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Charles Saylor 1786 - 1853 of Bloomfield

Hallowell Township, Prince Edward County

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Pioneers of the Bay of Quinte
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Saylor Family History

Why I am interested in this family.
My interest is natural given that my surname comes from this Charles Saylor, via his son Caleb. Figuring out the parents of Charles Saylor had been a brick wall for years. However on January 22, 2006, I finally found substantial evidence that Samuel Saylor and Margaret Jones are his parents and that Lavina Bowerman is his sister.  The evidence came to light while I was compiling the inventory of the Marion Cronk material for the Quaker Archives.
Bible page

Part of a page in a Saylor family Bible
in possession of John Saylor, Trenton, ON.

Use these links to jump up and own this web page.
  1. Overview
  2. Photo of the Saylor headstones in the Quaker cemetery
  3. Parents of Charles Saylor
  4. Birth, Marriage and children
  5. Was Charles Saylor a Quaker?
  6. Land Records
  7. Military Career and his sword
  8. Bloomfield Records
  9. 1851 Census
  10. Will and Burial
  11. Pioneer Life on the Bay of Quinte - PLBQ
  12. Y-DNA Evidence
2005 Randy Saylor; major revision June 2012

1. OVERVIEW
Having spent a lot of time researching this family, including two trips to New Jersey, it can be said that not a lot of solid information has survived about the early days of Charles Saylor. Let us start with what Pioneer of the Life of Bay of Quinte says about the arrival in Upper Canada of Charles Saylor.

"Records show that shortly before the War of 1812, Charles H. Saylor came to Prince Edward County from Dutchess County, N.Y., whence he had been preceded by neighbours and friends. His family had long been settled in New England, and many of them remained in the States."

This account was written in 1904 by my grandfather and as always we wish he had said more. It is worth trying to see how much of the above excerpt can be supported by the record. First off, the H in Charles H Saylor is found in no original record and the only place it is written is in this account in PLBQ. Charles Saylor did not have a middle name. Quaker minute books record the marriage of Charles to Jemima Hubbs in 1812 in Bloomfield so it is safe to assume he came at least a few years earlier - say around 1810. No records have been found showing Charles or his family in Dutchess County, NY. He was born in Springfield Township, Burlington County, NJ and it is possible that the family had connections with people in Dutchess County. The Saylor family was settled in New Jersey which is not usually included in "New England". The PLBQ account fails to mention that Charles arrived with his sister Lavina and mother Margaret and possibly his father. All the other older siblings stayed in and around NJ.

Charles's parents were Samuel Saylor and Margaret Jones who married in 1773 in New Hanover Tp., Burlington Co., NJ. See the web page on them for more detail. Research has unearthed a number of children of this couple and Charles and his sister Lavina were the youngest. It is my belief that Charles and and his sister Lavina came to Upper Canada about 1810 with their mother, Margaret. It appears that Margaret remarried and her new surname was Schaffer. No record of her husband or this marriage have been found. The conclusion is based on two pieces of evidence. One is the fact that Margaret Schaffer is buried beside Charles. The second piece of evidence is the story that I have called the "Doyle Story". Both are more fully explained below.

Charles and Jemima married in 1812 and Jemima was disowned from the Quaker community because she had married "Out of the Unity of Friends", ie; a non Quaker. Though no record of her reinstatement was recorded in the minutes, she reappears later in the Quaker minutes in good standing. At that time it was acceptable that Jemima would remain a Quaker if she 'acknowledged' the error of her ways and displayed acceptable behaviour and understanding. Charles was never a Quaker, but with Quakerly tolerance, he would have been allowed to attend meeting [church]. However he would not have held office or been recognized as a Quaker. He is buried in the old Quaker cemetery in Bloomfield. Quakers are deeply identified by their "Peace Testimony" which is expressed in their refusal to bear arms and unwillingness to serve or support the militia in any way. They were exempt from the militia through a system whereby they were required to pay a fee instead of serving. The fact that Charles was active in the militia, becoming a Major in 1848, meant that he never would have been accepted as a Quaker. The 1851 census states that Charles is a "Friend", the official word for Quaker, but in fact he was not a Quaker though his family was. The children of Jemima and Charles attended the Quaker school. A receipt from 1824 survives for the fee paid to the Quaker teacher.

In 1816, Charles "Sailor" purchased part of Lot 4, Con 1, 1st Con Military Tract, Hallowell Township, Prince Edward County. This is the main farm that the family had for many decades and more land was acquired over time.

