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Ancestors of Amy Russell Tolbert



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Humford Stevens and Winifried Bledsoe




Husband Humford Stevens

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Winifried Bledsoe

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Captain William Bledsoe (1676-1770)
         Mother: Elizabeth Stevens (      -      )





Children

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Stephen "Le Sage" Comte De Champagne & Blois




Husband Stephen "Le Sage" Comte De Champagne & Blois 1 2 3 4

            AKA: Stephen "Le Sage" Comte De Blois & Champagne
           Born: Abt 1046 - Blois, Loir-Et-Cher, Orleanais/Centre, France 5
     Christened: 
           Died: 27 May 1102 - Ramlah, Palestine (On Crusade Of 1101) 2 4
         Buried: 


         Father: Theobald III Comte De Blois, (I) De Champagne (Abt 1013-1089) 1 6
         Mother: Gersende Du Maine (Abt 1019-Bef 1096) 1 5 7


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Adela Of Normandy, Princess Of England (Abt 1062-1137) 1 2 4 8 9 - Abt 1080 - Breteuil, Eure, Normandy, France 4 9




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children

General Notes: Husband - Stephen "Le Sage" Comte De Champagne & Blois

Ancestral Roots has Stephen as son by the 2nd wife Alix, giving no marriage date for Theobald & Alix, nor birth date for Stephen. Turton also has Etienne/Steven born by the 2nd wife Alice de Vexin. But Richard Borthwick in a post to SGM believes that the dates indicate it was his 1st wife who was mother.

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The following information was supplied in a post-em by Curt Hofemann, curt_hofemann AT yahoo.com:

Stephen "Le Sage" Count of Champagne & Blois

Mother: Alix de Crepi b: ABT. 1020 in Vexin, Normandy, France

The identity of his mother seems to be in debate:

I think... (the mother of Stephen) should be Gersende of Maine, Thibaut III's 1st wife. Stephen Henry was born in 1046 and Thibaut and Gersende did not separate until 1048. ES II:46 gives these dates and mistakenly indicates Stephen Henry to be the son of Gundrada. Also see M Bur *La formation du comte de Champagne* (Nancy, 1977), 199, 214-15 where Stephen Henry is stated to be the son of Gersende. [Ref: Richard Borthwick 30 Jan 1998 message to Gen-Medieval] note: I don't know why he refers to as Stephen as Stephen "Henry". As far as I know, middle names didn't come into use until centuries later... Curt

Research note 1: mother: Alix de Crepi [Ref: Weis AR7 137:23]

Research note 2: mother: Gundrada [Ref: Moriarty p117, Paget p58, Watney p110]

Regards,
Curt

Note: the separation between Thibaut/Theobald and Gersende maybe didn't officially happen until 1048, but I have a child of Gersende's 2nd husband who looks to be b. abt 1045.
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Stephen "Le Sage" Comte De Champagne & Blois and Adela Of Normandy, Princess Of England




Husband Stephen "Le Sage" Comte De Champagne & Blois 1 2 3 4

            AKA: Stephen "Le Sage" Comte De Blois & Champagne
           Born: Abt 1046 - Blois, Loir-Et-Cher, Orleanais/Centre, France 5
     Christened: 
           Died: 27 May 1102 - Ramlah, Palestine (On Crusade Of 1101) 2 4
         Buried: 


         Father: Theobald III Comte De Blois, (I) De Champagne (Abt 1013-1089) 1 6
         Mother: Gersende Du Maine (Abt 1019-Bef 1096) 1 5 7


       Marriage: Abt 1080 - Breteuil, Eure, Normandy, France 4 9




Wife Adela Of Normandy, Princess Of England 1 2 4 8 9

            AKA: Adela Princess Of England
           Born: Abt 1062 - Rouen, Seine-Inferieure, Normandy, France 4 9
     Christened: 
           Died: 8 Mar 1137 - Marcigny, , Bourgogne, France 2 4
         Buried: 


         Father: William I the Conqueror of Normandy, King of England, Duke of Normandy (1027-1087) 1 10 11 12 13 14 15
         Mother: Countess Mathilda of Flanders (1032-1083) 1 12 16



