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Ancestors of Amy Russell Tolbert



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Robert De Tibetot (Tiptoft), 3rd Baron and Margaret Deincourt, Baroness Tiptoft




Husband Robert De Tibetot (Tiptoft), 3rd Baron 1

           Born: 
     Christened: 11 Jun 1341 - Nettlestead, Suffolk, England
           Died: 1372 - Nettlestead, Suffolk, England
         Buried: 
            AFN: G48B-ZX


         Father: John I De Tibetot, Baron (1313-1367) 1
         Mother: Margaret (Margery) de Badlesmere, Baroness Ros (Abt 1315-1363) 1


       Marriage: Abt 1365




Wife Margaret Deincourt, Baroness Tiptoft 1

           Born: Abt 1341 - Nettlestead, Suffolk, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
            AFN: G48C-03



Children
1 F Margaret De Tibetot, Baroness Scrope 1

           Born: Cal 1366 - Christ Church, London, Middlesex, Eng (Age 6 In 1372)
     Christened: 
           Died: 14 May 1431 - Prob. Eng
         Buried: 1431 - Christ Church, London, Middlesex, England
            AFN: 9G8C-ZL



2 F Millicent Tiptoft 1

           Born: 12 Apr 1368 - Nettlestead, Suffolk, Eng
     Christened: 
           Died: 25 Aug 1446 - Caistor Castle, Norfolk, Eng
         Buried: Aug 1446 - St Benet, Holme, Norfolk, England



3 F Elizabeth De Tibetot, Baroness Despencer 1

           Born: Cal 1370 - Of Nettlestead, Suffolk, Eng (Age 2 In 1372)
     Christened: 
           Died: 20 Apr 1478 - Prob. Eng
         Buried:  - Grey Friars, Ipswich, Suffolk, England




General Notes: Wife - Margaret Deincourt, Baroness Tiptoft

CONFLICT: Ancestral Roots states DEINCOURT Ancestral file states PEINCOURT
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Robert Willoughby, First Baron Willoughby of Eresby and Margaret Deincourt




Husband Robert Willoughby, First Baron Willoughby of Eresby

           Born: Abt 1271 - Cumberworth, , Lincolnshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 25 Mar 1317
         Buried: 


         Father: Sir William de Willoughby (Abt 1245-1306)
         Mother: Alice Beke (Abt 1250-Bef 1311)


       Marriage: Abt 1303




Wife Margaret Deincourt

           Born: Abt 1275
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 18 Oct 1333
         Buried: 



Children
1 M John Willoughby, Second Baron Willoughby of Eresby

           Born: 6 Jan 1304
     Christened: 
           Died: 13 Jun 1349
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Joan Roscelyn (Abt 1305-After 1354)



2 F Joan Willoughby

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




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Francis Thorton and Joan Delaryver/ de Lovier




Husband Francis Thorton

           Born: 1498 - East Newton, East Riding, Yorkshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 Apr 1566 - , , Yorkshire, England
         Buried: 


         Father: Robert Thorton (Abt 1454-      )
         Mother: Joan/Jane Layton (1458-      )


       Marriage: 




Wife Joan Delaryver/ de Lovier

           Born: 1498 - England
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 M William Thorton I

           Born: 1530 - , , Yorkshire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 30 May 1600 - England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Barbara Westby/Westly (1539-      )




General Notes: Husband - Francis Thorton

Francis Thornton's estate in Yorkshire was called "The Hills".


General Notes: Wife - Joan Delaryver/ de Lovier

She supposedly was a descendant of William I of England.
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Francis DeLoach and Averilla DeLoach




Husband Francis DeLoach

           Born: Abt 1710 - , Isle of Wight, Virginia, USA
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1770 - Northhampton, North Carolina
         Buried: 


         Father: William DeLoach (Abt 1678-1746)
         Mother: Eleanor Collins (Abt 1683-1750)


       Marriage: 21 Dec 1848 - Greene Co, TN 2




Wife Averilla DeLoach

           Born: Abt 1746 - Craven County, South Carolina
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1785 - Craven County, South Carolina
         Buried: 


