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STANCLIFF FAMILY GENEALOGY

From book "Descendants of James Stanclift of Middletown, Connecticut and Allied Families", By Robert C. and Sherry [Smith] Stancliff

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Revolutionary War Soldiers

Note:  The following are extracts from the above Stancliff Family Genealogy

(13) JOSIAH3 STANCLIFT (William2, James1)

Son of William and Esther [Adams] Stanclift born East Middletown, CT Oct. 6, 1734(1)

Josiah served during the Revolutionary War. He was in Captain Simons' Company of Col. Erastus Wolcott's Connecticut State Regiment and served in the Boston area. After the battle of Lexington, in April 1775, there was an alarm called the "Lexington Alarm" on which more than fifty Connecticut towns sent companies of soldiers with all haste to the point of attack(2). Josiah was on the Lexington Alarm List.

(15) JOSEPH3 STANCLIFT (William2, James1)

Son of William and Esther [Adams] Stanclift born East Middletown, Hartford County, CT Sept. 25, 1739.

He enlisted Dec. 25, 1776 for a period of three months in Capt. Nathan Rowlee's Company of Lt. Col. Timothy Robinson's detachment of Hampshire County, Massachusetts Bay Militia and served until Apr. 3, 1777 at Fort Ticonderoga(3). He was allowed 180 miles travel to his home.

(17-2) TIMOTHY4 KELSEY (Mary3 Stancliff, James2, James1)

Son of Samuel and Mary [Stanclift] Kelsey baptized New Hartford, Litchfield County, CT Sept. 15, 1745.

Lived Torrington, Litchfield County, CT in 1775 and served in the Revolutionary War in Capt. John Strong's Ninth Company, Seventeenth Regiment from Torrington, CT with brothers Daniel and Samuel, and in Capt. Griswold's Company in 1777.

(17-4) DANIEL4 KELSEY (Mary3 Stancliff, James2, James1)

Son of Samuel and Mary [Stanclift] Kelsey baptized New Hartford Sept. 1751(4).

He died while serving with the Revolutionary Army in Canada in 1776. He served during the Revolutionary War in Capt. John Strong's Ninth Company, Seventeenth Regiment from Torrington, CT and New Hartford, CT. He participated in the Canadian Campaign, with his cousin John Stanclift, son of Comfort Sr and Margaret [Lee] Stanclift, who was with him in Canada when he died. John Stanclift informed the family of his death in a letter and sent Daniel's silver buttons home to the family in New Hartford, Litchfield County, CT(5).

(17-7) SAMUEL4 KELSEY (Mary3 Stancliff, James2, James1)

Son of Samuel and Mary [Stanclift] Kelsey born New Hartford, Litchfield County, CT Mar. 30, 1756(6).

He enlisted with his cousin John Stanclift sometime in May 1775 in Connecticut Troops, in Capt. Griswold's Company of Colonel Hinman's Regiment, they marched first to Albany then to Crown Point and stayed there through the summer and in the fall went by water through Lake Champlain under command of General Schuyler to "Island Ore"(7), from there went under command of General Montgomery and took St. Johns after a siege of about six weeks..... It was John Stanclift who wrote a letter in 1776 to tell him of the death of his brother, Daniel, who was at that time serving with John in Canada.

(30) EUNICE4 STANCLIFT (James3, William2, James1)

Daughter of James and Martha [Wood] Stanclift born East Middletown, Hartford County, CT Aug. 12, 1745.

Married Jan. 14, 1776 in Southbury, CT ASAHEL BROWN(8). Ashahel Brown was listed as one of those serving in the Revolutionary War from Woodbury, Litchfield County, CT, but the National Archives provided no record of his service.

(31) GEORGE4 STANCLIFT (James3, William2, James1)

Son of James and Martha [Wood] Stanclift born East Middletown, Hartford County, CT Mar. 5, 1747/8(9) died "in New York" Aug. 30, 1776(10),

George Stancliff along with his younger half brothers, Thomas and James, was a member of a South Britain Militia unit as early as 1774 serving in Capt. Eleazer Mitchell's 12th Company of the 13th Regiment of Connecticut Militia(11). Responding to an urgent plea from General George Washington to Governor Trumbull of Connecticut for assistance at the desperate campaign in New York, "all able bodied men between the ages of sixteen and fifty years" were mobilized in Woodbury, Litchfield County, CT on August 10 and 11, 1776. These men marched for New York on the 12th of August(12). George, James and Thomas Stancliff were in a Company commanded by Capt. Elijah Hinman of Southbury(13). They arrived in New York and there officially joined the 13th Regiment of Connecticut Militia on August 15, 1776. George died just two weeks later on August 30. The date of George's death is consistent with the Battle of Brooklyn Heights, NY which took place Aug. 27, 1776 and the subsequent escape of the American Forces during the foggy night over the East River to Manhattan Island. This was the first defeat in General Washington's withdrawal from New York.