   Other Spouse: Stephan Henry , Count of Blois & Chartres (      -1102) 8



Children
1 M Stephen , King of England

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




General Notes: Husband - Stephen "Le Sage" Comte De Champagne & Blois

Ancestral Roots has Stephen as son by the 2nd wife Alix, giving no marriage date for Theobald & Alix, nor birth date for Stephen. Turton also has Etienne/Steven born by the 2nd wife Alice de Vexin. But Richard Borthwick in a post to SGM believes that the dates indicate it was his 1st wife who was mother.

------------------------

The following information was supplied in a post-em by Curt Hofemann, curt_hofemann AT yahoo.com:

Stephen "Le Sage" Count of Champagne & Blois

Mother: Alix de Crepi b: ABT. 1020 in Vexin, Normandy, France

The identity of his mother seems to be in debate:

I think... (the mother of Stephen) should be Gersende of Maine, Thibaut III's 1st wife. Stephen Henry was born in 1046 and Thibaut and Gersende did not separate until 1048. ES II:46 gives these dates and mistakenly indicates Stephen Henry to be the son of Gundrada. Also see M Bur *La formation du comte de Champagne* (Nancy, 1977), 199, 214-15 where Stephen Henry is stated to be the son of Gersende. [Ref: Richard Borthwick 30 Jan 1998 message to Gen-Medieval] note: I don't know why he refers to as Stephen as Stephen "Henry". As far as I know, middle names didn't come into use until centuries later... Curt

Research note 1: mother: Alix de Crepi [Ref: Weis AR7 137:23]

Research note 2: mother: Gundrada [Ref: Moriarty p117, Paget p58, Watney p110]

Regards,
Curt

Note: the separation between Thibaut/Theobald and Gersende maybe didn't officially happen until 1048, but I have a child of Gersende's 2nd husband who looks to be b. abt 1045.


General Notes: Wife - Adela Of Normandy, Princess Of England

Adela, French ADÉLE (b. 1062?--d. 1137), daughter of William I the Conqueror of England and his wife, Matilda of Flanders, and mother of Stephen, king of England, whose right to the throne derived through her. She was married to Stephen, earl of Meaux and Brie, in 1080 at Breteuil. Upon the death of his father in 1090, her husband succeeded to the earldom of Blois and Chartres. She appears to have played an active role in the administration of her husband's lands, regularly witnessing his charters, took an active interest in civil and ecclesiastical affairs, and was instrumental in rebuilding the catherdral of Chartres in stone. Having inherited her father's appetite and ability to rule, she became regent in 1095 when she persuaded her popular but weak-willed husband to join the First Crusade to the Holy Land. Although in charge of the central funds of the Crusade, Stephen deserted at Antioch in 1098, understandably enough in face of overwhelming odds. Unfortunately for his reputation, the crusaders survived and succeeded in capturing Jerusalem in 1099. After Stephen's return home in 1099, Adela waged a sustained campaign of bullying and moral blackmail that extended into their bedroom where, between intercourse, she would urge Stephen to think of his reputation and return to the Holy Land. In the end, her nagging worked and Stephen departed east once more in 1101, to meet a satisfactorily noble death at Ramlah in 1102. No longer a coward's wife but more congenially a hero's widow, Adela continued to rule Blois-Chartres during the minority of her sons. Anselm, her guest and teacher in 1097, was often entertained by her during 1103 and 1105 and she affected a temporary reconciliation between him and her brother, Henry I, who lavished patronage on her second son, Stephen, and appointed a third, Henry, bishop of Winchester, the richest see in England. In 1107 Adela entertained Pope Pascal during Easter and in the following year was hostess to Bohemund of Antioch. She made her son Theobald her successor in 1109, and persuaded him to join her brother Henry I against France in 1117. In 1120 she retired to the abbey of Marcigny-sur-Loire where she died in 1137. By all accounts a forceful personality, Adela's qualities were not uncommon among women artistocrats, although more often they found an outlet in the running of nunneries. Adela's secular career, as de facto ruler for more than a decade of one of the most powerful principalities of northern France, is exceptional testimony to the power of breeding as well as to her own determination. She was a benevolent patroness of churches and monasteries. Although married to a French count and living to see a son crowned king of England, she chose to be buried beside her mother at Caen under an inscription 'Adela, filia regis'. She was always the Conqueror's daughter. [Sources: Who's Who in Early Medieval England, Christopher Tyerman, Shepheard-Walwyn, Ltd., London, 1996; Encyclopædia Britannica CD, 1997]
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Theobald III Comte De Blois, (I) De Champagne and Alix De Crepi




