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Sheboygan County, Wisconsin Genealogy & History
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This article was contributed by Kay Reitberger

Herman

Sheboygan Press - April 29, 1927

Germans Began Settlement Of Town Herman

Log Cabins Built By Families Who Came In Groups From Germany


The first permanent settlement in the town of Herman was in the northern tier of sections in 1846 by Germans who located in the northeastern part of the town. A man name MUNGRO was credited with being the first white settler. He located in Section 2, but after remaining for only two years, he sold the property to Edward NEWHOUSE and then left the country.

Among the earliest permanent settlers, who arrived in 1846, were E. W. SCHLICHTING, H. HAGLSTEDT, F. BINDER and Christian WIEHE, all from Hameln, (This is their spelling - K. R.)Germany. A little later came a number of families who located in the southern part of the town, building log cabins for their habitation. Among the latter arrivals were F. BECKFIELD, F. PRIGGE, P. MEYER, D. NORDHOLZ, Charles OETLING, B. HOWARD, and H. G. MUELLER.

Lured To Sheboygan County

On May 4, 1847, a number of Germans from Lippe-Delmold (Again, their selling - K.R.), left Bremen for America to form the Lipper settlement in the state of Iowa. In the group, comprising 112 persons, were twenty-four families, thirteen unmarried men and two unmarried women. When they arrived in Milwaukee, they were approached by land speculators who called their attention to the rich soil and abundant forests located in Sheboygan county. The land men pictured the state of Iowa as a vast prairie where there were no trees from which to obtain either wood or lumber for building purposes.

These arguments influenced a number of emigrants who were already weary from their long journey across the sea, and who had no desire to undertake the long arduous overland trip across the Mississippi river to the state of Iowa, and the following named persons came to Sheboygan county and located in what is now the town of Herman.

Widow Maria ARPKE and children, Simon, Sr., father of Dr. H. A. ARPKE superintendent of the Insane asylum, E. Fredrich, Conradine (later Mrs. Simon LUHMANN), and Adolph.

Mr. and Mrs. Herman BUECKER (later Mrs. H. HUMKE) and children, Friedrich, Amalia (later Mrs. BRUENGER), Caroline (later Mrs. William SIEKER), Helene, another child, died on board ship.

Friedrich DOMEIER, whose wife also died on board ship, and his children, Wilhelm, Sophia (later Mrs. F. FASSE) and Friedrich, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Herman HELMING and son, Herman, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Heinrich LUHMANN.

Mr. and Mrs. Simon LUHMANN and children, Simon, Jr., Friedrich, Charlotte (later Mrs. Fred REINEKING), Heinrich, who later died in Mobile, Alabama, Karoline (later Mrs. A. ARPKE).

Mr. and Mrs. Adolph MARTEN and children, Friedericke (later Mrs. S. ARPKE), Heinrich, Sophie (later Mrs. F. STOELTING), and Adolph, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Franz NAGEL and children, Minna (later Mrs. SCHUELLE), Sophie (later Mrs. Conrad STOCK), Charlotte (later Mrs. KUHN), Louise (later Mrs. KLOCKE/KLOEKE), and Maria (later Mrs. RUPF).

Mr. and Mrs. Friedrich REINEKING and children, Amalia (later Mrs. Simon STOCK), Friedrich, Jr., Simon and William.

Mr. and Mrs. Christian SCHAEFER and children, Maria (later Mrs. ULM), Amalia (later Mrs. SEIBOLD), Christian, Jr., Friedrich (killed during the Civil war), Simon, Wilhelm and Sophie (later Mrs. HAHN).

Mr. and Mrs. Simon STEFFEN.

F. STOCK and children Friedrich, Louise and Heinrich.

Mr. and Mrs. Heinrich UPHOF and children, Adolph, Sophie (later Mrs. E. F. ARPKE), Henriette (later Mrs. BIERHAUS and after the death of her second husband Mrs. OHSE {Should this be her FIRST husband? - K. R.}).

Those who came without their parents were Friedrich and Heinrich BOEDEKER, Amalia SCHMIEDLING (later Mrs. A. MARTEN). Her brother died on board ship. Friedrich and Sophie STEFFEN (the latter was married to Anton WEBER), Karl and Katherina WEHRMANN (latter was married to S. REINEKING), and the Misses Louise BARTRICH and Katherine LIMBURG. The latter was married to F. FRENZES.