(35) THOMAS STANCLIFT (James3, William2, James1)

Son of James and Martha [Wood] Stanclift born East Middletown, CT Jan. 13, 1755(14).

He died South Britain, Southbury, CT Sept. 18, 1776(15), buried in the South Britain Cemetery under a brownstone gravestone carved by his father and inscribed "In Memory of Thomas Stanclift He got his Bane in the Sarvis of the Country and died September the 18 AD 1776 in the 22d year of his age. Sleep .... in Dust Till Jesus comes to Rase the Just".

Thomas enlisted during the Revolution, the term of enlistment covered the time between July 13, 1775 and Dec. 20, 1775. The Company, made up of men from the towns of Woodbury and Litchfield left the Parish of Bethlehem in the town of Woodbury on August 11, 1775. The 5th Company of Militia under command of Capt. Nathaniel Tuttle of South Britain marched to New London, CT to join the 7th Connecticut Regiment. While in New London the Regiment answered an alarm in Stonington, some ten miles to the east on Aug. 30, 1775. Stonington was being attacked by three British frigates under the command of Commodore James Wallace, Master of the "Rose", a Man of War of twenty guns. The City of Boston had been surrounded by Rebel troops and was under siege. In an effort to provide food for the beleaguered British forces, Wallace was raiding the coastal areas to steal livestock and provisions(16). The Stonington patriots repulsed the British ships in their harbor.

The Connecticut Regiment left New London on September 19, 1775 heading for Boston. They marched through Providence, RI and arrived in Cambridge, MA site of Washington's camp on Oct. 1, 1775. From there they marched to the Fort located at Winter Hill(17) in Charlestown, MA. At this Fort they remained as part of, or near to, General Isreal Putnam's Connecticut detachment. The British "Regulars" had taken Bunker Hill in June, 1775. Jonathan Twiss, the drummer with this Regiment, told of sending a printed account of the battle home to his family, complete with pictures and verse. The British still occupied the town of Boston and the Rebel forces still surrounded the town of Boston through the extremely cold fall and winter of 1775. Jonathan told of guard duty, of minor skirmishes with the enemy, of watching sheep put ashore to feed the hungry British troops at Bunker Hill, of disputes among the sometimes bored soldiers, of two enemy soldiers deserting to the American side and being fired upon by their own men, and of building additional sod breastworks or fortifications. For the most part they waited and watched the British Regulars.

Thomas once again enlisted in the service. This time he signed up in Elijah Hinman's Company made up of Woodbury men. Brothers George, and James were in the same Company(18). They arrived in New York and there officially joined the 13th Regiment of Connecticut Militia on August 15, 1776. The date of George's death suggests that they were engaged in the Battle of Brooklyn Heights on Aug. 27, 1776, and Washington's subsequent retreat to Manhattan Island during the night of Aug. 29, 1776. Thomas and James, along with the entire Company, were discharged a few days after that, on September 3, 1776. Thomas had been wounded(19) and while he was able to return to South Britain, he died there shortly after his return.


(36) JAMES4 STANCLIFF (James3, William2, James1)

Son of James and Mary [Lewis] Stanclift born East Middletown, Hartford County, CT Sept 12, 1756(20), died after 1830 possibly in Washington Township, Erie County, PA(21).

James was one of the three sons in this family who belonged to Eleazar Mitchell's 12th Company of the 13th Regiment of Connecticut Militia from Southbury, CT subsequent to October 1774. The names of James Jr, George and Thomas appear upon an unrecorded list handed down in the Mitchell Family(22). It is probable that these men saw service in some of the early alarms of the Revolutionary War.

