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Old Glory

Weekly Perryville Union
Perryville, Missouri, Friday, 28 December 1877


LOCAL NEWS

I take this method of informing my customers, and the public in general, that on and after Jan. 1st, 1878, I will cease to do a credit business, without any exception. I expect to sell for cash and produce only.

A settlement is required of all whose names are on my books, in the next thirty days.

WM. FURTH.


AN ADDITION. -- Vincent Miles, residing a few miles west of Perryville has just built an addition to his residence.

IN BLOOM. -- Some of our citizens have trees in bloom on their premises at this writing. Something rather unusual at the season.

CHRISTMAS, this year, was a very damp and moist one, it raining nearly all the time, however, the little ones endeavored to have their fun.

SQUIRE MOORE, living near Brewersville, is now engaged erecting a frame dwelling on his farm, and ere long it will be completed and occupied. It is twenty-six feet long and and [sic] sixteen feet wide.

A NEW HOUSE. -- We understand that Squire V. P. Tucker, of Claryville, contemplates erecting a dwelling house a short distance west of Perryville, some of the lumber for the same being on the ground.

CHARGED WITH MURDER. -- A man named Julian Pillow, charged with the murder of one Coleman, three months since, at a point called Dog Tooth, was, Saturday last, arrested at Grand Tower and taken to Cairo, where he was locked up for safe keeping.

A ROBBERY. -- We are told that some unknown person entered the library room at St. Mary's Seminary a few days since, while nobody was in it, and extracted from a drawer several dollars. The rogue has not yet been discovered.

OFF FOR PIEDMONT. -- Several of the school teachers of Perry county have been spending the present week at Piedmont, Wayne county, in this state, attending the school convention of Southeast Missouri, and it is very probable that said convention was well attended, and a pleasant time had.

SQUIRRELS are quite numerous in our county at this time. Augustine Vallroy, in a couple of hours the other day killed eight. In Bois Brule bottom they are more plentiful than has been the case for several years, and hunters are not compelled to be absent a great while from home as, in a few hours time, they can return well supplied with this game.


F  If you want a good refreshing glass of St. Louis beer, go to Arsan Callier's saloon.


A GOOD HUNT. -- Mr. James Hagan residing five mules north of Perryville, a couple of weeks since visited the woods after darkness had enshrouded the earth, and long before morning returned home with seven coons, four wild turkeys and one opossum, which was a good night's work, and better than any of our young hunters can do. Uncle Jimmie is nearly seventy-four years old.

REFORM AT GRAND TOWER. -- Several temperance lectures have lately been made at Grand Tower, across the river from Wittenberg, with tolerable fair results. We are informed that not less than two hundred and seventy persons in that vicinity have turned reformers, signed the pledge, and swear that they will not drink intoxicting beverages in the future. This temperance movement is getting to be a big thing.


MARRIED, a few days since, in Brazeau township, by Squire Burfeind, Wade Hampton (not of South Carolina) to Mary Bollinger, both of the colored pursuasion.

Married, one day this week, at St. Mary's Seminary, Mr. Henry Manning to Miss Mary Mattingly.

Married, on Sunday evening, December 9th, 18977, at the Catholic church in Silver Lke, by Father Moore, Mr. Alfred E. Besancon to Miss Elvina A. Maddock.


EMPTIED OUT. -- On Thursday evening of last week while George Meredith (a colored gentleman) was passing along the road with his team near Cassimere Chappuis, two of the wagon wheels unfortunately got into a deep gully, causing his wagon to turn over, and dumped his load of corn in to the public highway, but George being a good natured sort of an individual, soon had his wagon on its wheels, the corn in the bed, and proceeded on his way rejoicing that it was not worse.


DIED, on Thursday night, December 20th, 1877, at his residence some twelve miles southwest of Perryville Mr. Milbern Moore, aged about 48 years.

Died, on Thursday morning, December 20th, 1877, at her residence in Bois Brule bottom, some two and a half miles from Claryville, Mrs. Mary A. Watkins, aged 46 years.

Died, on Sunday night, December 23d, 1877, at his residence in west Perryville, Mr. Narius Cissell, aged 58 years.


PERSONAL. -- William McBride, of Kentucky, and some years ago a citizen of our county, returned to Perryville last Sunday evening, visiting his brother, J. C. McBride.

Dr. Robert Waters, who has been attending the St. Louis Medical college, returned here a few days since to spend the holidays.

The Fredericktown Jeffersonian says: "Frank Schulte and Robert Bruce went to Perry county Tuesday, to prospect for lead in the vicinity of Silver Lake."