His remaining decades are spent as a good citizen of the community - showing enough leadership that he is promoted to Major in the militia, entrepreneurial enough to be a miller with his own mill in Bloomfield, and probably a good parent as he and Jemima successfully raised eleven children. All but one survived into adult hood.

This quote below from, what I call, the "Doyle Document" is the most critical evidence that tells us about how Charles and Lavina Saylor came to Upper Canada.

"Thomas Jones, a weaver from England married Elizabeth Taylor in the U.S.A. and their daughter Margaret married Samuel Saylor who was born in Germany and came to America when he was 8 years old. They settled in Burlington New Jersey where they raised 10 children. Mary, Elizabeth, Francis, William, Samuel, John settled in the U.S.A., Charles, Samuel, Lavinia and Margaret came to Canada and settled in Prince Edward County shortly before the war of 1812."

See the web page on Samuel Saylor and Margaret Jones to read the full explanation
and citation of the Doyle Document. This 'story' was recorded by Dr Henry Saylor Doyle about 1970 and I make the argument on the web page above that it is most likely that Henry Doyle got this information from Marion Cronk who had the work of A.C. Bowerman in her possession. In 1904, A.C. Bowerman completed a massive work on the families near Bloomfield part of which was on the Saylor family. Unfortunatley the keypage of this account is missing and it would not be a surprise if Henry Doyle borrowed it and failed to return it. A story with this detail could not be made up - it had to come from somewhere and the Doyles, Cronks and Bowermans knew each other.

The above story says that Samuel Saylor and his wife Margaret [Jones] and children Charles and Lavina came to Upper Canada. No record of Samuel in UC has been found and he either died shortly after arrival or maybe on the way or maybe he did not come at all. Regardless, Charles and Lavina and probably Margaret did come to UC.

In the old Quaker cemetery in Bloomfield, Hallowell Twp., PEC, there is a long line of head stones which we might call the Saylor plot. The first burial there is for infant Charles Saylor who died in 1833 at 2 days old. Then, at the other end of the line, Margaret Schaffer is buried in 1835. The inscription reads: "Margaret Shaffer, d. June 18, 1835 @ 80 yrs 5 mo & 11 da." Thus she was born about January 1755. The next burial is Mary Saylor in 1839, the oldest daughter of Charles and Jemima. She is buried several spaces down the line from Margaret. Two more early burials are made; son Samuel in 1842 and grandchild Adam Henry Saylor in 1851. They are also buried down the line as seen in the picture below. Then in 1853, Charles Saylor dies and is buried right beside Margaret Schaffer. Twenty three years later in 1876, his wife Jemima dies and is buried right beside Charles. It is clear that two spaces were reserved for Charles and Jemima beside Margaret Schaffer. This is not proof, but a strong suggestion that Margaret Schaffer is in fact Margaret Jones, the mother of Charles Saylor. This is supported by the Doyle Document that states that Margaret came to Upper Canada. Margaret was born in 1755 and thus is the right age to be his mother. Her name change would result from a later marriage. Charles being buried beside Margaret is an honour not lightly given. It is my strong conclusion that Charles is buried beside his mother.

So why did Margaret Schaffer, the mother of Charles and Lavina come to Upper Canada with her two youngest children? Her older children remained in NJ. When one works hard on a puzzle and has unearthed all that seems available, it is inevitable that a gut feeling emerges. My hypothesis is based on the 1808 court case in Mount Holly, NJ where Samuel Sailer, the oldest son of Samuel Sayler and Margaret Jones, loses the family property in Mount Holly. See section 6 of their web page for full details. This financial ruin splits the family and Margaret and her youngest children, and perhaps the father, need to find somewhere else to live. Probably through family or friendly connections Samuel and Margaret, or Margaet by herself, take Charles and Lavina to Dutchess County, where they hear that many are moving on to the cheap and good land of Upper Canada. They, like so many before, emigrate to be with people they know. Many settlers in Hallowell, particularily the Quakers, came from Dutchess Co., NY. In 1810, Margaret would be 55, Charles 24 and Lavina 21 years of age.  With support of the community, Charles and Lavina marry into the Quaker community and do well. Margaret lives 25 more years and somewhere along the way married a man named Schaffer.


2. PHOTO OF THE SAYLOR HEADSTONES in the Old Quaker Cemetery, Bloomfield, PEC
small

Click on the picture to see larger version.

