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Newspaper Clippings

February 11, 1864
DeWitt County Public & Central Transcript
Clinton, Illinois

MARRIED.—On Tuesday evening, the 4th, by Rev. Preston Wood, Mr. James A. LAFFERTY, Sheriff of DeWitt County, and Miss Julia PHARES, all of this town.
...................

May 22, 1875
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CIRCUIT COURT.
The Circuit Court has disposed of the followign business in addition to what we have heretofore published:...

V. C. CRAIG vs Lucian CRAIG. Judgment of divorce.
...................

February 9, 1878
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

PROCEEDINGS OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Adjourned Term. Jan. 1878.

Ferdinand EASTLING, guardian, etc., vs. J. F. Waterbury; continued by agreement.
...................

February 9, 1878
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

PROCEEDINGS OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
Adjourned Term. Jan. 1878.

Lucian CRAIG vs. M. C. Slutts: case tried, jury trial; verdict for plaintiff that he is entitled to the immediate possession of the property; that the same had been unlawfully taken and detained from him.
...................

May 25, 1878
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

TOWN OFFICERS.
The following list of town officers has been in type for several weeks, but we have not been able to find room for it until now.  

PINE GROVE.
Supervisors—R. D. Sparks, chm., Wm. R. Beggs and James Sample; Clerk—A. L. Anderson; Treasurer—Wm. Shenck; Assessor—E. B. BANCROFT; Constable—Geo. Ostrander.
...................

August 24, 1878
Stevens Point Journal — Supplement.
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

TAX DEED NOTICE
Pine Grove
Town 21. Range 8.

Owner's Name
desc.
sec.
amt.
G. W. CRAIG
Lot No. 10
3
7.39
C. EASTLING
N½ NW ¼ SW ¼
11
3.37
...................

September 7, 1878
Stevens Point Journal — Supplement.
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

SECOND NOTICE
Pine Grove
Town 21. Range 8.

Owner's Name
desc.
sec.
amt.
G. W. CRAIG
Lot No. 10
3
7.39
C. EASTLING
N½ NW ¼ SW ¼
11
3.37
...................

December 21, 1878
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

REAL ESTATE.
Transactions from Dec. 7 to Dec. 18, 1878.
Reported to the JOURNAL by Ole O. Woglsand, Register of Deeds.

Ferdinand EASTLING to George D. Wairing, 40 acres, Almond, 150 dollars.
...................

November 22, 1879
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

COURT PROCEEDINGS.
November Term, 1879.

Lucian CRAIG vs. J. A. Walker. Cause dismissed on application of plaintiff's attorney.
...................

Friday, October 13, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Col. Geo. B. LEMEN, one of the old veterans of DeWitt county, went to Chicago last week with his son James and spent the Sabbath visiting his children who are living in the city. It being the old gentleman's seventy-third birthday, his children presented him with a costly gold-headed cane as a souvenir of their affection for the father who had cared for them in infancy and aided them through all their years.

Source: Judy Simpson
...................

Friday, November 10, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Drew INMAN, our popular general merchant, was agreeably surprised last Saturday night in a manner that will doubtless be long and pleasantly remembered by himself and family. Saturday was his thirty-fifth birthday anniversary, and two weeks ago his wife instituted a movement to surprise him by inviting a number of the members of the Knights of Pythias lodge to their house that evening to take tea, to be there when he arrived home. Mr. Inman is a popular member of this order, and is now serving his second term as Chancellor Commander; and as this occasion afforded a good opportunity for his fraters to give evidence of their appreciation of his fealty toward their society, they made use of it by presenting him with an elegant Knight of Pythias watch charm the finest they could procure. It was presented with a speech by Frank M. Burroughs, in behalf of his brethren, just after indulging in a magnificent feast, prepared by the hostess, who proved herself capable of entertaining the most pronounced epicurean. The only regret of all parties concerned was that all the Pythians could not take part in the entertainment of their worthy brother, but the capacity of the house would not admit of it. The name of the donors of the charm were: Frank M. Burroughs, Lyman H. Henry, Judge Ingham, A. C. Hosmer, Richard Butler, H. L. Hunter, William Metzger, C. L. ROBBINS, Charles E. Nagely, A. H. Magill, A. L. Friedman, F. O. Pease, M. L. Woy, Samuel Monlux, A. W. Razey, N. E. Wheeler, E. G. Argo, H. L. Keeler, E. F. Phares.

Source: Judy Simpson
...................

Friday, December 1, 1882
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

HOW THANKSGIVING WAS OBSERVED
To begin with, every body who could get a turkey bought one, but the national bird was remarkably scarce, and many a table had to substitute other kinds of poultry. During the early morning hours our merchants did a thriving business, but at ten o'clock the stores were all closed and the proprietors and their clerks took a holiday till four o'clock in the afternoon.

UNION THANKSGIVING SERVICES were held in the Presbyterian Church at eleven o'clock in the forenoon, and a larger congregation than is usual on such occasions assembled to return thanks for the blessings enjoyed during the past year. All of the pastors in the city took part in the exercises, the sermon being delivered by the Rev. T. I. Coultas. The sermon is highly complimented by those who heard it for its practical teachings and for the scholarship displayed in its preparation. Mr. Coultas is a pleasant talker and commands the attention of his audience.

THE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS gave their sixth annual ball in the evening. DeWitt Hall was handsomely decorated for the occasion, and all of Clinton's youth and beauty, with a fair sprinkling of venerable sires and mothers, assembled to enjoy the pleasures of the evening. The Knights have been noted in past years for their elegant entertainments, but last night was the crowning triumph. By eight o'clock the hall was crowded with joyous pleasure seekers, and a little later the members of the lodge marched in, in full uniform, and after going through a few evolutions the floor was cleared for dancing, and till four o'clock this morning the dancers made good use of their time. Goodman's excellent orchestra from Decatur furnished the music. At midnight a sumptuous banquet was provided at the Magill House, to which more than one hundred and fifty guests sat down. Mr. and Mrs. Razey made a special effort on this occasion, and they were highly complimented by all of the guests.

Many a poor family in Clinton had cause for gratitude to their more fortunate neighbors for some little delicacies to season their own homely fare.

Source: Judy Simpson
...................

November 9, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Death has invaded the home of Mr. and Mrs. Drew INMAN and taken from them the babe that was born two weeks ago. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of friends in their sorrow.

Source: Judy Simpson
...................

November 30, 1883
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. Drew INMAN has been confined to his bed by sickness for the past two weeks. His disease seems to be nervous prostration.

Source: Judy Simpson
...................

July 25, 1884
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. and Mrs. *Tobe INMAN are the happy parents of a bouncing big baby girl. The little stranger made her appearance on last Saturday. The name of Inman is not likely to be handed down very far into posterity by this family, as their four children are all girls.

Source: Judy Simpson

(*Nickname; aka Alto Inman)
...................

Friday, July 24, 1885
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Eddie Buck was starting for home from town on last Saturday night, on horseback, when his horse slipped and fell and came down with heavy force on the boy's right leg. Fortunately Mrs. Drew INMAN was driving past in her buggy, and she got out and picked up the boy, and getting him into the buggy, drove around to Mr. INMAN's store. Dr. Wilcox was immediately summoned. He examined the boy's leg and found that the knee was badly bruised but no bones were broken. The doctor prescribed a lotion for the bruised leg, and then Mrs. Inman drove the boy home to his mother's residence, nearly a mile west of town.

Source: Judy Simpson
...................

September 28, 1885
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

ADDITIONAL LOCAL

Steam Laundry
W. CRAIG has leased Geo. L. Sweetman's interest in the City Steam Laundry, and it will open up again on Monday next. He will give his entire attention to the business, which will be run as heretofore with delivery wagon, &c. Mr. Craig has secured first-class workmen and guarantees to turn out the best of work. He invites the former patrons, and many new ones, to call and give him a trial.
...................

March 4, 1887
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mrs. Carl SWIGART died at her home in DeWitt last Tuesday evening. She was the mother of three children. Mrs. Swigart was the daughter of the Rev. A. McCONKEY, of DeWitt, and a niece of Mrs. C. L. ROBBINS, of this city.

Source: Judy Simpson

(See obituary)
...................

August 16, 1888
Clark Republican and Press

Geo. W. CRAIG, Randolph Seamann and Mrs. France Nettleton, of this place have recently been granted pensions.
...................

Friday October 19, 1888
Wisconsin Leader
Merrillan, Wisconsin

Mr. and Mrs. Fred CRAIG, recently of La Crosse, now occupy H. Stiles' house.
...................

March 23, 1889
Tomah Journal
Tomah, Wisconsin

LA GRANGE
An example of profitable butter making is given us by Mr. N. GETMAN of La Grange. He milked five cows which supplied his family with butter & milk and besides this, sold butter in amounts of 1025 lbs. The butter sold for 18 cent per lb. Income from each cow nearly $40.00.
...................

May 11, 1889
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

First publication March 16, —w7
SHERIFF'S SALE.

IN CIRCUIT COURT—PORTAGE COUNTY,
John M. Smart and George G. Crowell, co-partners under the firm name and style of "Smart & Crowell", plaintiffs, vs. Cornelius EASTLING and Mary EASTLING, defendants.

By virtue of a judgment of foreclosure and sale in the above entitled action, and dated the 13th day of March. A.D., 1888, I shall offer for sale and sell to the highest bidder, on the 30th day of April, A.D., 1889, at 2 o'clock P.M., at the sheriff's office, in the court house, in the city of Stevens Point, Portage county,
Wisconsin, the following descried real estate, to-wit: Lots No. nine (9), No. sixteen (16), and No. twenty-one (21) in section No. nineteen (19), and lot No. seven (7), in section No. thirty (30), all in township No. twenty-one (21), north of range No. nine (9), east. The same being situated in the county of Portage and State of Wisconsin, to satisfy said judgment together with interest and cost of sale.

J. S. Mitchell,
Sheriff of Portage Co., Wis.

Synon & Frost, Plaintiff's Attorneys.
Dated Stevens Point, Wis., March 15, 1889.
...................

Friday, September 6, 1889
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The managers of the corset factory have matters in such shape that within the next few days the machinery will be set in motion and Clinton will be ready to supply the ladies of the land with the finest corsets ever manufactured. It is slow work fitting up a new factory as there are so many minor details that must be attended to in getting machinery ready to work. The Clinton members of the board of managers are Judge G. K. Ingham, Mr. Drew INMAN and Captain Conklin, and the stockholders may have perfect confidence that every interest will be carefully guarded. Already a number of orders have been sent in for a supply of corsets, and the indications are that the force of hands will be kept busy from the start.


Source: Judy Simpson
...................

