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TRIUMPH



The TRIUMPH departed London on 23 September, 1883 and arrived at Auckland on 26 November, 1883.
The Triumph was under the command of Captain Brotherton.
A total of 356 passengers arrived on this voyage.

All the information on the arrival of the "Triumph" and the accompaning passengers was kindly donated by Nicki DOLDEN.
If anybody has any information on the EVANS family, see "List of Immigrants", Nicki would be pleased to hear from you. Just click on the names below to send an email.




“The New Zealand Herald”, Auckland – Tuesday, November 27, 1883
(Vol.XX-No.6,873)

Page 4, Column A
SHIPPING…………ARRIVALS
Triumph ,s.s., 1797, Brotherton, from London. Passengers: Anne BARRON, Thomas
MACREADY, Mrs L LOCKYER and family (7), Mr and Mrs COTTERELL, Joseph
ROBINSON, Robert THOMSON, Robert WALDIE, C. LESSER, Robert COWPER,
David LITTLEJOHN, J. WEIR, Mr. and Mrs. WOODIN and family (2), Flora CROCKER,
Mrs. E. GRAINGER, F. E. ANSLEY, James BROWN, Mr. and Mrs. SNODGRASS,
Hannah DALEY, Margaret CAREY, Eliza MILLS, Hugh CAUGHEY, Mrs. THOMPSON
and family (5), Stephen ROUT, Samuel HARRISON, Charles PARMATER, Philip
FILLOUL, Clinton ATWOOD, Alexander EDWARDS, James THOMSON, Mrs, JOHNS
and family (5), Thomas SMITH, Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAMS, Mr. and Mrs. KINSMAN and
family (2), W. D. GANKROGER, Mr. and Mrs. DAWSON, Messrs SIMPSON (2), Annie
BROOKS, W. G. COULTON, W. H. HOSKINS, Thomas HOGG, Mr. and Mrs.
ARMITAGE and family (4), Mr. and Mrs. BROADBENT and daughter, Mr. and Mrs.
MACKAY, Mr. and Mrs. JONES, Messrs J. and R. PARKER, W. VARNEY, Mr. and
Mrs. MARRIOTT, Elizabeth BELL, Mr. and Mrs. HOWATSON and family (3), W. B.
THOMAS,Helen DALL and family (2), James HUTCHINSON, Mr. and Mrs. BOGIE
and family (3), Mr. and Mrs. MOODY, J. BRISK, Mr. and Mrs. HILL and family (10),
W. TURNER, G. H. GILDER, Mr. and Mrs. WHITE and family (3), Mr. and Mrs. A.
JONES, T. JENKINSON, Mr. and Mrs. GANE, Joseph BENNETT, Daniel CONNELL,
Margaret BOGIE, Mr. and Mrs. DISCOMBE and family (4), Messrs D. and J. CRAIG,
Gideon JACK, J. W. BLYTH, J. PASSMORE, J. CORNESTY, R. BELL, Mr. and Mrs.
FARRANT and daughter. - L.D.Nathan and Co., agents.”