The unmarried men in the group were Friedrich MUELLER, Wilhelm KREIE, Adolph NAGEL, Fritz NAGEL, Friedrich SCHORMANN, Conrad STOCK, Simon STOCK, Conrad SUNDERMANN, August TOENSMEIER, and Messrs. DELENDORF, TEGLER, and VORNBERG.

Buy Land At $1.25 An Acre

After arriving in the city of Sheboygan, the emigrants went to Sheboygan Falls, thence north over the old Green Bay road through Section 15 in which township they met the first white man they had seen since leaving Sheboygan. The Germans were greatly pleased when they learned this man was one of their own countrymen. He had arrived only three days previously and had hastily erected a rude log cabin the roof of which he covered with vines. In the hollow trunk of a large pine tree he had stored his valuables and provisions, and because of his peculiarities, the emigrants called him the "eccentric ofcer (sic) DENE."

On July 17, eleven weeks after they had left Bremen, the emigrants settled in Sections 16 and 17, each family and single person taking up forty or more acres of government land (soldier's claims), for which they paid $1.25 per acre.

They immediately began erecting log houses, utilizing vines to cover the tops as the "eccentric officer DENE" had done; but after being drenched by heavy rains they covered the roofs of their cabins with shingles, which they had cut out with tools brought from Germany. They got the idea of using shingles after inspecting the houses built in Sheboygan.

Having noted the light timber used in construction of buildings in Sheboygan, the emigrants considered this type of building too fragile for long use, and to make their own homes more durable they hewed and sawed up timbers two feet in thickness and eighteen inches in width, which they used for outside walls. When taking into account the fact that these timbers were cut with handsaws, one realizes what a tremendous task confronted these pioneers when they started the building of their homes.

Wild Animals Abound

The country was full of wild animals, and deer, during the winter, would come close to houses where they were slaughtered to furnish meat for the settlers.

The winter of 1848-49 was mild, and the new arrivals suffered no great hardship from the cold, but the following winter proved to be unusually severe. The snow lay deep upon the ground, making travel impossible while the temperature was extremely cold. This brought acute suffering to the early pioneers who were unprepared to withstand the rigor of northern climate. The few cattle in the town could not obtain sufficient food for their subsistence, and the settlers cut down trees in order that the cows might eat the smaller branches and the pine needles. There was not enough milk produced to supply even the meagre (sic) needs of the people and there was no opportunity for them to earn money with which to purchase badly needed provisions.

The undaunted and resourceful Germans industriously attacked the only thing left open for them to do, namely, making shingles for which there was an increasing demand in the village of Sheboygan. During the daylight hours, men, women and children cut down the pines and chopped off the limbs. At night, by the glow of huge bonfires, kept burning with the branches cut from the trees, the trunks of the pines were cut into proper lengths, and with the crude tools which the hardy pioneers had brought with them from Germany, shingles were carved and later transported to Sheboygan where they were exchanged for cash, food or provisions.

At that time there was only one yoke of oxen in the town. They were named "Fix and Peiter" and were owned by S. LUHMANN and A. NAGEL. These two men donated their services and also the use of their oxen to haul shingles to market. Later, however, F. REINEKING and F. STEFFEN jointly bought or traded for another yoke of oxen, which contributed greatly to the benefit of the settlers at large.

Poverty Causes Exodus

During the first few years after their arrival in Sheboygan county, many of the young people of the town Herman settlement went to Manitowoc, Two Rivers and Chicago to seek employment in order to assist their parents, and to earn a living for themselves as well. Some of the young men who went to Illinois found employment on the construction of the canal.

Some of the girls came to Sheboygan where they secure work as housemaids. The pay which these young people received for their labor ranged from $4 to $8 a month, mostly orders which were redeemable in merchandise at the stores. It was said that one man worked for three months for one shirt.

It is note-worthy that these young people, almost without exception, returned to the town of Herman where they married and continued to reside. Many descendants of these early intrepid settlers still live in Sheboygan county while a few of those who still survive, are scattered throughout the country.

