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NORTHAMPTON

 

 


The NORTHAMPTON departed London on 13 March, 1874 and arrived in Lyttelton on 6 June, 1874. Captain Barclay was in command.

 

 

 

Transcribed from the Star, Saturday, 6 June, 1874, Page 2.

 

 

 

SHIP NORTHAMPTON FROM LONDON.

This vessel, commanded by Capt. Barclay, arrived in harbour this morning after a passage of 68 days from land to land, and 72 days from Gravesend to anchor­age. Capt. Wood, pilot, ongoing alongside the vessel, found that sickness had occurred during the voyage, and that there were still several persons sick on hoard. During the voyage there had been several cases of modified small pox and one of fever. The Health Officer (Dr Donald), and Mr. March (Commissioner), visited the ship this morn­ing. Mr. March kindly furnished the following to our reporter:—

 

The ship left the London docks on March 13, and Gravesend on the evening of the 21st, having embarked immigrants in the docks. Sickness broke out soon after leaving. On April 5 George Ingram, single man, aged 19, died of typhus fever, after an illness of nine days; April 11, Beatrice Pilliett, aged 4, died of dysentery; April 14, Jonathan Worsfield, aged 20 months, infantile disease; April 30, Agnes Roberts, 12 months, diarrhea; May 3, Alfred Bentley, 22 months; May 26, Jane Greenaway, married, aged 26, heart disease; May 26, Margaret Jane Roberts, 10 months, infantile disease; total, 7 deaths—2 adults, 5 children. During the passage 13 cases of modified small pox occurred. At the present time there are three patients suffering from the disorder. The health of the passengers generally is good. No sickness occurred in the single girls' compartment during the voyage. The convalescent emigrants will be landed this afternoon and the others on Monday. A visit to the quarantine station was made, and everything was found to be in readiness. Mr. March will take charge of any letters or parcels addressed to the immigrants, either sent to the Immigration Office, Christchurch, or the Harbour Office, Lyttelton.

 

The detention of the immigrants is likely to be of short duration.

 

 

 

 

Copyright – Gavin W Petrie - 2012