common Quaker practice to mark gravestones with initials of the deceased
and the year of death or alternatively gravestones had no markings at all.





Christopher3 Smith    (Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. Bet. 1670 - 1680 in Providence, R.I.
m. Bef. July 1697    Mary Stephens    b. April 7, 1679 in Providence, R.I.?    d. Aft. Oct. 1758 in Scituate, R.I.?
d. Abt. 1758 in Scituate, R.I.?
burial: unknown

Christopher was a blacksmith in Providence and Scituate, R.I.


children:
Jeremiah4 Smith ( ? - ? )
Elizabeth4 Smith ( ? - ? )
Amphillis4 Smith ( ? - ? )
James4 Smith (Abt. 1706 - ? )
Christopher4 Smith ( ? - ? )
Abigail4 Smith ( ? - ? )
Benjamin4 Smith ( ? - ? )





Benjamin3 Smith    (Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. Bet. 1670 - 1680 in Providence, R.I.
m1. ?    Sarah Burlingame    b. ? in Providence, R.I.?    d. ?
m2. June 24, 1742 in Smithfield Friends Monthly Meeting, R.I.    Anne Smith    b. October 5, 1717 in Providence, R.I.?    d. January 26, 1782 in Providence, R.I.?
d. December 26, 1749 in Smithfield, R.I.

Benjamin’s second wife Anne Smith was the daughter of Benjamin Smith, a descendant of John Smith the Miller.
Anne married as her second husband in 1755 Gov. Stephen Hopkins, a signer of the Declaration of Independence.
Anne is buried next to Stephen Hopkins in the North Burial Ground (PV001) in Providence, Rhode Island.

Cherry Fletcher Bamberg, FASG, wrote about Benjamin Smith's daughter Amey Smith (1748 - 1784) in her articles,
"Amy (Smith) Russell and Her Family," "Rhode Island Roots," Vol. 37, No. 2 (Rhode Island Genealogical Society:
June 2011): 57-78; "Hopkins Family Letters (Part One)," "Rhode Island Roots," Vol. 37, No. 3 (Rhode Island
Genealogical Society: September 2011): 119-141; "Hopkins Family Letters (Part Two)," "Rhode Island Roots,"
Vol. 37, No. 4 (Rhode Island Genealogical Society: December 2011): 185-206.

While I acknowledge Cherry's skill as a writer and a genealogist, I have some criticisms of these articles. First,
Cherry neglected to mention Amey Smith's line of descent from Christopher1 Smith, which is standard procedure in
genealogy. The original manuscript letters and Smith Family Genealogy are interesting in their own right, however,
Cherry, as a Brown University graduate, continues to interweave her own liberal political beliefs into the story.
The only reason Cherry even wrote an article on one small branch of our large Christopher1 Smith Family is the fact
that Stephen Hopkins owned slaves. Stephen Hopkins married into our Christopher1 Smith Family, the vast majority of
whom as Quakers were ardent abolitionists. The fact that most of our Christopher1 Smith Family did not own slaves is
not emphasized by Ms. Bamberg or several other "Brownies." It is also disingenuous for Cherry to write a genealogical
article about a branch of our Christopher1 Smith family based solely on her personal liberal "spin-doctoring" of the
Rhode Island slavery story. It is quite clear from her articles that Cherry has no genealogical interest in our
Christopher1 Smith Family as an independent Rhode Island Family (she has no publications on any other branch of our
family). As a descendant of Christopher1 Smith, I find Cherry's tone and hidden political agenda in these articles OFFENSIVE!
These are my blood relatives, so you CLOWNS FROM BROWN UNIVERSITY keep your damn POLITICS out of our Family History!


children2:
Sarah4 Smith (1743 - ? )
Benjamin4 Smith (1744 - 1812 )
Ruth4 Smith (1746 - 1812 )
Amey4 Smith (1748 - 1784 )





***Joseph3 Smith    (Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. October 12, 1680 in Providence, R.I.
m. Abt. 1705    Patience Mowry    b. ? in Providence, R.I.?    d. Aft. 1734 in Smithfield, R.I.?
d. February 17, 1733/34 in Smithfield, R.I.

Joseph was a Quaker Preacher in Smithfield, R.I. (Farnham, "John Smith the Miller," p. 53).


children:
***Jacob4 Smith (1706 - 1797 )
Susanna4 Smith (1708 - ? )
Joseph4 Smith (1710 - ? )
Abigail4 Smith (1712 - ? )
Samuel4 Smith (1713 - ? )
Jethro4 Smith ( ? - ? )
Rebekah4 Smith ( ? - Aft. 1766)
Bathsheba4 Smith ( ? - ? )
Dinah4 Smith ( ? - ? )
Elnathan4 Smith ( ? - ? )





***Doctor Thomas4 Smith    (Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. December 5, 1697 in Providence, R.I.
m1. October 21, 1724 in Smithfield, R.I.?    Sarah Russell    b. Abt. 1702 in Dartmouth, Massachusetts    d. Bef. 1732 in Smithfield, R.I.
m2. April 6, 1732 in Smithfield, R.I. (possibly at the Friends Meeting House on Great Road at Union Village)    Abigail Aldrich    b. September 18, 1712 in Mendon, Massachusetts    d. October 5, 1789 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. September 15, 1777 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: unknown (probably at the Friends Burial Ground at Union Village, North Smithfield, R.I.)


Thomas was a blacksmith in the 1720’s through 1740’s. He was a member of the Society of Friends (Quakers) in
Smithfield (Smithfield was separated from Providence and was incorporated as a town in 1731). Apparently, there
were not many female members of the early Quaker Church in Smithfield in the 1720's, as Thomas married a woman
from the Dartmouth, Massachusetts Society of Friends Meeting in 1724. His first wife Sarah Russell died before
1732, perhaps during childbirth. Sarah was the granddaughter of Joseph Russell, the first settler and founder of old
Dartmouth (New Bedford), Massachusetts. In 1732, Thomas married as his second wife Abigail Aldrich, the daughter
of Moses Aldrich, a prominent Quaker preacher from Mendon, Mass. Thomas became an elder of the Upper Friends
Meeting House in Smithfield, and was discontinued as an elder in 1773 (RIHS Library, Quaker Microfilm
Collection, Box 125, “Men’s Minutes,” 1763 - 1780, p. 65, 69, 72).

Thomas served on the Smithfield Town Council in 1734 ("History of Woonsocket," by E. Richardson, Woonsocket,
S.S. Foss, Printer, 1876, pp. 33-34). He owned a 1/4 share of the first iron-mill at Woonsocket Falls in 1742
(ibid., pp. 54 - 56). Later in life, Thomas became a physician. He probably apprenticed with a doctor before
beginning his own practice. I haven’t found any evidence that he attended a college. Thomas lived near the
Woonsocket Cedar Swamp. "Dr. Thomas Smith" billed the Town of Smithfield on March 7, 1774 11 shillings and
six pence for attending my ancestor Joseph Chillson and also 18 shillings and ten pence for attending
Jabez Herrendeen (Smithfield Town Council Journal, 1771 - 1797, FHL Microfilm 959,526). Thomas Smith's will
was presented before the Smithfield Town Council by his wife Abigail on September 25, 1777. On October 18, 1777
Abigail again appeared before the Smithfield Town Council to make provision for her son Moses Smith, an idiot child
(Smithfield Town Council Journal, 1771 - 1797, FHL Microfilm 959,526).


children1:
***Joshua5 Smith
Caleb5 Smith (Bef. 1732 - Aft. 1800)

children2:
Mary5 Smith ( Aft. 1732 - ? )
Hannah5 Smith ( Aft. 1732 - ? )
Sarah5 Smith ( Aft. 1732 - ? )
Moses5 Smith ( Aft. 1732 - ? )






Original Smithfield Town Copy of Dr. Thomas Smith's Will courtesy of Central Falls City Clerk's Office.
Click on picture for a larger view.






Continuation of Dr. Thomas Smith's Will courtesy of Central Falls City Clerk's Office.
Click on picture for a larger view.






Original Smithfield Town Copy of Abigail Smith's Will courtesy of Central Falls City Clerk's Office.
Click on picture for a larger view.






The Upper Society of Friends Meeting House was built in 1719 on land owned by
Thomas3 Smith (1671 - 1741). The current Quaker Meeting House was built in the
1800’s and sits on the border between North Smithfield and Woonsocket in Union
Village, R.I. The Upper Smithfield Meeting House was used as the weekly place of
worship for Quakers in far northern R.I. Once a month, the Quakers of the Upper
Meeting House would travel to Saylesville, R.I. to attend the monthly Meeting. A yearly
Meeting of selected Quakers from all over Rhode Island and New England was held,
often times in Newport during the 1700’s. The cemetery in the woods to the left in
this picture is an ancient one dating from the 1720's. Several of my Smith ancestors
who were members of the Quaker religion are likely buried here.





John4 Smith    (Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. October 7, 1700 in Providence, R.I.
m. August 22, 1723 in Smithfield, R.I.    Abigail Aldrich    b. ? in Providence, R.I.?    d. Aft. February 1775 in Smithfield, R.I.?
d. July 9, 1752? in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: unknown (probably in Friends' Burial Ground in Union Village)

John was a farmer and member of the Society of Friends (Upper Meeting House) in Smithfield, R.I.
This family reconstruction is based on Arnold’s Vital Records and a few land deeds.


children:
Susanna5 Smith ( 1724 - ? )
John5 Smith ( 1726 - 1736 )
Sarah5 Smith ( 1727 - ? )
Phebe5 Smith ( 1729/30 - ? )
Benjamin5 Smith ( 1732 - ? )
Abigail5 Smith ( 1734/35 - 1752? )
John5 Smith ( 1737 - ? )
Samuel5 Smith ( 1739 - 1759? )
Thomas5 Smith ( 1740/41 - 1803 )
Jean5 Smith ( 1742/43 - ? )
Ruth5 Smith ( 1743 - ? )
Unknown son5 Smith ( 1743/44 - ? )





Daniel4 Smith    (Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. June 29, 1708 in Providence, R.I.
m. August 3, 1735 in Smithfield, R.I.    Mercy Aldrich    b. ? in Providence, R.I.?    d. Aft. August 1774 in Smithfield, R.I.?
d. Very likely February 23, 1784 in Smithfield, R.I. (see Smithfield Probate Records in Central Falls)
burial: unknown (probably in Friends' Burial Ground in Union Village)

Daniel was a blacksmith and member of the Society of Friends in Smithfield. He built a saw mill with his
brother John Smith (1700 - 1752?) and Edmund4 Arnold (1714 - 1781) (Edmund4, Richard3, Richard2,
Thomas1 Arnold, see Richard H. Benson, "The Arnold Family of Smithfield, Rhode Island," pp. 91-92) on the south
end of the Woonsocket Cedar Swamp. Edmund Arnold sold his one third share of the saw mill to Daniel Smith. Daniel
also built a blacksmith shop next to the saw mill. This saw mill/blacksmith shop complex survived into the mid-1800's
(see "N. Tafts Saw Mill" on Wallings' 1855 Map of Rhode Island south of the Woonsocket Cedar Swamp). I have found one
potential child for Daniel, a Daniel Smith Jr.





Ruth4 Smith    (Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. June 13, 1712 in Providence, R.I.
m. October 8, 1735 in Smithfield, R.I.    Ebenezer Thornton    b. ? in Providence, R.I.?    d. ? in Smithfield, R.I.?
d. October 8, 1790? in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: unknown

Ruth’s son Elisha Thornton became a Quaker Elder and a teacher. Elisha founded the Thornton Academy near
Slatersville, R.I.


children:
Elisha5 Thornton ( Aft. 1735 - ? )





***Jacob4 Smith    (Joseph3, Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. May 3, 1706 in Providence, R.I.?
m. January 8, 1727 in Providence, R.I.?    Dinah Harris    b. ? in Providence, R.I.    d. Aft. 1739 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. July 1, 1797 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: unknown

Jacob was a farmer in Smithfield and member of the Society of Friends. Family information is from
D.A.R. Mass. G.R.C. 1938-1939 S1 V114, p. 165; Howard D. Smith of Chelmsford, Mass., a descendant,
contributed the information in 1938. I’ve included this line because we descendants of Jencks Smith (1837-1910)
and Lenora Harris (1847-1930) are descendants of this line through Patience Smith, who married Thomas Jenckes
(1737-1811). Some of Jacob Smith’s descendants moved to the Douglas Pike area of Smithfield and were living near
my direct Smith ancestors.


children:
Abigail5 Smith ( 1729 - ? ) [Abigail married Joshua Winsor]
David5 Smith ( 1731 - ? )
Jeremiah5 Smith ( 1733 - 1818 ) [Jeremiah Smith married Lavina Olney; see his line below]
***Patience5 Smith ( 1735 - 1809 ) [Patience married Thomas Jenckes of Smithfield, R.I. and had 10 daughters and 1 son; her
daughter Phebe Jenckes (1758-1833) married Robert Harris, who my branch of the Smith Family is descended from; see Lenora Harris link below]
Mary5 Smith ( 1737 - ? ) [Mary married Jesse Jenks]
Rufus5 Smith ( 1741 - 1826 ) [Rufus married Mary Sayles and had at least 4 children]
Sarah5 Smith ( 1745 - ? )





Benjamin4 Smith    (Benjamin3, Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. October 14, 1744 in Smithfield, R.I.?
m. ? in Smithfield, R.I.?    Mary Tillinghast    b. December 7, 1753 in Smithfield, R.I.?    d. October 14, 1796 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. March 17, 1812 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Friends Burial Ground (LN025), Saylesville, R.I.


children:
Sarah5 Smith ( 1773 - 1778 )
George5 Smith ( 1775 - 1859 )
Daniel5 Smith ( 1777 - 1805 )
Benjamin5 Smith ( 1779 - 1806 )
Joseph5 Smith ( 1781 - 1847 )
Anne5 Smith ( 1782 - 1855 )
Stephen5 Hopkins Smith ( 1784 - 1858 )
Hopkins5 Smith ( 1786 - 1791 )
Amey5 Smith ( 1788 - 1802 )
Robert5 Smith ( 1791 - 1871 )
Mary5 Smith ( 1795 - 1878 )






Gravestone of Benjamin Smith (1744 - 1812) and his son Daniel Smith (1777 - 1805)
in the Lower Society of Friends Cemetery (LN025) in Saylesville, R.I.