Realizing the urgent need of a sawmill, the settlers banded together and constructed the first dam across the Sheboygan river in the town of Herman. After the dam was completed they erected a sawmill and installed a run of stone for grinding grist for feed. In 1856 the mill was completed and a few dwelling houses were erected on the present site of the village of Franklin.

The first child born in the town of Herman was Johanna BINDER in 1946 (sic), and the second birth was that of a son to Mr. and Mrs. Adolph MARTEN. In August, 1847, a son was also born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles OETLING.

In 1847 there were two deaths in the town, Friedrich STOCK and Amalia REINEKING, the latter being the wife of Friedrich REINEKING.

First Town Herman Wedding

The first marriage in the town was Friedrich STOCK and Amalia REINEKING, and the second marriage was that of H. Friedrich REINEKING and Charlotte LUHMANN, although the latter couple were married by a minister in Milwaukee.

The first minister to visit the town of Herman was an itinerant preacher named A. BERKY, who came to the settlement at different times. On one of his visits he baptized eleven children and married two couples at the REINEKING home.

The Rev. Casper PLUSZ, the first Reformed church minister, was sent to the town of Herman from Milwaukee, and he was the first pastor in the German Reformed church which was erected in 1850, the organization of the congregation having taken place in 1847.

An interesting story is told of the Rev. Mr. PLUSZ. He often preached to a small congregation in the city of Sheboygan, and, according to the story, was harassed by a group of recalcitrant "Free Thinkers" who decided they would punish the preacher for his religious utterances.

While returning on horseback to his home after one of these meetings, the Rev. Mr. PLUSZ had arrived at a point on the Calumet road opposite the present Calumet Park, when a brawny blacksmith stepped out into the road and, grabbing hold of the preacher, forcibly pulled the latter off his horse. It was the blacksmith's purpose to chastise the preacher, thereby hoping it would discourage him from continuing his religious services in Sheboygan.

It so happened that the Rev. Mr. PLUSZ was somewhat of a fighter himself, and the result was that he turned the tables and gave the smithy a heavy trouncing instead. When he thought the blacksmith was properly punished for his misdemeanor, the preacher told him that if he knew of any other fellow who was anxious to try out his pugilistic ability, to just send him around when the next meeting was conducted in Sheboygan.

Population Grows

During the ensuing few years many additional settlers arrived from Germany and located in Sheboygan county. Some of them settled in the town of Herman, some in the town of Sheboygan Falls, some in the eastern part of the town of Mosel, and some in the western part of the town of Rhine. A few of them located in Centerville and Newton, Manitowoc county.

In 1858 three different German reformed churches had been built in the county. One of these was called Sarons in the town of Sheboygan Falls, another was called Zoar in the town of Rhine, while the third was located in town MOSEL.

While the list may not be complete, the following names comprised the membership of the original German Reformed churches in Sheboygan county: ACHTEMEIER; ARNHOELTER; BEGEMANN; E. H. and S. BOEDECKER; BOEGER; A. E. and F. BRAND; BRANDSMEIER; BUSSI; F. H. and H. H. DECKER; DEPPING; DICKMANN; H. and S. DOMEIER; F. and H. ENGELKING; ENGELMEIER; F. and S. FASSE; FRANZMEIER; FREWERT; GRASSMEIER; GREIBE; GROENE; F. and W. GRUNDMEIER; HAHN; August HAMANN; HANKE; HARE; HASE; H. and F. HELMING; HEGER; HILKER; F. and S. HOLLENSTEINER; H. HUMKE; JOHANNING; KEUTER; A. and H. and P. KLEMME; KIELSMEIER; F. and S.KIESAU; E. and H. KLOCKE; A. and E. and H. H. KNOENER; KOEHRING; KRACHT; KRAMPE; KRIETE; KUHFUSS; E. and F. LANGENBERG; LUEBKE; LUEDEKING; MEIER; MEIERKORD; MEINERT; MESCH; MUEHLMEIER; F. and A. NAGEL; NOAH; OPFER; ORTMEIER; REME; RICKMEIER; SAMDERMANN; SANDMANN; SELBERG; SCHAPER; SCHAEFERKORD; SCHNITGER; A. and E. and F. SCHNUELLE; SCHROEDER; SCHWARZ; SIEKER; SIEKMANN; SIMMONSMEIER; SOEFKER; STAHL; L. H. and F. STOCK; F. and W. STOELTING; STUCKMANN; SUEBOLD; TASCHE; VIET; H. and Herman VEITMEIER; WALDECKER; E. and W. WEBER; WEHRMENN; and WINTER.