         Father: William DeLoach (Abt 1702-Abt 1765)
         Mother: Judith Wall (Abt 1707-Abt 1760)





Children

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Aaron Etheridge and Elizabeth DeLoach




Husband Aaron Etheridge

           Born: 1737
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 7 Mar 1821 - , Edgefield, South Carolina, USA
         Buried: 
       Marriage: Feb 1782 - , Edgefield, South Carolina, USA




Wife Elizabeth DeLoach

           Born: Abt 1735 - Virginia, USA
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt May 1818 - Green Co., GA
         Buried: 


         Father: William DeLoach (Abt 1702-Abt 1765)
         Mother: Judith Wall (Abt 1707-Abt 1760)



   Other Spouse: Josiah Allen, Sr. (1733-1781) - Abt 1762 - Virginia, USA



Children
1 M Josiah Etheridge

           Born: Abt 1789 - , Edgefield, South Carolina, USA
     Christened: 
           Died: 1 Jan 1860 - , Edgefield, South Carolina, USA
         Buried: 



2 F Martha Etheridge

           Born: Abt 1787 - , Edgefield, South Carolina, USA
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



3 M Archibald Etheridge

           Born: 1785 - , Edgefield, South Carolina, USA
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1850 - , Clark, Alabama, USA
         Buried: 




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Samuel Wall and Martha DeLoach




Husband Samuel Wall

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Richard Wall (Abt 1675-1755)
         Mother: Lucy Boykin (Abt 1676-Abt 1760)


       Marriage: WFT Est 1835-1879 2




Wife Martha DeLoach

           Born: Abt 1704
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1748
         Buried: 


         Father: William DeLoach (Abt 1678-1746)
         Mother: Eleanor Collins (Abt 1683-1750)





Children

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William DeLoach and Judith Wall




Husband William DeLoach

           Born: Abt 1702 - Southwark Parrish, Surry, Virginia, USA
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1765 - Welch Neck Tract, Craven Co., South Carolina, USA
         Buried: 


         Father: William DeLoach (Abt 1678-1746)
         Mother: Eleanor Collins (Abt 1683-1750)


       Marriage: Abt 1725 - Northhampton, North Carolina

Noted events in his life were:
• Alt. Death, Abt 1765 - Lynches Mill, Florence, South Carolina, USA




Wife Judith Wall

           Born: Abt 1707 - , Surry, Virginia, USA
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1760 - Welch Neck Tract, Craven Co., South Carolina, USA
         Buried: 


         Father: Richard Wall (Abt 1675-1755)
         Mother: Lucy Boykin (Abt 1676-Abt 1760)





Children
1 M Thomas DeLoach

           Born: Abt 1726 - , Brunswick, Virginia, USA
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1805 - , Edgefield, South Carolina, USA
         Buried: 



2 M William DeLoach

           Born: Abt 1728 - , Edgecombe, North Carolina, USA
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1790 - , Beaufort, South Carolina, USA
         Buried: 



3 M Michael DeLoach

           Born: Abt 1732 - , Edgecombe, North Carolina, USA
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1815 - Craven County, South Carolina
         Buried: 



4 F Elizabeth DeLoach

           Born: Abt 1735 - Virginia, USA
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt May 1818 - Green Co., GA
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Josiah Allen, Sr. (1733-1781)
           Marr: Abt 1762 - Virginia, USA
         Spouse: Aaron Etheridge (1737-Abt 1821)
           Marr: Feb 1782 - , Edgefield, South Carolina, USA



5 M Hardy DeLoach

           Born: Abt 1736 - , Edgecombe, North Carolina, USA
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1820 - Georgia
         Buried: 



6 M Jesse DeLoach

           Born: Abt 1742 - , Edgecombe, North Carolina, USA
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1817 - , Beaufort, South Carolina, USA
         Buried: 



7 F Eleanor DeLoach

           Born: Abt 1744 - , Edgecombe, North Carolina, USA
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1780 - Craven County, South Carolina
         Buried: 