Gravestone of Mary (Tillinghast) Smith (1753 - 1796), wife of Benjamin Smith, in
the Lower Quaker Meeting House Cemetery (LN025).






Gravestone of Stephen Hopkins Smith (1784 - 1858), son of Benjamin Smith, in
the Lower Quaker Meeting House Cemetery (LN025).






Stephen Hopkins Smith (1784 - 1858) won a fortune in the Louisiana Lottery and used
the money to build "Hearthside," which still stands on the Great Road in Lincoln, R.I.
Hearthside was built from 1810 - 1811 by Stephen to impress a woman whom he was
courting. The story relates that the woman who was from Providence did not like the rural
setting of Hearthside and ended up rejecting Stephen. Stephen never married and lived in
Hearthside mansion with his brother Joseph Smith. Stephen was an intelligent and
industrious man who built and operated the nearby Butterfly Mill. He was also active
in gardening and scientific pursuits, and Stephen helped develop the gardens of the
modern Lincoln Woods (“Lincoln R.I. Statewide Historical Preservation Report P.L-1,”
Rhode Island Historical Preservation Commission, 1982, pp. 16 - 18).





***Joshua5 Smith    (Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. Bef. 1732 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. July 5, 1750 in Smithfield, R.I.    Amey Herendeen    b. Abt. 1734/35 in Smithfield, R.I.    d. Bef. 1811? in Smithfield, R.I.
d. September 15, 1814 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: unknown (possibly in Smith Lot, NS028, or Oliver Smith Lot, NS048, both off Rocky Hill Road, North Smithfield, R.I.)


Joshua Smith was a farmer in Smithfield. He lived southeast of the Woonsocket Cedar Swamp. He was listed
in the Smithfield Tax List of 1778. His inventory for the Tax of 1778 included: "1 house, 5 horned
cattle, 3 swine, 3 acres pasture to keep 2 cows, 2 acres of tillage, 16 bushels grain, 5 acres meadow,
5 tons English Hay, 28 acres wood and waste land, total acres 38; 1.10 Pounds debt; 22 Pounds Personal
Estate; 114 Pounds Real Estate; Rateable Value: 136 Pounds" (Source: Rhode Island Roots, December 1996,
p. 129). Joshua, at about age 50, was in the lower middle portion of total estate value amongst
landowners in Smithfield in 1778.

Joshua signed an affadavit in a Petition to the General Assembly of Rhode Island on June 9, 1763 (Petitions to
R.I. General Assembly, Vol. 11-2, page 49, Microfilm, R.I. State Archives). In the affadavit, Joshua stated that
he had a conversation with my ancestor Mr. Jonathan Harris concerning a law suit between Elijah Phillips and John
and William Smith. Jonathan Harris stated that he thought "the Rascals lied" referring to John and William Smith.
Joshua served as the First Constable of the Town of Smithfield from June 1, 1772 to 1773. He was chosen the
Third Constable of the Town of Smithfield on June 5, 1780 and served to 1781 (Smithfield Town Meeting Records,
FHL Microfilm 959593; Smithfield Town Council Journal, 1771-1797, FHL Microfilm 959,526).

By process of elimination, it can be shown that Joshua Smith was the man of that name who served in Captain Abraham
Tourtellot's Company of Colonel Archibald Crary's Rhode Island State Regiment in 1778. The Joshua Smith who served in the
Second Rhode Island Regiment (Continental) and filed Pension S42336 was from Westerly, Rhode Island. The Joshua Smith
who served as a privateer (Pension W15345) and was captured in late 1777 at sea by the British was a prisoner of war
forced to served in the Royal Navy for the remainder of the war. Captain Abraham Tourtellot's Company was recruited
in Glocester and Smithfield, Rhode Island. The original pay rolls of this company can be seen in the Rhode Island
Historical Society Manuscript Collection, Shepley Collection Book, R.I.H.S. Library in Providence, R.I.
Joshua likely also served in the Smithfield militia during the Revolutionary War (he died before the first federal
Pension Laws were enacted in 1818; Smithfield militia Revolutionary War muster rolls are incomplete). His sons Esek,
Oliver, and Elijah Smith have documented Revolutionary War service.


children:
Esek6 Smith (Bef. 1757 - Aft. 1811 )
***Oliver6 Smith
David6 Smith ( ? - Aft. 1811 )
Elijah6 Smith (1761 - 1852)
Silva6 Smith ( ? - Aft. 1811 ) [Silva married John East, a Massachusetts Continental veteran soldier who lived on a
neighboring farm in Smithfield, Rhode Island]
Amey6 Smith ( ? - Aft. 1811 ) [Amey married Rhode Island Continental soldier Uriah Jones of Cumberland, Rhode Island
and had a family with him; Uriah deserted from the American Grand Army in September 1782, and his pension application was rejected.]
Sarah6 Smith ( ? - Aft. 1811 )
Abigail?6 Smith ( ? - Bef. 1811 )






Original Smithfield Town Copy of Joshua Smith's Will courtesy of Central Falls City Clerk's Office.
Click on picture for a larger view.






Continuation of Joshua Smith's Will courtesy of Central Falls City Clerk's Office.
Click on picture for a larger view.





Caleb5 Smith    (Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. Bef. 1732 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. October 25, 1750 in Smithfield, R.I.    Martha Mitchell    b. Abt. 1732 in Glocester, R.I.    d. Aft. 1800 in Charlton, Worcester County, Massachusetts
d. Aft. 1800 in Charlton, Worcester County, Massachusetts

Caleb was a blacksmith in Smithfield, Rhode Island. He moved to Dudley, Worcester County, Massachusetts
in the early 1770’s. By the 1790’s, Caleb and family were living in the town of Charlton, Worcester County,
Massachusetts, where he presumbably died. Information on this family is from Arnold’s Vital Records of
Smithfield and the Smith/Mitchell Genealogy (1994) researched by Barbara J. Nichols (copy in the RIHS Library).


children:
Patience6 Smith ( 1751 - Bef. 1832 )

William6 Smith ( 1754 - ? ) [William served in the Massachusetts Militia in the Revolutionary War]

Shadrach6 Smith ( 1756 - 1835 ) [Shadrach served in the Massachusetts Militia in the Revolutionary War and filed
Pension R9752. Shadrach moved to New Hartford (Utica), New York and had a family there.]

Russell6 Smith ( 1761 - ? ) [Russell served in the Massachusetts Militia in the Revolutionary War]

Caleb6 Smith ( 1766 - ? )







Jeremiah5 Smith    (Jacob4, Joseph3, Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. February 11, 1733 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. October 4, 1759 in Smithfield, R.I.    Lavina Olney   b. Abt. 1737-1738 in Smithfield, R.I.?    d. August 4, 1826 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. September 17, 1818 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Jeremiah Smith Burial Ground (LN043), Lincoln, R.I.

Jeremiah lived at Limerock in the northern part of old Smithfield. Jeremiah operated a lime kiln near the
Limerock quarries of the Dexter and Harris Families. He was a member of the Smithfield Society of Friends.
Family information is from D.A.R. Mass. G.R.C. 1937-1938 S1 V70, p. 27; Howard D. Smith of Chelmsford,
Mass., a descendant, contributed the information in 1937. See also p. 26, James H. Olney "A Genealogy of
the descendants of Thomas Olney: an original proprietor of Providence, R.I., who came from England in 1635,"
Providence, R.I., Freeman & Son, 1889.

My particular branch of the Smith Family are descendants of Jeremiah's sister Patience.


children:
Lydia6 Smith ( 1760 - 1827 )
Stephen6 Smith ( 1763 - 1764 )
Israel6 Smith ( 1765 - 1838 )
Phebe6 Smith ( 1767 - Aft. 1812 )
Adah6 Smith ( 1768 - 1808 )
Jeremiah6 Smith ( 1770 - 1854 )
Obadiah6 Smith ( 1772 - 1842 )
George6 Smith ( 1774 - 1856 )
Lavina6 Smith ( 1775 - Aft. 1812 )
Willard6 Smith ( 1778 - 1845 )
Naomi6 Smith ( 1780 - 1807 )
Mary6 Smith ( 1782 - 1867 )
Edward6 Smith ( 1784 - 1867 )
Patience6 Smith ( 1787 - 1866 )





This house off Clark Road in Smithfield, R.I. dates to at least 1776,
when Jeremiah Smith bought it and the homestead farm of 129 acres from
the Bradway Family (Smithfield Deeds Book 6, p. 456). Jeremiah Smith
sold this house to his son George Smith on January 12, 1807 (Sm Deeds,
Book 11, p. 288). The house remained in the Smith Family until 1879.
The current owners have the original Grantee copies of the above land
deeds. Thanks to the Elfast Family for the tour of the property. The
Bradway/Smith house is not listed in the 1992 "Historical and Architectural
Resources of Smithfield, Rhode Island," but it is listed in "Some 18th
Century Houses of Smithfield, Rhode Island," by Kay K. and Louise W. Moore,
for the Historical Society of Smithfield, January 2, 1985, a copy of which
can be found on the Greenville Public Library Website under "Digital Archives."






Outbuilding adjacent to the Bradway/Smith house also likely dates to the
18th century.






Jeremiah Smith, who operated a Lime Kiln in nearby Limerock, had this
house (the Jeremiah Smith House) built in 1790 on Wilbur Road in modern day
Lincoln (“Lincoln R.I. Statewide Historical Preservation Report P.L-1,”
Rhode Island Historical Preservation Commission, 1982, p. 69).






Thomas5 Smith    (John4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. January 14, 1740/41 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. January 9, 1772 in Smithfield, R.I.    Mary Sayles    b. ? in Smithfield, R.I.?    d. Aft. 1803 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. Between October 28 and November 9, 1803 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: unknown


children:
Cynthia 6 Smith ( ? - Aft. 1803 )
Marcy6 Smith ( 1774 - Aft. 1803 )





Esek (Eseck)6 Smith  (Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. probably before 1757 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. September 3, 1780 in Smithfield, R.I.    Mary (Shippee) Brown   b. ? in Smithfield, R.I.    d. ? in Smithfield, R.I.?
d. Aft. 1811 in Smithfield, R.I.?
burial: unknown


Esek enlisted in Capt. David Dexter’s Company of Col. Christopher Lippitt’s Regiment in very early 1776.
He was sick in the Spring of 1776, as his brother Oliver Smith served as a substitute in Dexter’s Company for
two months. Lippitt’s Regiment remained on guard duty in Newport, Rhode Island until early September 1776,
when the regiment received orders to join General Washington’s main army in New York. Two R.I. accounts of the
activities of Lippitt’s Regiment in New York and New Jersey exist: one written by Private John Howland in
Capt. David Dexter’s Company (Edwin M. Stone, “The life and recollections of John Howland, the late
president of the Rhode Island historical society,” Providence, R.I., G.H. Whitney, 1857) and one written by
Sgt. John Smith of Capt. Loring Peck’s Company (“Sergeant John Smith’s Diary of 1776,” edited by
Louise Rau, Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 20, No. 2, Sept. 1933, pp. 247 - 270).