Of the three brothers who marched off together in 1776, only James survived. George, Thomas and James all Entered Service in New York on Aug. 15, 1776 in Captain Elijah Hinman's 6th Company, of the 13th Regiment of Connecticut Militia(23). The members of the Company all entered Service on the same date and all were discharged a little more than two weeks later on Sept. 3, 1776. There were twenty four men in the Company including the Company officers. Brother, George Stanclift was the only man who was listed as having died in service during that tour of duty. He died "in New York" Aug. 30, 1776. Brother, Thomas Stanclift received wounds that resulted in his death soon after returning home. During the time of their enlistment the Battle of Brooklyn Heights took place on Aug. 27th and Washington's troops were ferried from Long Island to Manhattan all during the foggy night of Aug. 29th. It is likely that the brothers took part in those maneuvers. Brother, William joined the service as soon as he turned age 16 and died while a prisoner of the British forces


(38) WILLIAM STANCLIFT (James3, William2, James1)

Son of James and Martha [Wood] Stanclift born Simsbury, CT April 4, 1761(24), died probably in Dec. 1777(25) while a prisoner of the British forces in New York.

William enlisted or was drafted into the Army for a period of three years on May 19, 1777(26). This was shortly after William's 16th birthday. He was inducted into the Service on May 23, 1777 by Lt Elihu Trowbridge acting for Captain Samuel Granger(27). Capt. Granger's Company was part of the 2nd Connecticut Regiment of Foot, commanded by Col. Charles Webb. The Regiment joined the forces of General Isreal Putnam at Peekskill, Westchester County, NY. General George Washington regarded Peekskill as a strategically important area. It was possible that the British forces to the south would attempt to join the forces of General Burgoyne advancing down the Hudson River from Canada. The encampment at Peekskill provided a natural position of advantage to forestall that eventuality and to provide access to the southern states. After General Benedict Arnold refused the post, the task of defending the Peekskill area fell to General Putnam(28) and his Connecticut troops. On June 30, 1777 William was taken prisoner by the British. The nature of the encounter is not specified, but at least 24 men from the 2nd Regiment were taken prisoner between June 30 and July 2, 1777. William was listed on the Company Muster Roll and the Company Pay Roll as "a prisoner in New York". The final Muster Roll was dated Dec. 24, 1777. William died in the custody of the British.

 

JACOB DAVIS SR.  (Jacob4, Jabez3, John2, Dolar1) (allied Family)

Father of Sibble Davis, wife of Stanbrough Perigrene Stancliff.  Jacob Davis was born before 1742, since he was a freeman and inhabitant of Simsbury in 1763 and therefore at least age 21 at that time.  He had his tax abated for Military Service in 1778(6). A Jacob Davis served in troops of the Connecticut Line. The National Archives confirms this fact but the records contain no real information on this man. 

According to "Simsbury Soldiers in the War of the Revolution" by the Abigail Phelps Chapter of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, page 141, Jacob Davis Jr, was in 1775 at the "Lexington Alarm" under the command of of Elisha Phelps and Job Case.  He was listed as being from New Hartford but married in Simsbury Elizabeth Lewis.  Dates of marriage and Birthdates of all 10 children are also listed.

 

STANBROUGH PERIGRINE4 STANCLIFF (James3, William2, James1)

Son of James and Mary [Lewis] Stanclift born Simsbury, Hartford County, CT Dec. 18, 1762(29).

It is considered that Stanbrough served in the revolution for the following reasons:

1. Four older brothers are recorded as having served in the Revolution of whom three died. Stanbrough would have had family tradition to join the army as soon as possible

2. As a descendant of a family of stone workers he was probably a large man.

2. In the Biography written by Perry Stancliff a grandson of Stanbrough, Perry says that Stanbrough served in the Revolutionary War and was with General George Washington at Valley Forge. He also said that Stanbrough was wounded and partially crippled as a result(30).


(42S2) EZEKIAL LEWIS JR (Hannah4 Stancliff, James3, William2, James1)

Son of Ezekial and Sarah [Wait] Lewis died May 1824.

Ezekiel Lewis Jr. saw extensive service in the Army during the Revolution, he was an officer and had an illustrious career.


(44S1) ABNER SLADE (Olive4 Stancliff, Josiah3, William2, James1)

son of James and Experience [Parker] Slade born Ellington, CT May 5, 1756, died Jan. 8, 1846, buried Center Cemetery, Barkhamsted, Litchfield County, CT(31). He was the second husband of Olive Stanclift.