8 F Averilla DeLoach

           Born: Abt 1746 - Craven County, South Carolina
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1785 - Craven County, South Carolina
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Francis DeLoach (Abt 1710-Abt 1770)
           Marr: 21 Dec 1848 - Greene Co, TN 2



9 F Frances DeLoach

           Born: Abt 1748 - Craven County, South Carolina
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1808 - , Edgefield, South Carolina, USA
         Buried: 




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Living and Sarah Duncan




Husband Living (details have been suppressed)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Sarah Duncan

           Born: 1809
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Mark Patterson Duncan (Abt 1785-Abt 1860)
         Mother: Elizabeth Harvey (Abt 1788-      )





Children

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David B. Riggs and Sophia Dempsey




Husband David B. Riggs

           Born: 8 Nov 1749 - , Morris, New Jersey, USA
     Christened: 
           Died: 1837 - Shelbyville, Bedford, Tennessee, USA
         Buried: 


         Father: Timothy Riggs (Abt 1723-1805)
         Mother: Sarah Dunkham (1736-      )


       Marriage: 1815

   Other Spouse: Miriam Wright (Abt 1748-1814) 3 4 - 1771 - Surry, North Carolina, USA

Noted events in his life were:
• Residence, Move to Williamson Co, TN, 1810




Wife Sophia Dempsey

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 M Living (details have been suppressed)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




General Notes: Husband - David B. Riggs

[jcenright.FTW]

The infomation for this part of the family was taken from: MORE ABOUT THE RIGGS FAMILY 1590-1973 with the cognate Ogilvie, Haley, and Brittain families, Descended from Edward Riggs Born about 1590 By CLARA NICHOLS DUGGAN And HELEN KATHERINE DUGGAN


When David Riggs and his sons settled on the land in Williamson County later known as Riggs Cross Roads, it was largely an untouched wilderness of trees and canebrake through which the Indians and buffalo roamed.
The family was fortunate in that their land had an abundant supply of water provided by several springs, and a stream called Spring Creek which flowed through the place and on into Duck River. This creek is fed by three large springs at its head, which accounts for its name. It has two forks, the Riggs land being on the west fork. The east fork rises in Rutherford County and is also fed by springs. In the fall of the year, in times of the most severe drought when the creeks have stopped running, these springs will rise enough without rain to start the creeks running again in Holts Corner, which is about two miles south of the head of the creek.
The 555 acres of land on which David settled, and on which taxes are officially recorded in 1811, is in the southeast corner of Williamson County surrounding what is now Riggs Cross Roads. This land is near the adjoining counties of Rutherford, Bedford, and Marshall, the latter county having been cut out of Bedford in 1836. David eventually acquired land in all of these counties. There is a tradition that from a rail fence on the Riggs place one could spit into three counties: Williamson, Rutherford, and Bedford. It can be assumed that David and his sons bought their land in Tennessee after having sold their land in North Carolina. It is probable that the property at the Cross Roads was purchased gradually in small tracts. There are numerous tax deed records of land transactions by David and his sons in Williamson, Bedford, Marshall, and Rutherford Counties. The absence of other deeds may be attributed to the inadequate court house records of the early times or to confusion regarding the identity of the county in which the land was located. David built his log house on this new land in the northeast corner of what is now Riggs Cross Roads, about one and one-half miles north of the present Holts Corner. The Cross Roads is at the intersection of the new Horton Highway (U.S. 31-A) and the Flat Creek Road. The present U. S. Highway 31-A was first called the Fishing Ford Road, was later called the Nashville-Huntsville Road and prior to the Civil War became the Nolensville Pike. Goodspeeds' History of Tennessee states that the Nolensville Pike was built in 1841 and was 15 miles long. The Flat Creek Road was previously called the Columbia Road. David and his son Gideon were active in the marking and clearing of this vital roadway and others in the vicinity. This is attested by many entries in Williamson County minute books.
The Fishing Ford Road ran north and south by Riggs Cross Roads, and its importance in the development of the whole area from Nashville to Huntsville, Alabama, and on to Florida is told by W. N. Lloyd in the Winter 1973 issue of the Marshall County Historical Quarterly. He says, in part