After marching through Connecticut, Lippitt’s Regiment arrived on Manhattan Island on October 1, 1776
(“John Smith’s Diary,” p. 253). The men of the regiment camped on the northern end of the island with the
main American Continental Army. On October 12, 1776, the British began their amphibious landing on
Throg’s Neck, which they found to be too marshy for offensive operations. Lippitt’s Regiment marched to
East Chester, New York on October 14, 1776 and camped there as part of General John Nixon’s Brigade
of General Charles Lee’s Division (“John Smith’s Diary,” p. 254). On the 16th of October, the
regiment marched to Valentine’s Hill. The British attacked Pelham’s Bay on October 18, 1776 and were
repulsed near Pell’s Point with heavy losses by troops under General John Glover. The men of Lippitt’s
Regiment conducted patrols in the East Chester area until October 25, 1776 when they marched for
White Plains, New York. The British during this time had landed their main force near Pell’s Point and marched
northeast to New Rochelle, just missing Lippitt’s Regiment to their west. The Battle of White Plains took place on
October 28, 1776, and Lippitt’s Regiment saw only a little action during the battle. John Howland relates: “a part
of Connecticut Troops under General Spencer with McDougals Brigade were posted on a ridge of land next south
of the hill on which our regiment was stationed ..... We therefore stood under arms and with our cannon loaded,
as silent spectators of the conflict” (Edwin M. Stone, pp. 62 - 63). Howland later states, “A [British] company
of about 50 artillery men with two heavy mounted cannon, approached ...... a short distance from us, and began a
discharge on our line” (Stone, p. 63). After a couple of return discharges from the American cannon nearby, the British
artillery men withdrew “in confusion.” The antagonists entrenched and faced each other for two days before rain
soaked the battlefield all day on the 31st of October 1776. Washington withdrew his army to North Castle Heights
on November 1 (“The Battle for New York,” Barnet Schecter, Penguins Books, 2002, pp 240-242). Lippitt’s
Regiment went into camp near North Castle Heights and conducted some patrols while the British marched down
the Hudson River to encircle Fort Washington, which was surrendered by the Americans after heavy fighting on
November 16, 1776. British General Cornwallis led a heavy detachment up the Palisades cliffs on the Hudson River
and approached Fort Lee from the rear. The American garrison under Rhode Island General Nathaniel Greene
abandoned the fort on November 20, 1776 and retreated to New Jersey (Schechter, pp. 243 - 257). Thus began
the New Jersey campaign, and the American cause looked all but lost.

Lippitt’s R.I. Regiment remained in the North Castle, New York area until December 5, 1776, when they crossed over
to the west bank of the Hudson River (“John Smith’s Diary,” p. 262). The regiment later marched to Morristown,
New Jersey, arriving there on December 11, 1776. The British main force under Cornwallis were pursuing
Washington’s army to Trenton, New Jersey. Lippitt’s Regiment retreated through Germantown, New Jersey
towards the Delaware River after General Charles Lee, their Division Commander, was captured by British
Dragoons under Lt. Col. Tarleton on December 13 at Basking Ridge, New Jersey, where Lee unwisely spent the
night away from the protection of his division (“John Smith’s Diary,” pp. 264 - 265; Schecter, pp. 263 - 265).
The remaining Rhode Islanders of Lippitt’s Regiment (who were not discharged due to sickness) crossed the
Delaware River to Easton, Pennsylvania on December 17, 1776. The regiment marched south with their brigade,
now commanded by Rhode Island Colonel Daniel Hitchcock, paralleling the west bank of the Delaware River to
reach the main American Army under General Washington at Trenton, New Jersey. On the 22nd of December,
Lippitt’s Regiment arrived in Bristol, New Jersey on the Delaware River south of Trenton as a part of Hitchcock’s
Brigade (“John Smith’s Diary," pp. 266 - 267). Hitchcock’s Brigade was joined by the Pennsylvania Associaters,
a militia unit from Philadelphia commanded by General John Cadwalader.

During the evening of December 25, 1776, while Washington’s main force was crossing the Delaware River in boats
to attack the Hessian garrison at Trenton, the soldiers of Lippitt’s Regiment attempted to cross the Delaware River
over to Burlington, New Jersey to attack a Hessian garrison there as part of a diversionary advance on the enemy by
Cadwalader’s and Hitchcock’s brigades. Several men of Cadwalader’s force got over the river, but were forced to
turn back by large ice jams and the inability to get supporting artillery across the Delaware (“Washington’s Crossing,”
David Hackett Fischer, Oxford University Press, 2004, pp. 214 - 215). None of the men of Hitchcock’s Brigade got
over the river. John Smith described the scene: “the 25th in the Afternoon our Regt paraded and every man that
was able to goe upon Duty was ordred to get in Readyness to march and Join the Brigade which they Did and Crossed
over to Burlintown and marched that Evening Several miles to a River [the Delaware River] and Some of the troops
Crosed But the Ice was in the River so that they Could not Get over the artillery and was Oblig’d to Give over the
Expeadition for this Night and about 3 a clock [AM] it Began to hail Verey fast. Our Regt Returned in the meen
time and soon after was a Verey Bad Storm of Rain and hail Snow and thundring of Cannon which Began about
7 or 8 a clock in the morning and Continiued Very Loud and quick for a Considerable time [Washington’s attack
on Trenton].......” (“John Smith’s Diary,” pp. 267 - 268). Fortunately for the Americans, Washington’s force defeated
the Hessian garrison at Trenton in the early morning hours of December 26, 1776.

On the 27th of December, Cadwalader’s and Hitchcock’s force successfully crossed over the Delaware to Burlington,
New Jersey, which the Hessians abandoned on December 26 after Washington’s attack. The Americans advanced
from Burlington to nearby Crosswicks, New Jersey. Here, the Rhode Island men had to make a critical decision.
Their one year enlistment was set to expire at the end of December, so on the 30th of December, General
Thomas Mifflin had the Rhode Island soldiers paraded in regimental formation and “harangued” the Brigade
appealing to the critical need of the nation and the soldier’s individual patriotism to serve another month after their
original enlistments expired. John Smith tells us: “the 30th in the Afternoon our Brigade was sent for into the feild
where we Paraded Befor the General who was present with all the feild officers and after meaking many fair
promises to them he begged them to tarey one month Longer in the Service and Almost Every man Consented
to stay Longer who Received 10 Doler Bounty as soon as Signed their names then the Genl with the soldiers
have three Huzzas and was with Claping of hands for Joy amongst the Specttators and as soon as that was over
the Genel ordred us to heave a gill of Rum pr man and set out to trenton to acquaint Genl Washington with his
good success as he termd it to Meak his heart Glad once more we was Dismisd to Goe to our Quarters with great
Applause the inhabitents and others saying we had Done honour to our Country viz New England ......”
(“John Smith Diary,” pp. 269 - 270 ).

General Washington ordered a concentration of all of his forces at Trenton, New Jersey on January 2, 1777 as
a force of 9,000 British soldiers under General Cornwallis was advancing from Brunswick down the Princeton road.
With the muddy roads, the British made slow progress from Princeton on January 2nd. They were ambushed and harrassed
by American riflemen all afternoon and did not reach the outskirts of Trenton until 4PM. As the American riflemen
and advanced artillery retreated through Trenton, Washington sent Hitchcock’s Rhode Island Brigade over the bridge
at Assunpink Creek into downtown Trenton to cover their retreat (Fischer, pp. 290 - 299). The British rushed right
up to the rearguard of the Rhode Island Brigade, which opened fire on the British and held them off long enough
to evacuate most of the American forces south of Assunpink Creek. John Howland of Capt. David Dexter’s Company wrote:
“...... the bridge was narrow and our platoons in passing it were crowded into a dense and solid mass, in the rear of
which, the enemy were making their best efforts ....... The noble horse of Gen. Washington stood with his breast
pressed close against the west rail of the bridge, and the firm, composed, and majestic countenance of the General
inspired confidence and assurance in a moment so important and critical. In this passage it was my fortune to be next
the west rail, and arriving at the end of the bridge rail, I was pressed against the shoulder of the general’s horse
and in contact with the general’s boot. The horse stood as firm as the rider, and seemed to understand that he was
not to quit his post and station” (Edwin M. Stone, "Life of John Howland," p. 73). Heavy fighting continued in Trenton
until nightfall with the British making repeated infantry charges over the Assunpink Bridge that were bloodily repulsed
by the Americans, thus ending the Second Battle of Trenton (Fischer, pp. 305 - 307).

Outnumbered by a strong force of the enemy, the Americans seemed to be in a dangerous position with the Delaware
River to their backs. After a council of war which Rhode Islanders Nathanael Greene and Daniel Hitchcock attended,
Washington agreed to a bold plan proposed by General Arthur St. Clair and some of the local New Jersey officers to
flank the British left wing by a forced night march along cut trails and country lanes east of the Assunpink Creek. If
undetected, the American Army could reach Princeton and attack the rear areas of the British Army (Fischer,
pp. 313 - 316). A screening force of American militia tended the campfires during the night of January 2, 1777
to keep up the illusion that the Americans were staying put for a fight in the morning. From midnight to 2 AM,
the American Army moved out in bitter cold weather which turned the muddy roads into hard frozen ground. The
men were sleepy and tripped often over paths of newly cut tree stubs felled by the American vanguard. At
dawn the Americans had reached the Quaker Bridge, where they were forced to construct a temporary bridge for
their artillery (Fischer, pp. 316 - 323). After finishing the bridge and crossing Stony Brook, the American
Army split into two columns, the left under General Nathanael Greene and the right under General John Sullivan.
Hitchcock’s Brigade was with Sullivan’s column. The lead element of Greene’s Division commanded by
General Hugh Mercer ran into a heavy detachment of British troops led by Col. Mawhood that were marching to Trenton
from Princeton. In the resulting fierce and chaotic fight, the British charged with fixed bayonets and broke many
of the Americans of Mercer’s command and Cadwalader’s men who came up in support of Mercer. General Mercer
attempted to rally his men but was mortally bayonetted by the British and left for dead on the field (he would later
die of his wounds at the Thomas Clark House). At this time, General George Washington appeared on the battlefield
and took personal command of the American soldiers. He brought up Hitchcock’s Rhode Island Brigade to the right
of Cadwalader’s rallied troops and the whole American line advanced and fired a volley into the British. The British
finally broke and retreated and the fighting shifted into Princeton and the campus of Princeton College. General
Sullivan’s Division with supporting artillery defeated the remaining British in Princeton. The Americans were in no
condition to continue an attack towards Brunswick, so Washington decided to march to Morristown, New Jersey,
where the Army could maintain a strong defensive position in the mountains of northern New Jersey (Fischer,
pp. 334 - 343). After their arrival in Morristown, Lippitt’s Regiment was ordered to Chatham, New Jersey
southeast of Morristown. Here they conducted patrols to forage for the American Army at Morristown and to
harass British forage parties. John Howland states: “In February, Captain Dexter’s Company were discharged
at Chatham. Our paper money wages, forty shillings per month, was never paid fully, and we received nothing to bear
our expenses home” (Stone, p. 78). Some of the men marched to Peekskill, New York where they received some
shoes from J.J. Hazard from Rhode Island with the aid of Capt. David Dexter. John Howland became sick in
New York and was forced to remain there three weeks under the care of Capt. Loring Peck of Lippitt’s Regiment
(Stone, pp. 78 - 79).
The proof that Esek Smith served in Lippitt’s Regiment through January 1777 is seen based on a few wage receipt
rolls. Esek appears on a wage receipt roll dated December 24, 1776, also a “wages to Smithfield and Cumberland”
roll dated January 18, 1777 in Chatham, New Jersey, and a “wages for Continental Service” receipt roll dated
April 2, 1777 in Providence, Rhode Island (Revolutionary War Transcription File Index, Rhode Island State Archives,
Providence, R.I.).

Esek is probably the “Esek Smith” who served in Capt. Joseph Sprague’s Company in October 1777 in
Col. Chad Brown’s Rhode Island Militia Regiment (a unit which his brothers Oliver and Elijah served in).
He also likely served in Col. Chad Brown’s Regiment in August 1778 during the Battle of Rhode Island campaign
(Revolutionary War Transcription File Index, Rhode Island State Archives, Providence, R.I.).

After the war, Esek owned a small piece of land adjacent to his father Joshua Smith in Smithfield, Rhode Island.
I have found little other information about Esek.


children:
Unknown




***Oliver6 Smith  (Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. October 26, 1757 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. February 21, 1779 in Smithfield, R.I.    Elethear (also spelled Alethere) Herendeen   b. Abt. 1759 in Smithfield, R.I.    d. March 6, 1848 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. August 16, 1843 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Oliver Smith Lot (NS048), Rocky Hill Road, North Smithfield, R.I.
Thanks to Mr. Sokol for showing me the location of the Oliver Smith Lot. I first visited this cemetery in October 2004.
It was lightly overgrown with vegetation and has been cleaned. Some of the gravestones have fallen over.
There are about 4 to 5 older graves marked by eroded fieldstones. There may be additional graves on the
western side of the lot.


Oliver served with various militia units during the Revolutionary War. His Revolutionary War Pension File (W24991)
details his service (see also D.A.R. R.I. G.R.C. 1970 S1 V59 page 97). His brother Esek Smith enlisted in
Capt. David Dexter's Company of Col. Babcock's Regiment (Col. Christopher Lippitt assumed command shortly thereafter)
in January 1776 for one year. Esek became sick in Spring 1776 (perhaps with smallpox?), and Oliver served two months
in Esek's place in Capt. David Dexter's Company that Spring of 1776 in Newport, R.I. Lippitt's 2nd Regiment of
Rhode Island State Troops was attached later to Daniel Hitchcock’s Rhode Island Brigade (Continental) and served with
the Continental Army in New York in October 1776.