Abner saw extensive service during the Revolutionary War, and was on the Lexington Alarm List 1775 from East Windsor along with brothers Daniel and Aaron. He was in Capt Simmons Company of Connecticut troops with brother, Aaron Slade, and father-in-law Josiah Stanclift. He again enlisted at Ellington, CT in 1777 and served three years attaining the rank of Sergeant, being discharged at Morristown, Morris County, NJ. For this service he received a Pension.


(54S1) SGT. SAMUEL SHIPMAN(32) (Sarah4 Stanclift (James3, James2, James1)

Son of Captain Samuel and Sarah [Doty] Shipman of Saybrook, New London County, CT.

Samuel saw service during the Revolution as a Sergeant with the Connecticut Troops.


(64) COMFORT4 STANCLIFT JR (Comfort3, James2, James1)

Son of Comfort and Margaret [Lee] Stanclift born East Middletown, Middlesex County, CT Nov. 21, 1752(33)

Along with his younger brother, John, Comfort was a Private in Capt. John Strong's Second Company of the Torrington Train Band, a town Militia. On June 24, 1775 Comfort and John each appeared on the payroll for 12 half days pay for service in the Train Band, records submitted by Zachariah Mather, Company Clerk(34).

Comfort and brother, John, spent seven months in 1775 together in Captain Shubael Griswold's Company, Colonel Benjamin Hinman's Fourth Regiment of Connecticut Continental Troops. They enlisted at Torrington, Litchfield County, CT on May 1, 1775 shortly after the Battle of Lexington. The unit marched to Albany, Lake George, Fort Ticonderoga, and Crown Point, NY. At Crown Point, in the fall of the year, they took "water conveyance" and went North the entire length of Lake Champlain and up the Richelieu River to a point about 10 miles South of Montreal, Canada. Their objective was the Fort at "St. Jean Sur Richelieu" called by the British and the Americans Fort St. John. They laid siege to the Fort and after some forty six days it surrendered. The prisoners were then taken back to Litchfield County, CT and quartered with the residents. John and Comfort returned to Fort Ticonderoga with the prisoners, and there they were discharged in December 1775. He and John returned home to Torrington, CT together, Comfort's statement in his pension application indicates that they did not arrive in Torrington until January of 1776.

The following June Comfort again enlisted in Captain Nathaniel Goodwin's Company, Colonel Ebenezer Gay's Regiment, Second Battalion of Connecticut Troops under command of Colonel Charles Webb. Comfort's unit was marched to New York. He was present during the retreat from Long Island and was on "York Island" or Manhattan Island when the British landed "near Turtle Bay" on Manhattan opposite the South end of what is now Roosevelt Island, at that time they were forced to march to the Northern end of Manhattan and cross Kings Bridge into what is now the Bronx. They continued north to "American Winter Quarters at North Castle" about two miles North of White Plains(35). Here Comfort was dismissed at the end of his enlistment in December 1776.

In August or September 1777 Comfort volunteered for two months in "the taking of Burgoyne". He was in Colonel Andrew Adams' Regiment of Connecticut Volunteers in an Army commanded by General Gates. They marched to Saratoga and were successful as Burgoyne surrendered on Oct. 17 1777. David Stanclift of McKean, Erie County, PA wrote that Comfort "...was with General Stark at Saratoga when General Burgoyne was taken in the engagement.


(65) JOHN4 STANCLIFT (Comfort3, James2, James1)

Son of Comfort and Margaret [Lee] Stanclift born East Middletown, Hartford County(36), CT Sept. 26, 1754(37).

In 1775 he was a Private in Capt John Strong's Second Company of the Torrington Train Band, a town Militia. On June 24, 1775 John and Comfort each appeared on the payroll for 12 days pay for service in the Train Band, records submitted by Zachariah Mather, Company Clerk(38).