Fishing Ford Road is probable, if not certainly, the oldest traveled thoroughfare in Tennessee. Long before there was white permanent residence, in that section of our country now know as the State of Tennessee, of formerly the State of Franklin, this was a primitive but well used trail. The immense stock of game in Middle Tennessee created a north-south animal trail in lines of easiest passage from one salt lick to a watering place to a ford across the larger rivers. This trail was used by the northern and southern tribes of Indians in commerce and war with each other, as well as travel to the fantastic neutral hunting grounds in Tennessee for major sources of meat.

* * * * *

The North Carolina and Cumberland Gap routes led to the Fishing Ford Road route and stopped there. At the influx of settlers the Creeks, particularly, used the trail for raids on the settlements. The Americans were wanting to go West in their expansion, and used the trail more for commerce than for settlement. At this time the Cherokees, Creeks, and Choctaws were too powerful for the meager settlements to involve in a full war, and the intelligence and education of these nations tended more to harmony.

. . . When the Creeks gave an excuse for military opposition, Jackson recognized the route as the only possible overland method of transferring an army to the South. He also eyed as means and place of recruitment, for as word spread of his southern advance, hunters could wait or assemble along the trail. I do not know the route Fishing Ford Road, and its connection, took through Kentucky to the Ohio, but I am sure it followed, as in Tennessee, the animal trails of buffalo, elk, and deer from watering place and salt lick to each other to a ford along the Ohio. It followed each ford most directly in its path to the South.
The road then followed from a ford east of Nashville, along what became known in Civil War days as the Nolensville Pike, where even in my Mother's lifetime stage coaches stopped at Nolensville for water and a change of teams. The trail followed south to Chapel Hill and crossed the Duck a few miles to the east at a ford, which was later bridged. From this ford, it led to the Big Spring at Farmington and from there along its present course to Old Belfast, just north of the present town of Belfast. From there it is marked south for some miles to Elk Ridge, between Belfast and between Petersburg and Delina, and on to the Elk River, west of Fayetteville, at Harmes, Tennessee. The old route may still be seen by the tree line, where it ends, crosses a farm and picks up south of the farm on another road leading in the direction of Harmes. The route is marked on state maps of Alabama to Horseshoe Bend where Jackson defeated the Creeks.
Davy Crockett and Sam Houston reportedly joined him along this road, as well as ancestors of many people still living near by in the vicinities made accessible to the road.
Jackson's later war, against the Seminoles, followed the same route to Alabama and hence to Florida, and he was always able to pick up volunteers along the route. Historically, the road was by far more famous, and valuable to the development of Middle Tennessee than the Natchez Trace of later commercial value. It still holds the possibility of cheap and easy reconstruction to a historic monument which will be far more used for recreational travel to Huntsville than the Natchez Trace.
The road was mainly kept in development and usage by its sections being diverted into turnpikes in Davidson, Rutherford, Bedford, and Lincoln Counties, when roads or trails so maintained by individuals or companies became to be known as "Pikes". Goodspeed, Ramsay and Haywood in their histories of Tennessee mention the Fishing Ford Pike in each of the counties.
The history of Middle Tennessee really lies along its forgotten route. Along it lay the commerce, the settlements, the inns, the cemeteries, and the real history of Middle Tennessee. I would like very much to see its restoration and historic marking before it becomes only a legend.