John Howland, who was born in Newport, Rhode Island and moved to Providence, Rhode Island before the
Revolutionary War, enlisted in Capt. David Dexter’s Company as well. John gave a record of his service in
Col. Lippitt’s Regiment in his memoirs, which were written by Edwin M. Stone in 1857 (Edwin M. Stone,
“The life and recollections of John Howland, the late president of the Rhode Island historical society,”
Providence, R.I., G.H. Whitney, 1857). Lippitt’s Regiment was raised by the Rhode Island General Assembly
to protect Newport, R.I. since the harbor there was “infested” by 15 or 16 ships commanded by
Capt. James Wallace of the frigate HMS Rose, which raided Narragansett Bay at will and would cause much grief for
Rhode Islanders in coastal communities (Stone, p. 52). The terms of enlistment for Lippitt’s Regiment were
“two month’s pay in advance, and we were to find our own clothes.” Pay for a private was 40 shillings per month
(Stone, p. 53). John Howland reported for duty in Lippitt’s Regiment at the Headquarters which were
in the Bannister House in Newport, R.I. “There was a small regiment of State troops, commanded by
Col. William Richmond, of Little Compton, and a company of artillery, stationed in the island [i.e. Aquidneck Island]
when our regiment was formed, and in the spring of the year, we were all marched into town and quartered on the point
north of long wharf. These troops were formed into a brigade, and William Barton, who kept a hatter’s shop in Providence,
was appointed brigade major” (Stone, p. 55).


After his brother Esek returned to duty in Lippitt’s Regiment, Oliver Smith enlisted for three months as a private in
Capt. Samuel May's Company in Col. John Cook's Regiment (First Regiment) of R.I. State Troops in Sept. 1776
and served out his term. Oliver states in his service affadavit that he was on Aquidneck Island when the British took
possession of Newport in December 1776.


During the winter in early 1777, Oliver was drafted and served one month in Capt. Job Mowry's Company in
Col. Chad Brown's Regiment (2nd Providence Co. Regiment of R.I. Militia) and one month in Capt. Stephen Winsor's
Company in the same regiment. Oliver states in his affadavit that he stood sentry outside Brig. General Benedict
Arnold's quarters in Providence "many nights" during the early months of 1777. Brig. Gen. Arnold had been sent
to New England by General Washington to prepare local New England militias for the possible amphibious attack by
British forces attached to a British Fleet anchored off Connecticut. Brig. Gen. Arnold had a few months earlier in
October 1776 saved northern New York for the year with his skillful command of the rebel fleet on Lake Champlain.
With his assignment in New England in early 1777, Gen. Arnold displayed his usual talent for field command and
aggressive offensive spirit as he requested additional Continental Forces to attack the British forces garrisoned in
Newport. General Washington could spare no forces in 1777, but Arnold's plans to attack the British on Aquidneck
Island would see fruition under Major General John Sullivan's campaign in 1778. Brig. Gen. Arnold would later
lead Connecticut militia into battle against those same British forces anchored off Connecticut in April 1777
at Compo Hill, Conn. (Danbury Raid).
Oliver Smith was drafted again in the Spring of 1777 and served as a private in Capt. Nehemiah Smith's Company in
Col. Chad Brown's Regiment in Providence for one month. In the Fall of 1777 he was drafted and served as a private
in Capt. Joseph Sprague's Company in Col. Chad Brown's Regiment for two months. He was stationed at the "college
in Providence" (modern Brown University) and at the “Joseph Brown house” (on South Main Street in Providence).


In July or August of 1778, Oliver was drafted and served as a private for two months in Capt. Joseph Sprague's
Company of Col. John Angell's Regiment in General William West's Brigade during Major General John Sullivan's
expedition to Aquidneck Island. Oliver states in his affadavit that he participated in the Battle of Rhode
Island on "August 28" (the battle was fought on August 29, 1778; for a good review of the 1778 campaign, read
Paul F. Dearden's book "The Rhode Island Campaign of 1778: Inauspicious Dawn of Alliance," 1980). Oliver's final
service in the war was a one month term in the Fall of 1779 in Capt. Smith's Company of Col. Chad Brown's Regiment
of militia.

After the war, Oliver was a farmer in Smithfield, R.I.


children:
Unknown Female 17 Smith (Bef. 1785 - ? )
Celia7 Smith (Abt. 1783 - 1843)
***Thomas7 Smith
Lucretia7 Smith (Abt. 1789 - 1848)
Thamor7 Smith (1791 - 1868 ) [Thamor married Jonathan Paine who lived on a neighboring farm]
Juni7 Smith (Abt. 1795 - 1856)
Stephen7 Smith 2nd (Abt. 1802 - 1877)
Unknown Male 17 Smith (Aft. 1800 - ? )
Unknown Male 27 Smith (Aft. 1800 - ? )
Pannelia7 Smith (Aft. 1800 - ? ) [Pannelia had an illegimate son named Miranda Perry Aldrich in 1828
with Nathan Aldrich; see Lucretia Smith Will below and Smithfield Town Vital Records]











Original Smithfield Town Copy of Oliver Smith's Will courtesy of Central Falls City Clerk's Office.
Click on picture for a larger view.






Continuation of Will of Oliver Smith courtesy of Central Falls City Clerk's Office.
Click on picture for a larger view.






Continuation of Will of Oliver Smith courtesy of Central Falls City Clerk's Office.
Click on picture for a larger view.






Continuation of Will of Oliver Smith courtesy of Central Falls City Clerk's Office.
Click on picture for a larger view.






Original Smithfield Town Copy of Lucretia Smith's Will courtesy of Central Falls City Clerk's Office.
In the first clause of her 1848 will, Lucretia reserved one half acre of land around the Oliver Smith
Cemetery Lot for use as a Smith Cemetery. This 1848 will was approved and executed by Lucretia's
brother, Stephen Smith the 2nd, the legal landowner. A modern attorney has determined that this
will provision would not be upheld by the courts because Lucretia was not the full landowner.
Note also the provision for Miranda Perry Aldrich, illegitimate son of Lucretia's sister Pannelia Smith.
Click on picture for a larger view.






Continuation of Will of Lucretia Smith courtesy of Central Falls City Clerk's Office.
Click on picture for a larger view.










2011 to 2013 Access Issues to the Oliver Smith Lot (Rhode Island Historic Cemetery NS048)

The original Oliver Smith Historic Cemetery is located in a wooded area north of Rocky Hill Road in
southern North Smithfield Township. This area of North Smithfield was always woods since when I was
a kid, but new houses were developed on Rocky Hill Road starting in the 1980's. Back in the 1930's,
a large area of land was purchased around the Woonsocket Reservoir Number 3 and is owned by the City
of Woonsocket. The Woonsocket Reservoir Number 3 extends into a small piece of northern Smithfield.
Below are a couple of Google Maps of the area. The City of Woonsocket land will always be protected
because it is acting as a natural watershed buffer (maintaining good water quality) for the Woonsocket
Reservoir Number 3. However, new developments continue to pop up on Rocky Hill Road in the 2000's.
So, imagine my surprise when I went to visit the Oliver Smith Cemetery in Summer 2011 "in the woods,"
and I found a new house and garage blocking the old path that went to the cemetery.

In my earlier visits to the cemetery dating back to 2004, some local landowners told me that there
were some elderly Smith cousins who had kept the cemetery clean into the 1990's, but they apparently
died out. There are likely dozens of living Smith descendants of Oliver Smith alive today, but we
are scattered about the country. I have several living Smith cousins in Rhode Island, but most of
them are not interested in getting dirty doing the grunt work of research and cemetery cleanup.

So, in Summer 2011 and early 2012, I did some title research on the land and found that my great-great-
great-great-great Aunt Lucretia Smith actually tried to reserve a half an acre of land around the
Oliver Smith grave yard in her Will of 1848. I thought we had a good legal case of Smith Family
ownership of the half acre of land for the family cemetery, so I hired a Providence Land Attorney
to review our legal case. However, the attorney determined that the legal courts would likely not
uphold our Smith Family ownership of the cemetery because Lucretia Smith was not the full landowner
(her brother Stephen Smith the 2nd, who approved and executed her Will, was the legal landowner;
unfortunately, Stephen Smith the 2nd died intestate, or without a will).

The cemetery itself is protected by Rhode Island State Law, but we Smith descendants do have access
rights to the cemetery by English Common Law. As our family has been visiting the cemetery since the
mid 1800's, we have an established right of passage through the surrounding land (even if it is owned
by unrelated people). The Town of North Smithfield has required the current landowners, Richard Smith
and wife, to put in an easement (access path) for our family members to visit the cemetery. After
talking with Mr. Smith, he does not appear to be a descendant of Oliver Smith, but he has not traced
his Smith lines back far enough to determine it. Nevertheless, when an access path actually gets put
in, I will map it out and take photos of it for any interested relatives. Smith family members can
help out by writing letters of support for the cemetery easement to: Robert Ericson, Town Planner,
Town of North Smithfield, Town Hall, P.O. Box 248, Slatersville, Rhode Island, 02876. Please note
the Property Plat Number 20, Lot 21 in your letter. The more of you who write, the better, as the
Town of North Smithfield hasn't been very cooperative and is clearly more interested in Property Tax
Revenue than protecting historic cemeteries.

Thanks to my cousin Mr. Eayrs and his son from Middleborough, Massachusetts who have helped out with
cemetery easement support and cleanup. My cousins living in Rhode Island need to step up to the plate!











2011 "Google Maps" View of Rocky Hill Road and Oliver Smith Cemetery property marked by "A."
Note how woods dominates the land in this area. Back in the 1800's, most of this area was
farmland.






2011 "Google Maps" View of Oliver Smith Cemetery. The recently constructed house to
the southwest of the cemetery at 700 Rocky Hill Road is owned by the Morrissey Family.
A new house will be built in the woods to the southeast of the Morrissey Family house.






General Locus Map from Development Plat Map 20, Lot 21, courtesy of Town of
North Smithfield Town Clerk's Office.
Click on the image for a larger view.






Map of the Lots on Plat 20 in North Smithfield, Rhode Island. The original Oliver Smith Farm consisted
of Lots 21, 44, and 45 containing about 19 acres of land. Oliver Smith also owned land on the
south side of Rocky Hill Road. Lot 32 was part of the Jonathan Paine Farm; Oliver's daughter
Thamor Smith married Jonathan Paine. Lot 32 is now part of the City of Woonsocket Reservoir Watershed
land and will remain in a wooded and protected state. Map courtesy of Town of North Smithfield
Town Clerk's Office.






Development Plat Map 20, Lot 21 showing the constructed Morrissey House on the left,
and the planned Smith House on the right with Oliver Smith Cemetery in the back,
courtesy of Town of North Smithfield Town Clerk's Office.






Detail of east side of Plat Map 20, Lot 21 showing the proposed easement to the
Oliver Smith Cemetery, courtesy of Town of North Smithfield Town Clerk's Office.






Detail of the Oliver Smith Cemetery from Plat Map 20, Lot 21, courtesy of Town of
North Smithfield Town Clerk's Office. There is no stone wall around the Oliver Smith
cemetery so the surveyed cemetery boundaries are quite arbitrary. The land to the
rear is owned by the City of Woonsocket and is a protected Reservoir Watershed area.






Detail of the notes from Development Plat Map 20, Lot 21, courtesy of Town of
North Smithfield Town Clerk's Office.






November 2011 view to the northwest down Rocky Hill Road to the distinct bend in the road
at 700 Rocky Hill Road. The Oliver Smith Cemetery is located in the woods to the right in
this view. A new house will be built in the woods to the right.






November 2011 view to the north up Rocky Hill Road to the recently constructed Morrissey
House at 700 Rocky Hill Road. The Oliver Smith Cemetery is in the woods directly behind
the new Morrissey garage on the right in this view. The old path to the cemetery went right
through the new garage.






November 2011 view from Rocky Hill Road up the driveway to the new Morrissey House at
700 Rocky Hill Road. The Oliver Smith Cemetery is in the woods to the right in this view.
The cemetery will have to be accessed from the new Richard Smith House Lot which will be
constructed east of the Morrissey property.






Construction has begun! November 2013 view of the new house foundation being
built in front of the old Oliver Smith Cemetery, which is in the back treeline
in this view. Please stay off the property until the house and cemetery easement are
completed. Do continue to send in letters of support for the new cemetery easement to
the Town Planner of North Smithfield; the more the better!






Joseph Brown, a scientist and architect, and a member of the wealthy and renown
Brown Family of Providence, had this house built in 1774 at modern day 50 South
Main Street in Providence. The old Field Garrison House of the 1600’s stood at
this site and was torn down to build the Joseph Brown House. Oliver Smith in his
pension application states that he was quartered at the Joseph Brown House in
Fall 1777 while he served in the Rhode Island Militia (sources: Edwin M. Stone,
“The life and recollections of John Howland, the late president of the Rhode Island
historical society,” Providence, R.I., G.H. Whitney, 1857, pp. 23 - 24; William
McKenzie Woodward, “Guide to Providence Architecture,” Providence Preservation
Society & American Institute of Architects - Rhode Island Chapter, 2003, p. 20 ).






Gravestone of Oliver Smith in the Oliver Smith Lot (NS048).






Gravestone of Elethear (Herendeen) Smith in the Oliver Smith Lot (NS048).






Gravestone of Oliver Smith's daughter Celia Smith in the
Oliver Smith Lot (NS048).






Gravestone of Oliver Smith's daughter Lucretia Smith in the
Oliver Smith Lot (NS048).






Map by Dan of NS048, the Oliver Smith Lot (Family Cemetery) in North Smithfield, R.I. Click on
the map for a larger version. There are several unknown graves (likely Smith relatives) marked
by old fieldstones.