Source: Cemeteries of Township of Hallowell, Prince Edward County, transcriptions, AO, MS 451, reel 25, p. 385. A few changes made based on a visit to the site. Many of these limestone headstones are highly eroded and hard to read.
The headstone on the right is for Margaret Shaffer and to her left lying down is that of Charles. Jemima is next left and so on. They read [R to L]
  • Margaret Shaffer, d June 18 1835 @ 80yrs 5mo &11da
  • Charles Saylor, d May 19 1853 @ 66yrs
  • Jemima, wife of Charles Saylor died 18 of 5 mo 1876 aged 85y 7m's 2 da
  • Mary Saylor, dau of C&J d Aug 24 1839 @ 26yrs 19da
  • Samuel Saylor, son of C&J d Aug 12 1842 @ 26yrs 11mo his son
  • Adam H Saylor, son of C&C d Oct 12 1856 @ 2yrs 3mo 6da
  • Charles Saylor, son of C&J, d June 18 1833 @ 2da
  • William H Saylor, son of C&J d Nov 4 1855 @ 30yrs 6mo & 4da

3. PARENTS OF CHARLES SAYLOR
This document below is the work of Albert C Bowerman and it was done about 1900. In the Marion Cronk Fonds there is a folder of "field notes" that show that AC Bowerman interviewed older folks about their personal genealogy and history. Lavina [Saylor] Bowerman was a great aunt to AC Bowerman and he was 18 when Lavina died on a nearby farm. He would have known her well and the information below can be trusted.

IDENTITY OF PARENTS
"Judah Bowerman - mar. (4) Lavinia Saylor, dau of Samuel Saylor and his wife Margaret Jones, of  Mount Holy, NJ, 30 July 1826. Lavinia was a sister of Charles Saylor, and of Jemima Hubbs, she was born 11th of Nov 1789; and died on the "hill", where she is also buried, 11th of July 1862. The Saylor family were of german descent; tho not Friends [note: Jemima Hubbs was a Friend - Randy Saylor]. 
Source: The "Bowerman" Family of Canada Descendants of Ichabod Bowerman of Dutchess Co., NY 1683 - 1796 by Albert C. Bowerman, MB, Bloomfield, Can, July 1904, tissue carbon copy, AC Bowerman Records, Marion Cronk Fonds, Quaker Archives, p. 53 or Image 87
See the web page for Samuel Saylor and Margaret Jones for a more extensive presentation.


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4. BIRTH, MARRIAGE, CHILDREN
BIRTH
"Charles Saylor, born Dec. 24, 1786, Springfield, Burlington Co., New Jersey"
Note: This is very near Mount Holly, NJ
Source: Family Bible, possession of WRS.

MARRIAGE
12 April 1812, Hallowell, ON
Source: Saylor Family Bible, possession of WRS.

QUAKER MINUTE BOOKS
On 20, 5 month, 1812; One of the friends appointed to report on 'Jamima Sailor, formerly Hubbs' of being disowned reports that the 'appointment answered in writing'.
Source: West Lake Women's Prep Meeting Minutes, 1810-1864, AO, F997, MS 303, reel 14, B-2-2

On 19, 6 month, 1812; "The case of Jamima Hubbs on account of a complaint which came against her in a former minute and ??? appearing also since married out of the Unity of Friends for which conduct we are united in her being disowned and having the concurrence of men, she is accordingly disowned. Charity Terrill and Philadelphia Cronkite are appointed to inform her and report."
Source: West Lake Women's Prep Meeting Minutes, 1810-1864, AO, F997, MS 303, reel 14, B-2-2

CHILDREN
Charles Saylor
  (Samuel1 Sayler) was born December 24, 1786 in Springfield, Burlington Co, NJ, son of Samuel Saylor and Margaret Jones and died May 19, 1853 in Prince Edward Co..  He married Jemima Hubbs April 02, 1812 in Hallowell Twp, Prince Edward County, daughter of Robert Hubbs and Jane Haviland.  She was born October 16, 1790 in Hempstead,  Long Island, NY, and died May 18, 1876 in Prince Edward Co.