October 15, 1889
Decatur Daily Dispatch
Decatur, Illinois

Mrs. Drew INMAN and daughters, Misses Maynan, Milran, and Blanche, spent yesterday in Decatur with Mrs. W. F. Calhoun, on their way to their home in Clinton from a week's attendance at the St. Louis exposition.
...................

October 24, 1889
Decatur Daily Dispatch
Decatur, Illinois

Mr. Drew INMAN, a leading merchant of Clinton, was in the city yesterday on a short visit to his friend, Dr. W.F. Calhoun.

Source: Judy Simpson
...................

Friday, January 31, 1890
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

During the past week there have been several serious cases of la grippe in Clinton, and so bad were some of the patients that for a time fatal results were feared. Mrs. W. A. Wheeler, Mrs. S. K. Carter and Mrs. A. H. Isbell had severe attacks of pneumonia resulting from an attack of la grippe, but this morning we are glad to learn that all three are somewhat better. John W. Day, Drew INMAN, A. D. McHenry, Dr. Hyde, and Master-in-Chancery Gambrel have been seriously sick. Mr. Gambrel and Dr. Hyde are the only ones that are now considered dangerous. The above cases are the worst reported, though it is safe to say that there are not less than four hundred persons afflicted this morning in Clinton.

Source: Judy Simpson
...................

Friday, January 31, 1890
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

From the best information we can gather there were not less than six hundred persons in Clinton down with la grippe last Friday and Saturday. About two hundred and fifty scholars were out of school last Friday on account of the disease. But few homes escaped, and in some nearly every member of the family was down at the same time. There is one peculiarity about the disease, it strikes its victim suddenly and in three or four days, except in rare cases, the patient is convalescent. But then they are not entirely cured for the victim is troubled with pains in the limbs and their legs weight a ton, and every bone in their bodies has a rasping feeling.

Source: Judy Simpson
...................

Friday, February 7, 1890
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. Drew INMAN is still confined to his bed, but his family hopes to see him up in a few days. His case is not serious, but he has been very much prostrated.

Source: Judy Simpson
...................

Friday, February 28, 1890
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

HOME SWEET HOME.
These words have a new meaning to Fred L. Harpster since his return from Montana. Last Summer Fred went out to Montana with Drew INMAN on a prospecting tour, and going at the season they did, everything looked inviting. Both of the gentlemen came home filled with the beauties of the Montana country and the glowing prospects for business, and then and there they decided that it should be their future home. They saw wealth galore in its vast plains, which could be used in the cattle and sheep business, and the town of Great Falls seemed to be such a grand field for all kinds of enterprises that it was only a wonder to them that everybody in DeWitt county was not ready to start for Great Falls and Montana. They saw the bright side of the picture then, for it was summer time and everything was life and animation. But Fred saw the other side of the picture within the past few weeks. In the latter part of January he left this city again for Montana, this time with the intention of remaining and investing in business. He went out as a sort of John the Baptist to prepare the way for the coming of his family. In passing through Dakota the train he was on struck on of those mild blizzards for which Dakota is famous and this chilled his heart and made him long for his home in Clinton. Arriving at Montana, he found the place dull and cheerless, and a dozen men ready for every business opening or job. A man with small capital could find no place there, for every business seemed to be controlled by rings and syndicates. A man with large capital might make money in stock raising, but one who would try farming would starve to death. Fred shook the snow and mud of Great Falls off his feet as speedily as possible and visited other towns and localities, but the same state of things existed every where. Disgusted and weary he turned his back on Montana and his face toward God's country, and last Monday morning there was not a happier man in Clinton than Fred Harpster as he stepped off the train and was once more at home, sweet home. Fred will remain in Illinois, and we hope that he will find some business opening that will decide him to remain in this city.

Source: Judy Simpson
...................

Friday, March 7, 1890
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Drew INMAN has decided to remain in Clinton. Along in the latter part of last summer he decided to close out his stock of goods, sell his property, and move to Montana. Circumstances have changed his determination. Two of his children lie buried in Woodlawn and his wife could not bear the idea of going away and leaving her precious dead. Last week Drew went to Chicago and bought a large stock of goods and he is determined to become a fixture in Clinton. All of his friends rejoice that he has come to this conclusion. Today he makes announcement of his new stock of goods in the Public, and invites his old customers and new ones to call and see him.

Source: Judy Simpson
...................

Friday, March 14, 1890
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. Otto H. SWIGART, the supervisor from Santa Anna township, attended his last meeting this week as a member of the board. Otto has bought a fine farm of two hundred acres adjoining the city of Champaign, for which he paid $16,000. He has already moved part of his stock to his new home and in the course of a few days will leave this county. He will be a loss to Santa Anna township, for never in its history has that township had a truer or better representative on the board of supervisors. Through his energy and efforts the heavy railroad indebtedness of the township was so adjusted as to bear more lightly on the people, and it is now in such shape that it can be paid in regular installments. Otto Swigart is one of the brightest young farmers in this county, and Champaign will find him a valuable citizen.

Source: Judy Simpson
...................

August 8, 1890
Decatur Daily Dispatch
Decatur, Illinois

Clinton, ILL, August 7.—Fred Harpster and Drew INMAN left this morning for an extended trip through Dakota and Montana, with a view of locating if they find the desired location.
...................
  
Friday, August 22, 1890
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

..."We started a corset factory here once. We put in a good deal of money, but it died. For awhile we thought it would be a home for women who had to support themselves. We thought it would be a sort of 'Palace of Delight,' such as Walter Besant pictures in that impossible novel of his, 'All Sorts and Conditions of Men.' But nobody connected with the enterprise knew nothing about a corset, and the enterprise went to pieces."

Source: Judy Simpson
...................

March 13, 1891
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

Mr. Drew INMAN was in Chicago this week adding to his spring stock of dry goods and novelties. The ladies should call and see his new goods.

Source: Judy Simpson
...................
  
March 13, 1891
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

The 21st of March will soon be here, which the almanacs tell us will be the opening day of spring. The weather of the past two or three weeks has been anything but springy, yet it has not deterred our Clinton merchants from getting ready for the spring business. This week Drew INMAN has been in Chicago looking over the piles of goods in the wholesale dry goods houses, and as has been his custom he always comes home loaded with bargains. The ladies of this county will find it profitable to call at Inman's dry goods store and see his elegant stock of goods and the prices at which he has them marked. Mr. Inman has been so long in business in this city that he understands what dry goods customers want.

Source: Judy Simpson

...................

March 13, 1891
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

C. S. LAFFERTY, John Lisenby, and R. L. Rosencrans, members of the Masonic Lodge in Weldon, came to Clinton last Tuesday night and had the degree of Mark Master conferred on them.

Source: Judy Simpson
...................

Monday, April 26, 1891
Decatur Review
Decatur, Illinois

KENNEY
Drew INMAN, of Clinton, called on friends here last Monday.
...................

May 18, 1893
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Wisconsin

The marriage of Thomas BIDDLE and Miss May CRAIG, daughter of Nelson CRAIG, took place at Stanley on Sunday last, C. A. Krupp officiating justice.
...................

January 19, 1894
Decatur Daily Republican
Decatur, Illinois

Mrs. INMAN, wife of Drew INMAN, a leading merchant in Joliet, accompanied by her infant daughter (Joliwill), was a guest of W.F. Calhoun and family last night and to-day.
...................

August 1, 1894
Decatur Daily Republican
Decatur, Illinois

GAMBLING DRIVES HIM TO SUICIDE.
Joliet, Ill., July 31.— Samuel INMAN, son of Drew INMAN, the dry goods dealer on Chicago street, attempted suicide this morning by cutting his throat with a razor. Doctors were called, stopping the flow of blood, but it is impossible for him to recover. Young Inman was a slave to gambling and drank to excess. Last night he lost a large sum and this is supposed to have caused him to end his trouble.

The Inman family lately resided at Clinton, and are well known to many DeWitt county people who are residents of Decatur.
...................

February 9, 1895
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

A TIMELY ACT OF CHARITY.
At a meeting of the Grand Order of Orient last Saturday evening a sum of money was appropriated from the treasury to be used in purchasing provisions for the poor. A committee consisting of F. W. Kingsbury, F. T. Boston, and J. P. Dorsey was appointed to expend the money and distribute provisions to families or persons found to be in destitute circumstances. Monday morning the committee started out to relieve a number of families reported to be in need of charity and it was not a hard matter to find many persons suffering for want of food, clothing, or fuel. Among the first to receive assistance was a trio of bright little girls, the step-children of Norman CRAIG, who lives at 746 Jefferson street. Upon Investigation it was found that for three weeks the little ones, all of whom were less than 8 years of age, had been suffering for want of food and had not clothing enough to keep them warm. During that period it seems the mother had been absent from home. She had gone to Tomah, where the family formerly lived, to collect some money that was due her. Being unable to collect the money she was obliged to work and earn enough to pay her transportation back to this city. During her absence the children had been sadly neglected by the father, they being left alone a greater part of the time to care for themselves as best they could. The three slept together on a small cot with such a scanty supply of bedding that it was necessary to keep their clothing on at night, and even then they would suffer with cold. On Monday they were visited by the committee and provisions were at once sent to the home of a neighbor, where they were dealt out to the children, the step parent being left to provide for himself. After the committee had visited them it is said that Craig sold their sewing machine and invested a part of the money in wood and provisions. Mrs. Craig returned home last Tuesday and was much grived [sic] upon hearing of the sad neglect that had come to her little ones during her absence.
...................

March 2, 1895
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

—Some time ago mention was made of the destitute condition of the family of Mrs. Norman CRAIG, who reside on Jefferson street. Mrs. Craig is the mother of three bright little girls, for whom she is unable to provide. The first of the week ladies who were interested in the welfare of the children called upon Mrs. Craig and offered to find homes for the little ones. The mother readily gave her consent for the two youngest, but the eldest, a girl of eight, she preferred to keep with her. Accordingly the two younger daughters were taken and provided for until Thursday evening, at which time they were taken to Milwaukee by J. P. Dysart, agent for the Children's Home society of Wisconsin, whose duty it is to provide homes for orphans and other children who come to the care of the society. Mr. Dysart has alone placed over four hundred children in comfortable homes.
...................

Wednesday, March 6, 1895
Stevens Point Gazette
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

—J.P. Dysart, agent for the Children's Home Society, at Milwaukee, spent Thursday in the city, and on his return was accompanied by two little daughters of Mrs. Norman CRAIG, whom kind friends have been assisting for some time, the father being unable or unwilling to provide for their support, and who is the same individual who was mentioned in these columns about four weeks ago as having left the little ones to shift for themselves—to live or starve—during the temporary absence of the mother. Mrs. Craig is the mother of three children, all girls, and consented to part with the two youngest, after the ladies interested in the welfare of the family had consulted with her, and they will be provided with good homes.
...................