Elijah6 Smith   (Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. April 24, 1761 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. Bef. 1790 in Smithfield, R.I.    Mary (Smith?)    b. December 18, 1769 in Smithfield, R.I.?    d. November 22, 1824 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. June 23, 1852 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Smith Lot (NS017), Douglas Pike, North Smithfield, R.I.
This cemetery was in good condition in October 2004. It lies just north of the Mattity Road intersection.

Elijah served in the Rhode Island militia during the Revolutionary War. His Revolutionary War Pension File
(S21982) details his service (Thanks to Patricia Wood of Pascoag, R.I. for sending me a copy of Elijah’s
service record). In December 1776, the British invaded Newport, R.I with a powerful fleet and conducted an
unopposed amphibious landing on Aquidneck Island. The Rhode Island State Militia that were not on Aquidneck
Island (Elijah’s brother Oliver Smith was serving with Col. John Cook’s First Regiment on Aquidneck when the
British landed) were called out on alarm to Bristol, R.I. to defend the rest of the state. Elijah’s father Joshua Smith
was called out to serve with the militia at Bristol, but Elijah, at age 15, served in his place for 15 days in
Capt. John Eddy’s Company of Col. Chad Brown’s Regiment of Militia (2nd Providence Co. Regiment of R.I. Militia).
In April 1777, when Elijah turned 16, he enlisted in Capt. John Eddy’s Company of Col. Chad Brown’s Regiment
and served from April to December 1777. The Regiment was organized so that each man had to serve for one
full month every third month. Elijah served as a private on guard duty mostly in Providence and
sometimes along the shores of Narragansett Bay. In 1778, Elijah served with the same company but under
the command of Col. John Angell.
In July and August 1778, Elijah participated in Gen. John Sullivan’s campaign against the British on Aquidneck
Island. During the Battle of Rhode Island, Elijah and brother Oliver Smith were with Col. John Angell’s Regiment,
which saw little action during the battle but acted as the rearguard for the American army as it withdrew over
Howland’s Ferry to Tiverton on the night of August 30, 1778.
In 1779, Elijah served four full months as a private in Col. Chad Brown’s Regiment. Elijah’s final service
was an enlistment in the one month militia regiment raised in March 1780 for duty on Aquidneck Island under
Brigadier General Nathan Miller. Elijah served in the Battalion commanded by Lt. Col. George Peck and was
discharged in April 1780.

After the war, Elijah was a farmer in Smithfield (in present-day North Smithfield). Note: some birthdates
in this family came from D.A.R. Application # 71720, Microfilm Section, D.A.R. Library, Washington, D.C.


children:
Ephraim7 Smith (1790 - 1854)
Stephen7 Smith (1799 - 1883)
Simon7 Smith (1802 - 1882)
Unnamed infant son7 Smith (1805 - 1805)
Mary7 Ann Smith (1811 - 1890)





The “Stephen Smith” House, located on the corner of Mattity Road and
Douglas Pike, was built about 1815 by Stephen Smith’s father, Elijah Smith.
After Elijah died in 1852, the house was inherited by Stephen Smith. The house
remained in the Smith Family until the early 1900’s. Historic Cemetery NS017,
where the Smiths are buried at, is located just north of Mattity Road along
Douglas Pike. (Sources: “Images of America, North Smithfield,” North Smithfield
Heritage Association, Arcadia Publishing, Charleston, S.C., 2003, p. 53 ; “Historic
and Architectural Resources of North Smithfield, Rhode Island: A preliminary
Report,” Rhode Island Historical Preservation Commission, 1980, p. 47).






Detail of Map likely by Asa Winsor about 1846 of the Douglas Turnpike,
showing the "Stephen Smith" House built by Elisha Smith at the corner of
modern day Mattity Road and Douglas Pike at "Cat Hill." Map from Plat Map A98,
Central Falls City Clerk's Office.






"Smith Lot" (NS017), the lot where Elijah Smith and family are buried.
This cemetery was reserved out of the original property by the Probate
(Will) of Stephen Smith the 1st, North Smithfield Probate Records.






Gravestone of Elijah Smith in the Smith Lot (NS017).






Gravestone of Mary Smith in the Smith Lot (NS017).





Israel6 Smith   (Jeremiah5, Jacob4, Joseph3, Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. May 19, 1765 in Smithfield, R.I.?
m1. 1799 in Smithfield, R.I.?    Amey Phillips    b. 1779 in Smithfield, R.I.?    d. August 4, 1826 in North Scituate, R.I.
m2. February 24, 1829 in North Scituate, R.I.    Lucy Peckham    b. ? in R.I.?    d. ? in North Scituate, R.I.?
d. November 2, 1838 in North Scituate, R.I.
burial: Glenford Cemetery (SC031), Route 116, North Scituate, R.I.

Israel lived in North Scituate, Rhode Island. His sons Canton and Henry Smith moved to
Grand Rapids, Michigan and lived out their lives there. Family information from Mass.
D.A.R. G.R.C. 1938-1939 S1 V114, p. 164, contributed by Howard D. Smith of Chelmsford, Mass.
Howard D. Smith (1881 - 1964) was a son of Lt. Martin S. Smith and is buried in the
Glenford Cemetery (SC031) in North Scituate.


children1:
Martin7 Smith (1800 - 1870)
Waty7 Smith (1801 - 1864)
Canton7 Smith (1802 - 1882)
Henry7 C. Smith (1804 - 1886)
Galatia7 Smith (1812 - 1830) (Twin)
Statira7 Smith (1812 - 1869) (Twin) (married Alexander Hawkins)
Alcey7 W. Smith (1814 - 1889)
Jerusha7 L. Smith (1816 - 1836) (Twin)
Russell7 Smith (1816 - 1889) (Twin)






Grave of Israel Smith (1765 - 1838) in the Glenford Cemetery in Scituate, R.I.







Grave of Israel's son Martin Smith (1800 - 1870) and his Family in the
Glenford Cemetery in Scituate, R.I. Martin served in the Rhode Island
General Assembly in 1867.







Picture of 2nd Lt. Martin S. Smith of Company K, 3rd Battalion,
14th Regiment Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, from "The Fourteenth
Regiment Rhode Island Heavy Artillery (colored) in the War to
Preserve the Union, 1861 - 1865)," by Lt. William H. Chenery,
Snow and Farnham, Printers, Providence, R.I., 1898, p. 312.
Martin taught NCO classes to the colored enlisted men of the
regiment, p. 48 (see also p. 43, and p. 106 of the above Volume).







Grave of Israel's grandson 2nd Lt. Martin S. Smith (1844 - 1936) and his Family
in the Glenford Cemetery. Martin S. Smith served as a Lieutenant in
Co. K, 14th Rhode Island Heavy Artillery Regiment (colored) which became
the 11th U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery Regiment on May 21, 1864. This unit
served in Louisiana in the New Orleans area. Martin graduated from Brown
University in 1867 and was a member of the Rhode Island General Assembly in
1874, 1875, and 1879-1884. He was also a trial judge from 1879 to 1883, a
member of the Scituate Town Council in 1878, and a superintendent of schools
in Scituate. Martin was a member of the First Baptist Church in Providence
(Richard M. Bayles, ed., "History of Providence County, Vol. 1 and 2,
"Biographical Sketches: Town of Scituate"," p. 622). Note Martin S. Smith's
son Howard D. Smith (1881 - 1964) who lived in Chelmsford, Mass.







The "Martin Smith House" on Gleaner Chapel Road in northern Scituate, R.I.
This house dates to 1740. It was bought in 1785 by Israel Smith. His son
Martin Smith (1800 - 1870) inherited the house, who passed it on to
Lt. Martin S. Smith, who lived in it from 1878 to his death ("Historical and
Architectural Resources of Scituate, Rhode Island: A Preliminary Report,"
1980, p. 45).






George6 Smith 2nd  (Jeremiah5, Jacob4, Joseph3, Edward2, Christopher1)  
b. April 14, 1774 in Smithfield, R.I.?
m. March 11, 1804 in Smithfield, R.I.?    Mary Farnum    b. May 1785 in Smithfield, R.I.?    d. December 11, 1868 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. March 19, 1856 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: George Smith Lot (SM022), Clark Road, Smithfield, R.I.
GPS coordinates: 41o 54' 19.22" N; 71o 29' 51.44" W
I visited this cemetery in June 2008. A historic house that Jeremiah5 Smith owned in the 1700's is
nearby. Jeremiah Smith sold this house to his son George Smith on January 12, 1807.
Thanks to the Elfast Family for a tour of the property and access to the cemetery.


George was a farmer and lived off Douglas Pike near Clark Road. He was probably called "George 2nd"
to distinguish him from George Smith the blacksmith, who also lived in Smithfield in the mid-
1800's and appears to be a likely member of the Christopher1 Smith family. Family information from
Mass. D.A.R. G.R.C. 1938-1939 S1 V114, p. 163, contributed by Howard D. Smith of Chelmsford, Mass.


children:
Arnold7 Smith (1805 - 1879)
Stephen7 Smith (1807 - 1856)
George7 F. Smith (1809 - 1839)
Almond7 B. Smith (1813 - 1814)
Cyrus7 O. Smith (1815 - 1819)
Henry7 A. Smith (1818 - 1876)






A view of the George Smith Lot (SM022) off Clark Road in Smithfield, R.I.






***Thomas7 Smith  (Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. Abt. February 1785 in Smithfield, R.I.
m1. Bef. 1808   Sarah Chillson   b. September 5, 1788 in Smithfield, R.I.    d. September 24, 1841 in Smithfield, R.I.
(Sarah Chillson is buried in Smith Lot (SM049) on Smith Ave. in Greenville, R.I.).
m2. May 2, 1844 Elsa ( ? ) Richardson    b. Abt. January 26, 1809 in Connecticut    d. January 15, 1855 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. May 20, 1857 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: "Thomas Smith Lot" (SM012), Douglas Pike, Smithfield, R.I.

Thomas was a wheelwright and farmer. He lived and owned land along Douglas Pike in northern
Smithfield (near present-day Bryant University) during the early 1800's. His land was in the
"Island Woods" section along Douglas Pike near the land of Jenckes Harris. Thomas and his second
wife Elsa are buried with George A. Richardson, a child of Elsa's first marriage, in the
"Thomas Smith Lot" (SM012), a small historical cemetery visible off the entrance drive to Bryant
University (from Douglas Pike) on the right side about 50 yards in front of the security hut.


children1:
Unknown Male 18 Smith (Bef. 1810 - ? )
***Delilah8 Smith
Charles8 Smith (1812 - 1886)
Thomas8 Smith Jr. (1815 - 1878)
Elisha8 M. Smith (1819 - 1853)
Sterry8 Smith (1821 - 1898)
Amelia8 (a.k.a. "Amaline") Smith (1825 - 1905)
Nancy8 Smith (1827 - 1900)
Sarah8 A. (a.k.a. “Sally”) Smith (1827? - 1887)
Julia8 Ann Smith (1829 - 1898)
Frances8 Jane Smith (1831 - 1890)


children2:
Oliver8 Smith (1846 - 1913)






This unidentified Dagueorreotype might be Thomas Smith in the late 1840's
or early 1850's. Image from Smith Dagueorreotype Album, Eayrs Family Collection,
courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Massachusetts.






Town of Smithfield copy of the original will of Thomas Smith courtesy of
Central Falls City Clerk's Office.






Detail of Map likely by Asa Winsor about 1846 of the Douglas Turnpike,
showing the intersection of Douglas Pike with modern day Harris Road and
Limerock Road. The old Daniel Angell Tavern shown here was saved from
imminent destruction by the Romani Family in 2005 and removed to
153 Cooper Road in east Glocester, Rhode Island, where it was joined
to the historic Farnum House. Obadiah Smith was a distant cousin of ours
who had a farm on the north side of Limerock Road; his family is buried
in a small cemetery visible from Limerock Road.
Map from Plat Map A98, Central Falls City Clerk's Office.






Proceeding north up the Douglas Turnpike in 1846, we arrive at the George Smith the 2nd
House on the left side of the pike. Hanton City Trail is the next intersection to the
north before reaching the old Lydia Ann Road. The Smithfield Town Poor Farm and House
where just north of the Lydia Ann Road intersection.
Map from Plat Map A98, Central Falls City Clerk's Office.






Continuing north up the Douglas Turnpike in 1846 past the Smithfield Town Poor Farm,
we arrive at our ancestor Thomas Smith's Farm on the west side of the pike, about where
the modern entrance to Bryant University exists today. We Jencks Smith (1837 - 1910)
descendants are also descendants of Jenckes Harris whose large farm was directly on the
opposite side of the turnpike. Ethan Harris Esq. was Jenckes Harris' brother.
Map from Plat Map A98, Central Falls City Clerk's Office.






According to Smithfield Town records, this house at 1162 Douglas Pike dates to about 1774.
Thomas Smith lived here in the early 1800's up to his death date in 1857. Thomas is
buried in a small family cemetery nearby (to the left rear from this view). This house
stayed in the Smith Family until late 1899 when Jay G. Bellows, husband of Thomas Smith's
daughter Amelia Smith, defaulted on a mortgage to Sidney H. Mowry, who later sold the house
at public auction.






