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Sheboygan County, Wisconsin Genealogy & History
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Carl Ott

Source: "Portrait and Biographical Record - Published 1894 by Excelsior Publishing Co., Chicago" Pages 302 - 303

Carl Ott, a pioneer settler of Sheboygan County, was born near West Baden, Nassau, Germany, July 3, 1829, and is a son of Philip and Philipine (Schumacher) Ott. The mother died when her son Carl was about nine years old, and left six children, all of whom came to the United States, but only one is now living, the subject of this record. Later, the father was again married, in 1842, his second wife being Louise Schreiner. Of this marriage six children were born, of whom but three survive.

In 1846, the father, step-mother and eight children sailed from Havre, France, to New York, taking only four weeks to make the trip. The same year they arrived in Wisconsin, and located in Ozaukee County, where the father bought eighty acres of land, and took an eighty-acre claim. The surveyor who located the claim for them, finding they had made a mistake and built their house on the eighty acres they had bought, instead of on the claim, himself purchased the claim of tho Government, and thus cheated Mr. Ott out of his land. Later the father sold the other eighty, and in 1847 came to Sheboygan Comity, buying eighty acres in the town of Holland. He paid the settler $50 for his right, and the Government $1.25 per acre. On this farm he spent his last days, dying on the 24th of February, 1861. His wife survived him a number of years, her death occurring in 1889.

The gentleman whose name heads this article was reared and educated in his native land. When fourteen years of age he began to learn the shoemaker's trade, at which he worked two years, or until he came to the United States. After coming to this country, Mr. Ott aided his father in improving his farm. Everything was in its natural state, and there was much hard work to be performed; the land was to be cleared, and the home built, and this required all the help to be had.

In the town of Holland, December 31, 1861, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Ott and Miss Caroline Rehm. The lady was born in Meyerberg, Lippe-Detmold, Germany, July 25, 1835. Her parents, Henry and Sophia (Begeman) Rehm, both died in the Fatherland. In 1859, Mrs. Ott and her sister, Mrs. Wilhelmine Ulrich, of Plymouth, came to the United States. They took passage on a vessel at Bremen for New York, where they arrived after a voyage of seven weeks. On landing, they came direct to Sheboygan County. Their brother, Herman Rehm, now a resident of Plymouth, came later.

Prior to his marriage, Mr. Ott purchased eighty acres in Holland Township, which he improved, and nine years later traded this for forty acres, which he sold. In 1883, he bought eighty acres in the town of Plymouth, located on section 33, where he now lives. On this he has erected good buildings, making it a valuable farm.

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Ott six children were born, of whom but two are living, Henry and Philip. The former married Matilda Philipson, and operates the home farm; he has two children, Louis and Earl P. Philip wedded Amelia Haut; they have one daughter, Meta.

Mr. and Mrs. Ott belong to the Evangelical Association, being consistent members of that organization. Mr. Ott is a Republican in his political views, though not an aspirant for official honors. He served as School Treasurer in the town of Holland some nine years, performing most acceptably the duties of that office. He is a man who is respected by all who know him for his many excellent traits of character.


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