When the Sarons church in the town of Sheboygan Falls was organized in 1855, the congregation bought twenty acres of woodland from which logs were cut and lumber sawed to built the house of worship and the pastor's home. A tower was built on the church by volunteers, and the pastor officiated at the marriage of the contractor to pay the latter for having built the pulpit. The pastor also made the chairs which were used for seating the members of the congregation.

Hauls Logs For Church

Before the church in the town of Mosel was erected, services were held in a log school house, located on the Manitowoc road, in the winter of 1858. All members of the church in the town of Sheboygan Falls donated their time and the use of their oxen, when the trees were felled and cut into logs, hauled to the sawmill, and the lumber transported to the church site in the town of Mosel. They also volunteered their services in the building of the house of worship. It was this splendid co-operation and community spirit that contributed, in a large degree, to the ultimate success of the early settlers of the towns of Herman and Mosel.

A Rev. Mr. WINTER, who organized the three churches in the towns of Herman, Mosel and Sheboygan Falls, also organized thirteen other German Reformed churches in different sections of Wisconsin. It was he who first visualized the need of a school at which teachers and ministers could be trained for active service connected with the church movement in America. The Rev. Mr. WINTER's idea of an educational institution for training ministers and teachers was prompted by a similar institution, on a small scale, which he had seen in Upper Sandusky, Ohio. The result of his efforts in this direction culminated in the eventual organization of the Mission House and college located in the town of Herman, which is said to have been the first German college and theological seminary in the United States.

Watertown and Mayville both bid for this institution; but Friedrich REINEKING and Simon STEFFEN offered to donate five acres of land as a site and Dr. ZAHNER, assisted by Dr. SCHNECK, collected the first money raised for the building project in 1859.

The committee appointed for the purpose of arranging plans for the contemplated Mission College accepted the offer made by REINEKING and STEFFEN, and work was immediately started to erect the buildings required. The first professor was the Rev. F. BOSSHARD, who remained with the college until his death.

Town First Named Howard

In 1850 the town was detached from the town of Sheboygan Falls and was organized under the name of Howard. The following year the name was changed to Herman. The first town meeting was held in HOWARD's hotel, located on the Green Bay road. Charles OETLING was elected chairman and B. HOWARD town clerk.

The first post office in the town was established in 1848, at Howards Grove, and B. HOWARD was appointed the first postmaster.

The first school district was organized in 1848, and the first school was taught by Miss Eva ATWOOD.

For a number of years a toll-gate was located on the Calumet road about one mile northeast of Howards Grove. For many years Henry BOELDT collected the toll; but when the Plank Road as turned over by private interests to the town the gate was abandoned.

The first church was located on the Green Bay road about one mile north of the present village of Howards Grove, in what then was known as Pitchville. The original log building has been replaced by a more modern structure.

Among the first white settlers in the town and the chronological order of their arrival, were:

1846 - W. SIEMERS on Section 14 (SIEMERS later had a cheese factory); F. W. SCHLICHTING known as the "Bush KOENING" at Howards Grove.

1847 - Fred ARPKE on Section 19; A. ARPKE on Section 31 (The former later operated a factory manufacturing hubs and spokes); C. DEMGEN on Section 4; J. JUNG on Section 4; Fred BODENSTAB on Section 27; George PIEPER on Section 26; and August PIEPER on Section 24.

1848 - J. C. MUELLER on Section 7; George MEYER on Section 35; William KALK on Section 26; Julius BODENSTAB on Section 26; Joseph BUERKLE on Section 15 (he later became a merchant and hotel keeper); and P. MAURER on Section 19 (later he conducted a hotel).

1849 - Ludwig LUECKE on Section 15; William SIEKER on Section 17; William REINEKING on Section 21; and J. WEHRMAN on Section 4.