Modern map of location of Thomas Smith Lot (SM012) and historic "Thomas Smith House" to the north at
the entrance to Bryant University off Douglas Pike. The cemetery was part of the old Thomas Smith Farm
on Douglas Pike, Smithfield, Rhode Island in the 1800s.
Map from Town of Smithfield, Rhode Island G.I.S. Click on map for a larger image.







The 2012 Revision to the Rhode Island Historical Cemeteries Database finally
recognized our small family cemetery with its proper name, the "Thomas Smith Lot."
Prior to 2012, the cemetery was named the "Aldrich Lot" for whatever reason.
This cemetery was reserved out of the original property in the Land Deed from
Pearl C. Perreault to Bryant College, November 4, 1968, Smithfield (Georgiaville)
Deeds Book 38, 679-681. Visitors to the Cemetery also have a right of access over
Bryant University property from Douglas Pike to access the cemetery in the above
Land Deed. If Bryant University Security bother or harass you (my brother and I
were given the "stare down" from a Bryant Security officer a few years ago during
a cemetery visit), please send me an email at the link at the bottom of this web
page, and I will send you a copy of the Land Deed (your legal passport). This
cemetery is legally owned by all living Thomas Smith descendants.






2003 View of broken "gravestones" of Thomas Smith and second wife Elsa ( ? ) Richardson.





November 2013 View of Thomas and Elsa Smith Gravestone in SM012.
Click on the picture for a larger view.
This gravestone was repaired and reset by Friends of Smithfield Cemeteries. Thank You!





                                                   
Gravestone of first wife Sarah (Chillson) Smith in Smith Lot (SM049) in Greenville, R.I.        Back side of gravestone of Sarah (Chillson) Smith.


Thanks to the Friends of Smithfield Cemeteries for restoring and maintaining the Smith Lot (SM049), as this cemetery was in bad shape
in the 1980's and 1990's.





A Note on the Smith Dagueorreotype Album
The Smith Dagueorreotype Album is owned by a cousin of mine who is a descendant of George Smith (1837-1908),
twin brother of my ancestor Jencks Smith (1837-1910). The album features several people who look mostly like
Smiths to me. The people in the album are likely brothers and sisters of Delilah Smith (1807-1875), including
Charles Smith, Thomas Smith Jr., Elisha M. Smith, Sterry Smith, Amelia Smith, Nancy Smith, Sarah A. Smith,
Julia Ann Smith, and Frances Jane Smith. A few of the Smith sisters are likely missing, as I have not been
able to identify five separate sisters besides Delilah Smith in the album. IF YOU ARE A DESCENDANT OF ONE
OF THESE BROTHERS OR SISTERS OF DELILAH SMITH AND HAVE ANY OLD PICTURES OF YOUR ANCESTOR, PLEASE CONTACT ME
AT THE EMAIL LINK AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS WEB PAGE. WE WOULD LIKE TO IDENTIFY THESE INDIVIDUALS.
An example of two pages from the Smith Dagueorreotype Album is shown directly below.






Two pages from the Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Massachusetts.
The man on the right is clearly a Smith, and the woman to his right is probably his wife.
The two women on the left are probably Smith sisters.





I have spent some time viewing these excellent Daguerreotype images and believe I have figured out some of
the images based on age, clothing style, and facial features. As I am sure my living Smith cousins who
are descendants of Jencks Smith (1837-1910) would agree, the Smiths, particularly the males, have a distinct
look. Some of my educated guesses are shown below.






This woman I believe is Delilah Smith (1807-1875), one of the oldest
children of Thomas Smith and Sarah Chillson. Delilah has four different
images in the album (see below), which makes sense if George Smith or
Jencks Smith originally owned the album. The other brothers and sisters
of Delilah Smith would be uncles and aunts to the Smith Twins.





  
I will call this man "Smith Brother 1." My late grandfather Smith and some other
living Smiths look very similiar to this man. The woman was to his right in the
original album and is probably his wife. Images from Smith Daguerreotype Album
courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






I will call this man "Smith Brother 2," who has strong "Smith" features.
Image from Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






I will call this man "Smith Brother 3," who appears to be the youngest of the "Smith" brothers.
He might be Oliver Smith (Abt. 1846 - 1913), son of Thomas Smith and his second wife
Elsa ( ? ) Richardson; Oliver was a half brother of Delilah Smith and siblings.
Image from Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






I will call this man "Smith Brother 4." He looks a lot like my great-great Uncle Smith.
Image from Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.





  
I will call this man "Smith Brother 5." As seen in the original album pages above,
the woman to his right is probably his wife.
Image from Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.





  
  
These four images I believe are of the same woman, probably a Smith sister and
perhaps a favorite aunt of the Smith Twins; dates are likely 1850's to late 1800's.
Image from Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






Likely a Smith sister as seen in the original album pages above. Dark hair and eyes
seem to be a Smith phenotype. I have similar dark eyes myself.
Image from Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






This woman is, I think, a separate Smith sister, although she has similar features to the woman
directly above. I like the stylish hat and scarf in this image. Another woman who I think
is Lenora Delila Smith (1875 - 1903; see below) has dark hair and eyes like these two women.
Image from Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.










Juni7 Smith   (Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. Abt. 1795 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. Bef. 1824      Roby ( ? )    b. Abt. 1803 in Connecticut    d. ? in Smithfield, R.I.
d. February 27, 1856 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Oliver Smith Lot (NS048), Rocky Hill Road, North Smithfield, R.I.

Juni Smith was a farmer who lived next to the Smithfield Town Poor Farm off Douglas Pike during the 1800's.


children:
Mary8 Smith (1824 - 1891) [Mary married my great-great-great-great grandfather James Loomis (Lomas) and had at least 4 children]
Nelson8 Smith (Abt. 1826 - 1883 ) [Nelson married Nancy Potter in 1846 and had at least 5 children]
Israel8 Smith (Abt. 1831 - 1907 ) [Israel married Deborah Inman in 1854 and had several children;
Israel served as a Private in Company K, Second Rhode Island Regiment in the Civil War from 1861 to 1864; Israel
and Deborah are buried in Moshassuck Cemetery in Central Falls.]
Daniel8 A. Smith (Abt. 1833 - 1920 ) [Daniel served in Companies B and C, First Rhode Island Cavalry
Regiment in the Civil War. He married Phebe Louisa Rathbun in 1866; she died in 1886. Daniel moved to near
Richmond, Virginia in 1893. He died in 1920 in ZephyrHills, Florida.]
Phebe8 E. Smith (Abt. 1836 - ? )
Susan8 Smith (Abt. 1842 - ? )





The gravestone of Juni Smith in the Oliver Smith Lot (NS048).





Stephen7 Smith 2nd   (Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. Abt. 1802 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. October 10, 1841 in Smithfield, R.I.      Marcella Ballou    b. October 18, 1824 in Rhode Island    d. August 26, 1899 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. March 16, 1877 in North Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Smith-Harris Lot (NS025), Providence Pike, North Smithfield, R.I.
This cemetery was cleaned in the late summer of 2005. The land that the cemetery is on is the old
Stephen Smith 2nd farm (and later John Harris farm) which is currently being redeveloped.


Stephen Smith 2nd was a farmer who lived just north of the Douglas Pike and Branch Pike (Providence Pike)
intersection in modern northern Smithfield near the North Smithfield line. He was named "Stephen 2nd" to
distinguish him from his uncle Elijah Smith's son Stephen who was born earlier in 1799. Stephen served
as a Major in the 6th Regiment, 2nd Brigade of Providence County Militia in 1837. He served as a Lt. Col.
in the same regiment from 1838 to 1840 (see Joseph Jencks Smith, "Civil and Military List of R.I.," Vol. II).


children:
David8 Irving Smith (1842 - 1851)
Oreanna8 Smith (1844 - 1916)
Stephen8 Hisborn Smith (1848 - 1865)
Horace8 Greeley Smith (1854 - 1901)





North Smithfield Historic Cemetery NS025 after a good vegetation removal.





Gravestone of Stephen Smith 2nd in NS025.





Gravestone of Marcelia (Ballou) Smith, wife of Stephen Smith 2nd, in NS025.





Gravestone of Stephen Hisborn Smith, son of Stephen Smith 2nd and Marcelia Smith in NS025.




Ephraim7 Smith  (Elijah6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. November 16, 1790 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. Bef. 1822      Elizabeth Inman    b. October 25, 1789 in Smithfield, R.I.?    d. October 14, 1848 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. March 4, 1854 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Mowry-Smith Lot (NS033), Rankin Path, North Smithfield, R.I.

Ephraim Smith was a farmer who lived in modern day North Smithfield. The family information is based on
the research of Patricia Wood of Pascoag, R.I. and D.A.R. Application #71720.


children:
Ephraim8 Smith Jr. (Abt. 1822 - 1850)
Mary8 F. Smith (1826? - ? )
Daniel8 Smith (1826 - 1861) [Daniel married Minerva M. Mowry in 1853 and has several living descendants (known as the "Woonsocket Hill Smiths," a few of whom I have met]
Rachel8 M. Smith (1829 - 1911)
Anne8 E. Smith (1833 - 1911)
Harris8 Jackson Smith (Abt. 1837 - 1911)





Stephen7 Smith  (Elijah6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. July 22, 1799 in Smithfield, R.I.
m1. ? in Smithfield, R.I.      Mezada ( ? )    b. Abt. October 2, 1804 in Smithfield, R.I.?    d. March 17, 1825 in Smithfield, R.I.
m2. ? in Smithfield, R.I.      Elizabeth ( ? )    b. Abt. December 14, 1801 in Smithfield, R.I.?    d. June 9, 1860 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. December 7, 1883 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Smith Lot (NS017), Douglas Pike, North Smithfield, R.I.

Stephen Smith was a farmer who lived in modern day North Smithfield.


children:
unknown






Gravestone of Elijah Smith's son Stephen Smith in the
Smith Lot (NS017).






Simon7 Smith  (Elijah6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. January 17, 1803 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. Bef. 1836 in Smithfield, R.I.?      Maranda ( ? )    b. Abt. October 1, 1813 in Smithfield, R.I.?    d. May 7, 1903 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. November 30, 1882 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Smith Lot (NS017), Douglas Pike, North Smithfield, R.I.

Simon Smith was a farmer who lived in modern day North Smithfield.


children:
Amanda8 Smith (1835 - 1917)
Albert8 S. Smith (1838 - 1885)
Susan8 J. Smith (1839 - ? )
Thomas8 W.D. Smith (Abt. 1844 - ? )
Helen8 J. Smith (1845 - ? )
Sarah8 M. Smith (Abt. 1847 - ? )
Simon8 L.B. Smith (1853 - 1857)





Mary7 Ann Smith   (Elijah6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. July 22, 1811 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. December 31, 1890 in North Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Smith Lot (NS017), Douglas Pike, North Smithfield, R.I.

I haven't found evidence that Mary married. She lived with her brothers in modern day North Smithfield.






***Delilah8 Smith   (Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. Abt. October 17, 1807 in Smithfield, R.I.

had twin sons with unknown father in 1836 or 1837:
***Jencks9 Smith
George9 Smith

m1. Aft. 1840  William F. Waterman b. June 7, 1803 d. September 8, 1862
d. January 9, 1875 in Greenville, R.I.
burial: Smith Lot (SM049), Smith Ave., Greenville, R.I.

Delilah's nickname was "Duma." The twin boys Jencks and George took the Smith surname of their mother
Delilah after the unknown father left Smithfield and did not marry Delilah. Delilah is listed in the
Federal Census of 1840 in Cumberland, R.I. with two boys, and she later married William7 F. Waterman
(Lt. Andrew6, Andrew5, Resolved4, Resolved3, Resolved2, Richard1; see "Descendants of
Richard Waterman of Providence, R.I.," by Jacobus and Waterman, 1954, pp. 272-273; thanks to
Stuart Waterman for the source). William was a painter in Smithfield who raised the Smith boys at times
as his own sons. Jencks and George Smith became painting apprentices to William, and the painting
occupation would continue for a few generations in the Smith family. William had one child with
Delilah, a daughter named Harriet.

children1:
Harriet9 Josephine (Hattie) Waterman     b. Abt. December 1849 d. January 20, 1932
        m. April 21, 1868 in Woonsocket, R.I. Edwin Clifford Harris   b. Abt. 1847   d. February 4, 1938
burial: Harris Lot (SM016), Harris Rd., Smithfield, R.I.





  
  
I believe all four of these images are of Delilah Smith (1807 - 1875). The first one is very early,
likely from the 1840's. The second is from about 1850. The last two are probably from the 1860's to
1870's. Compare the second image of Delilah Smith to the Daguerreotype of George Smith (1837 - 1908)
below; the resemblance is remarkable.
Images from Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






Map by Dan of SM049, the Smith Lot on Smith Ave. in Greenville, R.I. Click on the map for a
larger version. SM049 is one of my favorite cemeteries in R.I. because of the people buried in
it. In the upper right, Amasa and Olive Smith are distant cousins descended from the Scituate
Smiths (Amasa's father was Christopher Smith). Sarah (Chillson) Smith, the daughter of
Revolutionary War soldier John Chillson who served in the Second R.I. Regiment (Continental)
and the Rhode Island Regiment (Continental), was the mother of Delilah (Smith) Waterman,
Elisha M. Smith, Julia A. (Smith) Medbery, and Amelia (Smith) (Baxter) Bellows.
Delilah (Smith) Waterman's son George Smith (1837 - 1908) is buried right next to her.
George's twin brother Jencks (1837 - 1910), whom I am descended from, is buried in the
Greenville Cemetery (SM045) across the road. George Smith married Edna Frances Fiske, whose
parents Emory and Sophia A. (Waterman) Fiske are buried nearby. Sgt. William A. Fiske served
in the 3rd Rhode Island Cavalry Regiment and died at sea when the Steamship "North America"
foundered in a storm off the east coast of Florida the night of December 22 to 23, 1864.
194 lives were lost in the sinking, many of them Union soldiers. I am also descended from
George N. and Nancy H. (Knight) Young.