During these early times, transportation to and from Nashville was largely wagon and horseback. A wagonload of farm products would be taken to Nashville for sale, and the wagon returned with needed supplies.
According to Mr. Wilbur F. Creighton in his book, Building of Nashville, Nashville companies began to operate stagecoach lines in the early 19th century as fast as suitable roads were constructed. We do not know the exact date that a scheduled stagecoach started operating between Nashville and Chapel Hill, with Riggs Cross Roads as a way station. However, Paul Ogilvie know that his great-uncle Alfred owned this line from 1895 to 1905,k and that his grandfather, Rufus Ogilvie, Sr., drove the coaches.
The stagecoaches were put out of business by the railroads. Though they have passed from the scene in the face of progress, they served their young country well.
Although the land at the Cross Roads was first settled by David, b. 1749, he did not remain there long. Sometime between 1816 and 1820 he moved to Bedford County and was succeeded by Gideon as owner of the Cross Roads. Gideon continued to develop and expand the property. At the time of his death in 1871, the property in the vicinity of the Cross Roads consisted of 1,000 acres, and there were five log houses on the place in addition to the stately brick house in which he lived. The village compound also contained a post office, a blacksmith shop, and a church.
The first log house was the one built in the northwest corner of the Cross Roads and occupied by David. Later, it was occupied by Gideon until he built his brick house across the road from it, between 1830 and 1840. The original log house then became the home of his daughter, Mary Campbell Riggs Haley. This house had two sections with a dogtrot between them. It was replaced by the present two-story frame house about 1910.
Although sometimes occupied by family members, especially the newlyweds, three of the other log houses were evidently built for tenants of possibly for slaves, as Williamson County Court House tax records show that Gideon paid taxes on nine slaves in Tennessee.
One of these three houses was located about one-fourth mile east of the Cross Roads. This house was on that portion of the land later inherited by Gideon's grandson, Jordan Riggs. In 1913 Jordan built a two-story, white, frame house near the site of the old cabin, which was later torn down. The new house is standing, but it is no longer owned by the Riggs family. Another of the three structures was located on the west side of the Fishing Ford Road about one-fourth mile north of the Cross Roads. The remaining log cabin, a tenant house, still stands, though shakily, on the north side of the Flat Creek Road about one-half mile from the Cross Roads. It is on the land inherited by Gideon's daughter, Mary Campbell Riggs Haley, but is no longer in the family.
The blacksmith shop was situated in the southeast corner of the Cross Roads. It was torn down in the early 1900's.
After their marriage in 1867, Gideon's daughter, Catherine Wright Riggs, and her husband, Thomas Chesley Brittain, built a large, two-story, log house a few hundred yards southwest of the Cross Roads on the land later inherited from Gideon by Catherine's son, Oliver Riggs Brittain. In 1898 Oliver replaced this log house with the present large, two-story, frame house. At this same time, Oliver built the log tenant house, which now stands on the south side of Flat Creek Road, just west of the Church of Christ.
In 1884, Thomas C. Brittain built a tobacco factory on the back of the property at the Cross Roads, and his son, Oliver Riggs Brittain, later added a tobacco warehouse facing the pike. More about these successful enterprises may be found earlier in this book in the section about the Brittains. The tobacco buildings do not stand today.
The post office at Riggs Cross Roads was established on January 7, 1834, and discontinued October 8, 1872. Gideon Riggs served as postmaster from January 7, 1834, to March 15, 1854, and from February 27, 1866, until his death on November 17, 1871. The foregoing information was furnished by the U. S. General Services Administration, Washington, D.C. The intervening time when Gideon was not postmaster was the period when he was in Arkansas. During his absence the office was held by Stephen Jordan, brother of his daughter-in-law, Nancy Jordan Riggs, and Joseph F. Brittain. At its beginning, the post office must have been operated from Gideon's home, as some of his living descendants remember seeing the letterbox fixtures in the old house before it was torn down.