1850 - August BRANDT on Section 32; George DEXHEIMER on Section 5; and John BREDEMEYER on Section 2.

1851 - F. KOELLMER on Section 19 (later he became a merchant); N. LUCAS on Section 4; Edward NEWHOUSE on Section 2 (later he became a merchant); Henry DREIER on Section 25; and A. FREDERICK on Section 21.

1852 - Frederick HARSCHE on Section 12; and John ERBSTROESZER on Section 36.

1853 - Carl BOHLMANN on Section 36; L. PIPPERT on Section 24; and H. August MUEHLMEIER on Section 20 (later he was a professor in the Mission House college).

1854 - A. SELSEMEYER, Howards Grove (proprietor of Herman House); Jacob EIFLER on Section 19 (later a blacksmith and manufacturer of wagons and carriages).

1855 - John SCHULENBURG on Section 19 (later owner of a gristmill).

1856 - William KIRST on Section 19 (later manufacturer of wagons and carriages).

1858 - Carl SCHUETTE on Section 10.

1866 - J. T. HERTEL on Section 25.

List Of Settlers

A nearly complete list of settlers in the Town of Herman in 1873 follows:

Section 1 - L. KOHNER; Nic FOX; F. WEISKOPF; C. DAMROW; F. A. MARC; F. KINNER; C. EICK; and P. BENDER.

Section 2 - F. JAGER; J. BREDEMEYER; E. NEWHOUSE; J. KLOCKNOW; P. BOOS; R. ROEHRBORN; H. KRUMDICK; and E. STRASSBURGER.

Section 3 - M. LEMMIN; H. JAGER; C. BRASS; C. BORNEFELD; P. SCHMIDT; and P. MELGER.

Section 4 - J. JUNG; N. LUCAS; C. DEMAGEN; C. SCHULTZ; J. SCHNELL; F. SCHWARTHORST; M. LINDEMAN; A. PAPENDIECK; and H. SCHREIBER.

Section 5 - M. KRETSCH; J. SILBERNAGEL; G. MEIER; J. SCHNEIDER; B. WESTLING; F. WEGNER; F. DICKMAN; A. SCHREIBER; G. DEXHEIMER; A. BOTENGESER; J. HERTEL; and J. SCHNELL.

Section 6 - W. REITHBRUK; A. DICKMAN; J. ROSENTHAL; C. SCHULTE; C. KASER; N. HOLZER; A. GOTTERMAN; J. SPINDLER; ad H. ALTENBERGER.

Section 7 - J. SPINDLER; J. C. MUELLER; H. UPHOFF; P. SPITZER; S. WEHRMAN; L. SPINDLER; William WILL; and P. BURKHARDT.

Section 8 - J. HERTEL; F. DICKMAN; C. SCHOLL; P. SILBERNAGEL; C. SCHAPER; F. STOCK; and A. NAGEL.

Section 9 - A. FREUND; C. BUSCHER; C. WICKSBURG; E. SCHRADER; C. SCHMUELLE; Nick HENSEN; G. STRASSBURGER; and H. WESLING.

Section 10 - William WILL; E. STRASSBURGER; C. SCHULTE; M. SOMMER; C. FELD; F. HEUER; and F. LUECKE.

Section 11 - B. F. KIMME; A SEMPH; William LEIMAN; C. WESENER; J. ZIMMER; G. KRAUTKRAMER; J. THEIS; C. SCHULTZ; F. DIESOW; and H. MUESEGARDES.

Section 12 - F. HASCHE; H. THEIS; A. HAMMELMAN; H. STOBER; H. TODTER; A. WALDSCHLAGER; and A. FROME.

Section 13 - Mrs. FISCHER; G. GERSMEHL; W. WIEMERS; C. HAKE; F. GRAMBORT; A. ZECH; P. GUM; P. WAPER; W. GOSSE; G. WINKET; and C. F. SCHULTZ.

Section 14 - W. D. VANDUN; H. THIES; Mrs. WIRTH; J. LEMMER; J. GLENNER; H. BOELDT; L. PIPPERT; W. HALBRASH; and W. SIEMERS.