Husband Theobald III Comte De Blois, (I) De Champagne 1 6

            AKA: Thibaud I Comte De Champagne (Iii) De Blois
           Born: Abt 1013 - Blois, Loir-Et-Cher, Orleanais/Centre, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 1089 - Champagne, France 6
         Buried:  - St. Martins, Epernay, Marne, Champagne, France
       Marriage: After 1048 - 2ND Wife 4

   Other Spouse: Gersende Du Maine (Abt 1019-Bef 1096) 1 5 7 - 1st Husband 1St Wife - Divorced By 1048 5




Wife Alix De Crepi 1 4 6

            AKA: Alice De Vexin
           Born: Abt 1020 - Crepy-En-Valois, Oise, Picardy, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Raoul II Comte D' Valois, & Crepy (Abt 0985-1060) 1 17 18
         Mother: Adele De Breteuil (0992-1051) 1 17 19





Children

General Notes: Husband - Theobald III Comte De Blois, (I) De Champagne

Mike Lysell, mlysell AT attbi.com, provided the following information via a post-em:

Jim - found the following under "The Counts of Champagne": "Thibaud I of Champagne, also known as Thibaud III of Blois, was born in 1019. Eldest son of Eudes II, he inherited the counties of Blois, Tours, Chartres and Sancerre in 1037. He equally had control over Chateau-Thierry, Provins and Saint-Florentin. His younger brother Etienne obtained the counties of Troyes, Meaux and Vitry as well as the abbey Saint-Médard of Soissons.

"A few years after the death of their illustrious father, Thibaud and Etienne participated in the revolt led by Raoul of Crépy and Galeran of Meulan against king Henri I. This rebellion lasted from 1041 to 1044. King Henri received military support from the powerful count Geoffroy of Anjou who laid siege to Tours. On August 21st 1044, in what is known as the battle of Saint-Martin-le-beau, the troops of the count of Anjou were victorious over the forces of Thibaud and his brother Etienne. Etienne managed to successfully retreat, but Thibaud was captured and held prisoner in the tower of Loches. To gain his freedom, and to most probably save his life, Thibaud was forced to give over control of the Touraine region as well as the castles of Chinon and Langeais to the count of Anjou. As a result of this loss, the center of the Blois-Champagne principality shifted away from the Loire valley towards the Seine and the East. Around 1048, Etienne died and left his young son Eudes III in the protection of his uncle who acted as his regent. Upon reaching his majority, Eudes III distanced himself from Thibaud.

"He came dangerously under the influence of king Philippe I before finally deciding to take part in the conquest of England in 1066. He left France never to return again. From this point onward, the count Thibaud took control permanently of all the lands belonging to his family. In 1045, Thibaud married Gersent of Le Mans who gave him his first son, Etienne-Henri. In 1049, Thibaud annulled this marriage, expressly at the demand of pope Leon IX, for reasons of parentage.