John saw service in the Revolutionary War. When applying for his pension, John's deposition dated September 20, 1832 at Erie County, NY states that John and brother, Comfort, spent seven months in 1775 together in Capt Griswold's Company of Connecticut troops at Albany, Lake George, Fort Ticonderoga, and Crown Point, NY. He and Comfort returned home to Torrington, CT together. John next spent time in Canada in 1776 during the American occupation of portions of Quebec. This account of his service was supported by a deposition given by brother, Comfort Stanclift, then of Erie County, PA. John's pension application was also accompanied by a deposition given by his cousin, Samuel Kelsey, living Sheldon, Erie County, NY on August 18, 1832. Samuel Kelsey and his brother Timothy Kelsey had served in the same unit with John and Comfort on the campaign to take the Fort near Montreal, Canada. Samuel Kelsey also attested to John's later service in the Campaign in Canada for a year in 1776 and that it was John who notified Samuel of the death of his brother, Daniel Kelsey, during that Campaign and sent Daniel's silver buttons home to his family(39). John reenlisted 1777 and served at the Battle of Germantown. David Stanclift, son of Lemuel told that John and Samuel were together at Germantown and that when the Americans were forced to retreat, the two of them escaped through a cornfield and "the man that was between them was cut in two with a field piece ball". John spent time in the winter quarters at Valley Forge, PA, being discharged from that place Jan. 9, 1778. David Miller Stanclift a great grandson of John said that John was with General George Washington when he crossed the Delaware River to surprise the Hessians at the Battle of Trenton, NJ and was at the Battle of Yorktown, VA. John again enlisted in the Connecticut Line in 1780 but his brother, Comfort, served four months of that enlistment and another substitute satisfied the remaining obligation.(40)

 

(67) SAMUEL4 STANCLIFT (Comfort3, James2, James1)

Son of Comfort and Margaret [Lee] Stanclift born East Middletown, CT Jan. 23, 1759(41).

Samuel saw substantial and continued service during the Revolutionary War, entering the service from Sandisfield, MA. Samuel served between Dec. 13, 1775 and Nov. 27, 1776 at Fort Ticonderoga. He again enlisted in the Continental Army Mar. 11, 1777 through Dec. 31, 1779 spending part of this time at Valley Forge. David Stanclift, son of Lemuel said that Samuel and brother John were together at the battle of Germantown and that when the Americans were forced to retreat, the two of them escaped through a cornfield and " the man that was between them was cut in two with a field piece ball". Samuel again served Jan. 1, 1780 to Mar. 11, 1780 and the record notes that he received the Massachusetts state bounty(42). Samuel then served two more enlistments from Connecticut in 1782 and 1783(43)


(71) LEMUEL4 STANCLIFT (Comfort3, James2, James1)

Son of Comfort and Eunice [Ranney] Stanclift born East Middletown, CT Apr. 9, 1764(44)

Lemuel enlisted Mar. 1, 1781 for a period of three years in Company of Capt. Joseph Walker of the 1st Regiment commanded by Col. Samuel B. Webb. He was discharged at West Point, NY on Dec. 31, 1783. He made application for a pension Feb. 23, 1820 at McKean, Erie County, PA

After his death, his widow Mehitable received a widow's pension #5387 that was executed on Aug. 7, 1848.

____________________________________________________________

Footnotes:

1. .Middletown Land Records, Vol. 2, page 19, according to Frank Farnsworth Starr Ledgers but omitted from the Barbour Records.

2. .HISTORY OF ANCIENT WOODBURY, by William Cothern, page 194-195

3. .MASSACHUSETTS SOLDIERS AND SAILORS IN THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION, Vol. 14, page 831.

4. .New Hartford Congregational Church Records Vol.1, page 6

5. .Deposition of Daniel's brother, Samuel Kelsey of Sheldon, Erie County, NY given Aug. 18, 1832 and attached to the pension application of John Stanclift.

6. .New Hartford Vital Records Vol. 1, page 43

7. .Ile-aux-Noix

8. .SOUTH BRITAIN SKETCHES AND RECORDS by W. C. Sharpe 1898, South Britain Church Records, page 19.

9. .Middletown Vital Records, Vol.1, page 98. Listed erroneously under Standish.

10..The Service record of George Stanclift from the National Archives (card #37087506) indicates that George served and died in 1777. The "Pay Abstract" in his Military Record is dated Nov. 10, 1777 but the date he entered service and the date of death are not complete years reading only 17__. Administration was granted on his Estate in Woodbury, Litchfield County on Oct. 1, 1776. In addition, both George and Thomas, who did die 1776, are listed in same Militia Company. The date in the Archives records must have been taken from the Pay Abstract, which was often written at a later date, and is in error.