They had the following children:
 i.    Mary  Saylor, born August 05, 1813; died August 24, 1839 in Prince Edward Co..
ii.    Samuel Saylor, born September 12, 1815; died August 12, 1842 in Prince Edward Co
iii.    Adam Hubbs Saylor, born December 30, 1817; died September 02, 1908 in Friends Cemetery, East Bloomfield, Prince Edward Co.
iv.    Lavinia Saylor, born September 09, 1819 in Bloomfield, Prince Edward Co., Ontario; died June 06, 1857 in Hallowell, ON.
v.    John Saylor, born March 26, 1821; died March 27, 1904. (See Saylor family History)
vi.    William Henry Saylor, born May 27, 1823; died November 04, 1853 in Friends Cemetery, East Bloomfield, Prince Edward Co..
vii.    Caleb Barker Saylor, born April 28, 1825 in Bloomfield, Prince Edward County; died May 19, 1898 in Trenton, ON.
viii.    Robert Hubbs Saylor, born January 09, 1827; died May 23, 1907.
ix.    Abraham Barker Saylor, born April 16, 1829 in Hallowell Twp., Prince Edward Co., Ontario; died November 12, 1915 in Glenwood Cem. Picton.
x.    Anna Hubbs Saylor, born May 18, 1831 in Hallowell Twp.; died July 03, 1864 in aged 33, Stinson Cemetery, west of Bloomfield.
xi.    Charles Saylor, born December 13, 1834; died December 15, 1834.
Check out my World Connect Family File for descendants of the above.


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5. WAS CHARLES SAYLOR A QUAKER?

CHARLES WAS NOT A QUAKER
It is unlikely that Charles Saylor was a Quaker even though his wife and children were. His military service would have prevented him from acceptance. However he is buried in the Quaker Cemetery with his family. Jane Zavitz-Bond, archivist and long time Canadian Quaker scholar said that being buried there would not have been an issue. In fact he could attend meetings but would not have been allowed to join or take take any role in the Society. The strongest direct evidence is a statement by his son, Robert, in 1886 to the Supreme Court of Canada that "my mother was a Friend." Surely if his father had been a Friend, he would have said "my parents were Friends." Also, in an extensive search of New Jersey and New York Quaker records and all surviving Canadian Quaker records no mention of Charles or other 'Saylor's' other than his wife and children has been found.
Source: Supreme Court of Canada, Jones vs Dorland, V2, 1886, Dudley and Burns, p. 442, copy in Canadian Quaker Archives, H SCC 886 II, Pickering College, May 2004
Source: Curiously the 1851 census states that Charles is a "Friend" but this is likely an assumption on the part of the recorder as the rest of the family were Friends.
Source: Charles is not named as a member whereas Jemima is, in the West Lake list of 1820, 1830 and 1837. Jemima's headstone uses the Quaker method of dating, another indication of her being a life long Quaker. See notes under Jemima and West Lake Quaker minute books.

CHILDREN ATTENDED QUAKER SCHOOL
Receipt reads: "Charles Saylor: 12 mo, 6, 1825, To G. Fieldhouse, Instructing thy children, half a year 1.5.0. Received the same. G. Fieldhouse. "
[Note: George Fieldhouse, probably the teacher, was accepted as a member of the West Lake Quaker meeting on 19, 1 mo, 1826. Henry Field house was accepted 16, 9 mo, 1824.]
Source: Receipt in possession of WRS
Source: re Fieldhouse, Quaker Records, West Lake Monthly Meeting, 1824-1837, AO, MS 303, C-3-73, reel 44


