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Sheboygan County, Wisconsin Genealogy & History
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William Whiffen

Source: "Portrait and Biographical Record - Published 1894 by Excelsior Publishing Co., Chicago" Pages 234 - 235

William Whiffen, of Sheboygan, is one of the pioneers of the county, the time of his coming being September, of 1845. He was born in the village of Spaldwick, England, November 1, 1818. His father was Uridge Whiffen, and his mother's maiden name was Susan James. Uridge Whiffen was engaged in wagon-making, as a machinist, and in carpentering for many years. He was a native of Berry, Huntingdonshire, and his wife of the city of Kimbolton. The family resided in Spaldwick for many years. In the family of Uridge and Susan {James} Whiffen there were five children that grew up to mature years, three sons and two daughters. Of the family none are known to be living except the subject of this sketch.

William whiffen was reared in his native country and learned the trade of a tailor. He carried on the business of merchant-tailoring for a number of years in the city of Huntingdon. October 18, 1841, occurred the marriage of Mr. Whiffen and Mary Ann Hitchcock, a native of the city of Bedford, England, born September 7, 1820, being a daughter of John and Esther Hitchcock {the maiden name of the latter having been Astwood}, also natives of Bedfordshire. The family have been for many generations residents of that shire. Mrs. Whiffen was one of a family of five children, one son and four daughters. She is the only one of her father's family who ever came to the United States, and the only one now living.

In February, 1842, the subject of this sketch emigrated to the United States. He was accompanied by his father, his two brothers and two sisters, all of the family, the mother having died in 1831. The family soon became separated. William Whiffen and wife lived for several months in the city of Utica, N. Y., and then settled on a farm, which Mr. Whiffen purchased in the town of Westmoreland, Oneida County. Two and a half years later, they sold this farm and removed to Kendall County, Ill., and in the fall of 1845 came to Sheboygan. Mr. Whiffen immediately purchased a farm in the town of Sheboygan Falls, and there lived from 1845 to 1875, when he sold his farm and removed to Sheboygan.

Mr. and Mrs. Whiffen have seven children, five sons and two daughters; George U., who lives on a farm in the town of Sheboygan Falls; Andrew J., Superintendent of Sheboygan County Insane Asylum; Bethsheba, wife of Jarvis Connell, of the town of Lyndon, Sheboygan County; Frederick J., a resident of Los Angeles, Cal.; Margaret, the wife of Horten Smith, of Minneapolis, Minn.; Albert W., a farmer in the town of Sheboygan Falls; and Charles H., of Sheboygan City, a leading traveling salesman for Straw, Ellsworth & Co., of Milwaukee.

Mr. Whiffen has been identified with the growth and developement of the county for nearly fifty years. In his political affiliations he is a Democrat. For five years he served as Chairman of the town of Sheboygan Falls. He and his wife were reared in accordance with the religious teachings of the Episcopal Church, and Mrs. Whiffen is still in communion with that denomination. Mr. Whiffen, though a firm believer in the cardinal principles of Christianity, is not connected with any religious body.

Mr. and Mrs. Whiffen have been residents of Sheboygan County for nearly fifty years. Here the majority of their children were born; they here grew to manhood and womanhood, and have now passed out into the world honored and respected citizens.


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