Page 4, Column A
ARRIVAL OF THE TRIUMPH.
At about half-past five o’clock yesterday morning the steamship Triumph, under
charter to Messrs. Shaw, Savill, and Albion Company, was signalled, and an
hour later she came round the heads, and steamed slowly up the harbour, under
the charge of Captain Sainty, the pilot. At the time of her arrival, it being
broad daylight, one could obtain a fair view of the vessel, and to all
appearance she struck one as being very much after the style of the Westmeath,
which recently visited this port under charter to the same firm. Her full,
heavy hull gave one the impression of her being a vessel built with the main
object in view of a large cargo carrier, and upon stepping upon deck this idea
was confirmed, as it was evident that the matter of cargo carrying had been
the great consideration, whilst that of passenger carrying was of secondary or
no importance. Her saloon, built on deck amidships (for 5 or 6 people) may be
said to be a fairly comfortable apartment, and with that, one finishes all
that can be said of the accommodation of the ship (excluding that provided for
the officers and crew). as a vessel for cargo carrying purposes, the Triumph
is no doubt a most handy vessel. She has large and commodious lower hold and
‘tween deck space, and is also provided with all the best appliances for the
rapid discharge and taking in of cargo. Unlike the Westmeath, the Triumph is
fitted with a re-……
(cont Column B……)
-frigerator of the most approved description, and it is expected she will have
a large cargo of meat from southern ports. In size the Triumph is not much
above the largest of these owned by the Union Company, and certainly for
comfort, speed, &c., cannot in any way be compared to them. However, the
steamer has come into port in a most cleanly condition, a fact that reflects
most highly upon those in authority on board, and the immigrants themselves,
who appear to be of a most suitable class. The passage from London (a somewhat
long one) has been what may be termed a fair weather one. It was commenced
from London on September 23rd, Plymouth being left three day later, strong
westerly winds prevailing. Cape St. Vincent was made on the 5th of October,
and two days were spent in taking in coal. Fine weather prevailed from this
port until crossing the Equator, on the 12th October. The Cape of Good Hope
was reached on the 24th October, where she coaled and left again on the
following day, all the passengers by this time being in good health and
spirits. With the exception of one blow, nothing of note occurred to mar the
pleasures of the run to Hobart, which had to be called at, the supply of coal
again being found to be running short. The port named was reached on the 17th
inst., and the process of coaling the ship at once proceeded with.
Notwithstanding the precautions taken, a number of discontented seamen (some
13) managed to smuggle themselves ashore, and Captain Bretherton was forced to
ship other men in the place of those who deserted. It was not until the second
day (the 19th) that the triumph was able to proceed on her voyage, but
favoured by fine weather, good progress was made, port being reached as we
have already said at 6.30 a.m. yesterday.

LIST OF IMMIGRANTS.
William, Annie J. and Amelia R. ANDERSON, Thomas, Emily, Margaret, Richard and
Thomas BATTERSBY; Reuben, Elizabeth, Ada E. and James E. BOACHAM; William,
Harriett and Emma J. BURNETT; John, Mary and William CANNON; James, Maria,
Kate and Ada DELL; George J., Anne J., George J.R., Arthur, Cartotamo, Wilfred,
Gertrude, Mable and Violet M.E. DORMER; Abraham, Ruth, Sarah J., Gertrude,
John A., and Elsie DORRICOTT; William, Mary A., Katie, Harrison and Herbert S.
EVANS
; Andrew, Jane, Robert and Adam GEDDES; George, Isabella, David,
Catherine, Isabella, Georgina and Millar Paul RORD; William, Elizabeth, John Henry,
Lucy A. and Lizzie HOUGHTON; George E. and Catherine HALSE; James, Margaret,
William, Mary and James HUNTER; William, Annie, William and Dorothea INGRAM;
William, Matilda, William E., Freddy, Lydia M and Walter LOCKWOOD;Helena
CHARLESWORTH; George, Martha, John William, Kate, Ellen and Geo. LONG;
William, Elizabeth, Sarah, and Mary MCCLELLAND; Sarah and Agnes MCKEE;
Thomas, Elizabeth, Elizabeth, Isabella and William MITCHELL; Edward, Clarion,
Edward, Annie and Mary PASCOE; Peter, Sarah, Annie, Ellen, Arthur, Emily,
Kate and Ada PLOUGHMAN; William and Ann RICHARDS; Henry, Catherine,
Charles and Robert ROBINSON; Alfred, Elizabeth and John G. Rose, Stephen,
Eliza and Frederick SAMSON; John and Elizabeth STEMBRIDGE; John, Esther,
Ruth and Willie WEST; George, Jemima, Walter, Henry and Herbert A.YEATES;
John, Thomas J. and William BROWN; John CAHALON, Edmond DUGGAN,
Daniel and Ellen FINNIGAN, James GERAGHTY, James GIBSON, Niel HANSEN,
Matthew HICKEY, John HOLLINGER, John T. and Albert HOUGH, Arthur KING,
Michael and Elizabeth MCMANUS, William MITCHELL, Edmund MOORE, John
MORAN, Andrew OLESEN, Wm. PARKINSON, Frederick PORTER, Walter J.
PRICE, John RICHEY, William S. ROUT, Patrick and Ellen RYAN, Patrick and
Catherine SHIELDS, John W. SMITH, William SMITH, Patrick and Anne TRACEY,
Patrick and Bridget WOODHOUSE, William WORTHINGTON, Martha ADAMS,
Sarah CAHALAN, Susan COMESKEY, Lizzie, Maria and Sarah J. DALZELL;
Hannah DELL, Martha DOUGLAS, Elizabeth FINCH, Catherine FOALS, Anna E.
Willia D. and Minnie GATELEY; Anne GIBBSON, Sarah and Mary GRANGER,
Hannah HEALEY, Sarah and Mary HOUGH, Mary JACKSON, Eleanor LEWIS,
Mary MCBRIDE, Sarah J. MCCREADY, Amy MCKISSACK, Mary MALONE,
Ann MEEHAN, Elizabeth J. MEGAHTY, Anne and Jane MURTAGH, Ann C.
OLESEN; Sarah, Marian, Ida, Tom, JohnB., Harry and Alice PARKINSON;
Fanny PORTER, Elizabeth PURDY, Matilda SCHROGGS, Eva SHILLINGTON,
Clara STEELS, Kate WARD, Anne WOODS, Adelaide HALL.