"Thibaud I was directly implicated in the establishment of at least 12 monastic and parish churches in the Champagne region (a Benedictine priory for Saint-Germain of Auxerre at Saint-Florentin after 1037 ; a Benedictine priory for Marmoutier at Ventelay before 1042 ; the Benedictine priory of Saint-Ayoul for Montier-la-Celle at Provins in 1048 ; the hôtel-Dieu of Provins in circa 1050 ; the parish church at La-Croix-sur-Ourcq circa 1050 ; the collegiate church of Oulchy-le-Château after 1050 ; the parish church of Charlesville in 1060 ; the Benedictine priory of Sainte-Foy for Sainte-Foy of Conques at Coulommiers after 1060 ; the Clunisian priory of Saint-Pierre at Coincy in 1072 ; the collegiate church of Saint-Jean-des-Vignes at Soissons in 1076 ; the collegiate church of Saint-Martin of Vertus in 1081 ; the Benedictine abbey Saint-Sauveur at Vertus in circa 1081 ; the Benedictine priory of Saint-Quentin of Troyes for Molesmes before 1089 or 1090). He was in fact a self-proclaimed protector of all monastic institutions in Champagne. This great interest for monasticism was in part due to his concern for maintaining the independence of these communities from political rivals and it was a means of assuring better, friendly control of territories in these newly acquired eastern lands. His sphere of influence was thus made more considerable. As for his western domains, Thibaud established fewer new communities there. He was however the defensor of the great monastic house of Marmoutier in the Touraine region to whom he gave several tracts of land which permitted the establishment of two new priories in the county of Blois. Later in his life, Thibaud was to play an important role in what is now known as the 'Quarrel of Investitures'.

Since the papacy of Leon IX (1049-1054), the Roman church began actively to fight simony in the ranks of the French episcopacy as well as to take steps in extracting itself from what was felt at the time to be heavy handed secular influence. Archbishops and bishops who had gained their office not by election, but by fraudulent means were to step down or risk anathema and excommunication. The reforms came to a climax during the reign of pope Gregory VII (1073-1085). The king of France, Philippe I, did not cooperate with Rome and had no desire to see French dioceses gain in independence. For decades the Capetian monarchs had themselves been appointing ecclesiastics to office. This was too often done in exchange for 'gifts' to the king and meant that the monarch had a great deal of influence over those appointed in this manner. The pope sent legates to France who were to reform the French episcopacy and to excommunicate those who did not heed the decisions of the popes representatives. Thibaud I invited the legates to hold a council in his city of Meaux in Brie. In 1081, this council decided the excommunication of several of the king’s appointees. Another decision of great importance made at Meaux was that all monastic communities in Champagne and elsewhere in the north of France with fewer than ten members were to be affiliated with Cluny or Marmoutier, thus they would be protected from those nobles and others who might try to exploit them. Thibaud I was undeniably an ally to the reformers and participated throughout his lifetime to revitalizing the Church in France.

"The count Thibaud I Champagne died in 1089 at the age of seventy and was buried not at Marmoutier, but in the collegiate church of Saint-Martin founded by his father in the heart ot the Champagne region at Epernay. His eldest son Etienne-Henri inherited the western counties as well as Meaux. His sons Eudes IV and Hugues, born from his second marriage in 1060 to Adela of Bar-sur-Aube, received the remaining eastern counties. His youngest son, Philip, would become bishop of Chalons, but would only be in office one year before dying at a rather young age."

This sheds some light on his marriage to and divorce from Gersende du Maine and indicates she is the mother of Stephen (Etienne-Henri).

The website is located at //lamop.univ-paris1.fr/baudin/anglais/Thibaud1. No authors or sources are listed.

I thought you would be interested in the information.

Mike Lysell
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Theobald III Comte De Blois, (I) De Champagne and Gersende Du Maine




Husband Theobald III Comte De Blois, (I) De Champagne 1 6

            AKA: Thibaud I Comte De Champagne (Iii) De Blois
           Born: Abt 1013 - Blois, Loir-Et-Cher, Orleanais/Centre, France
     Christened: 
           Died: 1089 - Champagne, France 6
         Buried:  - St. Martins, Epernay, Marne, Champagne, France
       Marriage:  - 1st Husband 1St Wife - Divorced By 1048 5

   Other Spouse: Alix De Crepi (Abt 1020-      ) 1 4 6 - After 1048 - 2ND Wife 4




Wife Gersende Du Maine 1 5 7

           Born: Abt 1019 - Le Mans, Sarthe, Maine/Pays-DE-La-Loire, France
     Christened: 
           Died: Bef 1096
         Buried: 