June 4, 1896
Tomah Journal
Tomah, Wisconsin

VALLEY JUNCTION
John WOOD and brother Elmer have commenced work on the bridge over Mill Creek near the R. R. track, which they intend to have completed this week.
...................

June 11, 1896
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Wisconsin

Miss Lillie MORRIS and Norman CRAIG were united in marriage at the residence of Charles CHAMBERLAIN at Milladore on May 28, 1896. They will make their home in this village.
...................

(IT REALLY DOES TAKE A VILLAGE)

July 8, 1896
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

A FIGHT FOR POSSESSION.
Little Earl Cavender Still in Charge of the Sheriff. — Mother Wants the Boy. — Good and Bad Reputations.

The circuit court room was well filled on Thursday and Friday last, many spectators being attracted there to listen to the testimony in the Kendall-Bentley case, the legal battle being brought about by the kidnapping of little Earl Cavender from the house of C. M. Kendall by his grandmother and aunt, a couple of weeks ago. B. B. Park and W. F. Owen represented the Kendalls, and J. H. Brennan was present to look after the interested of the Bentleys and those who were backing them up. The interested parties were all present, including Mrs. Cavender, the mother of the boy, and her husband, Mrs. Bentley, Ambrose Bentley, Mrs. Lillybridge and Mr. and Mrs. Kendall, while the boy remained in the charge of the sheriff.

The examination was on a writ of habeas corpus, and the application alleged that the mother of the boy was unfit to bring him up, having a bad reputation and character, while if the boy was given to the grandmother, Mrs. Bentley, or aunt, Jessie Bentley, alias Mrs. Lillybridge, etc., he would be taken to Minnesota, where the surroundings were unfavorable for one of his tender years.

Mrs. Bentley was the first witness and testified that the boy had been placed in her charge by his mother, Mrs. Cavender. That the Kendall's took the boy last fall for a visit of a week and thereafter refused to give him up. She gave an account of the kidnapping by herself and daughter, the same as heretofore published. That the boy was taken on the authority of his mother, who was acting on the advice of John. H. Brennan. A letter asking her to get the boy, dated June 15th, while the kidnapping occurred on the 23d inst., was produced as evidence.

John H. Brennan testified to advising the mother to take the boy, if Kendalls would not give him up, or to authorize her mother to do so.

Mrs. Cavender testified that she lives in Chicago, and that the father of the boy was J. H. Glendon, to whom she was married in St. Paul, or supposed she was, but the marriage proved to be a fraud. She couldn't remember the date of her marriage, the name of the minister, etc. She was married to her present husband in Milwaukee in 1891, and he was tending bar at the time. She denied that her character or associations were bad, or ever had been, and she wanted to educate her son.

In the afternoon C. M. Kendall testified to the bad character of the mother of the child, while the reputation of the Bentleys generally was unsavory. The mother had given the boy to himself and wife to bring up and keep as their own, saying that she didn't want him, and she had never paid a cent for his support.

Will. Sitherwood swore that Mrs. Cavender had visited a saloon in which he was working, had drank in the back room, and thereafter drove in a hack with others to the eastern part of the city.

John Goulette testified that a woman who looked like Mrs. Cavender had visited his saloon, in company with others, during the past winter, and Wm. McCarr saw a woman drinking in a saloon whom he supposed was the same party.

Claud Parker testified to different trips in which the woman rode in his hack.

J. F. Pratt, H. A. Wood, F. J. Pratt, H. E. Casler, and Ed. Casler all residents of Pine Grove, testified to the reputation of the Bentleys, that the son being bad in the opinion of most of them, whey they knew nothing against the others.

Fred Stewart testified that the boy was well treated at Kendalls and their reputation was good.

Theo. Parker said that Kendall was a very nice man, and knew nothing against his wife's reputation. Have heard some gossip about her, but couldn't remember or repeat it.

Mrs. Theo. Parker: Never heard Kendall's talked about. Was at home when Mrs. Bentley came for the boy. Never heard such talk before. She swore and cursed in terrible shape. She was there perhaps half hour. Heard man say "don't kill the child." Lady said "I will kill the child." Mrs. K. got child and went into house. The boy was well taken care of.

B. L. Vaughn and Henry Curran testified to the good reputation of Kendall, and Theresa Giette said she never saw the Bentleys mistreat the boy.

Mrs. Kendall testified that the boy was given them by the mother in 1890, and that she went and took him from the Bentleys last August.

Geo. Wallace said the boy was at Kendall's in 1892: Albert CRAIG, of Plainfield, said that the reputation of Hiram EASTLING, who drove the team when the boy was carried away, was good.

Mrs. Stewart said that Mrs. Kendall's reputation was good, and J. N. Brands said his wife rented them a house at Wausau.

Mrs. Bentley again testified at length, denying that she had swore at Mrs. Kendall, and had heard the latter call boy names, such as fool, idiot, etc.

Mrs. Cavender denied giving the boy to the Kendalls and had repeatedly written to have Mrs. Kendall take the boy back to its grandmother, and had paid nothing for his support and clothing.

After testimony was all in, it was decided to adjourn further hearing until the 13th inst.

...................

Saturday, July 11, 1896
Decatur Daily Review
Decatur, Illinois

CLINTON
Mrs. Drew INMAN of Joliet is visiting the family of C. L. ROBBINS.

(Lydia McConkey ROBBINS)
...................
  
July 15, 1896
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

ARGUING THE CASE.
Arguments in the Kendall-Bentley case, for the possession of little Earl Cavender, are in progress before Judge Murat today. The case was opened by W. F. Owen for the Kendalls, but before progressing far Mr. Owen became ill and his line of argument had to be followed out by B. B. Park. John H. Brennan is talking for the Bentleys and the mother of the boy as we go to press, and Mr. Park will close the case for the Kendalls.

...................
  
July 22, 1896
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

KENDALLS GET THE BOY.
When this paper went to press, last Wednesday afternoon, the attorneys in the Kendall-Bentley case had not finished their arguments before Judge Murat, but at the conclusion of the same the court reserved his decision until the following afternoon at 2 o'clock. At this time most of the interested parties were present, including Mrs. Kendall, Mrs. Bentley and Mr. and Mrs. Cavender. The court stated that the evidence was to the effect that the mother, Mrs. Cavender, is unfitted to care for the boy, Earl Cavender, and while the reputation of the grandmother, Mrs. Bentley, is good, her surroundings are such that it would not be in justice to give her custody of the lad. As there were others who are ready and willing to care for the boy, and as he had committed no offense, he could not be placed in a state institution. The welfare of the child, the court decided, would be best subserved by placing him charge of Mr. and Mrs. Kendall, and it was so ordered.

The mother of the boy, Mrs. Cavender was in no way visably [sic] affected by the decision of the court, but the grandmother showed her feeling by weeping. On the other hand, Mrs. Kendall wept for joy. The boy was released from the sheriff on Friday and turned over to the Kendalls.

(Note: The following Spring, the local paper noted that little Earl was on the honor roll at school. It is nice to know that he did well despite his situation.)
...................

Friday, July 24, 1896
Decatur Daily Review
Decatur, Illinois

CLINTON
Mrs. Drew INMAN and her two little daughters have returned to their home in Joliet, after a pleasant visit with Mrs. C. L. ROBBINS and other friends.

(Lydia McConkey Robbins)
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October 7, 1896
Tomah Journal
Tomah, Wisconsin

WYEVILLE
H. E. WOOD attending court at Sparta.
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November 5, 1896
Tomah Journal
Tomah, Wisconsin

WYEVILLE
H. E. WOOD departed one day last week for an extended visit at—well, we don't know where—neither does Mrs. WOOD. She intends to move in the house of her brothers, Ben and Eli SUTHERLAND and keep house this winter.
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December 3, 1896
Tomah Journal
Tomah, Wisconsin

WYEVILLE
H. E. WOOD returned home one day this week.
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January 1, 1897
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

BEAUTIFUL MARRIAGE SCENE.
The beautiful farm residence of Mr. and Mrs. George BARNES, four miles northeast of Weldon, was the scene of a beautiful home wedding on Wednesday evening, December 23d, which was witnessed by about sixty guests. At 7 o'clock, to the sweet strains of the wedding march, Miss Nellie, the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. BARNES, and Otto McCONKEY, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. S. L. McCONKEY, took their place in a gateway entwined with smilax, where they were met by the officiating minister, Rev. A. H. Widney, and in an impressive manner the pastor joined them in wedlock after the divine law and appointment of the Creator. After the ceremony a sumptuous repast was served, and a social evening was passed, enlivened with selections on the piano by the bride, with violin accompaniments by her father and sister, Mrs. Charles PACE. The place of honor was accorded to William BARNES, grandfather of the bride, whose seventy-six years rests lightly on his pleasing face and generous nature. The presents were numerous and valuable. The happy couple has the best wishes of many friends.

Source: Judy Simpson
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February 18, 1897
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

MARRIED.
Mr. Wilbur N. CRAIG, son of Fred CRAIG, and Miss Jennie L. WRIGHT, daughter of Geo. M. WRIGHT, were married at the residence of Justice J. B. Carpenter on Dixon street, Wednesday evening. Both of the contracting parties reside in this city.
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Monday, February 22, 1897
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

THE CHAMPION LOAD
Geo. ALGER brought into the Cirkel Mnfg. Co's. yards a load of 31 inch elm bolts on Tuesday which scaled 7½ cords. He hauled the load four miles with his own single team. It was about the size of a car load. —Exchange

Mr. Alger called at the Journal office to-day, stated that the team that drew the above load was bought of Curran & Weisner of this city.
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August 19, 1898
Clinton Register
DeWitt Co., Illinois

LAFFERTY FAMILY REUNION.

The LAFFERTY Family reunion occurred Wednesday on the old homestead in Rutledge township, nearly 180 persons participating. The occasion was in reality to begin the series of reunions that will follow through the coming years. Grandma LAFFERTY, of DeWitt, and her daughter Mary, Mrs. Julia WILSON and daughters of this city and H. W. SCHUMACHER and family, of Eldorado, Kan., were present, and with Charles LAFFERTY of this city, Wm. LAFFERTY of McLean county; Sam and Isaac of Rutledge township, and quite a number of the collateral kindred of the Lafferty race sat down to a sumptuous blanket in the old original grove north of the mansion where every delicacy known to our fruitful clime made up the feast.