Page 5, Column C
THE S.S. TRIUMPH.
THE anxiously looked for steamship, the Triumph, came into port shortly after
six o’clock yesterday morning, and without delay steps were taken to have the
vessel safely berthed at the Queen-street Wharf, and the process of providing
means for the prompt discharge of the cargo was attended to by Captain nearing
and his men, who are employed by the agents of the vessel, Messrs, L.D. Nathan
and Co. All the passengers have come into harbour in excellent health, having
enjoyed such during the passage. Unfortunately, four infants died during the
passage. One birth occurred. Dr. Menzies, who came out in charge of the
passengers, speaks most highly of them, and they also testify to the attention
shown to them by the medical officer and those in authority on board.
Everything possible for the comfort of the passengers, considering the limited
space at the disposal of the authorities was done, and throughout the trip the
passengers remark that they were all well cared for and attended to. Shortly
after the vessel had rounded the North Head, Dr. Philson (the Health Officer),
accompanied by Mr. O. Mays (the Immigration Agent), and Mr. Brophy (Assistant
Immigration Officer), boarded the vessel, and the inevitable march past was
gone through, and, fortunately for all concerned, the examination was
announced to be satisfactory, so that the acceptable bit of paper, “clean
bill”, was handed to the master by Dr. Philson. After the vessel had been made
fast to the wharf, Mr.O.Mays took steps to arrange for the disposal of those
now temporarily under his charge, and the manner in which the immigrants were
landed and sent away to their destination was most creditable to the new
officer. The single girls were sent to the Home, and the married couples and
single men were sent on to the present immigration building, where they will
be housed until situations are obtained for them. Every possible step will be
taken to secure for the Triumph rapid discharge at this port, so that the
vessel may get on again on her way for Southern ports. It is expected the
vessel will be ready for sea on Thursday next. From here she goes on to
Wellington, Lyttleton, etc., where she will take in the principal part of her
cargo, of which frozen meat will bar no mean part. Captain Nearing has the
work of discharging the ship entrusted in his hands, and there is little doubt
but that the utmost will be done by him to obtain for the vessel a prompt
departure hence.”

“The New Zealand Herald”, Auckland – Wednesday, November 28, 1883
Page 1, Column A

NOTICE TO PASSENGERS EX ss TRIUMPH
All passengers for Gisborne, Hawke’s Bay & Southern Ports, are requested to
produce passage tickets at our office at once, to be registered for forward
passes.”

“The New Zealand Herald”, Auckland – Thursday, November 29, 1883
Page 1, Column A
‘S.S.Triumph
All through passengers per s.s. Triumph for Southern Ports must present
themselves at the office of the undersigned at 10 o’clock a.m., so as to
obtain forward passes. They must also be on board the Manapouri before 2
o’clock p.m.”

“The New Zealand Herald”, Auckland – Friday, November 30, 1883

Page 4, Column A
SHIPPING…………CLEARED OUTWARDS
Manapouri, s.s., Logan, for Southern ports. Passengers:- Mesdames Whitson,
Anderson,………………., Captain Lloyd, and 124 immigrants. – Union S.S. Co., agents.

Triumph, s.s., 1797, Brotherton, for Wellington.-L.D.Nathan and Co., agents.”

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Copyright - Gavin W Petrie
(2003)