         Father: Herbert I Eveillechien Comte Du Maine (Abt 0984-1036) 1 20
         Mother: 



   Other Spouse: Alberto Azzo II Marquis D' Este (1009-1097) 1 7 - After 1048 - 2ND Husband 2ND Wife



Children
1 M Stephen "Le Sage" Comte De Champagne & Blois 1 2 3 4

            AKA: Stephen "Le Sage" Comte De Blois & Champagne
           Born: Abt 1046 - Blois, Loir-Et-Cher, Orleanais/Centre, France 5
     Christened: 
           Died: 27 May 1102 - Ramlah, Palestine (On Crusade Of 1101) 2 4
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Adela Of Normandy, Princess Of England (Abt 1062-1137) 1 2 4 8 9
           Marr: Abt 1080 - Breteuil, Eure, Normandy, France 4 9




General Notes: Husband - Theobald III Comte De Blois, (I) De Champagne

Mike Lysell, mlysell AT attbi.com, provided the following information via a post-em:

Jim - found the following under "The Counts of Champagne": "Thibaud I of Champagne, also known as Thibaud III of Blois, was born in 1019. Eldest son of Eudes II, he inherited the counties of Blois, Tours, Chartres and Sancerre in 1037. He equally had control over Chateau-Thierry, Provins and Saint-Florentin. His younger brother Etienne obtained the counties of Troyes, Meaux and Vitry as well as the abbey Saint-Médard of Soissons.

"A few years after the death of their illustrious father, Thibaud and Etienne participated in the revolt led by Raoul of Crépy and Galeran of Meulan against king Henri I. This rebellion lasted from 1041 to 1044. King Henri received military support from the powerful count Geoffroy of Anjou who laid siege to Tours. On August 21st 1044, in what is known as the battle of Saint-Martin-le-beau, the troops of the count of Anjou were victorious over the forces of Thibaud and his brother Etienne. Etienne managed to successfully retreat, but Thibaud was captured and held prisoner in the tower of Loches. To gain his freedom, and to most probably save his life, Thibaud was forced to give over control of the Touraine region as well as the castles of Chinon and Langeais to the count of Anjou. As a result of this loss, the center of the Blois-Champagne principality shifted away from the Loire valley towards the Seine and the East. Around 1048, Etienne died and left his young son Eudes III in the protection of his uncle who acted as his regent. Upon reaching his majority, Eudes III distanced himself from Thibaud.

"He came dangerously under the influence of king Philippe I before finally deciding to take part in the conquest of England in 1066. He left France never to return again. From this point onward, the count Thibaud took control permanently of all the lands belonging to his family. In 1045, Thibaud married Gersent of Le Mans who gave him his first son, Etienne-Henri. In 1049, Thibaud annulled this marriage, expressly at the demand of pope Leon IX, for reasons of parentage.

"Thibaud I was directly implicated in the establishment of at least 12 monastic and parish churches in the Champagne region (a Benedictine priory for Saint-Germain of Auxerre at Saint-Florentin after 1037 ; a Benedictine priory for Marmoutier at Ventelay before 1042 ; the Benedictine priory of Saint-Ayoul for Montier-la-Celle at Provins in 1048 ; the hôtel-Dieu of Provins in circa 1050 ; the parish church at La-Croix-sur-Ourcq circa 1050 ; the collegiate church of Oulchy-le-Château after 1050 ; the parish church of Charlesville in 1060 ; the Benedictine priory of Sainte-Foy for Sainte-Foy of Conques at Coulommiers after 1060 ; the Clunisian priory of Saint-Pierre at Coincy in 1072 ; the collegiate church of Saint-Jean-des-Vignes at Soissons in 1076 ; the collegiate church of Saint-Martin of Vertus in 1081 ; the Benedictine abbey Saint-Sauveur at Vertus in circa 1081 ; the Benedictine priory of Saint-Quentin of Troyes for Molesmes before 1089 or 1090). He was in fact a self-proclaimed protector of all monastic institutions in Champagne. This great interest for monasticism was in part due to his concern for maintaining the independence of these communities from political rivals and it was a means of assuring better, friendly control of territories in these newly acquired eastern lands. His sphere of influence was thus made more considerable. As for his western domains, Thibaud established fewer new communities there. He was however the defensor of the great monastic house of Marmoutier in the Touraine region to whom he gave several tracts of land which permitted the establishment of two new priories in the county of Blois. Later in his life, Thibaud was to play an important role in what is now known as the 'Quarrel of Investitures'.

