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THE HUBAND’S OF IPSLEY AND THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH ST. PETER’S CHURCH
The remarkable family of Huband (also known as Hubold, Hubald, Hubaud, and Hubaude)is undoubtedly of ancient and worthy extraction, having held Ipsely as Lords of theManor through seven centuries.

The Domesday Book, compiled in 1068 for King William after his invasion shows thefollowing entry for Ipsley:
Hugh also holds 3 hides in Ipsley
Land for 7 ploughs. In Lordship 1; 2 slaves;
7 villagers with a priest and 13 smallholders with 4 ploughs.
A mill at 16 d; woodland 1 league long and 1/2 league wide.
The value was 30s; now 40s.
Earl Algar held it.

The fact that a priest was mentioned implies that a place of worship of some sortexisted although it seems to have been of too small a value to have been recorded.

This Hugh, who also appears to have held other lands according to Domesday records,seems to have been the ancestor of the later Hubands of Warwickshire. From this Hughdescended William Hubold (sometimes written Hubaut) who was living in the reign ofKing Stephen in 1140 and Hugh Hubold, his son, who held the Manor of Ipsley in 1189.

In 1236, one Sir Henry Hubald is recorded as being taxed for “one knight’s fee” inIplsey, and this same gentleman was one of those involved in “The Barons’ War” helpingin the seige of Kenilworth Castle against the King in 1245. As a result of this action,his manor of Ipsley and his other lands were seized. However, this treason was purgedby a decree known as the “Dictum de Kenilworth” and in 1261 he was made a Commissionerfor GAOL Delivery at Warwick, a position in which he was still to be found in 1269,1270 and 1271. He also established the right to hold a Court Leet at Ipsley.

His son and heir became Sir John Hubald of Ipsley who maried Margaret, the daughterof Sir William Lucie of Charlecoate in Warwickshire. They appear to have had fivesons: John, who served in the wars in Brittany; William, who served in those in Gascoigne;and also Thomas, robert and Geoffrey.

In 1342, John Hubald was employed with others in the service of King Edward III inWales for which he had special letters of protection, and three years later, he becamea member of the commission raised to inquire what “persons were seized of lands inWarwickshire, from the yearly value of £ 5 to £ 1000 and to certify thesame.” The following year, he received a military summons to attend the King in theFrench wars and was given the responsibility for providing arms, horses and archersfrom Warwickshire. At this time, the stone church was nearing completion and it wasdedicated to St. Peter in 1348. The oldest of the church bells was cast circa 1340.It is 2 feet 7 - 3/4 inches in diameter and weighs 6 hundredweights. It is knownas the Royal Bell since it has a coin of the reign of King Edward III cast into it.

This John Hubald was succeeded at his death by his eldest son, also called John Hubald,who, in 1356, was one of the knights of the shire in the parliament held at Westminster.He, in turn, was succeeded by Thomas Hubald, who, in 1379 in the reign of King RichardII was recorded as being a commissioner responsible for assessing a subsidy for Warwickshire.He was the father of Richard Hubald, who ranked amongst the persons of note in Warwickshirein 1434 in the reign of King Henry VI. He appears to have made “oath for observanceof certain articles concluded in the parliament then holden”. His coat of arms isdescribed simply as “sable, three leopards’ faces.”

A Thomas Hubaud has been recorded during the reign of King Edward IV in 1461 althoughlittle is known of him, and he was followed by Richard Hubaud who flourished in thetime of King Henry VII. He married Anne, the daughter of Thomas Burdet of Arrow,alcester. Their son, John Huband, of whom mention was found in 1530 was succeededby Nicholas Huband Esquire, who married Dorothy Danvers, daughter of Sir John Danversof Calthorpe and Waterstock in Oxfordshire. Dorothy was co-heiress with her two sisters,Ann and Elizabeth to their father’s estate. Anne married Reginald Digby Esquire ofColeshill, Warwickshire, and Elizabeth married Sir Thomas Cave of Stanford.