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6. LAND RECORDS
*Lot 4, Con 1, 1st Con Military Tract, #416, B&S, 14 Mar 1816, reg 8 Oct 1816, from Cornelius White to Charles Sailor, half of lot
*Lot 3, Con 1, 1st Con Military Tract, #1749, B&S, 2 Apr 1831, reg 4 Apr 1831, from Paul Clark to Charles Saylor, 36 acres in lots 3 and 4.
*Lot 4, Con 1, 1st Con Military Tract, #1885, B&S, 4 Feb 1832, reg 13 Feb 1832, from Peter Mastin to Charles Saylor, 7 acres in 3 and 4
*Lot 4, Con 1, 1st Con Military Tract, #2248, B&S, 13 Mar 1832, reg 21 Mar 1834, from Peter Mastin to Charles Saylor, 24 acres in 3 and 4
*Lot 3, Con 1, 1st Con Military Tract, #2248, B&S, 13 Mar 1832, reg 21 Mar 1834, from Peter Mastin to Charles Saylor, 24 acres in 3 and 4.
*Lot 3, Con 1, 1st Con Military Tract, #383, B&S, 22 July 1847, reg 30 Apr 1853, Charles Saylor & wife to John Saylor, 88 in this and 4
*Lot 4, Con 1, 1st Con Military Tract, #382, B&S, 22 Jul 1847, reg 30 Apr 1853, from Charles Saylor & wife to John Saylor, 88 in this + 3
*Lot 4, Con 1, 1st Con Military Tract, #384, B&S, 15 Apr 1853, reg 22 May 1853, from Charles Saylor to John Saylor, 50 1/2
*Lot 4, Con 1, 1st Con Military Tract, #472?, B&S, 15 Apr 1853, reg 23 Sep 1853, from Charles Saylor to Robert H Saylor, 68 1/2
*Lot 4, Con 1, 1st Con Military Tract, #436, Mort, 20 Nov 1853, reg 6 Dec 1853, Philip Vandewaters to John Saylor, 100 acres in # and 4, 485.10/0, discharged 5855 or 5555
*Lot 4, Con 1, 1st Con Military Tract, #439, B&S, 13 Dec 1853, reg 17 Dec 1853, from John W Terwilliger to Adam H Saylor, 50
*Lot 4, Con 1, 1st Con Military Tract, #447, B&S, 1 Jany 1853, reg 8 Feb 1854, from Charles Saylor & wife to Henry Challand, 30
*Lot 4, Con 1, 1st Con Military Tract, #807, QC, 6 Feb 1856, reg 20 Feb 1857, Exrs of Charles Saylor to Benjamin Hubbs, 3
*Lot 4, Con 1, 1st Con Military Tract, #389, Will, 19 Apr 1853, reg 23 May 1853, from Charles Saylor to his Heirs in Trust
Source: Hallowell Twp., PEC, Abstract Index, Vol 1, AO, GS 5150 [newer version GSU 198152 is a poor copy]

1816 LAND RECORD - 416
On March 14, 1816, Charles Sailor, yeoman of Hallowell, buys half of Lot 4 in the First Concession Military Tract, Hallowell for 200 from Cornelius White of Hallowell; witnessed by Manly Wilman and Arra Ferguson.
Source: PEC, Deeds, Vol E, Deed #416, page 13, AO, GS 5194

1831 LAND RECORD - 1749
2 Apr 1831 Charles Saylor buys 36 acres of Lots 3 and 4, First Con Military Tract from Paul Clark, for 100; witnessed by William Rorke, merchant and Joseph Rorke, gentleman, both of Hallowell.
Source: PEC, Deeds, Vol Q, Deed #1749, pg 14, AO, GS5197

1832 LAND RECORD - 1885
Feb 4, 1832, Charles Saylor buys 7 acres part of Lots 3 and 4, First Concession Military Tract from Peter Mastin for 100; witnessed by William Rorke, merchant and Joseph Rorke, gentleman, both of Hallowell.
Source: PEC, Deeds, Vol Q, Deed #1885, pg 2771, AO, GS5197

1832 LAND RECORD - 2248
14 Mar 1832, Charles Saylor buys 24 acres part of Lots 3 and 4, First Concession Military Tract from Peter Mastin for 100; witnessed by Benjamin Hubbs, gentleman and John Fair, Yeoman, both of Hallowell.
Source: PEC, Deeds, Vol S, Deed #2248, pg 117, AO, GS5198


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7. MILITARY CAREER and HIS SWORD

EXCERPT FROM PLBQ
"Being a miller by occupation, Charles H. Saylor was exempt from military service, but he joined the militia and the interest he displayed brought him gradual promotion to the rank of major. He anticipated service during the Mackenzie Rebellion, and it was he who "warned" out the militia, taking the precaution to see that each man was armed. He was the first to bring muskets over from the Stone Mills to Picton, bringing five loads with which to insure a hot reception for any invaders. His eldest son, Adam, exhibits, with pardonable pride, the sword worn by his father in the service." [785]

WAR 1812
No record has been found of Charles having any involvement with the War of 1812. He is not listed in Soldiers of the King, The Upper Canadian Militia 1812 -1815, William Gray, 1995 which is an index of names. He is not listed as having made a claim for land based on service in this war in "An Index of the Land Claim Certificates of Upper Canada Militiamen who served in the War of 1812 - 1814", Lauber, 1995.

He is not listed in the well known Men of Upper Canada Militia Nominal Rolls 1828-29, Elliott et al, 1995, which attempted to list all men from age 19 to 35. He was 42 and is not listed.