Judge W. H. LAFFERTY, the father of the DeWitt county branch of the family, so well and widely known, came to DeWitt county from Clark county, O., in 1859 settling on the farm where Wednesday's festivities were held. He there raised and educated his family, many of whom are parents and now grandparents, He was for a time county judge of this county and held other positions of honor in the old commonwealth, and his son James LAFFERTY, the first husband of Mrs. Julia WILSON of this city, was elected sheriff of the county.

The meeting was a most pleasant one and the reminiscences of early life in their picturesque wilds were recited and new and more fervid attachments generated in such recollections.
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August 23, 1898
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS
Mrs. W. C. CRAIG has gone to Amhurst to spend a couple of weeks.
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January 4, 1899
Tomah Journal
Tomah, Wisconsin

VALLEY JUNCTION
Miss Nora WOOD won 2nd prize—a diamond ring—at the Electric Company engagement. A voting contest was held for the most popular lady.
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April 21, 1899
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Wisconsin

Iva, a little daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Geo. L. CRAIG, 10, died yesterday morning after a week's illness. It is reported that her illness was due to excessive rope jumping, a practice much in vogue among children.
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May 20, 1899
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Wisconsin

Frank FELLOWS & Mabel CRAIG went to Chippewa Falls last week and were united in marriage.
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May 31 1899
Tomah Journal
Tomah, Wisconsin

WYEVILLE
H. E. WOOD recently returned from the southern part of the state where he has been selling evergreen trees.
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Friday, June 9, 1899
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

MR. SWIGART HAS COURAGE.
Harry SWIGART was slightly injured in a runaway at Weldon Saturday. In company with James Stewart he was driving a team of mules to a road wagon. The mules ran away; Mr. Swigart being thrown out and drug a distance of eighty rods while holding to the lines. Not to be discouraged, however, Mr. Swigart hitched the mules to another buggy and again attempted to drive them. The mules again ran and after breaking two rigs, Mr. Swigart decided to postpone further operations until he recovers from the numerous injuries.

Source: Judy Simpson
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July 22, 1899
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS
Elmer Eggleston, Albert Sappendowski, and Jet. CRAIG have gone to Lae Qui Parle, Minn., to work on V. P. Atwell's farm.
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Friday, December 1, 1899
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

WILL LEAVE WELDON.
Harry SWIGART, one of the most enterprising citizens of Weldon and DeWitt county, has disposed of his many interests in Weldon and will shortly leave on a prospecting tour of Iowa and Dakota, with a view of selecting a permanent location.

Source: Judy Simpson
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December 29, 1899
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Wisconsin

Geo. BURKE, court commissioner, presented a bride Anna (STODA) KNICKERBOCKER of Chippewa Falls as a present to Norman CRAIG.
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January 1900
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Wisconsin

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. BIDDLE, JR. had a daughter on New Years Eve.

(The baby was Mary Alice BIDDLE)
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March, 1900
Tomah Journal
Tomah, Wisconsin

WYEVILLE
Several families from this area attended the wedding of Mr. Louis SCHOLZ and Miss Eva WOOD, Thursday, at Benjaminville.
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April 26, 1900
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Wisconsin

Mr. & Mrs. Geo. ALGER had a daughter on Saturday.

(The baby was Doris ALGER)
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April 26, 1900
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Wisconsin

Geo. L. CRAIG purchased Fred Lehman's dwelling and 2 lots.
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May 3, 1900
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Wisconsin

Mr. & Mrs. Geo. L. CRAIG's son, Roy, has some choice hens. He showed an egg that measured 6½ by 8 inches and is perfectly formed.
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December 27, 1900
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Wisconsin

Mr. M. V. SPENCER of La Crosse and Miss Cora FREEDY of this place, were married at the residence of H. Bryden at Neillsville, by Rev. Ingham on Saturday, December 22, 1900. They will reside in Greenwood, Clark County.
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February 2, 1901
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS

Tuesday
Jetty CRAIG has gone down to Plainfield to spend a couple of weeks.
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April 18, 1901
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Wisconsin

Marriage license issued to Peter H. BAST and Adaline A. CROWELL.

(Adeline Adelia CRAIG m. (1) Ezekiel Barrett BANCROFT 1876, m. (2) Jacob CROWELL 1897, m. (3) Peter BAST 1901).
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April 18, 1901
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Wisconsin

Norman CRAIG bought 1 acre of land from A. A. Barr.
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Thursday, July 11, 1901
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Wisconsin

Born, to Mr. And Mrs. Chas. CHAMBERLAIN, on Sunday, July 7, a daughter.
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November 1901
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point Wisconsin

THE CIRCUIT COURT.
Minnie MAY vs. Frank MAY, alias. Judgment of divorce with leave for plaintiff to resume her maiden name, that of Minnie CRAIG. Defendant to pay plaintiff $100 and $50 for court costs and disbursements.
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April, 1902
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

Nelson ALISON [sic] and Minnie CRAIG of Plainfield were united in marriage on Wednesday, April 9. J. W. Bovee performing the ceremony at his residence. Mr. Alison has rented the Chas. ALISON [sic] farm and will settle down and become an honest farmer. They have the best wishes of their many friends for a long and happy life.
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Saturday, February 14, 1903
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

PLAINFIELD
Mr. and Mrs. Nelson ALLISON are rejoicing over the arrival of a girl baby at their home.
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July 16, 1903
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Clark Co., Wisconsin

Born to Mr and Mrs H. Adams of the Town of Thorp on July 12, a daughter; to Mr and Mrs Geo. ALGER on July 13, a daughter.
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August 6, 1903
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Clark Co., Wisconsin

Reseburg Ramblings—BIDDLE and Peters have an outfit for sawing wood which they think will discount anything for doing swift work that there is in the country.

The following real estate sales have been made during the past week in this vicinity: Chas. POPPE to W. Brintnall, lot 3, block 6, Village of Thorp, consideration $400.
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October 15, 1903
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Clark Co., Wisconsin

A daughter was born to Mr and Mrs Thos. BIDDLE on Friday last.
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December 3, 1903
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Clark Co., Wisconsin

Mrs. Geo Peterson and Mrs. F. M. CRAIG of Stanley entertained the members of the Union Club of this village at the former's home at Stanley on Saturday evening last. A very enjoyable time is reported by all.
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Saturday, October 7, 1905
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS

Monday
Mrs. Jetty CRAIG has returned from her former home at Alexandria, Minn., where she spent several weeks.
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Saturday, October 14, 1905
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS

Saturday
Mrs. S. M. Kimball has sold her residence property consisting of one lot and a small house at the corner of Normal avenue and North Reserve street, opposite the west entrance to the Normal, to Wilbur N. CRAIG for a consideration of $700. The deal was closed by the Southwick-Sellars Land company.

Wednesday
The fire department was called to the residence of Wilbur CRAIG, corner of Normal avenue and North Reserve street, this morning on account of a chimney fire.
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August 3, 1906
Clinton Public
Clinton, Illinois

MARRIED IN CHICAGO.

Recently Miss Ethel PHIPPS, daughter of Dr. Wm. Phipps of DeWitt, left home for a visit in Mt. Pulaski, but got no nearer than Clinton. She arrived here at 7:20 a.m. and at 8:20 a.m. boarded the train east. She was joined by John LAFFERTY, also of Dewitt. They went to Chicago, were married, returned to DeWitt and went to different homes. The parents of the girl had learned enough to feel suspicious but their fears were quieted by firm denials. The next Sunday, after returning from a buggy ride, John informed the girl's parents they had a new son-in-law who was proud of is father-in-law and mother-in-law.
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Saturday, October 13, 1906
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS

Saturday
George SUTHERLAND, who recently sold out his blacksmithing business at Arnott, has removed to the city and occupies the Frost residence at 931 Main street. He has also rented a forge and floor space at D. J. Kelsey's shop and will do a general blacksmithing business here.

Monday
Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur CRAIG, a son.
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Saturday, December 8, 1906
The Decatur Review
Decatur, Illinois

MURDERER DIES IN AN ASYLUM
Shooting of Dr. L. S. Chapin Remains Mystery.

George F. Wilkinson, the murderer of Dr. S. L. CHAPIN of Saybrook, is dead. He died at the asylum at Jacksonville, where he was taken from Bloomington and he died without making any sign of sanity or giving the attendants any reason to believe that he was not what he seemed to be-a man without mind or memory.

THE CRIME.
Wilkinson was the man who shot down Dr. S. L. Chapin of Saybrook without provocation as far as any one ever knew. The deed was committed in August, 1904. Wilkinson, as will be remembered, met Dr. Chapin on the street in front of the Chapin residence and fired at him. Wilkinson then walked down town and gave himself up. He admitted the killing and told a story of his reasons to the sheriff when he was first taken to the jail in Bloomington. Within a few hours after going to Bloomington he began to show signs of derangement and within a few days he was apparently a mental wreck. He did not seem to recognize any one and did not speak and never spoke from a time a few hours after his incarceration in the jail there.

He went to his death with no sign and the mystery of the murder of Dr. Chapin will remain unsolved.

Note: S. L. Chapin was Samuel Chapin, son of Stillman and Susan (Lafferty) Chapin.
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Friday, June 19, 1908
Clinton Register
DeWitt County, Illinois

SIXTY-FIVE YEARS OF WEDDED LIFE.

Former DeWitt County Couple Travel Life's Pathway
Together Almost the Allotted Time of Man.

Tuesday was the sixty-fifth wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Stillman A. CHAPIN of Holder, who lived for 77 years in one township in DeWitt county, moving away only five years ago. The couple held no special celebration of the event, but spent the day quietly at home. Mr. Chapin is 87 years old, and his wife is 84. They are both in good health at their advanced age and able to enjoy life to its fullest extent.

Mr. Chapin has been a farmer all his life, being one of the pioneers in this part of the state. He was born near where East Saint Louis now stands in 1821 and moved to DeWitt township, DeWitt county, with his parents when he was but five years old, where he continued to reside until five years ago. On June 16, 1843, he was married to Susan LAFFERTY, who has shared his joys and sorrows from that time to this. She was born in Ohio and came to DeWitt county when a young girl with her brother, Judge William LAFFERTY. The couple continued to live in DeWitt county until 1903, when they moved to Saybrook and then to Holder, where they reside at present.

Mr. Chapin was active in the affairs of early days and held various offices of public trust. For thirty years he was a justice of the peace, and when DeWitt county was first organized under the township system he was chosen township clerk, a position he held until his eyesight compelled him to refuse further election. His first vote was cast for James K. Polk. Mr. Chapin was an honored and respected member of the community in which he lived and an influential factor in the history of his county.

