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Ancestors of Amy Russell Tolbert



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Xerses I , King of Persia and Vashti




Husband Xerses I , King of Persia 1

           Born: 519 B.C.
     Christened: 
           Died: 465 B.C.
         Buried: 


         Father: Darius I , King of Persia (0558 B.C.-0486 B.C.)
         Mother: Atossa (      -      ) 1


       Marriage: 

   Other Spouse: Esther (      -      ) 1

Noted events in his life were:
• Reigned, 486-465 B.C.




Wife Vashti 1

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children

General Notes: Husband - Xerses I , King of Persia

(Persian Khshayarsha) Ascending the throne upon the death of his father,
he subdued a rebellion in Egypt, and then spent three years preparing a
great fleet and army to punish the Greeks for aiding the Ionian cities in
498 bc and for their victory over the Persians at Marathon in 490 bc. The
Greek historian Herodotus gives as the combined strength of Xerxes' land
and naval forces the incredible total of 2,641,610 warriors. Xerxes is
said to have crossed the Hellespont by a bridge of boats more than a
kilometer in length and to have cut a canal through the isthmus of Mount
Athos. During the spring of 480 bc he marched with his forces through
Thrace, Thessaly, and Locris. At Thermopylae 300 Spartans, under their
king, Leonidas I, made a courageous but futile stand, delaying the
Persians for ten days. Xerxes then advanced into Attica and burned Athens,
which had been abandoned by the Greeks. At the Battle of Salamís later in
480 bc, however, his fleet was defeated by a much smaller contingent of
Greek warships commanded by the Athenian Themistocles. Xerxes thereupon
retired to Asia Minor, leaving his army in Greece under the command of his
brother-in-law, Mardonius (fl. 500-479 bc), who was slain at Plataea the
following year. Xerxes was murdered at Persepolis by Artabanus (died 464
bc), captain of the palace guard; he was succeeded by his son Artaxerxes I
(reigned 465-425 bc). Xerxes is generally identified as the Ahasuerus of
the Book of Esther.
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Vcke




Husband Vcke

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 M Siward de Longworth

           Born: Abt 1145 - Upholland, , Lancashire, England
     Christened: 
           Died: 1204 - England
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Lady Julianna (Eva) (      -      )




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Vermund Frodasson




Husband Vermund Frodasson 2

           Born: Abt 369 - , , Denmark
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Frodi Havarsson (Abt 0347-      ) 2
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 M Olaf Vermundsson 2

           Born: Abt 391 - , , Denmark
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




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Visbur Vanlandasson




Husband Visbur Vanlandasson 2

           Born: Abt 319 - Sweden
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Vanlandi Svegdasson (Abt 0298-      ) 2
         Mother: Driva Snaersson (Abt 0302-      ) 2


       Marriage: 




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 M Domaldi Visbursson 2

           Born: Abt 340 - Sweden
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




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Saint Vladimir I "The Great" , Grand Duke of Kiev and Regneide/Rogneda Polotsk




Husband Saint Vladimir I "The Great" , Grand Duke of Kiev 1 3 4 5

           Born: Abt 955 - Kiev, Ukraine
     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Jul 1015 - Berestovo, Kiev, Ukraine 6
         Buried:  - Church Of The Ti, Kiev, Ukraine


         Father: Svyatoslav I Kiev, Grand Duke of Kiev (Abt 0920-0973) 1 3 7
         Mother: Debrima Lubech (Abt 0915-      ) 2 3 7


       Marriage:  - 1st Wife - Divorced

   Other Spouse: Anna Princess Of Byzantine Empire (0963-1011) 1 3 8 - Abt 988 - Kherson, Kiev, Ukraine

   Other Spouse: Rogneda Von Ohningen (Abt 0968-1014) 3 9 - After 1011 6




Wife Regneide/Rogneda Polotsk 3 5 6 10

           Born: Abt 958 - Polotsk, Byelorussia
     Christened: 
           Died: 1000 11
         Buried: 


         Father: Ragnvald Olafsson, Of West Gotland & Polotsk (Abt 0925-0970) 3 10
         Mother: Ingelborge (Abt 0930-      ) 3