He is not listed in the Adjutant General's Office, Upper Canada 1794 - 1847, Register of Officers, RG9, IB5, Vol. 8, Reel T3489, LAC

CAPTAIN CHARLES SAYLOR
He is mentioned in the Regiments of Prince Edward, first in June 1836 where a Charles Taylor is listed under the Third Reg't Prince Edward as a Captain with a "date of rank" of March 26, 1835 (see Volume 5 of the below reel). This is probably a misspelling of Saylor as the same group of people are mentioned in later lists and he is listed as Saylor there.

In the volume dated October 1, 1838 Charles Saylor is listed as a Captain of the Fourth Regiment of Prince Edward and his date of rank is June 26, 1835, (See Vol. 6). Lastly he is mentioned in the following volume (Vol. 7) of the same date under "alterations" as Captain, Charles Saylor, date of rank, March 26, 1838 (General order #616). His name appears in each case in a group of unchanging names that seem to have the dates of rank changing.
Source: Adjutant General's Office, Upper Canada 1824 - 1847, Register of Officers, RG9, IB5, Vol. 1 to 7, Reel T3488, LAC

MAJOR CHARLES SAYLOR
4th Battalion, Prince Edward
Major Charles Saylor, date of commission, 25 Aug 1848
Source: Militia List, Canada West, 1851, Maj. Jos Thompson, Toronto, 1851, AO, 355.1 THO, p. 24

MILITARY SWORD AND GUNS OF CHARLES SAYLOR
swords1
sword2
gun
Click on each picture to see a larger picture.

In PLBQ, it is said that Adam Saylor "exhibits, with pardonable pride, the sword worn by his father in the service." The sword referred to above and two guns that belonged to Charles are now in the possession of James Milton Saylor. They came to him through his father and grandfather. The account above states the sword was owned by Charles's son, Adam Saylor, who had one son that died young. Probably Adam passed them on to George Wellington Saylor, the grandfather of the current owner, to maintain possession within a male line of descendants.

This sword is a military sword and appears to be of the Gothic Hilted 1822 officers design. "In 1822, all Regiments of Foot were given a new sword. The Dress Regulations for the pattern sword stated: 'Gilt half basket with G lV R inserted in the outward bars and lined with black patent leather. Grip of black fish-skin with three gilt wires. The blade 32.5 inches in length, with round back terminating to a shampre within 9 in of the point and very little curved. Scabbard black with gilt mountings, steel in the field. To be carried by Garrison Staff, Royal Military Asylum, provost-Marshall, medical, Commissariat, Paymaster, Judge Advocate, Foot Guards and Infantry of the Line."

"In 1831 the blade was narrowed to 1 in. wide at the hilt, and in 1834 Filed Officers adopted brass scabbards for the sword. During the twenty years after this sword was adopted, much discussion centered around the type of blade. Although the 'ramrod' back stiffened the blade and made it a good thrusting weapon, it served as a barrier to making a good clean cut .... "
Source: British Military Swords, John Wilkinson Latham, 1966, p. 15 - 16, TRL

Of the sword, James writes, "The sword blade has a thick backing running [see the 1822 pipe back sword on this web page] along the top of the blade and running down to a thin blade. So it would seem that it is an earlier one, it also has a piece of the handle [where the thumb would rest against] that folds down towards the blade. This may be when the sword is being worn, this piece would not rub against the hip of the wearer." The sword has the crest of Victoria Regina so must date after 1837. Also the hinge as mentioned by James is seen in photographs in the above reference.

One of the guns is a rifle and the other is a shotgun and both are of the percussion cap firing system, invented in the early 1800's. By the 1850's it had largely replaced the flintlock as an ignition system. Of the rifle, James writes, "The rifle has 'Real Twist' stamped on the top of the barrel just in front of percussion cap nipple. This 'Real Twist' means that instead of a solid barrel the hot steel was wrapped around a solid round object and hammered to make a 'weld' when hot. This was the only method of "welding". The barrels of the cannons used in the Civil War were cast but where the firing chamber was, they were wrapped and welded in the same manner. This was done when they used a larger caliber. This rifle was never meant to fire a solid ball, they were used mainly for birds and small game.
Sources: Photographs taken of the items by RS, email James Saylor, Jan 2003.



8. BLOOMFIELD RECORDS
1818 PETITION
Charles was one of 218 men who signed this petition in support of Robert Gourlay thus revealing his political leanings towards reform.