Since the papacy of Leon IX (1049-1054), the Roman church began actively to fight simony in the ranks of the French episcopacy as well as to take steps in extracting itself from what was felt at the time to be heavy handed secular influence. Archbishops and bishops who had gained their office not by election, but by fraudulent means were to step down or risk anathema and excommunication. The reforms came to a climax during the reign of pope Gregory VII (1073-1085). The king of France, Philippe I, did not cooperate with Rome and had no desire to see French dioceses gain in independence. For decades the Capetian monarchs had themselves been appointing ecclesiastics to office. This was too often done in exchange for 'gifts' to the king and meant that the monarch had a great deal of influence over those appointed in this manner. The pope sent legates to France who were to reform the French episcopacy and to excommunicate those who did not heed the decisions of the popes representatives. Thibaud I invited the legates to hold a council in his city of Meaux in Brie. In 1081, this council decided the excommunication of several of the king’s appointees. Another decision of great importance made at Meaux was that all monastic communities in Champagne and elsewhere in the north of France with fewer than ten members were to be affiliated with Cluny or Marmoutier, thus they would be protected from those nobles and others who might try to exploit them. Thibaud I was undeniably an ally to the reformers and participated throughout his lifetime to revitalizing the Church in France.

"The count Thibaud I Champagne died in 1089 at the age of seventy and was buried not at Marmoutier, but in the collegiate church of Saint-Martin founded by his father in the heart ot the Champagne region at Epernay. His eldest son Etienne-Henri inherited the western counties as well as Meaux. His sons Eudes IV and Hugues, born from his second marriage in 1060 to Adela of Bar-sur-Aube, received the remaining eastern counties. His youngest son, Philip, would become bishop of Chalons, but would only be in office one year before dying at a rather young age."

This sheds some light on his marriage to and divorce from Gersende du Maine and indicates she is the mother of Stephen (Etienne-Henri).

The website is located at //lamop.univ-paris1.fr/baudin/anglais/Thibaud1. No authors or sources are listed.

I thought you would be interested in the information.

Mike Lysell


General Notes: Wife - Gersende Du Maine

Note: Gersende's separation from her 1st husband supposedly didn't happen until 1048, but by my dates it would have been earlier than 1045. @@check ancestry
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William De Blois, 4th Earl Of Surrey and Isabel de Warenne, 4th Countess Of Surrey




Husband William De Blois, 4th Earl Of Surrey 1 21

            AKA: 04th Earl Of Surrey William De Blois
           Born: Between 1132 and 1137 - Blois, Loir-Et-Cher, Orleanais/Centre, France 22
     Christened: 
           Died: Oct 1159 - Hospital Of Montmorillon, Poitou, France 22
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Isabel de Warenne, 4th Countess Of Surrey 1 23 24 25 26

            AKA: 04th Countess Of Surrey Isabel De Warenne
           Born: Abt 1137 - Lewes, Sussex, England 27
     Christened: 
           Died: 12 Jul 1203 - Lewes, Sussex, England 28
         Buried:  - Chapter House, Lewes, Sussex, England


         Father: William de Warenne, 3rd Earl Of Surrey (Abt 1119-1148) 1 29 30 31
         Mother: Ela De Talvas, D'alencon (Abt 1120-1174) 1 29 32 33 34



   Other Spouse: Hamelin Plantagenet, 5th Earl of Surrey and Warenne (Abt 1130-1202) 1 23 24 35 - Apr 1164 25 28