There were four children born to Mr. and Mrs. Chapin, three of whom are living today. There were three boys and all of them became practicing physicians. Dr. C. E. CHAPIN, of Bloomington, and Dr. H. S. CHAPIN, of Holder, are both prominent in their profession in their respective localities. Dr. S. L. CHAPIN was murdered by George Wilkinson at his home in Saybrook four years ago, the murderer afterward dying in the asylum in Jacksonville. The fourth child is now Mrs. M. H. [Levi Thomas] COTTINGHAM , of Lincoln.

Both Mr. and Mrs. Chapin have always been staunch Presbyterians and prominent in the work of that denomination. Hale and hearty at their advanced ages they are an optimistic couple and look exclusively on the bright side of life. They expect to live many years yet and will certainly have the congratulations and best wishes of their friends on yesterday's anniversary.

Source: Judy Simpson
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December 11, 1908
The Decatur Review
Decatur, Illinois

PANA
Pana, Ill., Dec. 11.—At a meeting of the Knights of Pythias the following officers were elected for the ensuing year:

Chancellor Commander— J. Walter Preths.
Vice Chancellor— George Taylor.
Prelate— Drew INMAN.
Master of Work— L. E. Jordan
Master of Finance— J. O. Hawker.
Master of Exchequer— T. J. Vidler.
Master at Arms— W. B. Jordan.
Inner Guard— Homer Newcomb.
Outer Guard— George Nilharts.

The lodge also voted to have an open house and smoker on New Year's afternoon. The auditors appointed to go over the books were J. J. Pierpoint, George Taylor, and W. G. Kauffman. Jacob Metzger was reelected keeper of records and seals for another year.
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October 29, 1909
The Gazette
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

ACCIDENT AT LIGHT PLANT
Supt. Mainland and Three Employees Have Close Call From Being Badly Burned, Last Saturday.

A peculiar and what easily might have been a fatal mishap occurred at the Stevens Point Lighting Co. plant on the north side of the slough last Saturday morning at about 10 o'clock.

For several days Clyde Kizer and another expert boilermaker from Oshkosh had been putting in new flues and making other repairs on the center one of the battery of three boilers. In order to expedite their work the smokestack above the boiler to their right had to be stuffed with hay and excelsior. There was just a little fire in the right-hand furnace and it is probable that a quantity of gas accumulated during the time the outlet above was filled up.

Jas. Mainland, the superintendent, was standing on the scaffolding which had been erected in front of the middle boiler, but he made a quick jump to the floor when a small quantity of flames shot out from the flues, slightly scorching his clothes. Not over ten seconds later an immense sheet of flames came forth, shooting across the south wall, a distance of sixteen feet, against which stood Mr. Kizer and Israel Rand, the company's machinist. The latter "ducked" sufficiently so that he was only slightly burned on the hands, but Kizer was not so fortunate, getting the full charge on the back of his neck and head, burning him very seriously. Wilbur CRAIG was standing near Mr. Mainland at the time, but he escaped unharmed. The explosion made a deafening report and shook the building so badly that bricks were loosened and broken. Had Mr. Mainland not jumped from the scaffolding he would probably have been fatally burned.
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Saturday, August 20, 1910
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

AMATEUR BASEBALL
The Stars defeated the Fighters Wednesday in baseball by a score of 14 to 13. The Stars were C. Dorrance, T. McCarr, E. McCarr, F. Suchowski, J. Rellahan, Walter Vinetski, L. McCarr, and A. Sunter. The Fighters were A. Friday, Charles Berens, F. McNiel, M. Peterson, F. Suchowski, E. Literski, J. Peterson, F. CRAIG, and J. Moxon.
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December 3, 1910
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS

Monday
Jetty CRAIG and little son of Fargo, N. D., arrived in the city Sunday morning, called here by the serious illness of the former's mother, at her home on the Jordan road.
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December 14, 1910
The Gazette
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

FRATERNAL OFFICERS
List of Officials Chosen by Local Fraternal and Benevolent Organizations Last Week.

BEAVERS RESERVE FUND
Officers chosen by Stevens Point Colony No. 19, Beavers Reserve Fund Fraternity are as follows:

Commander—H. F. Gusel.
Vice Commander—Matt Burkle.
Guide—Wilbur CRAIG.
Secretary—E. A. Merrill.
Treasurer—J. W. Moxon.
Hunter —John Herman.
Trapper—John Jakens.
Trustee, 3 years—William Duggan.
Medical Examiners—Drs. F. A. Walters, F. A. Southwick.
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December 31, 1910
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS

Thursday
The funeral of Mrs. Frederick CRAIG, who died at her home in this city, Monday morning, was held from the house at 2 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, Rev. W. H. Fuller officiating. Burial took place in Forest cemetery. The pallbearers were Henry Sylvester, James Barrows, Henry Kelk, and John Jakens.

(See obituary)
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January 14, 1911
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

PLAINFIELD
Mrs. Net. [sic] ALLISON and children have moved to Stevens Point to reside with her father, Fred CRAIG, who recently lost his wife. Mr. ALLISON will also go there to live.
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Saturday, March 4, 1911
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

PLAINFIELD
Mrs. Minnie ALLISON of Stevens Point visited at Charles P. ALLISON's last Friday.
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Saturday, July 8, 1911
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS

Saturday.
Fred CRAIG is visiting his son in Fargo, N. D.
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Saturday, September 23, 1911
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS

Wednesday
Miss Nellie EASTLING of Plainfield, Miss Marguerite BURKE of Thorp, and Miss Anna Hewitt of Portage have been guests of Miss Frances Oesterle. Miss Eastling returned to her home this morning.
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Saturday, October 14, 1911
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS

Wednesday
Fred CRAIG left this morning for Thorpe, Eau. Claire, and other points north to spend a few weeks with relatives and friends.
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Saturday, December 2, 1911
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
Reported for the Journal by the Portage County Law and Abstract Co.

Charles E. Werl to Fred CRAIG, part of SW section 28-24-8, Hull, $800.
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Saturday, December 2, 1911
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS

Saturday
Mr. and Mrs. W. EASTLING left for Almond this morning to spend a few days with relatives.
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Saturday, March 16, 1912
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

PLAINFIELD
Nelson ALLISON of Stevens Point has rented the Delia Waterman farm and expects to move on the farm in a few days.

ALMOND
Mrs. E. G. CROWELL and daughter, Carol, returned last Saturday from a few days' visit with Mrs. Alvin Martin at Ripon.
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January 5, 1915
Tomah Journal
Tomah, Wisconsin

VALLEY JUNCTION
This community was startled and saddened this week by the death on Monday evening of George HANCOCK, one of the oldest residents of the village by a stroke of paralysis.
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January 31, 1915
Tomah Journal
Tomah, Wisconsin

WOOD DISTRICT
A crowd of people celebrated the birthday of Mrs. Sam STEELE January 26. Everyone had a good time. Supper was served by Mrs. Steele.
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February 6, 1915
Tomah Journal
Tomah, Wisconsin

VALLEY JUNCTION
Mrs. Ruth HANCOCK has sold her residence in Valley Junction to Earl FOX and has moved into the residence on the west side belonging to the Warrens Land Co.
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August 30, 1915
The Decatur Review
Decatur, Illinois

PANA
Miss Josephine INMAN has returned to St. Louis following a visit here with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Drew INMAN.
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Monday, September 6, 1915
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

THE OFFICIAL BOARD
The following constitute the official board of St. Paul's M. E. church for the coming conference year: T. W. Anderson, Robert Maine, C. W. Simonson, H. S. Hippensteel, C. G. Fletcher, W. S. Young, A. J. Kuhl, H. C. Snyder, James Ballou, J. W. Merry, Rev. J. T. Bryan, C. C. Hayward, Frank King, A. E. Dafoe, Fred Wilson, rev. W. E. Marsh, Mrs. W. E. Marsh, Mrs. W. S. Young, E. A. Mace, R. D. Austin, Emil Zimmer, Geo. Buchan, Mrs. W. E. Atwell, Mrs. Mary Robinson, Mrs. H. Calkins, Mrs. H. C. Snyder, Jas. E. Delzell, Wilber CRAIG, Raymond Kyes, Val Putz, Mrs. C. C. Hayward.

These Will Assist
These will be assisted in handling the various benevolent and other causes of the church, by the following: Mrs. Mary Delzell, Mrs. Hippensteel, Mrs. J. H. Holman, Mrs. Walter Johnson, Mrs. Ed King, Mrs. Willard, Mrs. Will King, Mrs. Jennie CRAIG, Mrs. J. C. Bryan, Miss Anna WRIGHT, Mrs. Meta Phelps, Mrs. G. K. Mansur, A. J. Herrick, Jerome Robinson, Herbert Marsh, Etta Bloye, Mrs. Phaneuf.

The officers of this church say that not for ten years have the offerings of the people met all current expenses of the church as this year, notwithstanding the fact that some $700.00 have been received from the people for evangelistic services, Green Bay hospital and other non-regular appeals.
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Friday, November 19, 1915
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

ENLISTED IN THE NAVY
Lloyd W. Craig to Serve in Uncle Sam's Navy

On Thursday of this week Lloyd W. CRAIG, son of Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur N. CRAIG of this city, enlisted in the United States navy at the recruiting office, 222 Grand avenue, Milwaukee. He was immediately transferred to the United States training station, Great Lakes, Illinois, where he will undergo four months' training, graduating as a full fledge man-o-war's man with the rate of ordinary sea man.

From there he will go to one of the dreadnoughts of the Atlantic fleet, where he will serve until the day previous to his twenty-first birthday, when, if he has applied and behaved himself, he will be honorably discharged and paid four cents per mile for the distance between Milwaukee and whatever port he happens to be in at the time of his discharge.
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December 15, 1915
Tomah Journal
Tomah, Wisconsin

VALLEY VIEW
Elmer ROOT, Frank Root's 5 year old son, fell on the ice Friday and hurt his leg just above the knee.
Monday they called Dr. Johnson from Tomah. The Dr. found the leg broken and came Tuesday to set it and just as the Dr. was driving into Root's, a cry for help was heard just across the road. The Dr. and a few women ran over to find Mrs. Willis WOOD enveloped in flames, her clothing having caught fire and completely burned from her body and she is in a very serious condition.
...................
  
December 1915
Tomah Journal
Tomah, Wisconsin

MAY DIE FROM BURNS.
Mrs. Willis WOOD, age 20 years, of the town of Byron, was probably fatally burned at her home on Tuesday when her clothing caught fire from the stove. She was alone in the house except for her 7-months-old-baby. Screaming for help she ran to the bed where her baby was sleeping and tried to smother the flames with the bed clothes, Had not assistance quickly arrived, both she and the baby would have been burned to death.