Noted events in her life were:
• Fact 1



Children
1 F Daughter Of Kiev 3 12

           Born: Abt 975 - Kiev, Ukraine
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



2 M Jaroslaus I "The Wise" Polotsk, Grand Duke Of Kiev 2 3 13 14

            AKA: Jaroslav Valdimirovich Grand Prince Of Kiev
           Born: Abt 978 - Kiev, Ukraine
     Christened: 
           Died: 20 Feb 1054 - Polotsk, Byelorussia 15
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Ingegard Olafsdottir (1001-1050) 3 13 14
           Marr: 1019 - 2ND Wife 16



3 M Wyrtgeorn (Vortigern) King Of Wenden 3

           Born: Abt 980 - Wenden, Germany
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
         Spouse: Thyra Svendsdottir (Abt 0988-      ) 3



4 F Premyslava Of Kiev 3 5

           Born: Abt 982 - Kiev, Ukraine
     Christened: 
           Died: 1018
         Buried: 




General Notes: Husband - Saint Vladimir I "The Great" , Grand Duke of Kiev

Sources: RC 143, 321, 361; Clarkson; A. Roots 241. 243; AF; Kraentzler
1162, 1170, 1171, 1172, 1233, 1603; Timetables of History; Through the Ages.

Roots: St. Vladimir, Grand Prince of Kiev. Died 15 July 1015. Married after 1011, a daughter (died 14 Aug 1014) of Kuno, Count of Ohinigen, by Richilde, dau. of Otto I, the Great. Married also Rogneide, dau. of Rognald of Polotzk.

RC: "The Great" of Kiev, Ukraine, Russia. Grand prince of Novgorod and Kiev. Baptized a Christian, 988.

K: Wladimir I le Grand et le Saint. Grand Duke of Novogorod, Kiew.
"Le Grand et le Saint." Grand Prince of Kiev or Grand Duke of Kiev and Novgorod. Ruled 980-1015. "980. St.Vladimir becomes Prince of Kiev."

Clarkson:
Vladimir succeeded his father through the process of fratricidal wars in which his brothers were slain. "He installed himself at Kiev (977), whence, by savage campaigns, he collected wives and tribute from most of the Dnieper Basin. Vladimir's chief fame rests on his forced conversion of the Russian Slavs to Christianity...During his reign, Kiev was repeatedly harassed by the Pechenegs; to hold them off, Vladimir built a sort of fortified line of new towns along the steppe frontier. At his death (1015) he left seven sons--of four or five different mothers--each ruling as prince in a portion of the Russian land; one of them, Yaroslav of Novgorod, was in open rebvellion, having refused to pay tribute to his father. Sviatopolk, who seized Kiev, promptly murdered three of his brothers, but was defeated in a four-year struggle by Yaroslav, who succeeded to the title of grand prince. Yaroslav, however, was forced to share the territory with another brother, Mstislav, who took the opportunity to move his residence from outlying Tmutorakan, beyond the Sea of Azov, to Chernigov, near Kiev. Not until Mstislav's death (1036) did Yaroslav "the Wise" venture to remove his seat from Novgorod to Kiev."

"Vladimir...who had won the throne of Kiev by the murder of his older brother, was the last major European ruler to abandon paganism." He invited envoys from the Khazars (Jews), the Volga Bulgars (Muslims), Rome and Greece to "sell" their religious beliefs. But "Vladimir and his simple warriors (were) unable to make up their minds in this war of words." Therefore, they visited the temples of the Bulgars, the Romans and the Greeks, not bothering with a visit to the Khazars. They found the mosques unclean and western Catholic worship tolerable, but they were entralled with the spendor and beauty of the Greek places of worship. Hence, they embraced the Greek Orthodox religion.

Vladimir was promised the hand of Anne, sister of the Byzantine emperor, in return for military aid and, despite some foot dragging by the emperor after the aid was provided, married the lady in 988. "In 990 Vladimir returned to Kieve with his imperial bride and a retinue of priests. Throughout his dominions the population was compulsorily baptized wholesale..."

