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Wildflowers in the FALLIS Pioneer Cemetery

Greene County, Ohio

All genealogy research contain errors, so let me know if your research contradicts mine. My research of Indiana and Ohio families comes from conversations with relatives, copied scrapbooks, library research, online records, courthouse visits, and multiple visits to final resting places on family farms and cemeteries. Families in other states rely mostly on the research of others. If you have additional information on any families, corrections, photos, or anything to add to the history of our families, please leave a Comment in my Guest book, join my Follis Families on Facebook page, or send an Email. Read Dick Eastman's discussion of Unverified Data.

Always interested in plants and wildlife I have some 2006 photographs of wildflowers in the FALLIS Pioneer Cemetery. The Boy Scouts mow the cemetery around the 4th of July so the wildflowers are not as vigorous as the glowing yellow masses of Ragworts in the Concord Cemetery in Whitley County, Indiana.

Spring beauty wildflowers and dandelions by Isaac's tombstone  Ragwort wildflowers by Isaac's tombstone

On the left April 18, 2006 I saw large numbers of Spring Beauty which looks like snowflakes in large masses. The often pink veined white flowers are smaller than dimes. This link to a photo on Illinois wildflowers was taken at a cemetery. The yellow flowers on left are Dandelions. On the right in Alan Price's photo are more Ragworts in bloom.

Ragwort and spring beauty wildflowers by Fence  Ragwort wildflowers by Flags

The Ragworts were not very tall when I visited in April 18 or when Alan Price volunteered to take photos April 30, 2006. The area on the left is the closest to what I saw in the Whitley County, Indiana cemetery. Because the cemetery is on a hill it always appears dry when I visit compared to wetter woodland areas which this time of year are muddy with pools of standing water. I cleaned the FALLIS tombstones in 2005 and took some of the Ragworts that I removed from the tombstones. They were twice as tall and thick in my city garden as they are in FALLIS Cemetery. Vigorous reseeders, they turned out to be a weedy mistake that I mostly removed. This Connecticut Wildflower link has useful information and close up photos. This Purdue University link indicates Ragwort is poisonous to livestock which could have been a serious problem in the pioneer days.

Pussytoe Flowers along fence  Six-spotted Beetles on Mercy's tombstone

On the left along the fence were blooming Pussy-toes. A confusing group of possibly 32 species this pussy-toe is probably Woman's Tobacco or Antennaria plantaginifolia on the USDA site. On the right these metallic green beetles found on the Mercy VAUGHAN FALLIS' tombstone are Six-Spotted Tiger Beetle, Cicindela sexguttata as seen close up on this web page. If I got too close they would fly away.

There were small groups of Toothworts by a bench in the back and scattered around the entire cemetery seen on this Illinois wildflower link.

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