During the Civil War the Yankees made a devastating march through the Cross Roads area. They burned the rail fences and took the horses and cattle. They found and stole the silver and money, which had been buried. Some years later lightning struck the brick house and it had to be torn down. It was replaced with a simple frame cottage. Of course, things were never again the same at the Cross Roads. Yet, despite these tragedies there did follow a short golden period of relative stability, from about 1900 to the First World War (1914). Those days provide nostalgic recollections for the authors. Then it was that as children they found excitement and enchantment at the Cross Roads, where they spent many of their summers.
The 35 mile trip from their home in Nashville to visit their grandmother and other relatives at the Cross Roads was made on the stagecoach, which departed before daylight from Flat Rock (now called Woodbine) at the edge of town on Nolensville Pike. A stop for a change of horses and lunch, or dinner as it was called, occurred at the hotel in Nolensville. The meal cost 25 cents. The fare on the stagecoach was $1.00. After several rest stops for water from springs along the way, we arrived at the Cross Roads around four or five o'clock in the afternoon.
Then the happy times really began - playing with our cousins, enjoying good food, picking blackberries and swimming in the creek afterwards, sliding down haystacks, and even helping with the chores, though often only with some prodding. We played around the springhouse which Gideon had built below the house at the Cross Roads. Ripe berries hung from the mulberry trees surrounding the spring, and fell at our feet to be eaten. The trees around the spring are gone, but the walls of the springhouse in this once lovely place still stand and can be seen from the highway near the cemetery.
The wheat threshing was one of the big events of the summer. The hands were fed bounteously. Ham, fried chicken, every vegetable that grew in the garden, and numerous cakes and pies were put on the table. The table had to be set not once. Bu twice and often three times, in order to get everyone fed.
The Cross Roads was a social center of the community. There, relatives and friends came for dinner after church on Sunday and stayed for the afternoon to exchange news and ideas as will as gossip. The influx of relatives from the city who came to visit in the summer was welcomed for the stimulus they brought, notwithstanding the extra work their visits required. These memories of the Cross Roads are a dear possession of many family members still living.
The picture at the Cross Roads has changed now. The Industrial Revolution has had its effect and taken its toll. First, there was the construction of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, completed in 1914, which cut a great swath through the middle of the farm. The railroad righ-of-way came directly through the church at the Cross Roads, necessitating the relocation of the church, to its great disadvantage. A church building was erected on the Flat Creek Road on the Brittain farm, part of Gideon's original land. The present house was left standing only a few feet from the deep cut of the railroad and its beautiful location was irreparably marred.
The next step of "progress" was the construction of U. S. Highway 31-A in the 1930'', which took another wide swipe through the farm since its route deviated from that of the old Nolensville Pike. The homestead cottage at the Cross Roads still stands facing the old Nolensville Pike, which is now designated as Riggs Road on the General Highway Map of Williamson County, Tennessee, January 1970. The turnoff from U. S. 31-A through the railroad underpass to the south portion of the old pike carries a sign "Fuller Road." The house is caught in the web of these roads and the railroad, and its former claim to beauty and dignity is completely gone.
The great depression of the 1930's, with its many years of declining farm prices, had a disastrous effect. Many of the younger members of the family could no longer "make it" on the farm, so they moved to the cities, where they have done well. The original land that was owned by Gideon has been subdivided into six parts, each with a residence. Only three portions of the old farm no remain in the ownership of the Riggs family as follows: 1. The homestead cottage at the Cross Roads belongs to Ollie Cathey Riggs, the widow of Aaron Gambill Riggs, who was the great-great-grandson of David Riggs, the settler. 2. The Fuller house and fifty acres belong to Allen Fuller, a great-great-great-grandson of David. 3. The Brittain house and the farm of about 300 acres are owned by the heirs of Leonard Brittain, deceased, great-great-grandson of David.
Thus the history of the family has dramatized the changes in the social and economic fabric of our country during the past 165 years as a simpler past has gradually merged with an every more complex present. Times are changing again. Prices for farm products and farm land have risen. If one of Gideon's descendants has his farm today in its entirety, he would be a rich man.