RC says he had many pagan wives and concubines of whom these are known: (1) Adlaga; (2) Olava; (3) Malfrida, a Bohemian, d. 1002; (5) a Greek, widow of his brother, Teropolk; (6) N.N.(27-36), a Bulgarian; md (7) 989, Anna, daughter of the Eastern Emperor, the Basilius Romanos, d. 10011; (8) N.N. (321-33), daughter of Kuno, Count of Ohningen. K. calls the latter Rogneda de Oehningen. One AF record says born about 962.

According to my records, St. Vladimir had three daughters with Vladimirovna as name or part of name--all via different wives. Maybe he just liked the name. Maybe there are errors in the records.
His baptism made Orthodox Christianity the official religion of Russia.
Vladimir was a pagan at the beginning of his reign, which was at first
devoted to consolidating his territories into a unified Russian state. In
exchange for helping the Byzantine emperor Basil II suppress a rebellion,
Vladimir was allowed to marry the emperor's sister, Anne, at which time he
accepted Christianity. Allied to Byzantium by religious and family ties,
Vladimir introduced Byzantine civilization into Russia by building
churches, suppressing paganism, and making social reforms. Nonetheless, he
remained open to Western influences, which are reflected in his
legislation.


General Notes: Wife - Regneide/Rogneda Polotsk

The following post to SGM, 18 Feb 2003, by Igor Sklar, in reponse to the question of who Iaroslav/Jaroslaus The Wise's mother was gives her ancestry:

From: Igor Sklar (sklar2002 AT yandex.ru)
Subject: Re: Iaroslav the wise
Newsgroups: soc.genealogy.medieval
Date: 2003-02-18 10:31:36 PST

"jl" <zglorg AT wanadoo.fr> wrote in message news:<b2rvkb$br2$1 AT news-reader12.wanadoo.fr>...
> Plz someone can tell me who his mother was.
>
> Anna of Macedonia or Rogneda
>
> thanks
>
> jl

Yaroslav's mother was Rogneda of Polotsk. I don't understand how it could be, conditioned that Vladimir took Rogneda by force in 980, whilst Yaroslav was born about 978 (he was 76 when he died). However the case, Yaroslav was the eldest biological son of Vladimir.

Rogneda is not a Slavic name. Her father was Ragnvald of West Gotland, then of Polotsk (killed 970), the brother of Truggvi Olafson of Norway (died 965) and the illegitimate son of Olaf Haraldson of Norway (died 934). As you may see, Yaroslav was a great grandson of Harald I Fairhair (died 931), the first Yngling king of Norway. This explains why in Norse sagas Vladimir is called a kinsman of Norse King Olaf Traggvison (who was brought up in Kiev) more than once.

Some folks are in pains to establish their line of descent from Macedonian Emperors of Byzantium. They assume that Yaroslav was born in 988 and his mother was Anna of Byzantium. But it's nothing more than their fantasy.

Respects, Igor

Note: Even though there is some doubt about the above ancestry, I am adopting it. There is much doubt about all of the early Scandinavian ancestry, depending as it does not 11th century writers (ie. Snorri & Nestor), and sagas. It is best to categorize the ancestries as legendary or historical, where the latter have verifiable evidence backing them up, while the "legendary" depend on the sagas, etc. This ancestry is legendary. Another variation is that it was Rogneda's mother (Ragnvald's wife) Ingelborge who was daughter of Olaf, instead of Ragnvald being son.
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Saint Vladimir I "The Great" , Grand Duke of Kiev and Anna Princess Of Byzantine Empire




Husband Saint Vladimir I "The Great" , Grand Duke of Kiev 1 3 4 5

           Born: Abt 955 - Kiev, Ukraine
     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Jul 1015 - Berestovo, Kiev, Ukraine 6
         Buried:  - Church Of The Ti, Kiev, Ukraine


         Father: Svyatoslav I Kiev, Grand Duke of Kiev (Abt 0920-0973) 1 3 7
         Mother: Debrima Lubech (Abt 0915-      ) 2 3 7


       Marriage: Abt 988 - Kherson, Kiev, Ukraine

   Other Spouse: Regneide/Rogneda Polotsk (Abt 0958-1000) 3 5 6 10 - 1st Wife - Divorced