Dr. Johnson of this city who was called to the home of a farmer in that neighborhood, was passing the house and heard the woman's screams. He ran into the house and with the assistance of neighbors who followed, succeeded in putting out the fire, but not until Mrs. Wood was terribly burned. The flames were kept from her face, but her neck, chest, back, and arms were badly burned. It is not believed that she can survive. It was the intention to bring her to the Tomah hospital, but she could not be moved.

Source: Jackie Gelly

(See obituary)
...................

December 17, 1915
Tomah Monitor Herald
Tomah, Wisconsin

Mrs. Willis WOOD, residing near Valley Junction, a young woman of about 20 years old, was probably fatally burned at her home Tuesday afternoon when her clothes caught on fire from the draught of a heating stove. She was alone in the house at the time with her 7 months old baby. The draft of the stove was open and a flame pulled out, catching her dress as she stood in close proximity to the fire. Her clothes burned rapidly and screaming for help she ran to the bed and caught up a blanket endeavoring to extinguish the flame. The bedding caught and the timely assistance of Dr. Johnson probably prevented the immediate destruction of both herself and baby.

The Dr. had been called into the neighborhood to attend another patient and was first to hear her cries for assistance. He ran to the house followed by several neighbors and at once grasped the situation. The fire was soon extinguished but not before the woman had been terribly burned, back, chest, arms receiving frighty burns.

It was not possible to move her to the hospital as was planned, her burns being worse than first believed. Aid was applied at once, and it is considered an even chance of survival from the frightful experience she has undergone.

Source: Dennis Aney
...................

Wednesday, January 5, 1916
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS
Lloyd CRAIG, who is attending the United States Naval Training Station at Great Lake, Illinois, is visiting at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. CRAIG, and will return tomorrow.
...................

Tuesday, February 8, 1916
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

HURTS BACK IN GAME
Lloyd Craig Retired From Navy After Basketball Injury

Lloyd CRAIG, who enlisted in the United States navy Nov. 15 and has since been at the naval training school at Great Lakes near Chicago, returned home Saturday, having been given an indefinite leave of absence. Mr. Craig was injured some time ago during basketball playing, his back being badly wrenched. He was confined to the hospital for a couple of weeks and later was given a medical discharge. In case he is unable to return to his regular duties in the service he will receive a pension of $12 a month for the remaining period of his enlistment, it is stated.

Mr. Craig entered the Normal school here last September and attended for a number of weeks but later left to join the navy. He was identified with the Normal basketball work and was also connected with other teams previous to that time.
...................

April 11, 1916
Tomah Journal
Tomah, Wisconsin

VALLEY VIEW
The remains of the infant child of Mr. & Mrs. Carl STEELE of Warrens was laid to rest in the Wood District Cemetery.

(This was Roland STEELE)
...................

Wednesday, May 31, 1916
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

HURT PLAYING TAG
Verne Craig Has Ligaments Of Wrist Ruptured In Fall

Verne CRAIG, the 12 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur CRAIG, 1044 Normal avenue, suffered a painful accident during a game of tag near the Methodist parsonage Tuesday afternoon. While running the little girl fell, striking on her left hand and rupturing the ligaments at the wrist. The hand will be disabled for some time.
...................
  
Monday, June 12, 1916
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

SISTER DIES
Fred CRAIG of this city was summoned to Thorpe Saturday morning on account of the death of his sister, Mrs. Alta BURKE. Mrs. Burke had been in poor health for some time but was confined to her bed for only about three weeks and the news of her death was very unexpected. She leaves three brothers, Fred Craig of this city and George and Albert of Thorpe, and three sisters, Mrs. L. M. FREEDY and Mrs. George AUGER [ALGER] of Thorpe and Mrs. Charles CHAMBERLAIN of Augusta, and five daughters, the Misses Lucile, Dorothy, Bernice, and Ruth BURKE, who live at home, and Mrs. Roy PIPER of Thorpe, besides a son, John BURKE, also of Thorpe. Mrs. Burke is an old resident of Thorpe and will be buried in the Irish Catholic cemetery at that place.

(See obituary)
...................

October 19,1916
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

JETTY CRAIG INJURED
Crushed Between Elevator And Floor At St. Louis, Mo.

A St. Louis, Mo., newspaper, under the heading "House Wrecker Hurt," tells of the injury of the son of Fred. CRAIG of this city recently as follows:

"Jetty CRAIG, 36 years old, Olive street, a wrecker, tearing down a building at Eighth and Olive streets, suffered internal injuries at 4:30 Friday morning when he tripped in an elevator at the building and started it upward between the basement and first floor. Craig was crushed between the elevator and the floor."
...................

January 27, 1917
The Clinton Public
DeWitt Co., Illinois

LAFFERTY GOLDEN WEDDING

At their beautiful country home three and one half miles north of DeWitt on Wednesday, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac LAFFERTY celebrated their golden wedding anniversary with an elaborate three course dinner served by the four daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Lafferty, with Mrs. Mae Tuggle of Clinton as cateress. The rooms of the home were prettily decorated in yellow and white. Mr. and Mrs. Lafferty have five living children, as follows: Ira LAFFERTY, Mrs. Ada RUDISAL of Birbeck, Mrs. Arcadia WALDEN, Mrs. Iva FULLER, and Miss Alta at home. They have nineteen grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Congratulations were received from Mr. and Mrs. C. S. LAFFERTY of St. Petersburg, FLA; M. R. NORTH of Long Beach, CA; Mrs INMAN of Pana, IL; Mr. and Mrs. H. B. BROWN of Hastings, NEB; Louisa MCCONKEY of Mansfield; Mrs. Martin Murry of Hastings, NEB was a guest at the home last Wednesday. Mr. and Mrs. Lafferty were both born and raised in this country. Mr. Lafferty being 72 years of age and his wife 68. They have lived at their present home the 50 years of their married life. The beautiful gifts received were two Masonic pins, one Eastern Star pin, two gold headed umbrellas, one gold headed cane, salad set, hand painted china, a cameo broach and stick pins, silverware with gold bowles [sic], and a five dollar gold piece. There were about sixty relatives and friends present, and the day was a most happy one.

Source: Thelma Brooks-Morgan and Judy Simpson
...................

May 26, 1917
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

THREE HUNDRED ENTER GARDENING CONTESTS
Children Respond Well to the Call of the County to Do Their Bit in This Time of Crisis.

With the closing of the contest on May 15, 310 contestants have filled out their entry blanks and are now formally enrolled in the contest. It is hoped each boy and girl will diligently work and compete for the prizes and thereby do their bit during the coming summer.

Enthusiasm from parents, teachers and children has made the contest an interesting work and it is hoped that all will continue to encourage and support the contestants. Because of the increased number of contestants, the prizes have been re-arranged so that each child will have ten chances of winning a prize. The revised prize list is as follows:

Class 1 and 2, Sweepstakes—1st, $10.00; 2nd, $7.50; 3rd, $5.00.
Classes 1 and 2—Most profitable, $10.00; best producing, $5.00; best appearing, $5.00.
Class 1—Boys-1st, $6.00; 2nd, $4.00; 3rd $2.00; 4th, $1.00.
Class 1—Girls-1st, $6.00; 2nd, $4.00; 3rd $2.00; 4th, $1.00.
Class 2—Boys-1st, $5.00; 2nd, $3.00; 3rd, $2.00; 4th, $1.00.
Class 2—Girls-1st, $5.00; 2nd, $3.00; 3rd, $2.00; 4th, $1.00.

These prizes will be contributed by Messers. Week and Dunegan and the First National Bank.

Class 1 includes all children between the ages of 10 and 16, while class 2 includes all children under 10.

Sixteen Districts
The city has been divided into 16 districts and one supervisor has been appointed to each district, who will advise and encourage the children in their work and also record and score the progress of each garden so that the judges will be aided in their award of prizes. The supervisors will make their first visit on May 26 and all contestants are urged to be at home on that day to discuss their problems and point out the location of the garden. The following city children have entered the contest and have been classed in their respective districts:

First district,...etc.
Seventh district, Prof. Rogers, supervisor — Allan Reading, Edward Scribner, Lawrence Helm, Eugene Vaughn, Evelyn Swanson, Vern CRAIG, Bernard Pliska, Alis Stroik, Inez Helminski, Tecla Trzbiatowski, Henry Tardiff.
Eighth district...(etc.)

In the County
The children of the state graded schools and county number 53, with Plover 12, Amherst Junction 11, Paper Mills school 6, Junction City 11, Bancroft 4, and the children on the outskirts of the city 9. State graded school children will be supervised by their respective principals, or some one appointed by them. All others will be supervised by M. M. Ames and A. F. Pott.

In many cases two or even four in one family have entered.

The supervisors will mark on arrangement of garden, attractiveness, culture (which means general care given), and productiveness. Patriotic citizens have generously consented to do their bit in helping supervise the work.
...................

June 30, 1917
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS

Saturday
F. CRAIG went to Plainfield this morning to spend a few days with relatives.
...................

Wednesday, July 4, 1917
The Gazette
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

LOCAL NEWS OF INTEREST
Mrs. *J. L. CRAIG and little granddaughter, Vera NORTON, of Thorp, spent the first of the week in this city, guests at the home of Fred CRAIG, while enroute to Plainfield, where they are visiting friends.

(*Should be G. L. CRAIG)
...................

July 21, 1917
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS

Saturday
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Ralph GETMAN, at the home of Mrs. Getman's parents at Coloma, July 12, a daughter

Saturday
Mr. and Mrs. R. W. GETMAN are the parents of a baby girl born Thursday.

Wednesday
Fred CRAIG, 1078 Normal avenue, has been entertaining Mrs. George CRAIG and granddaughter, Vera NORTON, for the past three weeks. The guests left this morning for their home in Thorpe, Wis.
...................

September 15, 1917
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS

Saturday
Mrs. Net. [sic] ALLISON and three children, Oakley, Fred, and Vida, have returned home after several days' visit at the home of Fred CRAIG, 1018 Normal avenue.
...................

Wednesday, November 7, 1917
The Gazette
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

LOCAL NEWS
Frank Zarewski is the new foreman at the gas plant of the Wisconsin Valley Electric Co., succeeding Wilbur CRAIG, resigned.
...................

November 17, 1917
The Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS

Saturday
Wilbur CRAIG, for 23 years foreman of the gas department at the Wisconsin Valley Electric company's plant, has resigned his position. His place has been taken by Frank Zahrewski.

Mr. and Mrs. W. CRAIG and son, Lloyd, 1044 Normal avenue, are spending several days visiting friends at Kaukauna.

Wednesday
Lloyd CRAIG, who has been employed as a gas fitter for the Wisconsin Valley Electric company in this city for the past three years, has gone to Mosinee, where he expects to be employed.
...................