NOT SO FUNNY. -- A few nights ago some young men started out on a fox chase, and all of the party were in excellent humor, not caring whether they bagged game or not. Not long after they started, they discovered a wagon standing in the road and thinking to have a little fun at the expense of its owner, gently removed the bed from the wagon and laid it upon the ground, and leaving it in this condition, pushed, forward in pursuit of game. This, of course, may have been exceedingly funny for the hunters, but was not a bit funny for the owner of the wagon, as he was compelled to procure assistance to place it where it belonged. This transpired in the neighborhood of Frohna. Naughty young men.


A DOUBLE MURDER REPORTED. -- We have been informed that a double muuder was perpetrated near Smithville, (not far from our county line) in Bollinger county, on Sunday the 16 inst. As told to us, two individuals, named Cheek and Mayfield, who had not been on friendly terms for some time, met upon the highway, not far from Smithville at the above period, and some words passed between them, when Cheek picked upon a rock and hurled it at Mayfield with great force, striking him upon the head and fractured his skull, from the effects of which he soon after died. Cheek becoming considerable frightened, repaired to the place of his abode, and securing a pistol, killed himself, thus committing a double murder, in case this report should prove true.


F  Fresh St. Louis beer always on hand at Arsan Callier's saloon.


LAST MONDAY Evening. -- Christmas Eve -- the juveniles of this place concluded to make the occasion a merry one. They applied a torch to a large pile of dry goods boxes, barrels, &c., and in a few minutes the public square was illuminated, and fire crackers and old pistols for a while reminded us of the days gone by. The reports of fire arms died away on the stillness of the night air, and every thing seemed perfectly calm. A storm was brewing. The juveniles had organized and armed themselves with tin pens, oyster cans, cowbells, &c., made a raid on the saloons and toy shops, and struck up a combination of music which would be difficult for Strauss to perform on a piano. They laid siege to the above named places, and never ceased their attack until they were invited in and received their Christmas gift. Having received their gifts, they retired to their homes and ere long was lost in dream land, while old Santa Claus was trimming the trees and making preparations for a happy Christmas. The Perryville Silver Cornet Band made the stillness of the night ring with some fine marches and waltzes, and occasionally a sacred melody.


Old Times

Editor Union: While glancing over our last, we noticed the same of Sarah Riney whose epitaph was copied from a stone that shows that the works of man must crumble under the influences of the elements. The epitaph reads as follows:

Sarah Riney
Died in the year of
our Lord July 21st, 1824.
Aged 42.

That year, as has been formerly observed, was an eventful year in the history of the revolution. Prominent among many of the events that occurred, was a dangerous object the troops had in view. In consequence of the financial drain on the different states to carry on the war, the means had become so limited that the soldiers was [sic] compelled to undergo hardships almost unbearable. Becoming fired with indignation at what was impossible to be avoided, in order to seek a redress of their grievances, a letter was sent to Washington imploring him to take the government into his own hands, and at once supply their demands. Washington, not to be swayed under the influences of those pending dangers, stood as firm as the "rock of adamant; and rebuked the writer with the utmost stringency for daring to present such a proposition.

Washington's influence was so much greater than that of his soldiers, that when they heard his rebukes, they desisted from their project in view, and in the course of a short time events took a change for the welfare of the people, and in consequence of the same, the soldiers were dismissed from further service, and at once returned to their homes.

The name of the next old pioneer on the list is Mary Duvall. After removing the moss from the stone that marks this venerable lady's last resting place, the following inscription was noted:

Mary Duvall
Died in the year of our
Lord, July the 19th, 1835,
Aged 47.

The subject of this sketch was born in 1786. In that year an event occurred that created as much excitement for the time being as at any period during the revolution. -- The event in question was a jealousy growing out of the people in regard to financial affairs. They tho't it dangerous to give to Congress the power to levy money and use it without the consent of the states. Being jealous of their liberty they wanted to retain the power of levying taxes in their own hands, consequently the country was rapidly drifting to destruction, and every ligament was stretched to its utmost tension. The whole fabric was quivering under the weight of dissension; the canopy of heaven looked down upon a fast desolving [sic] republic, and the vanities of the Americans while undergoing the first realities of freedom.

They could not longer stand under the burden of egotism, and consequently it gave vent in the way of rebellion, known as Shay's rebellion. In a very short time it had assumed wonderful magnitude, and a powerful armed force was required to disconcert the plans of this dangerous element.

Those old pioneers began their career in the early days of this republic and seen great changes take place in the course of time. The constitution of the United States went into effect; this broad expanse of land was laid off into territories, and according to the constitution, they were admitted into the Union as States.

Civilization advanced farther and farther westward, and the red men of the forest were compelled to retreat before its powerful influences, but not without a sanguinary contest. Improvements were rapidly springing up in every direction, but such conveniences as the locomotive for making rapid transit; or the magnificent steamers that plough the briny deep were not among the famous inventions when those old pioneers were called to the land of rest.

MORE ANON.