There is evidence of Nicholas and Dorothy Huband to be found in St. Peter’s Chruch.On the north side of the chancel can be found an incised alabaster slab which onceformed part of thier tomb. This shows an effigy of the Knight and his lady with thesmall effigies of thier fifteen children, eight sons, and seven daughters, alongthe bottom edge. Between the heads of Nicholas and Dorothy is an angular shaped shieldshowing the arms of Huband. The effigy of Nicholas represents him in armour, bareheaded,with his hair combed straight down and cut round in the peculiar fashion introducedtowards the end of the fifteenth century. The armour consists of a breastplate witha short skirt of taces to which are attached angular shaped tuiles which cover theupper part of the thighs. The shoulders and arms are also protected. The hands arebare and joined on the breast. A plain narrow belt, buckled in front, crosses thebody diagonally from the right hip to the left side where the sword is suspended.His feet rest on a couchant and collared dog. Dorothy appears on the left side ofher husband wearing an angular shaped headdress after the fashion introduced towardsthe close of the fifteenth century, Her dress consists of a high bodied robe, tiedin front, which gradually opens down the skirts revealing a petticoat. The sleevesare puffed at the shoulders and hang in what was known as “demi-cannon” sleeves.These are ornamented and finish at the wrist in ruffles. There is a turn down collarat the neck. Her shoes are broad toed but her feet do not rest on the dog. Her hands,too, are joined on the breast. The effigies of the children show the males clad inlong gowns nad the females in headdresses and gowns similar to that of their mother,The inscription, now sadly partially eroded, was recorded by Sir William Dugdaleand Dr. Thomas in their book “Antiquities of Warwickshire.” It reads:
Here lyeth the bodyes of nycolas Hubaude and Dorothe hys wyfe the whych nycolas deceasedthe second day of maye in the yere of oure Lorde MDLiii and the sayd dorothe deceasedthe xvi daye of maye in the yere of oure Lorde MDLviii upon whose soles god havemercy. Amen.
From Nicholas and Dorothy succeeded John Huband Esquire of Ipsley who was Sheriffof Warwickshire in 1527 and 1544. He found great favour with the celebrated but unfortunateRobert, Earl of Leicester, who constituted him Constable of Kenilworth Castle andChief Steward of all the Manors, and Ranger of all his forest parks. This John Hubandmarried Mary, the youngest daughter of Sir George Throckmorton of nearby CoughtonCourt but died without issue. It is generally believed that the splendid Ipsley Courtdates from this time. An incised slab showing this couple can be found on the southside of the chancel of St. Peter’s Church. They appear similar in dress to Nicholasand Dorothy with the exceptif a few details. It is thought that this slab might originallyhave formed the cover to a high tomb which once stood on the south side of the chancel.Although the tomb is now destroyed, the inscription was recorded by Sir William Dugdaleand reads as follows:
Here lyeth the bodies of John Hubaude of Ipsley, Knight and of Mary his wyffe, theyoungest daughter of George Throckmorton Knight which John deceased the xxiiii ofDecember in the year of oure Lord God MDLvii upon whose soules Jhu have mercy.
Amen.

After their demise, the estate passed to John’s brother, Ralph Huband Esquire, whoalso served as High Sheriff of Warwickshire. He died in 1605 leaving a son and heir,also called John. This John Huband Esquire of Ipsley married a daughter of Sir HenryPoole (Baronet) of Oakly, Wiltshire and died on April 16th, 1650 aged 68, leavingthree daughters, Anne who was married in 1631 to Sir Henry Englefield (Baronet) ofWootton Bassett, Wiltshire; Eleanor and Elizabeth, and a son and heir, Ralph HubandEsquire.

Ralph married Anne, the daughter and heiress of Gervase Tevery Esquire of Staplefordin Nottinghamshire. It is this Anne who is commemorated by the memorial tablet onthe west wall of the church. It consists of an inscribed centre surrounded by a designwhich includes a shield surmounted by a helm, crest and mantling charged with thearmorial bearings of Huband impaling Tevery, the latter being a lion rampant witha border. At the base of this monument is sculptured a skull with wings. The tabletis inscribed as follows:
DOMUS VIVENTIUM
HERE LYETH THE BODY OF ANNE HUBAUD DAUGHTER AND COHAERESSE OF GERVASE TEVERY OF STAPLEFORDIN THE COUNTY OF NOTTINGHAM ESQ; THE WIFE AND RELICT OF HER DEAR HUSBAND RALPH HUBAUDLORD OF THIS MANOUR. A PERSON RATHER TO BE ADMIRED THAN IMITATED FOR HER PIETY TOWARDSGOD HER CHARITY TOWARDS HER NEIGHBOURS AND HER INCESSANT CARE OF HER SONS AND BEINGONLY MARRIED TO THEM AND THE FAMILY SLEIGHTED ALL MATCHES THAT SHE MIGHT RESTOREAND LEAVE A FAIR AND FREE ESTATE TO THEM AND THEIR POSTERITY. SHE DEPARTED THIS LIFEYE 23 OF MARCH 1672 IN THE YEAR OF HER AGE 59. TO WHOSE MEMORY HER AFFLICTED SONSERECTED THIS MONUMENT AS A GRATEFUL AND LASTING TESTIMONY OF THEIR NEVER DYING LOVEAND DUTY.
JOHN HUBAUD BARONET
TEVERY HUBAUD NATU MINOR
QUOS VITA SEPERARET TUMULUS SOCIARET