Gravestone of Delilah Smith in Smith Lot (SM049) in Greenville, R.I.
Inscription reads: "Delilah, wife of William F. Waterman, died January 9, 1875,
in the 67th year of her age"






Gravestone of William F. Waterman in Smith Lot (SM049) in Greenville, R.I.
Inscription reads: "William F. Waterman, died September 8, 1862, in the 60th year
of his age"





  

These three images are likely of Harriet J. Waterman (1849 - 1932), daughter of Delilah Smith
and William F. Waterman. Compare Harriet's face to Delilah's above. The first image is about
1850's, the second about 1860's, and the third with son Keith or Jonathan Harris about 1870's.
Images from Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






Gravestone of Harriet J. Waterman and
Edwin C. Harris in the Harris Lot (SM016).





Charles8 Smith   (Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. December 27, 1812 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. ? in Smithfield, R.I.?    Diana Pierce    b. November 22, 1826 in Cape Cod, Mass.    d. January 2, 1917 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. September 8, 1886 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Smith Lot (SM008), old Lydia Ann Road (north of Douglas Pike), Smithfield, R.I.
Condition: Cemetery clean in November 2013. There was one broken and worn gravestone. According to
the RIHCTP, this might be Delmont Smith’s stone.


Charles was a wheelwright and a wagon maker who lived along Douglas Pike just east of the old Lydia Ann Road
intersection.


children:
Alice9 Chilson Smith (1845 - 1909)
Edith9 Smith (1848 - ? ) [Edith had an illegimate child named Joseph Alexander Smith in 1866; Joseph A. Smith married
Esther Collins in 1887 and had several children; Edith later married Orin Cook in 1873 and had a family with him]
Delmont9 Smith (Abt. 1852 - 1931? ) [Delmont Smith married Sarah Jane Luther in 1886]






Map of Charles Smith Lot (SM008) and other historic cemeteries on Douglas Pike. Click on the map for a larger view.
To access the Charles Smith Lot and the old Lydia Ann Road, turn north on DeCotis Farm Road from Douglas Pike. Park in
the turnabout on the west side of DeCotis Farm Road. Walk south on DeCotis Farm Road and look for the trail to the west
which is actually the old Lydia Ann Road which dates to the early 1800's. Map from Town of Smithfield GIS.







View up DeCotis Farm Road from the intersection with Douglas Pike. To get to the Charles Smith Cemetery,
travel up DeCotis Farm Road to the turnabout on the left side where you can park. Walk to the south and
the old Lydia Ann Road to the west.







View to the west from DeCotis Farm Road down the old Lydia Ann Road to the Charles Smith Lot.
Click on the image for a larger view.
Charles Smith's gravestone can be seen in the middle area just to the left of the trail.







Close-up view of the Smith Lot (SM008) off Douglas Pike where Charles Smith and family are buried.
Charles lived nearby along the Douglas Pike during the 1800's.






Gravestone of Charles Smith in Smith Lot (SM008).






Gravestone of Diana (Pierce) Smith in Smith Lot (SM008).






Gravestone of Charles Smith's daughter Alice Chilson Smith
in Smith Lot (SM008).





Thomas8 Smith Jr.   (Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. Abt. 1815 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. April 18, 1846 in Thompson, Connecticut Julia A. Hopkins    b. Abt. 1822   d. Bef. 1870
d. February 1, 1878 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: unknown; probably buried on his farm on Douglas Pike, possibly buried in Thomas Smith Lot (SM012)
(I believe Julia Hopkins is buried in the Town Cemetery Attachment (NS036) to the Union Cemetery (NS007) in
Union Village, North Smithfield, R.I.)

Thomas was a wheelwright in Smithfield. He lived along Douglas Pike in northern Smithfield.


children:
Thomas9 Smith 3rd (1847 - 1930) [Thomas married Marcia J. Enches; they are buried in Union Cemetery in North Smithfield]
Sessions9 Hopkins Smith (Abt. 1849 - ?)
Mary9 E. Smith (Abt. 1850 - ?)



Elisha8 M. Smith   (Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. Abt. March 17, 1819 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. Before 1837 in Smithfield, R.I.?    Lillias Richardson of Gideon and Lucina Richardson    b. 1818    d. May 4, 1888
Lillias (Richardson) Smith married Clark Sayles on March 11, 1856 in Smithfield, R.I. Lillias and Clark Sayles are buried in the
Gideon Sayles Lot (NS024) on Iron Mine Hill Road in North Smithfield.
d. November 27, 1853 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Smith Lot (SM049), Smith Ave., Greenville, R.I.


children:
Hannah9 T. Smith (Abt. 1836 - ? )
Edwin9 Smith (1843 - 1869)





                 
Gravestone of Elisha M. Smith in Smith Lot (SM049) in Greenville, R.I.          Back side of gravestone of Elisha M. Smith.





Sterry8 Smith   (Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. Abt. June 1821 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. October 16, 1842 in Smithfield, R.I.    Eliza Ann Curtis    b. Abt. 1816 in Connecticut    d. 1854 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. July 7, 1898 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Chepachet Cemetery (GL023), Acotes Hill, Glocester, R.I.

Sterry lived next to his uncle Stephen Smith 2nd in 1860. He later lived in North Smithfield.


children:
Charles9 H. Smith (1842 - 1924)
William9 W. Smith (1844 - 1845)
John9 Winslow Smith (1845 - 1928)
Truman9 Smith (1848 - 1907)
Edward9 Curtis Smith (Abt. 1850 - 1932)





Gravestone of Sterry Smith and family in Chepachet
Cemetery (GL023), Glocester, R.I.





Amelia8 Smith   (Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. March 20, 1825 in Smithfield, R.I.
m1. Bef. 1847 in Smithfield, R.I.?    Samuel M. Baxter    b. Abt. January 1815    d. April 8, 1858 in Smithfield, R.I.?
m2. March 7, 1884 in Smithfield, R.I.?    Jay Grosvenor Bellows    b. July 31, 1841 in Smithfield?    d. January 2, 1923 in Blackstone, Massachusetts [Civil War Pension File 1125274]
d. October 2, 1905 in North Providence, R.I.
burial: Smith Lot (SM049), Smith Ave., Greenville, R.I.
Condition: Amelia and Jay G. Bellows’ gravestones were tipped over in October 2004. The Smith Lot appears to have
been vandalized from 2003 to 2004 as several gravestones were tipped over. This cemetery was cleaned and repaired
in early 2005, presumably by Friends of Smithfield Cemeteries (Thank you!).

Jay G. Bellows served in Company D, 3rd Battalion Massachusetts Mounted Rifles (Devens' Cavalry) of the Massachusetts Militia in 1861.



children1:
Amie9 T. Baxter (1847 - 1869)





Nancy8 Smith   (Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. Abt. October 15, 1827? in Smithfield, R.I.
m. November 26, 1850 in Smithfield, R.I. [Civil War Pension File]    Edwin P. Williams    b. January 25, 1833 in Olneyville, R.I.    d. December 30, 1906 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. April 5, 1900 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Greenville Cemetery (SM045), Greenville, R.I.
GPS Coordinates: 41o 52' 5.20" N; 71o 33' 23.93" W


Edwin P. Williams enlisted in Company H of the 12th Rhode Island Regiment [9 months regiment] on September 23, 1862. With a family in
Rhode Island, Edwin deserted from the 12th Rhode Island on March 23, 1863. He turned himself in to the Rhode Island Provost Marshal's
Office in Providence, Rhode Island on September 24, 1863. Edwin was court-martialled and sentenced to serve out his enlistment with the
7th Rhode Island Regiment. He joined Company C, 7th Rhode Island Regiment in December 1863. After some medical problems in early 1864,
Edwin served out his enlistment and was honorably discharged from the 7th Rhode Island Regiment at Petersburg, Virginia on September 20,
1864 [Edwin P. Williams Civil War Pension File 864607, U.S. National Archives].


children:
Hannah9 Lucina Williams (January 2, 1852 - 1922) [Hannah married Thomas J. McCormick]
Dorcas9 Ann Williams (October 11, 1855 - 1924) [Dorcas married Peter D. Lafenierre and later second husband Harry Lees]
Andrew9 Jackson Williams (October 23, 1858 - 1934) [Andrew married Mary A. Baker and has living descendants]
Nellie9 Williams (September 24, 1860 - ? ) [Nellie married Edgar Lewis Williams]
Nancy9 Williams (August 12, 1868 - 1926 ) [Nancy died in the Howard Institution in Cranston, Rhode Island]





Gravestone of Edwin P. Williams and Nancy (Smith) Williams in Greenville Cemetery (SM045).





Sarah8 A. Smith   (Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. July 10, 1823? in Smithfield, R.I.?
m. Bef. 1843 in Smithfield, R.I.?    Smith S. Aldrich    b. May 7, 1816 in R.I. of George Aldrich and Polly Sayles    d. October 6, 1867 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. December 21, 1866 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Smith Lot (SM049) in Greenville, R.I.?

Sarah’s (also known as “Sally”) son George T. Aldrich is buried in Smith Lot (SM049) in Greenville, R.I.
While there was a GAR marker in front of his grave, I have found no evidence that George served in the
Civil War. This GAR marker probably belongs to Amasa Hammond or Edwin Smith in SM049.


children:
Sarah9 Maria Aldrich (Abt. 1843 - ? )
George9 Thomas Aldrich (Abt. 1848 - 1871) [George married Josephine Chandler Hall in 1868 and had at least one daughter]




Julia8 Ann Smith   (Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. August 31, 1829 in Smithfield, R.I.?
m. Bef. 1850 in Smithfield, R.I.?    Horace Medbery (Medbury)    b. Abt. 1826 in R.I.    d. ? in North Providence?
d. December 16, 1898 in Smithfield, R.I.?
burial: Smith Lot (SM049), Smith Ave., Greenville, R.I.

Julia bought three acres of land with a house along Douglas Pike (near present day Bryant University)
on August 24, 1880 from her nephew Thomas Smith 3rd (Sm Deeds Book 2 (Georgiaville), p. 163). She lived
at this house for the rest of her life.


children:
Sebastian9 Leon Medbury (a.k.a. "Leon S. Medbury") (1849 - 1918) [Sebastian married, had a family, and likely has living descendants]





Gravestone of Julia Ann (Smith) Medbery in the Smith Lot (SM049)
in Greenville, R.I. This stone was tipped over in November 2013, but
was repaired by August 2014. The stone is very heavy and requires
at least two people to right it. The Smith Lot has been frequently
vandalized by local knuckleheads over the years.





Oliver8 Smith   (Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. Abt. August 1847 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. January 15, 1864 in Smithfield, R.I.    Annah I. Aldrich of Thomas and Eliza Aldrich    b. 1847 in R.I.    d. ?
d. May 9, 1913 in Cranston Alms House, Cranston, R.I.
burial: Cranston?


Oliver Smith moved to Glocester, R.I. after the Civil War and worked as a Teamster there. In 1880, he was working in a
Locomotive Factory in Providence, R.I. By 1900, he ended up in the Rhode Island State Alms House in Cranston.


children:
Warren9 Augustus Smith (b. April 16, 1866 d. Bef. 1899?) [Warren married Nellie (Ellen) Randall and had at least 3 children]
Hattie9 Aldrich Smith (b. July 25, 1867 d. 1929) [Hattie married Patrick Ferry and had at least 2 children]
George9 A. Smith (b. May 14, 1871 d. 1905) [George married Alice T. Connolly and had at least 5 children]




  
I believe both of these photos are of Oliver Smith, the first about 1860's, the second about 1870's to 1880's.
Images from Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






I believe this photo is of Annah (Aldrich) Smith, wife of Oliver Smith.
Image from Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.





Orreanna8 Smith   (Stephen 2nd7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. October 1, 1844 in Smithfield, R.I.
m1. July 4, 1867 in Providence, R.I.    John Albert Harris    b. May 25, 1846 in Cumberland, R.I.?    d. June 29, 1880 in Smithfield, R.I.?
m2. Aft. 1877 in Smithfield, R.I.?    William Mathewson Paine    b. March 5, 1831 in Smithfield?    d. November 4, 1904 in Smithfield, R.I.?
d. March 4, 1916 in Smithfield, R.I.?
burial: Slatersville Cemetery (NS003), Greene St., Slatersville, R.I.