   Other Spouse: Rogneda Von Ohningen (Abt 0968-1014) 3 9 - After 1011 6




Wife Anna Princess Of Byzantine Empire 1 3 8

           Born: 13 Mar 963 - Constantinople, Turkey
     Christened: 
           Died: 1011 8
         Buried: 



Children

General Notes: Husband - Saint Vladimir I "The Great" , Grand Duke of Kiev

Sources: RC 143, 321, 361; Clarkson; A. Roots 241. 243; AF; Kraentzler
1162, 1170, 1171, 1172, 1233, 1603; Timetables of History; Through the Ages.

Roots: St. Vladimir, Grand Prince of Kiev. Died 15 July 1015. Married after 1011, a daughter (died 14 Aug 1014) of Kuno, Count of Ohinigen, by Richilde, dau. of Otto I, the Great. Married also Rogneide, dau. of Rognald of Polotzk.

RC: "The Great" of Kiev, Ukraine, Russia. Grand prince of Novgorod and Kiev. Baptized a Christian, 988.

K: Wladimir I le Grand et le Saint. Grand Duke of Novogorod, Kiew.
"Le Grand et le Saint." Grand Prince of Kiev or Grand Duke of Kiev and Novgorod. Ruled 980-1015. "980. St.Vladimir becomes Prince of Kiev."

Clarkson:
Vladimir succeeded his father through the process of fratricidal wars in which his brothers were slain. "He installed himself at Kiev (977), whence, by savage campaigns, he collected wives and tribute from most of the Dnieper Basin. Vladimir's chief fame rests on his forced conversion of the Russian Slavs to Christianity...During his reign, Kiev was repeatedly harassed by the Pechenegs; to hold them off, Vladimir built a sort of fortified line of new towns along the steppe frontier. At his death (1015) he left seven sons--of four or five different mothers--each ruling as prince in a portion of the Russian land; one of them, Yaroslav of Novgorod, was in open rebvellion, having refused to pay tribute to his father. Sviatopolk, who seized Kiev, promptly murdered three of his brothers, but was defeated in a four-year struggle by Yaroslav, who succeeded to the title of grand prince. Yaroslav, however, was forced to share the territory with another brother, Mstislav, who took the opportunity to move his residence from outlying Tmutorakan, beyond the Sea of Azov, to Chernigov, near Kiev. Not until Mstislav's death (1036) did Yaroslav "the Wise" venture to remove his seat from Novgorod to Kiev."

"Vladimir...who had won the throne of Kiev by the murder of his older brother, was the last major European ruler to abandon paganism." He invited envoys from the Khazars (Jews), the Volga Bulgars (Muslims), Rome and Greece to "sell" their religious beliefs. But "Vladimir and his simple warriors (were) unable to make up their minds in this war of words." Therefore, they visited the temples of the Bulgars, the Romans and the Greeks, not bothering with a visit to the Khazars. They found the mosques unclean and western Catholic worship tolerable, but they were entralled with the spendor and beauty of the Greek places of worship. Hence, they embraced the Greek Orthodox religion.

Vladimir was promised the hand of Anne, sister of the Byzantine emperor, in return for military aid and, despite some foot dragging by the emperor after the aid was provided, married the lady in 988. "In 990 Vladimir returned to Kieve with his imperial bride and a retinue of priests. Throughout his dominions the population was compulsorily baptized wholesale..."

RC says he had many pagan wives and concubines of whom these are known: (1) Adlaga; (2) Olava; (3) Malfrida, a Bohemian, d. 1002; (5) a Greek, widow of his brother, Teropolk; (6) N.N.(27-36), a Bulgarian; md (7) 989, Anna, daughter of the Eastern Emperor, the Basilius Romanos, d. 10011; (8) N.N. (321-33), daughter of Kuno, Count of Ohningen. K. calls the latter Rogneda de Oehningen. One AF record says born about 962.