   Other Spouse: William II de Blois, Earl of Surrey and Warenne (Abt 1134-      )

Noted events in her life were:
• Alt. Death 27 29, Lewes, Sussex, England, 13 Jul 1199



Children

General Notes: Husband - William De Blois, 4th Earl Of Surrey

EARLDOM OF SURREY (IV) 1148 or 1149

WILLIAM DE BLOIS, a younger son of STEPHEN KING OF ENGLAND, by Maud, suo jure COUNTESS OF BOULOGNE, daughter and heir of Eustace, COUNT OF BOULOGNE, was born between 1132 and 1137. In 1148 or 1149 he became EARL OF SURREY by his marriage to the heiress. In August 1153, by the death of his elder brother Eustace, he became Count of Boulogne. In November 1153 the treaty between his father and Henry, Duke of Normandy, which provided that Henry should succeed Stephen as King, stipulated that William should hold all the lands &c. which his father had held before he became King [the comti of Mortain, the lands of the Honors of Boulogne, Eye and Lancaster, and other lands granted by Henry I], and the lands &c. of the Honor of Warenne, including the castles of Bellencombre and Mortemer; also Norwich castle, with a large interest in the comitatus of Norfolk, which Stephen had given him; also Pevensey castle, with an interest in that Honor. However in 1157 William surrendered to Henry II Pevensey and Norwich and whatever crown lands were in his hands and all his strongholds in Normandy and England, being allowed to retain whatever Stephen had held at the death of Henry I. In 1158 he was knighted by Henry II at Carlisle. In the summer of 1159 he served in the Toulouse campaign, dying during the retreat in October. He was a benefactor to Lewes Priory. He married Isabel, only daughter and heir of William (DE WARENNE), 3rd EARL OF SURREY, by Ela. He died s.p. as above in October I 159 and was buried in the hospital of Montmorillon in Poitou. Isabel survived him and was sought in marriage by Henry Il's brother William, but Archbishop Beket opposed the match on the ground of consanguinity, and she married, 2ndly, the King's illegitimate half-brother, Hamelin. [Complete Peerage XII/1:497-9, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]


General Notes: Wife - Isabel de Warenne, 4th Countess Of Surrey

He [William de Blois] married Isabel, only daughter and heir of William (DE WARENNE), 3rd EARL OF SURREY, by Ela. He died s.p. as above in October I 159 and was buried in the hospital of Montmorillon in Poitou. Isabel survived him and was sought in marriage by Henry Il's brother William, but Archbishop Beket opposed the match on the ground of consanguinity, and she married, 2ndly, the King's illegitimate half-brother, Hamelin. [Complete Peerage XII/1:497-9, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

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He [Hamelin Plantagenet] married, in 1164 (probably in April), Isabel, widow of William (OF BLOIS) 4th EARL OF SURREY, and only daughter and heir of William (DE WARENNE), 3rd EARL OF SURREY, all above-named. He died 7 May 1202 and was buried in the Chapter House at Lewes. Isabel survived him and made gifts for the soul of her late husband to the priory of St. Katherine, Lincoln, and to Lewes Priory. She was living in April 1203 but died probably soon afterwards, possibly 12 July 1203, and was buried in the Chapter House at Lewes (g). [Complete Peerage XII/1:499-500, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]

(g) By her 2nd husband she had issue, a son William, 6th Earl, and 3 daughters: (1) Ela, who m. 1stly Robert de Newburn, of whom nothing is known, and 2ndly, William FitzWilliam of Sprotborough; (2) Isabel, who m. 1stly Robert de Lascy, and 2ndly Gilbert de Laigle, lord of Pevensey; (3) Maud, who m. 1stly Henry, Count of Eu and lord of Hastings, and 2ndly Henry d'Estouteville or de Stuteville, of Eckington, co. Derby, and Dedham, Essex, lord of Valmont and Rames in Normandy.
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Sir John Sutton IV and Constance Blount




Husband Sir John Sutton IV

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 1406
         Buried: 


         Father: Sir John Sutton III (1361-1396)
         Mother: Alice de Spencer (      -      )