1830 PETITION
Charles was one of over 500 others who signed this petition asking that Prince Edward County be made a district.
1818
1818
1830
1830

NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS
Letters remaining at the P.O. to be picked up "Capt Chas Saylor".
Hallowell Free Press, January 4, 1831, p. 4,

Road Masters - Charles Saylor one of those named.
Hallowell Free Press, January 11, 1831 p. 3

Directors of Prince Edward Agricultural Society - Charles Saylor one of 20 named.
Hallowell Free Press, May 31, 1831 p. 3



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9. 1851 CENSUS
Charles Saylor, farmer, b. New Jersey state, age 66, Friend, married.
Jemima, b. NY state, age 62
Robert H. Saylor, farmer, b. Canada, age 25, married.
Catherine Saylor, age 20 [note - wife of Robert]
Samuel Saylor, 1 [note - Child of the above]
Caleb Gibson, 15. [probable nephew of Catherine]
Under the column for deaths in 1851 are 2 entries:
1. female, 85 years old died of old age.
2. male, 4 years old died of consumption.
Note: 1 storey house and 2 families living there.
Source: 1851 Census, Prince Edward County, Hallowell, AO, C11750, part 1, p. 57


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10. QUAKER CEMETERY - BLOOMFIELD, ON - SHAFFER
Buried beside Charles and in the row of Saylor's is Margaret Shaffer, d. June 18, 1835 @ 80 yrs 5 mo & 11 da. Thus she was born about January 1755. Margaret is not named as a member of the West Lake Meeting in 1820, 1830 and 1837. I think she is Margaret (nee Jones) the mother of Charles who would have remarried later in life.

WILL
To the registrar of the County of Prince Edward A Memorial of the Last Will and Testament of Charles Saylor to be registered according to law which will is in the following words.  I Charles Saylor of the Township of Hallowell in the County of Prince Edward and Province of Canada yeoman being weak in body but of a sound and disposing mind memory and understanding do make and publish this my last will and testament in form and manner herein after stated hereby revoking and making void all other wills and testaments be me heretofore made.
First I will and direct that all my just debts and funeral charges be paid and discharged from my personal estate.
Secondly I will and bequeath to my well beloved wife Jemima for her comfortable support and maintenance the use and benefit of all my real estate which I have not bargained or shall not by me have been bargained away at the time of my decease with the use of all that part of my dwelling house that we at present occupy with as much of my household goods and furniture there to belonging as she desires to keep for her use with the use and benefit of all out houses thereon erected with all the rents issues and profits arising from said premises for her sole use and benefit during her natural life except by the consent of my heirs my executors named herein after to be named do or shall think best to dispose of a certain piece of land lying on the east side of the road containing about three acres of land which if not disposed of by me hereafter I do hereby authorise my executors with the consent of my heirs to dispose of the said piece of land at the most convenient opportunity after my death and give a good and sufficient title for the same in fee simple.
I further will and bequeath to my wife the sum of twenty five currency per annum or such par of said sum as she may annually require for her own use and benefit to make her comfortable during her life to be paid to her out a part of my estate to be held in reserve by my executors for such special use which said annuity is to be in lieu of all dower or right and title to dower.
Thirdly I hereby nominate and appoint my son Adam Hubbs Saylor my friend Archelaus Southard and my son Abraham barker Saylor to be my executors to this my last will and testament who I hereby authorise and impower to collect and pay all just debts and to settle as much of my estate as they think will be advantageous for the benefit thereof as soon after my death as practible without interfering with the provisions heretofore made for the support of my wife and pay to all my children respectively or their heirs equal proportions of the effects of such settlement that my children all share and share alike.
Fourthly It is further my will and I devise at the death of my wife and I hereby impower my executors above named to sell all my real and personal estate that there remains unsold and for all lands by them sold and also from true to true as the payments and obligations are fulfilled for lands by me bargained away and secured to the different parties by my bonds on such payments being made and fulfilled by any or all such parties as therein specified I impower order and direct my executors to convey any or all such my real estate by good and sufficient titles in law fee simple.
It is further my will that in selling my real estate after the death of wife left for her use that my son Robert H Saylor if living shall offer or preference to purchase
and lastly I will and devise that after my executors sell and dispose of all my estate as above directed they proceed to make a final settlement of my affairs as soon as they think expedient by paying the proceeds arising therefrom in equal legacies to each of my children if living or their heirs as the case may be that my children all share and share alike in such division.
In testimony whereof I the said Charles Saylor have to this my last will and testament subscribe my name and affixed my seal this nineteenth day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty three.
Which will is witnessed by Smith P Leavens of the Township of Hallowell in the County of Prince Edward  and William H. Saylor of the Township of Murray in the County of Northumberland yeoman and this memorial thereof is required to be registered by Robert Hubbs Saylor one of the devisees of and holding under said will I witness whereof said Robert Hubbs Saylor has subscribed his name and affixed his seal this the twenty third day of May in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty three.
In the presence of Robert Hubbs Saylor
Thoms Sharp??
William Christy
Source: Photo copy of actual will, WRS: Registered in Book A, Hallowell, pages 449-451.