F  A No. 1 St. Louis beer for sale at Arsan Callier's saloon.


Kaskaskia - Relics of the past as they now appear.

The editor of the Chester Valley Clarion visited Kaskaskia the other day, and has the following to say about the visit:

"At Kaskaskia our party were fortunate in meeting Mr. Edmond Menard, who volunteered to show them around the ancient place and relate important particulars in reference thereto. It is not definitely settled when Kaskaskia first received its first white inhabitants, but Mr. Menard, who has given the matter considerable attention, rests his belief that the year 1682 witnessed the first location of French explorers at that place. Probably a portion of the exploring party, under the command of LaSalle, in the summer of 1682 -- when returned northward from an expedition on the Mississippi river, which had been discovered in 1542 by DeSoto, and by the French in 1673 -- remained as Kaskaskia and established a permanent settlement. Father Gravier, who succeeded Allonez and Marquette, all of whom were charged with the mission service among the Indians in the Illinois country, is accredited with being the first missionary to arrive at Kaskaskia. Having organized the work, Father Gravier was tranferred [sic] to Mackinaw, and was succeeded by Fathers Bineteau and Pinet, who continued the service during their lives.

From this period until the present the history of Kaskaskia is of record, illustrating its rise to the magnitude of the Capital of the Northwest Territory, affording homes for many families what were then and since become noted in our State; its decay, and the present status of the place.

As Mr. Menard let the way toward the church, the primary point the investigation, he stated the first place used for the territorial legislature was long since in ruins, the building having been located in the vicinity of the present school house; that even the ruins of the foundation were difficult to discover. At the church -- a large brick building, erected in 1843, -- we found workmen engaged in constructing a lofty spire and belfry, in which two fine bells are incased [sic]. Among the relics of former days there remains in the church the old bell, bearing the date of 1741, which was presented to the citizens of Kaskaskia, it is stated, by Louis XIV of France. This is the first bell whose notes were ever heard in the Mississippi Valley, and for more than a century it called to worship the people of Kaskaskia. Even, now, though much worn, the bell appears servicable [sic]. It is a feature of ancient days in which the people of Kaskaskia have much pride.

From the church the party passed to the ruins of General Edgar's residence, pausing for a few moments to view the store house occupied by Mr. Pape, which is the first brick building constructed in the State of Illinois. The brick for this structure were brought from Pittsburg, Pa., in keel boats, and not a few of them, at this time are being taken away by relic hunters. Of the residence of General Edgar there is but little remaining. The building was constructed, principally, of cedar timber, which was placed in an upright position and inserted three or four feet in the ground. Many of the upright posts remain in the same position as originally placed, but curiosity seekers are seizing upon them to manufacture keepsakes, and only a few years will pass before all will pass away. Nothing definite is known of the age of this house, though Mr. Menard stated that a new coat of shingles was placed upon it in the year 1816. Of course our party took a hand in despoiling the time worn building and secured cedar for canes and relics.

Repairing to the conveyance we proceeded to drive about the ancient place, taking a view of the Kaskaskia hotel, where Gen. Lafayette in 1822, was treated to a banquet; of the old Convent building now in ruins, and other places in interest.

Having completed the inspection of Kaskaskia proper, the party returned across the ferry and proceeded to Garrison Hill, where the defined shape of Fort Gage is still to be seen. This fort was erected, for the settlement, about 1736 -- the whites being then at war with the Chickshaw Indians. During the old French war of 1756, a garrison of French troops occupied the post. About ten years later a serious conflagration destroyed the buildings about the fort, and it was about this time that the troops of England occupied the same. The English General Gage -- prominent as a British officer in the Revolution -- was complimented by having his name given to the fort. The outer works of the fort -- containing within the same nearly an acre of space -- are daily defined by the contour of the earth ridge. General Clark, holding a commission from Patrick Henry, then Governor of Virginia was directed to capture Fort Gage. Accordingly, with four companies of troops, he made his way from Pittsburg, and captured the fort, July 4th, 1778. Temporarily the country passed under the control of the State of Virginia, and was ceded to the United States.

Kaskaskia of to day, as well as Fort Gage, having played their part in history, contains but little to attract the busy world except the memories and relics of the past. There is but little now left to remind the observer of the busy scenes transacted there more than a century ago, long before St. Louis, the metropolis of the Mississippi Valley, was redeemed from savage nature. Its inhabitants now, in most part, are honest tillers of the soil who quietly move through life in a frugal manner. While a semblance of early history remains, however, Kaskaskia will receive the attention of the curious as being the first settled place in the great West."


F  Mr. Hayes will celebrate his silver wedding next month, and congress means to make him the very appropriate present of the silver bill about time of his celebration. -- It would be the basest kind of ingratitude for him to refuse his signature under the circumstances. --

Ex.

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