Section 15 - L. LUECKE: H. LUECKE; H. VOLBRING; J. LEMMER; J. HENKEL; F. LUECKE; F. MEIER; H. STROVER; and W. D. VANDUN.

Section 16 - L. LUECKE; E. WEHRMAN; C. ARNHOELTER; E. STAHL; H. KNOENER; H. BOEDECKER; and William MAUSER.

Section 17 - F. LUHMANN; F. MUELLER; H. BOEDECKER; S. LUHMANN; Herman GOSSE; and William SIEKER.

Section 18 - S. WEHRMAN; C. SELBERG; L. WEINS; J. RICKERT; J. SCHRADER; S. BOEDECKER; and H. MARTEN.

Section 19 - C. HOLTZSCHUH: H. ZIMMERMANN; F. HELMING; F. STOELTING; A. MARTENS; F. ARPKE; C. SINNER; J. SCHULENBURG; J. H. DECKER; and P. HOPPE.

Section 20 - H. KRESSAN; S. REINEKING; G. HUMKE; H. KIESAU, Reformed College; F. REINEKING; and H. FRANZ.

Section 21 - S. ARPKE; W. REINEKING; C. ARNHOELTER; S. DAHMEIER; C. USADEL; C. KLEIN; and W. REINCKE.

Section 22 - B. STURM; W. KIRCHECK; F. GOEDEKE; C. KUSTER; A. FRIEDRICH; W. WAGNER; C. STRASSBURG; D. SCHNEIDER; W. KICK; H. AHRNSBRAK; and F. BURHOP.

Section 23 - M. ROTH; G. WINKEL; J. ZOLTHEIS; H. REDEBUSCH; G. KUESTER; H. ENGELHART; G. V. SCHMIDT; E. W. SCHLICHTING; D. NORDHOLZ; and J. SCHUMACHER.

Section 24 - H. MEYER; F. BRAUN; C. MEIER; C. SCHULTZ; J. BOYE; A. PIEPER; H. APPERT; and F. ECKARDT.

Section 25 - C. GLASSOW; D. BURHOP; G. BEST; V. NAGEL; C. KRAUSE; G. GOCHMAN; J. KALK; HERINGER; H. DREIER; and T. VOLK.

Section 26 - J. BODENSTAB; L. KARSTADT; A. H. SELSEMEYER; William KALK; George PIEPER; and C. OETLING.

Section 27 - Carl HENNING; C. SPRENGER; M. SCHULZ; H. BRAMSTADT; D. SCHNEIDER; G. NEUMAN; F. BODENSTAB; C. LAU; and F. SCHULTZ.

Section 28 - H. KLOCKO; C. GRIEBE; J. T. HERTEL; M. SCHULZ; A. MARTENS; S. GRIEBE; F. SCHUMAK; G. FREIMUND; and F. STREBLOW.

Section 29 - C. WEBER; G.KUCK; S. STUCKMAN; William WEBER; G. FRANZ; S. KENTER; C. SCHNEIDER; and F. LANGENBERG.

Section 30 - F. KORB; ARPKE and BROTH; H. HANKE: F. H. SINNER; William LINDOW; S. ARPKE; A. MATHIAS; H. SIMMONSMEYER; George COLE; F. LANGENBERG; and A. BUSSE.

Section 31 - F. SCHNUELLE; C. GREENE; H. SIMMONSMEYER; C. A. BAUMANN; A. BRANDT; E. BRANDT; and H. JOHANNING.

Section 32 - H. JOHANNING; B. BRANDT; A. BRANDT; C. BOEDECKER; and H. FENNER.

Section 33 - William STOELTING; W. KLEINHAUS; L. KERL; L. F. SCHUMANN; C. SCHULTZ; M. HUSS; E. WIMLER; and F. SPRENGER.

Section 34 - A. SPARLINGER; M. PERRONNE; William BECKER; M. HENNING; M. RAU; C. GOEDEKE; Mrs. FAHN; J. DENGEL; P. F. KAHMAN; and C. FEDLER.

Section 35 - E. W. SCHLICHTING; H. MUELLER; George MEYER; C. BOHLMANN; G. RAHN; H. KOHL; M. RAU; C. BENIN; C. LIEBZELT; C. KUSEL; and A. KNOLL.