The family cemetery at the Cross Roads has luckily survived the encroachment of the highway and the railroad. It is located at the intersection of U. S. Highway 31-A and the Flat Creek Road, about one-mile north of Holts Corner. It is reserved for and dedicated to descendants of Gideon Riggs.
The family takes pride in its maintenance, and a family gathering is held there each Mother's Day. A bronze plaque in memory of Gideon has been placed in the right-hand side of the stone entrance. The plaque and entrance were designed by Dan Fuller and constructed under the supervision of Harold (Buster) Fuller, great-great-grandsons of Gideon. The plaque bears the following inscription:

IN MEMORY OF GIDEON RIGGS 1790-1871 AND HIS WIVES MARY REYNOLDS 1798-1825 SOPHIA CAMPBELL 1801-1836 CATHERINE F. HOLDEN 1815-1865 ALL THEIR GRAVES ARE HERE EXCEPT CATHERINE F. HOLDEN'S WHICH IS IN ARKANSAS. HIS FARM INCLUDED APPROXIMATELY 1000 ACRES HEREABOUTS, WITH BRICK HOUSE ABOUT 100 FT. NORTHWEST OF HERE

ERECTED 1969 BY HIS DESCENDANTS 5
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Richard II "The Good" of Normandy, Duke of Normandy and Astrid (Margaret) Princess Of Denmark




Husband Richard II "The Good" of Normandy, Duke of Normandy 6 7 8 9




           Born: 23 Aug 970 - Rouen, Seine-Inferieure, Normandy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 28 Aug 1026 - Fecamp, Seine-Inferieure, France 8 10
         Buried: 


         Father: Richard I "The Fearless" of Normandy, Duke of Normandy (0933-0996) 6 7 11 12 13 14
         Mother: Gunnor (Gundra\Gunnora) "Not" of Crepon (Abt 0942-1031) 6 7 15 16 17


       Marriage: After 1017 - 2ND Wife 10

   Other Spouse: Poppa/Papia D'Envermeu (Abt 0970-After 1024) 6 7 10 - Abt 1024 - 3rd Wife 10

   Other Spouse: Judith of Brittany (Abt 0982-1017) 6 7 9 - Abt 1000 - Normandy, France 10 18




Wife Astrid (Margaret) Princess Of Denmark 7 10

           Born: Abt 990 - Denmark
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 1024
         Buried: 


         Father: Svegn "Forkbeard" , King of Denmark & Norway (Abt 0960-1014) 6 7 19 20
         Mother: Sigrid "The Haughty" Storrada (Abt 0952-After 1014) 6 7 21 22





Children

General Notes: Husband - Richard II "The Good" of Normandy, Duke of Normandy

Richard II, byname RICHARD The GOOD, French RICHARD le BON (d. 1026/27), duke of Normandy (996-1026/27), son of Richard I the Fearless. He held his own against a peasant insurrection, helped Robert II of France against the duchy of Burgundy, and repelled an English attack on the Cotentin Peninsula that was led by the Anglo-Saxon king Ethelred II the Unready. He also pursued a reform of the Norman monasteries. [Encyclopaedia Britannica CD '97]


General Notes: Wife - Astrid (Margaret) Princess Of Denmark

Dau of Swen King of Denmark

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Sources


1 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ancestral File (TM) (June 1998 (c), data as of 5 JAN 1998).

2 v37t0751.ftw.

3 v151t2775.ftw.

4 jcenright.FTW.

5 Mrs. Alvaretta Kenan Register, State Census of North Carolina 1784-1787 (David, Zadock, Iram & Samuel Riggs).

6 Tauté, Anne. "The Kings and Queens of Great Britain" pub by Elm TreeBooks/Hamish Hamilton Ltd. Great Britain.//.

7 Jim Weber (https://myaccount.rootsweb.com/publicprofile?mn=jimweber110&kurl=http:%2F%2Fwc%2Erootsweb%2Eancestry%2Ecom%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Figm%2Ecgi%3Fdb%3Djweber%26id%3DI03403%26op%3DGED).

8 Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on, Richard II.

9 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 39-22.

10 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 121e-21.

11 Freeman, Marsha Colleen (Scully) (Rec# 435). "Buell Genealogy" pub. 1 Dec1978. Chart #34.

12 Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on, Richard I.

13 Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 157-1.

14 Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999, 1603.

15 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 121e-20.

16 Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999, 1273.

17 Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, Todd A. Farmerie, 3 Dec 1996.

18 The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968, 6.

19 Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on, Sweyn.

20 Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev, by Rupert Alen & Anna Dahlquist, 1997, King's River Publ, 91-99.

21 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 241-5.

22 Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders, and Kiev, by Rupert Alen & Anna Dahlquist, 1997, King's River Publ, 178.


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