It seems possible that Anne and Ralph might have been entombed together in a monumentnow unfortunately demolished which stood on the north side of the chancel. It wasdescribed by Dugdale as having consisted of a high tomb bearing the sculptured recumbenteffigies of an Esquire in his armour and his Lady. Over the tomb was a horizontaltester canopy supported by corinthian columns and round the valence of the testerwere shields charged with armorial bearings and surmounted by helmes, crests andmantling similar in description to the memorial tablet; the tester was surmountedby small obeliskal terminations, placed at intervals. Against the east wall and underthe canopy was a plain tablet inscribed as follows:
Here lyeth the Body of Ralph Hubaude of Ipsley in the county of Warwick Esquire deceasedthe 17th of January in the yeare of our Lord God 1625. Finis.
No mention is made of Anne in Dugdale’s description.

Ralph and Anne had three sons, John, Tevery and Ralph who was a gentleman commonerof Queen’s College, Oxford. On his death on the 23rd of July 1670, he was buriedat St. Peter’s Church in that city. Ralph was succeeded then, by his eldest son,John Huband who was created a Baronet by King Charles II upon his restoration in1660, an event that also commemorated in the church by the addition of two new bellswhich were cast in 1664. The first being 3 feet 3 inches in diameter and weighing10 - 1/2 hundredweights, and the second being 2 feet 7 - 3/4 inches in diameter andweighing 7 - 3/4 hundredweights.

This John Huband married Jane, the daughter of Lord Charles pawlett of Dowles, Hampshire.He later became one of the first directors of the Bank of England. At the time ofhis death around 1716, he had three children: Jane, married to Edward Pollen Esquire,Martha, and a son and heir also called John.

It was this John Huband who married Rhoda, the eldest daughter of Sir Thomas Broughton,Baronet, of Broughton in Staffordshire. He died in 1727 leaving a son, John, hisheir, and three daughters, Rhoda, who was married to Sir John Delves (Baronet) ofDoddington, Cheshire and died on January 27th 1772; Mary, who was married to ThomasWright Esquire of Warwick and died on 8th of October 1768; and Jane, who was marriedto Sir Robert Henley, created Baron of Henley and Earl of Northington, Lord Chancellorof England. (This Lady Rhoda Delves is buried with five others, one a child, in avault belonging to the Huband family near to the Lord’s Table. This was discoveredwhen the vault was accidently broken open by workmen carrying out repair work in1867. Another coffin bears the inscription “Sir John Huband Baronet, died January16th 1716, aged 43 years.” an account of this appears in the “Redditch Indicator”of February 1867.)

The heir to the Estate, Sir John Huband, 3rd Baron of Ipsley, unfortunately diedwhilst still a minor in his eighteenth year. After this, the property passed to thesisters who subsequently disposed of the Manor House and lands to Charles SavageEsquire of Tachbrook and from whose family it later passed by marriage to WalterSavage Landor.

The family representation then devoted on the descendant Nicholas’ fourth son, Anthonyand thus ended the connection of the direct line of Hubands with Ipsley.

The living of the church which had been in the gift of the Huband family was broughtfrom them by the then curate John Dolben in whose family it remained until the endof the last century.

Unfortunately, a great part of the Manor House of Ipsley Court is said to have beendestroyed by fire in or around 1742.

The decline of the Manor continued until by 1785 the church was in such a bad stateof repair that the then Rector, the Reverend Philip Wren (great grandson of Sir ChristopherWren who played a great part in the rebuilding of London after the Great Fire of1666) decided that the two side aisles would have to be demolished. It was at thistime that two windows bearing the Huband coat of arms were lost. Fortunately, theywere recorded by Dugdale in 1730 and described thus:
In the East window of the North aisle:
HUBAUD - Sable, three leopards, head jessant flowers de lis.
In the North window of the chancel:
HUBAUD - Sable, a chevron betwixt three leopards, heads jessant, flowers de lis,argent.

In or around 1827, the burnt out ruin of Ipsley court was taken down leaving justthe two wings standing. These, now refurbished, are used by the Law Society.