11..THE AMERICAN GENEALOGIST Vol.19, page 21

12..HISTORY OF ANCIENT WOODBURY by William Cothern, 1854, Reprint 1977, page 196

13..THE RECORD OF CONNECTICUT MEN IN THE MILITARY AND NAVAL SERVICE DURING THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION, Edited by Henry P. Johnston, A.M. Hartford: 1889, page 468.

14.Simsbury Vital Records, Town Acts Vol. 4, page 183.

15.SOUTH BRITAIN SKETCHES AND RECORDS, by W.C. Sharpe, Deaths in South Britain, page 533.

16.HISTORY OF STONINGTON AND GENEALOGIES, by Richard A. Wheeler, page 38-39

17.THE AMERICAN WAR OF INDEPENDENCE 1775-1783, a Commemorative Exhibition Organized by the Map Library and Department of Manuscripts of the British Library Division, Maps on Display at the British Museum, London, England. Winter Hill was north west of Bunker Hill on the Mystic River and was the site of General Isreal Putnam's headquarters according to the British map.

18.CONNECTICUT MEN IN THE REVOLUTION

19.The gravestone cut by his father indicates cause of death was due to his service.

20.Simsbury, CT Vital Records, Vol. TM4, page 183, record specifies birthplace as Middletown, CT.

21.David Stanclift wrote in his Memoirs that James moved to Erie County, PA about 1830 to live with his son, Russel Stancliff.

22.A photo copy of the list was supplied to Donald Lines Jacobus and published in THE AMERICAN GENEALOGIST Vol. 19, No. 2, 1942. The list was made by Lt. Eleazur Mitchell who was commissioned Lt. May 1771, and Capt. in Oct. 1772 of a Company of Militia in the South Britain Society.

23.THE RECORD OF CONNECTICUT MEN IN THE MILITARY AND NAVAL SERVICE DURING THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION, Edited by Henry P. Johnston, A.M. Hartford: 1889, page 468.

24.Simsbury Vital Records Vol. Town Acts Vol. 4, page 183.

25.Military Records, National Archives. The last Company Muster Role in William's Military Record was dated Dec. 24, 1777.

26.During the first two years of the War men enlisted for "expeditions" or specific maneuvers. According to HISTORY OF ANCIENT WOODBURY, by William Cothren, page 188 "Early in 1777, enlistments for three years, or during the war were called for, and the quota for each town established...."

27.Military Records, Document 545b at the Connecticut Archives, Connecticut State Library.

28.HISTORY OF WESTCHESTER COUNTY NEW YORK, by Frederic Shonard and W. W. Spooner, 1900, page 428

29.Simsbury Vital Records, Vol. TM4, page 183.

30.THE BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF BUREAU, MARSHALL, PUTNAM & STARK COUNTIES, ILLINOIS 1897, page 657.

31.REGISTER OF REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS AND PATRIOTS BURIED IN LITCHFIELD COUNTY, CONNECTICUT, by Joyce McKensie Cropsey, published 1976 by DAR, page 104. This cites Birth year, death date and burial place for both Abner and Olive.

32.The Shipman Genealogy says marriage was Feb. 14, 1772, but the Records of the First Congregational Church of Chatham, Vol.5, page 49 indicate that the marriage was Feb. 4, 1773.

33.Middletown Vital Records, Vol.2, page 291.

34.Connecticut Archives Document, Connecticut State Library

35.The areas mentioned in Comfort's narrative were identified on old maps published for the British Museum in THE AMERICAN WAR OF INDEPENDENCE 1775-83, A Commemorative Exhibition Organized by The Map Library and Department of Manuscripts of The British Library Reference Division.

36.The area became Middlesex County in 1785

37.Middletown Vital Records, Volume 2, page 291. Date corroborated in John's bible records written in his own hand.

38.Connecticut Archives Document, Connecticut State Library

39.Samuel and Daniel Kelsey were the sons of Samuel and Mary [Stanclift] Kelsey and were second cousins of John Stanclift.

40.United States Archives, Pension records of Comfort Stanclift

41.Middletown Vital Records, Vol.2, page 291.

42.MASSACHUSETTS SOLDIERS IN THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION Vol.14, page 810, 816, and 929.

43.CONNECTICUT MEN IN THE REVOLUTION Vol.12, page 321 and 338.

44.Middletown Vital Records, Vol.2, page 291.

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