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11. ACCOUNT IN PIONEER LIFE ON THE BAY OF QUINTE
"Records show that shortly before the War of 1812, Charles H. Saylor came to Prince Edward County from Dutchess County, N.Y., whence he had been preceded by neighbours and friends. His family had long been settled in New England, and many of them remained in the States.

Being a miller by occupation, Charles H. Saylor was exempt from military service, but he joined the militia and the interest he displayed brought him gradual promotion to the rank of major. He anticipated service during the Mackenzie Rebellion, and it was he who "warned" out the militia, taking the precaution to see that each man was armed. He was the first to bring muskets over from the Stone Mills to Picton, bringing five loads with which to insure a hot reception for any invaders. His eldest son, Adam, exhibits, with pardonable pride, the sword worn by his father in the service.

Shortly after arriving in the county, Charles H. Saylor purchased land near Bloomfield; the old homestead, which, still in the possession of the family, stands, remodeled and improved, within view of the village. He possessed in a marked degree the adaptability needed for a successful pioneer; not only did his training include the skill of the carpenter and the joiner, but the knowledge of the miller and millwright as well; and it is said that he could cobble his own shoes!  He was born in Springfield, N.J., 1776 (sic - should be 1786), and in 1812 he married Jemima, daughter of Hubbs; she was born on Long Island in 1790, and died in 1876, having survived her husband twenty-three years."
Source: Pioneer Life on the Bay of Quinte, PLBQ, 1904, p. 785.



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12. Y-DNA EVIDENCE
Y-DNA tests have been done for three paternal descendants of Charles Saylor. The results are posted on the Saylor DNA project web site.

Take note of these three tests on the above web site.
Group 2 - 62606 and 194392 - Descendants of Charles Saylor b. 1786 via son Caleb Saylor b. 1825
Group 3 - 100884 - Descendant of Charles Saylor b. 1786 via son William Saylor b. 1823
Group 3 - 154198 - Descendant of Charles Saylor b. 1786 via son John Saylor b. 1821

Test 110884 and 154198 match 36/37 and indicate a very recent paternal common ancestor. Both men who were tested are 5 generations from Charles Saylor so we can say conclusively that the common ancestor is Charles Saylor. It can also be said that their results identify the Y-DNA of Samuel Sayler, the father of Charles Saylor.

Note that these compare closely with other Saylor tests (groups 3 and 4) a few of whom know they came from Binninngen or Bottmingen, Switzerland. Both of these are today suburbs of Basel, Switzerland. Given these close results it can also be concluded that the Saylor ancestors of Charles Saylor came from in and around Basel, Switzerland.

I descend fron Caleb Saylor. Curiously, in my case [Group 2] the Y-DNA of myself and a nephew did not match with this group. Therefore one of the men between Charles Saylor and us was adopted into the family or is the result of adultery. In DNA lingo this is called a Non Paternal Event [NPE]. Further testing, both Y-DNA and the Family Finder test have resulted in identifying my grandfather, Charles Wesley Saylor as the probable 'adopted' son. His supposedly adoptive parents, Caleb Saylor and his wife Caroline Vandewater, had a son who died young followed by two daughters and no further children for 8 years. In 1863, when Caroline was 37, Charles Wesley Saylor entered their family as an infant, either through adoption or adultery. No family story about this has come down to us today. No public record of guardianship has been found. There was no official civil adoption in Ontario in 1863 and guardianship was usually only done when the infant stood to inherit some significant property when he/she reached the age of majority. Maybe someday, a Y-DNA match will come forward and we can the identify the birth father of Charles Wesley Saylor.

All is not lost. I also have a gggrandmother, Esther Saylor, daughter of Henry Chambers Saylor who was born 1795 in NJ. Using the new Family Finder test I match well with a '4th cousin' who shares this line with me, verifying that the blood line in this case is not compromised.
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