Orreanna married our distant Harris cousin John A. Harris (John A.8, Jeremiah7, William6, Christopher5, Christopher4,
Nicholas3, Thomas2, Thomas1 Harris) and lived on her father Stephen Smith 2nd’s Farm (later
John Harris Farm) between Douglas Pike and Providence Pike just north of the Smithfield/North Smithfield town boundaries.
A few of her Harris descendants became members of the D.A.R. Orreanna later married William Paine and apparently
did not have any children with him. John A. Harris is buried in Diamond Hill Cemetery, Cumberland Historic Cemetery CU025.
Orreanna’s second husband William Paine served in the Civil War.


children1:
Eleather9 M. Harris (1869 - 1886)
Stella9 Arnold Harris (1872 - 1959) [twin with Stephen; Stella married David L. Mowry and is buried in Union Cemetery]
Stephen9 Allen Harris (1872 - 1872) [twin with Stella]
John9 Albert Harris (1874 - 1950) [John married Martha Brown and has some living descendants]
Stephen9 Smith Harris (1875 - 1918) [Stephen married Agnes Miller Howat and had at least two children; he is buried
in Union Cemetery]





The cenotaph to John A. Harris (1846 - 1880) in the Smith-Harris Lot (NS025)
in North Smithfield, R.I. This stone is a hand-carved fieldstone. John A. Harris
is actually buried in Cumberland Historic Cemetery CU025, Diamond Hill Cemetery.






The grave of John A. Harris in Diamond Hill Cemetery (CU025). John is
buried near his parents Jeremiah Harris (1811-1894) and Mary (Darling)
Harris (1820-1883).






Grave of Eleather M. Harris in the Smith-Harris Lot (NS025). Eleather was named
for her great-grandmother Elethear (Herrendeen) Smith.






Gravestone of Orreanna (Smith) (Harris) Paine and second husband William M. Paine in the
Slatersville Cemetery (NS003).





***Jencks9 Smith   (Delilah8, Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. November 30, 1837 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. December 10, 1866 in Cumberland, R.I.   Lenora Harris    b. November 24, 1847/48   d. August 11, 1930
d. October 18, 1910 in Providence, R.I.
burial: Greenville Cemetery (SM045), Greenville, R.I.
GPS Coordinates: 41o 52' 5.20" N; 71o 33' 23.93" W

Jencks was a house painter, and he served as the Town Police Sergeant of Smithfield
from about 1885 to 1910. He was the twin brother of George Smith (1837-1908). Jencks
acquired some fame as the arresting officer of Earl Jacques, a mill worker who confessed
to murdering Mary Eddy on January 3, 1908. Jencks was an elderly man of 70 years old at
the time, and he acquired the assistance of Providence City Police Detectives to solve the
murder case. Mary E. Eddy was 39 and worked at the Greenville Woolen Mill on Putnam Pike;
she was buried in Acotes Hill Cemetery in Glocester, R.I. (see the article "Murdered for
thirteen dollars" written by Smithfield Historian Jim Ignasher in the
"Your Smithfield Magazine," January 2010, Vol. 4, No. 6, pp. 66-67).

A photograph of one of the Smith Twins playing in the Greenville Cornet Band about 1890
may be seen (third row, far right) in the recent Book "Images of America, Smithfield,"
Arcadia Publishing, 2008, by Ken Brown Sr., Jim Ignasher, and Bill Pilkington, p. 87.


children:
Albert10 Orman Smith (1867 - 1907)
***Jenckes10 Smith Jr.
Lenora10 Delila Smith (1875 - 1903)
Willie10 Winsor Smith (1881 - 1892)
Frank10 Harris Smith (1885 - 1945)





Twin brothers Jencks Smith and George Smith circa 1860's.






Daguerreotype of Jencks and Lenora (Harris) Smith, probably late 1800's.
Image from Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






Gravestone of Jencks Smith and Lenora Harris in Greenville Cemetery (SM045).





George9 Smith   (Delilah8, Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. November 30, 1837 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. May 24, 1865    Edna Frances Fiske     b. March 1846    d. February 11, 1900
d. June 17, 1908 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Smith Lot (SM049), Smith Ave., Greenville, R.I.

George was a house painter, and he served as a Town Constable of Smithfield
from the late 1880's to 1908.


children:
unknown child 110 Smith (Bef. 1868 - ?)
George10 Smith Jr. (1868 - 1914)
Carrie10 Chilson Smith (1872 - 1935)
Harold10 Fiske Smith (1875 - 1938)
Edna10 Frances Smith (1884 - 1939)
Emily10 Green Smith (1886 - 1924)





Daguerreotype of George Smith, probably 1860's.
Image from Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






Photograph of Edna Frances Fiske, wife of George Smith, probably 1860's.
The Fiske Family is another old Rhode Island Family.
Image from Eayrs Family Collection courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






This image is one of my favorite photographs of George Smith, probably late 1800's.
Notice the percussion cap double barrell shotgun and George's sleeping hunting dog.
Image from Eayrs Family Collection courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






George Smith had this house at modern day 561 Putnam Pike in Greenville, R.I.
built in 1885. George lived at this house until his death in 1908 ("Historical
and Architectural Resources of Smithfield, Rhode Island," 1992, p. 59).






This photograph is of the George Smith Farm in the late 1800's. The dirt road
in front of the house is now modern Putnam Pike, currently noted for its traffic.
George's twin brother Jencks Smith lived in a house next door to this farm in the
late 1800's. In the early 1900's, Jencks Smith moved to Providence, R.I.
Image from Eayrs Family Collection courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






Gravestone of George Smith and Family in Smith Lot (SM049) in Greenville, R.I.
In the 1990's, the Smith Lot was overgrown with brush, but was cleaned up nicely
by the Friends of Smithfield Cemeteries.





Albert10 Orman Smith   (Jencks9, Delilah8, Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. June 14, 1867 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. February 10, 1904   Ellen Esther Knight (Harris)    b. December 1858   d. August 27, 1942
d. July 5, 1907 in Brookline, Mass.
burial: Swan Point Cemetery (PV003), Providence, R.I.

Albert O. Smith was the President of the Smithfield Town Council from 1902 to 1907, was a member of the
Republican State central committee from 1902 to 1907, and was a member of the Smithfield school committee
for ten years. For 14 years he managed the grain and milling business of Congressman Adin B. Capron
at Stillwater.




  
I believe these two images may be of Albert Orman Smith from late 1800's. However, these images
are also similar to the man I think is George Smith Jr. (see below).
Images from Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.





***Jenckes10 Smith Jr.   (Jencks9, Delilah8, Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. December 14, 1868 in Greenville, R.I.
m. Abt. 1901 in Smithfield, R.I.   Mary Evelyn Flynn     b. August 14, 1876    d. November 11, 1962
d. September 24, 1933 in Greenville, R.I.
burial: Greenville Cemetery (SM045), Greenville, R.I.
GPS Coordinates: 41o 52' 5.20" N; 71o 33' 23.93" W

Jenckes was a painter, Smithfield police sergeant, and the Chief of Police of Smithfield until 1928.


children:
Female 11 Smith
Male 1 11 Smith [died young, age 5]
***Male 2 11 Smith





Jenckes Smith Jr. (1868 - 1933) circa 1900's.





Lenora10 Delila Smith    (Jencks9, Delilah8, Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. July 14, 1875 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. bef. Nov. 1894    Asa Gideon Steere    b. September 1871   d. 1947
d. August 17, 1903 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Harmony Cemetery (GL035), Putnam Pike, Glocester, R.I.

children:
Female 11 Steere



  

I believe these three images are of Jencks and Lenora Smith's daughter Lenora Delila Smith.
Lenora died tragically at age 28. Her husband, Asa Gideon Steere, married Lenora's
cousin, Edna Frances Smith, daughter of George Smith. There are some living descendants
of Asa G. Steere and Lenora Delila Smith.
Images from Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.





Willie10 Winsor Smith   (Jencks9, Delilah8, Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. October 12, 1881 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. December 10, 1892 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Greenville Cemetery (SM045), Greenville, R.I.
GPS Coordinates: 41o 52' 5.20" N; 71o 33' 23.93" W




Frank10 Harris Smith   (Jencks9, Delilah8, Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. October 11, 1885 in Greenville, R.I.
m. November 14, 1912    Alzada Knight     b. June 21, 1890    d. March 31, 1982
d. March 20, 1945 in Greenville, R.I.
burial: Greenville Cemetery (SM045), Greenville, R.I.
GPS Coordinates: 41o 52' 5.20" N; 71o 33' 23.93" W

Frank was an accountant, foreman, and painter. He was President of the Smithfield Town Council in 1920 and 1922.
Frank's farm was on Pleasant View Avenue near Greenville where the current Smithfield High School stands. The old
Smith buildings were unfortunately torn down to make way for the modern high school.

I am a "double cousin" with this family as I am related to both Frank H. Smith and his wife Alzada Knight (I am a
descendant of the Knight Family through my Young Family). "Zada" (Knight) Smith had a talking parrot, and there are
some funny stories in my side of the family about the parrot and some of its "sayings." Most of the Smith sons below
served our country in World War II.


children:
Male 1 11 Smith
Male 2 11 Smith
Male 3 11 Smith
Male 4 11 Smith
Male 5 11 Smith
Male 6 11 Smith



George10 Smith Jr.   (George9, Delilah8, Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. September 2, 1868 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. Abt. 1892    Margaret A. Barlow     b. 1859    d. 1944
d. August 14, 1914 in Greenville, R.I.
burial: Smith Lot (SM049), Smith Ave., Greenville, R.I.


children:
Howard 11 Barlow Smith (1893 - 1941) [Howard worked for the State Department of Highways and was killed by a reckless
driver (John J. Cunningham Jr.) on a state highway project in North Smithfield, Rhode Island on March 19, 1941]

child 2 11 Smith




I believe this image is of George Smith Jr. about late 1800's.
Image from Smith Daguerreotype Album courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.





Carrie10 Chilson Smith   (George9, Delilah8, Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. October 29, 1872 in Smithfield, R.I.
m. October 4, 1899 in Smithfield, R.I.    Weston Eayrs    b. September 13, 1873    d. June 21, 1943
d. March 11, 1935 in Middleborough, Massachusetts
burial: Swan Point Cemetery (PV003), Providence, R.I.


Weston Eayrs (pronounced "airs") was a master dyer for the Puritan Mills (American Woolen Co.) in Plymouth, Massachusetts.


children:
female 1 11 Eayrs
male 1 11 Eayrs
male 2 11 Eayrs
male 3 11 Eayrs (died young)
female 2 11 Eayrs
male 4 11 Eayrs
female 3 11 Eayrs
female 4 11 Eayrs





Photo of Weston Eayrs and Family from the Eayrs Family Collection,
courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Massachusetts.






Weston Eayrs in North Adams, Mass. Photo from the Eayrs Family
Collection courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






Photo of Carrie Chilson (Smith) Eayrs from the Eayrs Family Collection
courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






Photo of Weston and Carrie (Smith) Eayrs with children in Greenville, R.I.
Photo from the Eayrs Family Collection courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






Weston Eayrs with daughter Carrie about 1913. Photo from the Eayrs Family
Collection courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.






Weston Eayrs and Carrie Chilson (Smith) Eayrs with daughter Edith in 1920.
Photo from the Eayrs Family Collection courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.





Harold10 Fiske Smith   (George9, Delilah8, Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. October 12, 1876 in Greenville, R.I.
m. Abt. 1897    Mary A. Jordan     b. August 1868 in New York    d. ? in Smithfield, R.I.
d. January 30, 1938 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Greenville Cemetery (SM045), Greenville, R.I.
GPS Coordinates: 41o 52' 5.20" N; 71o 33' 23.93" W


children:
Clifford11 D. Smith (1891 - 1897)
Mary11 E. Smith (1898 - 1978)





Edna10 Frances Smith   (George9, Delilah8, Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. June 27, 1884 in Greenville, R.I.
m. November 15, 1905 in Smithfield, R.I.    Asa Gideon Steere    b. September 1871    d. 1947
d. August 22, 1939 in Greenville, R.I.
burial: Harmony Cemetery (GL035), Putnam Pike, Glocester, R.I.


children:
infant Male 11 Steere (died 1907)





Picture of Asa G. Steere and second wife Edna F. (Smith) Steere, probably 1930's.
Image from Eayrs Family Collection, courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.





Emily10 Green Smith    (George9, Delilah8, Thomas7, Oliver6, Joshua5, Doctor Thomas4, Thomas3, Edward2, Christopher1)
b. February 16, 1886 in Smithfield, R.I.
d. February 22, 1924 in Smithfield, R.I.
burial: Smith Lot (SM049), Smith Ave., Greenville, R.I.

Emily was a house servant in the 1910's and later worked in a Worsted Mill.






Picture of Emily Green Smith about 1900's.
Image from Eayrs Family Collection, courtesy of Ted Eayrs of Middleborough, Mass.










Geography vs. Genealogy, a distribution of historic Smith and Harris Families in Smithfield




This is a scanned image of the USGS 7.5 minute Georgiaville, R.I. Quadrangle (1975 Photorevision) with the grave
sites and old farms of some of my 18th and 19th century Smith and Harris ancestors marked on it. Refer to this page
and the Harris Family page linked via "Lenora Harris" for specific information about the people shown on this map.
The grave sites are important because people in 18th and 19th century R.I. were typically buried in grave plots on
their own farm lands. You begin to see a clear pattern between where people lived and where they are buried.







These web pages are currently under construction, so please be patient.

If you are a relative or are interested in obtaining or providing additional information
on these families, then please send me (Dan) an email.