Section 36 - J. ERBSTOESZER; H. SEEBALD; J. PRIGGE; William HEUER; Mrs. J. ARNOLDI; and G. KUCK.

An Honored Pioneer Of Herman

There is a wonderful picture of Charles OETLING on this page.

At the left is an excellent likeness of Charles OETLING, one of the first white children born in the town of Herman. His father was one of the group of German emigrants who came to Sheboygan county in 1846 and formed the Lipper settlement in the town of Herman.

Mr. OETLING was born in August, 1847, on the farm located a short distance north of Millersville, and has lived all his life near that place. The large beautiful residence which he and his wife and his son and family occupy, stands almost on the spot where the first log school house was built in the town of Herman. Much of the history connected with the early life and subsequent development of the town of Herman was furnished by this rugged, grand old patriarch, probably the only living descendant of that sturdy stock which came from Lipper - Delmond, Germany, eighty years ago.

Churches Of Town Herman

Lutheran Trinity Church


The Lutheran Trinity church, located about one mile northwest of Howards Grove, was organized in 1852, and this coming summer will celebrate its seventy-fifth anniversary. The first building erected as a house of worship is now being utilized by the present pastor as a garage.

The first pastor to serve the congregation was the Rev. Mr. LOCHNER, and others in regular order of succession were the Revs. O. EISFELDT; REYER; KOLB; AULICH; WUEBEN; HILD; F. L. KARTH; G. A. VOIT; O. F. SCHMIDT; and the present pastor, the Rev. Walter J. KITZEROW.

A new edifice was erected in 1886, and in 1895 a large pipe organ was installed.

Henry BRAMSTEDT, Sr., who is still active and spry, was the first child to be baptized in the old church building.

The Lutheran Trinity church celebrated its first Mission Fest in the summer of 1860. Invitations were sent out to various congregations throughout the country, and faithful members drove long distances, some with yokes of oxen, to attend the Mission Fest. Guests from Morrison, Maple Grove, and Manitowoc, arrived on Saturday evening, and Sunday following being a perfect day, others came from Sheboygan, Sheboygan Falls, Plymouth, and surrounding country, forming a crowd of over 400 persons who gathered to participate in this event. The morning service was conducted by the Rev. Mr. STECHER.

Lunch consisted of only bread and butter and potatoes was served, and the money collected at that time amounted to $50, which was considered a large sum in those early days.

St. Paul's Lutheran Church

The St.Paul's Lutheran congregation was organized in 1860 by the Rev Mr. SPRINGLING, and the first house of worship was located two miles south of Howards Grove. The first minister was the Rev. Mr. KLEINHAUS, who was followed b the Rev. Mr. HILLEMANN who remained until 1898. Then came the Rev. Ave. LALLEMAN, who was succeeded by the present pastor, the Rev. L. B. MIELKE.

The original house of worship was used by the congregation until 1884, when a new building was erected. The latter was remodeled in 1926.

Emanuel Reformed Church

The Emanuel Reformed church at Franklin is the oldest house of worship in the town of Herman. The first building used for this purpose was erected in 1848 by the pioneers who came from Germany and settled in the town in 1847.

In the summer of 1863, a larger building was erected. The second edifice was used until 1912, when the present large modern brick edifice was completed and dedicated in May of that year.

The second building used as the house of worship for about fifty years was moved to another location near the college buildings where it was remodeled and now is being used as a gymnasium.

Up until the year 1850 the congregation was supplied irregularly by various pastors, but the membership having grown to considerable number, it was deemed necessary to have a resident pastor. According to the church records, the Rev. Casper PLUESS was the first resident pastor, and remained from 1850 until 1854.

Other pastors in regular order of succession were as follows: 1854 to 1858 - Rev. Jacob BOSSHARD; 1858 to 1870 - Rev. H. A. MUEHLMEIER; 1870 to 1973 (sic) - Rev. H. J. RUETENIK; 1874 to 1913 - Rev. C. G. MARTIN, D. D.; 1913 to 1914 - Rev. Calvin H. SCHNEIDER (died during his pastorate); 1915 to 1921 - Rev. E. H. BORNHOLT.

Since December 11, 1921, Rev. William HUENEMANN has been the resident Pastor.


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