February 20, 1918
The Gazette
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

THE CIRCUIT COURT
E. H. Anschuetz vs. Wilbur N. CRAIG et al. Judgment of foreclosure and sale for $556.29 damages, $39 dollars solicitors fees and costs.
...................

Wednesday, April 3, 1918
The Gazette
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

LOCAL NEWS OF INTEREST
Fred CRAIG went to Plainfield last Friday morning and visited until the first of the week with his daughter in that village.
...................

May 29, 1918
The Gazette
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

PLAINFIELD
J. CRAIG (Jet) of Mississippi has been a guest of his sister, Mrs. N. ALLISON and family, the past week.
...................

August 2, 1918
Decatur Review
Decatur Illinois

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur KANE and daughter, Palma [sic] (Pama), are here from Iowa visiting Mrs. Kanes' mother, Mrs. Drew INMAN.
...................

Monday, January 27, 1919
The Daily Breeze
Taylorville, Illinois

OLD MAN IS KILLED BY “BIG 4” AT PANA
Inquest Held Sunday By Coroner Hill; Accident Saturday Night

County Coroner John Hill went to Pana Sunday morning and held an inquest over the remains of William Hazen LITTLE, aged 69 years, who was killed there Saturday night by an express train on the “Big 4” railroad. The verdict found by the jury was that the deceased came to his death by being struck by the engine of the Extra No. 6417 Big 4 passenger train at the Poplar Street crossing. There were but 2 witnesses examined, they being Henry J. Tait, who was with the deceased when the accident occurred; and Dr. D.M. Littlejohn, who was called following the tragedy. It was Tait, assistant at the Fogey Ice & Cold Storage Co., at Pana, who told the story of the accident as follows:

“I was with the deceased at about 10:10 o’clock Saturday night, walking east on the Big 4 tracks before Locust and Poplar Streets. At that time, I saw a train coming from the east on the main track. It looked like an express train. I watched the deceased and saw him run across the track, as if to get across before the train reached Poplar Street. I saw him just as the engine struck him. It seemed to me as if he gave a jump to clear the track just before the train hit him. He fell to the north side of the track. After the train passed, I went to where he was lying on the ground. He was breathing at the time, but unable to speak. The train crew came back to investigate; also W. P. Edmission, Chief of Police. Deceased was still alive when I left the scene. I do not know how fast the train was running, but it was stopped before it had reached Locust Street, one block from the scene of the accident. I believe the engineer sounded his whistle for the crossing.”

Dr. Littlejohn, who reached the scene at about 10:30 p.m., stated that Little was dead when he arrived there. The only bruise inflicted by the train was on the right side of the chest, which gave the appearance of having been struck by a small rod or other sharp point. It is believed that the old man thought the approaching train to be a Freight and did not realize the speed at which it was approaching.

The jury was made up of Prestiss Felters, foreman; Edward Picquet; W. R. Edmission; Theodore Bond; Samuel O. Wegener; and Will F. Jordan, clerk.
...................

Saturday, March 8, 1919
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

PLAINFIELD BRIEFS
Nelson ALLISON and family are packing up their household goods and will move to Pine Lake, near Rhinelander, where Mr. Allison is to be employed.
...................

May 13, 1919
Stevens Point Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

SOCIETY AND WOMEN'S NEWS
Miss Ina Ethel CRAIG of this city and Mason H. DAY of Shawano were united in marriage at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon at the home of the bride's brother, Lloyd CRAIG, 511 Center avenue, by Rev. G. M. Calhoun, pastor of St. Paul's M. E. church. Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Craig were attendants. After a luncheon, served to the bridal party and immediate relatives, Mr. and Mrs. Day left for Wausau for a visit at the home of his parents. They will make their home at Shawano, where Mr. Day is employed in a paper mill. His bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur CRAIG of this city and until recently was employed as a cashier at the Woolworth store here.
...................

Monday, May 26, 1919
The Decatur Review
Decatur, Illinois

Mrs. Drew INMAN and daughter, Mrs. Chide [sic] (Blanchida) KANE of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is in the city visiting relatives.
...................

Saturday, January 17, 1920
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

SOCIETY AND WOMEN'S NEWS
The Mispah Bible class of the St. Paul's M. E. church met at the home of Mrs. W. E. Atwell, 1048 Clark street, on Friday afternoon and in business session elected the following officers for 1920:

President, Mrs. H. J. Calkins.
First vice-president, Mrs. Charles Thomas.
Second vice-president, Mrs. W. E. Atwell.
Secretary, Mrs. Wilbur CRAIG.
Assistant secretary, Mrs. M. Cutler.
Treasurer, Mrs. W. S. Young.

Mrs. W. E. Marsh continues as teacher of the class and has had charge of many of the activities of the class. The president, Mrs. Calkins, is also superintendent of the home department of the Methodist Sunday school. Monthly meetings are held at the homes of the several members.

Following the election of officers, the remainder of the afternoon was spent in an informal way and a luncheon was served.
...................

Wednesday, November 2, 1921
Stevens Point Gazette
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

OUT IN SOCIETY
BeckerKlein

The Evangelical Lutheran church was the scene of a pretty wedding Tuesday evening, October 25, when Miss Irene Klein, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Klein, 126 Algoma street became the bride of George E. Becker, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Becker, of Linwood.

The couple were attended by Miss Alta Johnson and William Klein, Jr., the latter a brother of the bride. Little Miss Lydia Smith, a niece of the bride, was the flower girl.

The bride wore a gown of white georgette crepe, an embroidered veil and carried a corsage bouquet of white roses. The bridesmaid wore a gown of pink georgette crepe trimmed with pink ribbon and carried a bouquet of pink carnations. The flower girl wore a dress of white organdie [sic] and strewed carnations, asters and sweet peas in the aisle as the wedding party proceeded to the altar.

Lohengrin's wedding march was played by Miss Gladys Reinke. The double ring ceremony was performed by Rev. Walter Werth. Before the ceremony, the choir sang a song, and after Wilfred Hetzer rendered a violin solo, "A Perfect Day."

A dinner was served at the home of the bride's parents. Besides immediate relatives those who were present were Rev. Mr. Werth, Miss Werth, and Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Keeney. Miss Clara CRAIG and Mrs. Lloyd CRAIG, friends of the bride, served.

Mrs. Becker is a graduate of the 1919 class of the rural department at the Stevens Point Normal and taught the past two years at Plainfield and Junction City. Mr. Becker is employed at the Palace Bakery in this city.

Mr. and Mrs. Becker left today for Milwaukee, Madison and other places in the southern part of the state. They will be at home at 205 Algoma street after November 7.
...................

May 1, 1926
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Wisconsin

Geo. CRAIG is digging a basement and lay-up a stone wall for his home.
...................

June 3, 1926
Colby Phonograph
Colby, Wisconsin

A very pretty wedding was solemnized Tuesday, June 1, 1926, at 2:00 o'clock in the afternoon, when Miss Fern Pederson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gus A. Pederson, became the bride of Mr. Talbert Erickson, son of Wm. Erickson of Dundee, Iowa. Rev. J. W. Parker pronounced the ceremony in a most impressive manner, at the home of the bride's parents. Miss Velda Pederson acted as bridesmaid and the groom was attended by Mr. Phil Smith.

The bride was attired in a beautiful dress of white satin and lace with veil and coronet of pearls and carried a shower bouquet of roses and lilies of the valley. The bridesmaid wore a dress of pink crepe de chine and also carried a bouquet of roses and lilies of the valley.

A wedding reception was held at the home of the bride's parents, the home being made beautiful with flowers for the occasion.

The newlyweds will make a wedding trip to points in Minnesota and Iowa, and after June 15th will be at home at Cedar Hedge Farm, at Marshfield.

Those from out of town who were here for the wedding were: Mrs. Morris Anderson and children, the Misses Alice Turrish, Jane Anderson, Verne CRAIG, Frances RYSKOSKI, Evelyn Nichols, all of Stevens Point, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Smith of Chili, the latter a sister of the groom, Mr. Homer Smith of Marshfield and Vernon Smith of Loyal.

The bride had been employed as bookkeeper at the Woolrath store at Stevens Point for the past two years. She was reared to womanhood at Greenwood, Clark County, Wis. and is a graduate of the high school at that place.
...................

Monday, February 28, 1927
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

SOCIETY
George—Allison

Miss Erma Marion ALLISON, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson ALLISON, Hancock, and Floyd Henry GEORGE, son of Mr. and Mrs. William H. GEORGE, Wisconsin Rapids, were married at the home of the bride's parents at Hancock last Wednesday morning, Rev. A. W. Cook officiating. The bride's sister, Mrs. Clarence HIRST, was matron of honor. Both were attired in blue georgette.

A wedding dinner was served after the ceremony and a reception was held in the evening at the Allison residence. Mr. George is in the employ of the Wood County Grocery company of Wisconsin Rapids, where the young couple will make their home.
...................

Wednesday, February 23, 1927
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

SOCIETY
Granddaughter Married

Fred CRAIG, janitor at Nelson Hall, the Teachers' college dormitory, is at Hancock today, going there to attend the marriage of a granddaughter, Miss Ermie ALLISON, who became the wife early this afternoon of Floyd GEORGE, of Wisconsin Rapids. The bride is the younger daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson ALLISON of Hancock, at whose home the ceremony was performed and where a reception was held. Mr. George is associated with a wholesale grocery concern at the Rapids.
...................

Friday, April 29, 1927
Waukesha Daily Freeman
Waukesha, Wisconsin

POLICE HERE NAB ALLEGED 'PEEPING TOM'
Search of Several Weeks Ends in Arrest of Young Man Last Night

Alleged to have been operating in the city for nearly three weeks, frightening young women and peeping in windows at the Carroll college dormitory and following girls on the streets at night, Lloyd W. CRAIG, married, living at 213 Maple avenue, was last night apprehended by Captain George Knipfel and Officer "Herb" Rehberg, members of the local police force.

Reports came from Voorhees dormitory Wednesday night at midnight that a man was peeping in windows and hiding behind trees on the front campus of the college. Police were dispatched to the college but the man escaped before officers arrived.

PLEADS GUILTY
Craig is alleged to have continued his prowling last night and frightened several girls on McCall street and in the neighborhood of the Northwestern depot with his advances. The girls fled and reported him to the police. Craig was seized in the vicinity from which reports came and taken to the county jail.

According to Officer Rehberg, the alleged "peeper" admitted his nightly escapades and declared he has been on the streets practicing foul tactics for about three weeks.

Arraigned in court this morning the defendant pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct and was put under bonds amounting to $300, pending further evidence. Judge Newton Evans, sitting for Judge Parkinson, continued the case until next Tuesday.

