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Aubrey Percy Thomas Elliott

Born:26 January 1899
70 Cornwall Cottages, Islington, London

Married:

Ivy Downes, 1934 - widowed
Marjorie Hilda Whitham (nee Paterson), 1963
Died:March 1979, Emsworth, Hants



Frances James Elliott 
1864-?
Alice E.A. Elliott ----------------------------
1891-?

Bessie Jane Elliott --------------------
1892-?

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Thomas Angus Elliott ---------------------
1897-?
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AUBREY PERCY THOMAS ELLIOTT-----
1899-1979
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Alice Ellen Angus
1861-?
Ivy Downes
?-?
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 Marjorie Hilda Whitham (nee Paterson)
1906-1988




My grandfather, Aubrey Elliott, is one of the key figures in my childhood. I remember him as an elderly man, deaf from the bombs in the World Wars he fought in, with a box full of medals in the bedroom and sharing his later years with my grandmother, Marjorie, who would get infuriated when he turned off his hearing aid just as she was trying to tell him something!

Aubrey was born and bred in London, to parents who were also Londoners. His mother Alice was the daughter of a journeyman printer from Lambeth, and came from a family of six (1); his father, Frances, came originally from Somerset but moved to London in early life to work as a groom.

Aubrey spent all his life in Islington before meeting my grandmother just before their retirement.

His family lived in Cornwall Cottages, in Islington. The Cottages were one of several blocks of tenement flats on Popham Street, just down the road from the Angel Tube station.

Aubrey was the youngest of four, with two older sisters and an older brother. His life would have been that of a typical working class London street urchin: his father was a groom, presumably in local inns, and money would have been scarce.

He would have been about 15 when the First World War broke out. I believe from memories of my conversations with my grandmother that he served in both World Wars - though I have yet to confirm this for sure.

When he was about 35, between the World Wars, he married a woman called Ivy Downes. I have yet to discover if there were any children: I know that she died and left him a widower.

He must have resigned himself to a solitary life, working in London as a civil servant, after that. But then he met my grandmother: and a year before he retired, found himself married for a second time with a ready-made family - my mother and uncle.

He was always a Londoner through and through, and never seemed entirely at home in the rural seaside town of Emsworth where he spent his later years. But even so, he had a largely happy - if argumentative - and companionable old age, and eventually died, my grandmother by his side, at home in his sleep.




(1) 1881 census for 13 Griffen Lane, home of Alice Ellen Angus and her family (father: Henry Angus, journeyman printer; mother: Sarah Lane)