       Marriage: 




Wife Constance Blount

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Sir Walter Blount (      -      )
         Mother: Sanchia de Toledo (      -      )





Children
1 M Sir John Sutton, 1st Lord Dudley

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Elizabeth Berkeley (      -      )




picture
Henry VIII Tudor, King of England and Elizabeth Blount




Husband Henry VIII Tudor, King of England




           Born: 28 Jun 1491
     Christened: 
           Died: 28 Jan 1547
         Buried: 


         Father: Henry VII Tudor, King of England (1485-1509)
         Mother: Elizabeth of York (1466-1503)


       Marriage:  - This couple did not marry

   Other Spouse: Katherine , of Aragon (1485-      ) - 1509

   Other Spouse: Anne Boleyn (Abt 1505-1536) - 1533

   Other Spouse: Jane Seymour (Abt 1504-1537) - 30 May 1536

   Other Spouse: Anne , of Cleaves (      -      ) - 6 Jan 1540

   Other Spouse: Katherine Howard (Abt 1522-1542) - 28 Jul 1540

   Other Spouse: Katherine Parr (      -      ) - 12 Jul 1543




Wife Elizabeth Blount

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 M Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Richmond and Somerset

           Born: 15 Jun 1519
     Christened: 
           Died: 23 Jul 1536
         Buried: 




picture
Sir Walter Blount and Sanchia de Toledo




Husband Sir Walter Blount

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Sanchia de Toledo

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 F Constance Blount

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Sir John Sutton IV (      -1406)




picture
Living and Living




Husband Living (details have been suppressed)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife Living (details have been suppressed)

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Wiley Thomison (1882-1955)
         Mother: Beaulah Jaco (1892-WFT Est 1937/1987)





Children
picture

Sources


1 Jim Weber (https://myaccount.rootsweb.com/publicprofile?mn=jimweber110&kurl=http:%2F%2Fwc%2Erootsweb%2Eancestry%2Ecom%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Figm%2Ecgi%3Fdb%3Djweber%26id%3DI03403%26op%3DGED).

2 Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on, United Kingdom, Ancestry of the British Royal House.

3 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 262-26.

4 The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968, 15.

5 Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, Richard Borthwick, 30 Jan 1998.

6 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 137-22.

7 Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, John Yohalem (Jean Coeur de Lapin), 23 Nov 1996.

8 Tauté, Anne. "The Kings and Queens of Great Britain" pub by Elm TreeBooks/Hamish Hamilton Ltd. Great Britain.//.

9 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 137-23.

10 Microsoft Encarta 1994 ed.

11 Freeman, Marsha Colleen (Scully) (Rec# 435). "Buell Genealogy" pub. 1 Dec1978. Chart #34.

12 Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 161-9.

13 Burke's Peerage & Baronetage, 106th Edition, Charles Mosley Editor-in-Chief, 1999, cxiv.

14 Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on, William I.

15 Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000, III:164.

16 Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on, Baldwin V.

17 The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968, 220, 112, 15.

18 Leo's Genealogics Website (Leo van de Pas), www.genealogics.org, Raoul II Comte d'Amiens, de Valois et Crepy.

19 Leo's Genealogics Website (Leo van de Pas), www.genealogics.org, Adele de Breteuil.

20 The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968, 175.

21 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 83-36.

22 Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000, XII/1:497-499.

23 Davoli, Elizabeth Lynn. AOL user DOMINICKY. E-mail addressed toWarenne@aol.com "Re: Bill and Charlie" sent Mar 2, 1995 22:02:32 EST.

24 Magna Charta Sureties 1215, Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Sheppard Jr, 5th Edition, 1999, 151-1.

25 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 83-26.

26 Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000, XII/1:497-499, 497 (i), 500.

27 Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, Ed Mann, 6 Jan 1999.

28 Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000, XII/1:500.

29 The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968, 112.

30 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 108-26.

31 Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000, XII/1:496-7.

32 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 83-25, 108-26.

33 Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000, XII/1:497.

34 Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000, XI:375-7.

35 Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000, XII/1:499-500.


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