According to my records, St. Vladimir had three daughters with Vladimirovna as name or part of name--all via different wives. Maybe he just liked the name. Maybe there are errors in the records.
His baptism made Orthodox Christianity the official religion of Russia.
Vladimir was a pagan at the beginning of his reign, which was at first
devoted to consolidating his territories into a unified Russian state. In
exchange for helping the Byzantine emperor Basil II suppress a rebellion,
Vladimir was allowed to marry the emperor's sister, Anne, at which time he
accepted Christianity. Allied to Byzantium by religious and family ties,
Vladimir introduced Byzantine civilization into Russia by building
churches, suppressing paganism, and making social reforms. Nonetheless, he
remained open to Western influences, which are reflected in his
legislation.
picture

Saint Vladimir I "The Great" , Grand Duke of Kiev and Rogneda Von Ohningen




Husband Saint Vladimir I "The Great" , Grand Duke of Kiev 1 3 4 5

           Born: Abt 955 - Kiev, Ukraine
     Christened: 
           Died: 15 Jul 1015 - Berestovo, Kiev, Ukraine 6
         Buried:  - Church Of The Ti, Kiev, Ukraine


         Father: Svyatoslav I Kiev, Grand Duke of Kiev (Abt 0920-0973) 1 3 7
         Mother: Debrima Lubech (Abt 0915-      ) 2 3 7


       Marriage: After 1011 6

   Other Spouse: Regneide/Rogneda Polotsk (Abt 0958-1000) 3 5 6 10 - 1st Wife - Divorced

   Other Spouse: Anna Princess Of Byzantine Empire (0963-1011) 1 3 8 - Abt 988 - Kherson, Kiev, Ukraine




Wife Rogneda Von Ohningen 3 9

           Born: Abt 968 - Ohningen, Konstanz, Baden, Germany
     Christened: 
           Died: 14 Aug 1014 6
         Buried: 



Children
1 F Dobroniega Princess Of Kiev 3 4

           Born: After 1011 - Kiev, Ukraine 16
     Christened: 
           Died: 1087 16
         Buried: 




General Notes: Husband - Saint Vladimir I "The Great" , Grand Duke of Kiev

Sources: RC 143, 321, 361; Clarkson; A. Roots 241. 243; AF; Kraentzler
1162, 1170, 1171, 1172, 1233, 1603; Timetables of History; Through the Ages.

Roots: St. Vladimir, Grand Prince of Kiev. Died 15 July 1015. Married after 1011, a daughter (died 14 Aug 1014) of Kuno, Count of Ohinigen, by Richilde, dau. of Otto I, the Great. Married also Rogneide, dau. of Rognald of Polotzk.

RC: "The Great" of Kiev, Ukraine, Russia. Grand prince of Novgorod and Kiev. Baptized a Christian, 988.

K: Wladimir I le Grand et le Saint. Grand Duke of Novogorod, Kiew.
"Le Grand et le Saint." Grand Prince of Kiev or Grand Duke of Kiev and Novgorod. Ruled 980-1015. "980. St.Vladimir becomes Prince of Kiev."

Clarkson:
Vladimir succeeded his father through the process of fratricidal wars in which his brothers were slain. "He installed himself at Kiev (977), whence, by savage campaigns, he collected wives and tribute from most of the Dnieper Basin. Vladimir's chief fame rests on his forced conversion of the Russian Slavs to Christianity...During his reign, Kiev was repeatedly harassed by the Pechenegs; to hold them off, Vladimir built a sort of fortified line of new towns along the steppe frontier. At his death (1015) he left seven sons--of four or five different mothers--each ruling as prince in a portion of the Russian land; one of them, Yaroslav of Novgorod, was in open rebvellion, having refused to pay tribute to his father. Sviatopolk, who seized Kiev, promptly murdered three of his brothers, but was defeated in a four-year struggle by Yaroslav, who succeeded to the title of grand prince. Yaroslav, however, was forced to share the territory with another brother, Mstislav, who took the opportunity to move his residence from outlying Tmutorakan, beyond the Sea of Azov, to Chernigov, near Kiev. Not until Mstislav's death (1036) did Yaroslav "the Wise" venture to remove his seat from Novgorod to Kiev."