His wife, appearing in court, declared that the defendant is a "model husband" and she was not aware that such activities were going on.
...................

Monday, May 2, 1927
Sheboygan Press
Sheboygan, Wisconsin

BADGER BRIEF
Waukesha— Lloyd W. CRAIG, married, was placed under bonds of $300. and his case continued pending further police investigation, on charges of "peeping" into windows of Carroll college dormitories here, and molesting women on the street. He admitted all charges, saying he had been "operating" for the past three weeks. His wife appeared in court, declared he had always been a model husband, and she could not understand his change in attitude.
...................

Tuesday, May 3, 1927
Waukesha Daily Freeman
Waukesha, Wisconsin

CONFESSED "PEEPER" FINED BY PARKINSON
Lloyd W. CRAIG, confessed window "peeper" was fined $25 and costs today by Judge T. W. Parkinson and released after being held for several days following his arrest by local police upon the complaint of two young women whom it is said he followed and molested.
...................

April 6, 1928
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

SOCIETY
Almond Surprise Party

Mr. and Mrs. E. G. CROWELL of Almond were surprised last Friday evening, when 32 of their friends gathered at their home to help them celebrate their 24th wedding anniversary. Bridge was played and a lunch was served, the guests having brought well-filled baskets with them.
...................

April 6, 1928
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

CITY BRIEFS
Mrs. Nelson ALLISON of Hancock, a patient at St. Michael's hospital for the past three weeks, where she received treatment for neuritis, returned Thursday. Her condition is much better.
...................

July 9, 1928
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Clark Co., Wisconsin

A seven pound baby girl was born to Mr and Mrs L. SNYDER on July 3rd.
...................

July 23, 1928
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Clark Co., Wisconsin

Louis Krom, the prominent Owen merchant, nearly lost his life at the local tourist park last Wednesday afternoon while in swimming. Mr. Krom had just got into the water and was swimming across to the sand bar when he suddenly felt sharp pains in chest. Try as he would he could not take a stroke and went down, when he came up again he yelled for help and Fred BEHRENS, who was near at hand, jumped in clothes and all and brought him safely to shore.
...................

Monday, July 30, 1928
The Decatur Review
Decatur, Illinois

BRIEF NEWS NOTES OF PANA PEOPLE
Pana, July 30.— Mrs. Drew INMAN and daughter, Mrs. Pana [sic] KANE, left Friday for Chicago where they will join Mrs. M. D. Kizer and then go to Atwood, Ind., to spend a month at the lakes there.

(Pama Kane was the granddaughter, Mrs. Inman's daughter was Mrs. Blanchida Kane)
...................

September 3, 1928
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Clark Co., Wisconsin

Eidsvold Epitome—Melvin BIDDLE and Elmer Swim left for Saskatchawan, Canada, on Monday where they expect to be employed.
...................

December 31, 1928
Thorp Courier
Thorp, Clark Co., Wisconsin

Mitterhoffer News—Frank Blaszczyk is the proud owner of a new saxophone purchased of H. M. MEAD. Frank is busy taking music lessons from Mr. Mead.
...................

October 22, 1929
Decatur Evening Herald
Decatur, Illinois

AGED MAN DIES
P. H. (Perry) LITTLE, 69, who has for some time been making his home with his nephew, Carl LITTLE of this city, passed away last Friday morning. He has been ill for the past two months as a result of a paralytic stroke which caused his death. Funeral services were conducted Saturday afternoon in the Johnson chapel followed by interment at Vernon, South of Vandalia.
...................

Friday, April 3, 1931
The Decatur Review
Decatur, Illinois

EFFINGHAM MAN HAS BROKEN BACK
Injured Helping Lift Kettle of Tar.

Effingham— Carl LITTLE, maintenance foreman for the state highway department of this city, broke his back Wednesday afternoon while at work near the Charles Austin farm southwest of this city.

Mr. Little was assisting in lifting a heavy kettle of hot tar. While the injury is serious it will not necessarily prove fatal, but recover will take some time.

The injured man was brought to the hospital here. As soon as advisable he will be put in a cast.
...................
  
June 21, 1934
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

PLAINFIELD FAMILY LEAVES ON TRIP TO ROSEBURG, OREGON.
Plainfield. June 19—Mr. and Mrs. J. J. EASTLING and two daughters, Eleanore and Genevieve, left Sunday morning for Roseburg, Oregon, making the trip via auto. They are planning on stopping off several days at the Yellowstone National park before reaching Oregon, where they will spend some time with Mrs. Eastling's sister. They will be gone about two months.
...................
  
July 16, 1934
Stevens Point Daily Journal
Stevens Point, Wisconsin

FUNERAL OF MR. CRAIG
Funeral services for Floyd Chester CRAIG, 416 Center street, who died at his home early Thursday morning after a lingering illness, were held at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon at the Boston funeral home. Rev. Carl Asmus officiated and burial was in Forest cemetery.

During the services Mrs. Glen Watkins and Mrs. Wayne Watkins, accompanied by Edward Plank, sang "In the Garden," "Sometime We'll Understand" and "All the Way My Savior Leads Me."

Pallbearers were William Engelbert, Warren Sprague, Leonard RYSKOSKI, and Ed Kline.

In charge of flowers were Helen Baker, Jean Malcho, and Miss Schneider.

(See obituary)
...................

December 8, 1936
Ironwood Daily Globe
Ironwood, Michigan

PAYS FINE FOR LACK OF DRIVER'S LICENSE
Russell EASTLING of Stevens Point paid a $5 fine and costs, totaling $10.50, in county court at Hurley this morning when he pleaded guilty to driving a car without an operator's license. He was arrested by Meno Bertoluzza, county traffic officer, Sunday.
...................

August 17, 1944
Effingham Daily News
Effingham, Illinois

A farmer living a few miles northwest of the city sent in an SOS call by Jack Barnes for some of the good shots in Effingham to come out to his place and chase away the squirrels that were taking his corn near a stretch of woods.

Carl LITTLE and George Dehn hitchhiked up to the scene in a hurry. They chased a big flock of squirrels out of the corn into the trees and began to pepper away.

Source: Susan Capps
...................

September 24, 1944
Effingham Daily News
Effingham, Illinois

William LACY of this city who has followed the profession of chef at some of the leading hotels and cafes in the middle west, resigned from his position at the Court House Cafe.

It was with great reluctance that he gave up his profession of nineteen years, but he finally had to do so because the heat, which is an inherent part of cooking, was bothering his health.

Source: Susan Capps
...................

1950
(paper unknown)
Wisconsin

'PLEASE COME HOME'
Mother Makes Plea to Son
Missing Month

"Roger, please come home...I am so worried about you...You have been gone six weeks...I am so afraid you are hungry...we expected you to come home for your 14th birthday"

That was the plea today of Mrs. Kristel CRAIG, 2812 Cedar avenue, whose son Roger, disappeared from home April 13.

Roger, Mrs. Craig said, is 5 feet 6, weighs 130 pounds, has brown hair and eyes and dimpled cheeks.

He was wearing, when last seen, brown trousers, a satin-finished mutton-colored jacket and brown shoes.

Source: Elaine Greene-Jenson
...................

March 14, 1963
Monroe County Democrat
Monroe Co., Wisconsin

TUNNEL CITY CRASH VICTIMS
BURIED AT MILLSTON THURSDAY

A long and sad funeral procession moved up highway 12 from Tomah to Millston today (Thursday) carrying the bodies of the six victims of Sunday's auto-train crash at Tunnel City. In the procession were six hearses, each with one of the victims, and a long line of cars carrying mourners from the three families involved.

The dead are Mrs. Helena SHERWOOD, 35, Rt. 1 Warrens; her daughters, Sharon, 11; and Patricia, 9 and her son David, 13. The other victims were Carol WOOD, 16 daughter of the Addison WOODs of Rt. 1, Warrens; and Edith PADDOCK, 16, daughter of the Jennings PADDOCKs of Wisconsin Rapids. The two girls were nieces of Mrs. Sherwood. All six were occupants of the automobile, driven by Mrs. Sherwood, which was struck broadside by the Northwestern Road's Dakota 400 at noon.

The arrangements for burial of all six victims at one time were extensive. Regional funeral directors supplied the additional hearses needed and the six devices for lowering coffins into graves. To avoid confusion there were only 12 pallbearers instead of 36. There were only three graves. Mrs. Sherwood and her three children were buried in one large grave while the bodies of her two nieces were placed in separate graves. All six were buried in the Millston cemetery — not far from the Paradise Valley area in which the Woods and the Sherwoods live.

Funeral services were held at 1:30 p.m. from the Tomah Baptist church with the Rev. Harley Roof officiating. All six bodies were in state at the Ninneman funeral home which was in charge of arrangements.

Source: Dennis Aney
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May 1975
Dallas Morning News
Dallas, Texas

FORMER DEPUTY SHERIFF, CRAIG, FOUND SHOT TO DEATH
Former Deputy Sheriff Roger Dean CRAIG, 39, was found shot to death at 3:30 p.m. Thursday in his father's home at 10524 Luna Road.

Homicide investigator Robert Garza said a rifle and a note were found near the body. Garza said the wound in Craig's upper right chest apparently was self-inflicted.

Craig had been embroiled in controversy surrounding [the] assassination of President Kennedy.

A DEPUTY at the time of the assassination, Craig said he saw Lee Harvey Oswald running west down Elm Street from the Texas School Book Depository about 15 minutes after the assassination. He said Oswald then got into a station wagon that had pulled up alongside of him.

He also said he heard the shots fired at the presidential motorcade and that because of their close proximity, the shots had to have been fired from two different rifles.

Craig had recently appeared on radio talk shows expressing his views on the assassination and his testimony appears in the Warren Report.

Patrolmen P. L. Anderson and R. W. Wood said Craig's father, Kristel CRAIG, discovered the body in a back bedroom in their 1-story frame home at 3:30 p.m. The father had talked to the victim 30 minutes earlier, but had left the house to work on a lawn mower in the back yard.

POLICE SAID Craig said in the note he was sorry for what he had to do, but that he could not stand the pain.

Anderson and Wood said Craig's father told them Craig had been taking pain-killing medication for injuries in a car wreck two years ago and for a gunshot wound in the shoulder in Waxahachie six months ago.

At that time, Craig reported to Waxahachie police a stranger appeared at the door of a house at which Craig was waiting for a woman friend, and shot him with a shotgun when Craig answered a knock at the door.

Craig was under the supervision of Sheriff Bill Decker at the time of the assassination. He left the department shortly after the assassination.

Craig was named Man of the Year by the sheriff's office in 1960 for his work in aid in helping to capture an international jewel thief.

(See obituary)
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