"Vladimir...who had won the throne of Kiev by the murder of his older brother, was the last major European ruler to abandon paganism." He invited envoys from the Khazars (Jews), the Volga Bulgars (Muslims), Rome and Greece to "sell" their religious beliefs. But "Vladimir and his simple warriors (were) unable to make up their minds in this war of words." Therefore, they visited the temples of the Bulgars, the Romans and the Greeks, not bothering with a visit to the Khazars. They found the mosques unclean and western Catholic worship tolerable, but they were entralled with the spendor and beauty of the Greek places of worship. Hence, they embraced the Greek Orthodox religion.

Vladimir was promised the hand of Anne, sister of the Byzantine emperor, in return for military aid and, despite some foot dragging by the emperor after the aid was provided, married the lady in 988. "In 990 Vladimir returned to Kieve with his imperial bride and a retinue of priests. Throughout his dominions the population was compulsorily baptized wholesale..."

RC says he had many pagan wives and concubines of whom these are known: (1) Adlaga; (2) Olava; (3) Malfrida, a Bohemian, d. 1002; (5) a Greek, widow of his brother, Teropolk; (6) N.N.(27-36), a Bulgarian; md (7) 989, Anna, daughter of the Eastern Emperor, the Basilius Romanos, d. 10011; (8) N.N. (321-33), daughter of Kuno, Count of Ohningen. K. calls the latter Rogneda de Oehningen. One AF record says born about 962.

According to my records, St. Vladimir had three daughters with Vladimirovna as name or part of name--all via different wives. Maybe he just liked the name. Maybe there are errors in the records.
His baptism made Orthodox Christianity the official religion of Russia.
Vladimir was a pagan at the beginning of his reign, which was at first
devoted to consolidating his territories into a unified Russian state. In
exchange for helping the Byzantine emperor Basil II suppress a rebellion,
Vladimir was allowed to marry the emperor's sister, Anne, at which time he
accepted Christianity. Allied to Byzantium by religious and family ties,
Vladimir introduced Byzantine civilization into Russia by building
churches, suppressing paganism, and making social reforms. Nonetheless, he
remained open to Western influences, which are reflected in his
legislation.
picture

Vologaeses I , King of Parthia




Husband Vologaeses I , King of Parthia

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 
       Marriage: 




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 M Vologaeses II , King of Parthia

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 




picture
Vologaeses II , King of Parthia




Husband Vologaeses II , King of Parthia

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 


         Father: Vologaeses I , King of Parthia (      -      )
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 M Vologaeses III , King of Parthia

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 148
         Buried: 




picture
Vologaeses III , King of Parthia




Husband Vologaeses III , King of Parthia

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 148
         Buried: 


         Father: Vologaeses II , King of Parthia (      -      )
         Mother: 


       Marriage: 




Wife

           Born: 
     Christened: 
           Died: 
         Buried: 



Children
1 M Vologaeses IV , King of Parthia

           Born: Abt 115
     Christened: 
           Died: Abt 192
         Buried: 



picture

Sources


1 Microsoft Encarta 1994 ed.

2 Knox, Robert John Anderson and Tanner, Danielle. AOL user BobNDani. Fileuploaded on AOL "Tanner/Courtenay/Larsson/9500+" on Feb 2, 1995. File Name: knox0001.ged wsx.

3 Jim Weber (https://myaccount.rootsweb.com/publicprofile?mn=jimweber110&kurl=http:%2F%2Fwc%2Erootsweb%2Eancestry%2Ecom%2Fcgi%2Dbin%2Figm%2Ecgi%3Fdb%3Djweber%26id%3DI03403%26op%3DGED).

4 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 147-23.

5 The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968, 25.

6 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 241-4.

7 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 241-3.

8 Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on, Vladimir.

9 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 214-4.

10 Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, Igor Sklar, 18 Feb 2003.

11 Newsgroup: soc.genealogy.medieval, at groups - google.com, Thierry Stasser, 18 Feb 2003.

12 Royalty for Commoners, by Stuart.

13 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 53-22, 241-5.

14 The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968, 14.

15 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 53-22.

16 Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists, 7th Edition, by Frederick Lewis Weis, additions by Walter Lee Shippard Jr., 1999, 241-5.


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