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The Resseguies
Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania


The following excerpts are taken from

Commemorative Biographical Record
of Northeastern Pennsylvania
including the Counties of
Susquehanna, Wayne, Pike and Monroe
containing Biographical Sketches of
Prominent and Representative Citizens
and many of the Early Settled Families.
Illustrated.

Beers, J. H. & Co., 1900, Chicago
pp. 449, 540-1

Beers is long out of print, though originals may occasionally be
found on the rare book market; a reproduction may be ordered.




SAMUEL RESSEGUIE

. . . was the first permanent settler at South Gibson. He was the son of William Resseeguie, of Fishkill, NY. In May, 1813, he brought his family to the wilderness, paying a Mr. Taylor $40 for a quit claim deed for 400 acres. He erected a log cabin having bark shingles held down by poles and moved with his family into this rude dwelling. His quit claim deed proved worthless; he bought 120 acres of land at $2 per acre, which he occupied until he passed away, in 1858, at the age of eighty-two years. He had married, at Norwalk, Conn., Freelove Disbrow, a native of Connecticut, and their children were: Fitch, Lewis, Aaron, William, Harrison, Nelson, Betsey, Cynthia, and Sally. Fitch Resseguie, the eldest child, . . . was born in 1804, and was reared in the backwoods home, developing the sturdy character of a pioneer and a generous hospitality which usually abounded in the early settlements. He married Mary Tewksbury, daughter of Jacob and Mary (Reed) Tewksbury, natives of Vermont, who migrated in 1814 to Susquehanna county, settling in Brooklyn township. Fitch Resseguie was a lifelong farmer of the Tunkhannock Valley. He was a charter member of the M. E. Church, and in the early days his house and barn were always open for Church services. His noble wife, whose womanly and Christian graces were a refining influence throughout the community, died in 1876, aged sixty-three years. Fitch Resseguie died in 1890, aged eighty-six. Their children were as follows: Charles W., became editor of the Daily Transcript and Ledger, of Susquehanna; he married Angeline M. Woodward; his death occurred May 21, 1898, at Susquehanna. Freeman T. was drowned at the age of sixteen years. George R., born February 1, 1839, a farmer of Harford township, married Harriet M. Ehrgood. William E., a merchant of South Gibson, married Helen Denny. Mary D. is the wife of . . . Jesse Holmes. Manly T., who married Vianna Pickering, died at the age of forty years.



HON. GEORGE REED RESSEGUIE

This enterprising farmer and fruit grower of Harford township, Susquehanna county, was for three years a soldier in the Civil war, participating in some of the most stubbornly-contested engagements of the conflict, and was twice wounded. He made a most excellent military record. Mr. Resseguie was born in South Gibson, Susquehanna county, February 1, 1839, son of Fitch and Mary (Tewksbury) Resseguie, and grandson of Samuel Resseguie, who was the first permanent settler in South Gibson. Samuel Resseguie was a son of William Resseguie of Fishkill, N.Y. In May, 1813, he brought his family to the wilderness, paying a Mr. Taylor $40 for a quit-claim deed for 400 acres. He erected a log cabin having bark shingles held down by poles and moved with his family into this rude dwelling. His quit-claim deed proved worthless; he bought 120 acres of land at $2 per acre, which he occupied until he passed away, in 1858, at the age of eighty-two years. He had married, at Norwalk, Conn., Freelove Disbrow, a native of Connecticut, and their children were: Fitch, Lewis, Aaron, William, Harrison, Nelson, Betsey, Cynthia, and Sally.

Fitch Resseguie, the eldest child, was the father of our subject. He was born in 1804, and was reared in the backwoods home, developing the sturdy character of a pioneer and a generous hospitality which usually abounded in the early settlements. He married Mary Tewksbury, daughter of Jacob and Mary (Reed) Tewksbury, natives of Vermont, who migrated in 1814 to Susquehanna county, settling in Brooklyn township. Fitch Resseguie was a lifelong farmer of the Tunkhannock Valley. He was a charter member of the M. E. Church, and in the early days his house and barn were always open for Church services. His noble wife, whose womanly and Christian graces were a refining influence throughout the community, died in 1876, aged sixty-three years. Fitch Resseguie died in 1890, aged eighty-six. Their children were as follows: Charles W., became editor of the Daily Transcript and Ledger, of Susquehanna; he married Angeline M. Woodward; his death occurred May 21, 1898, at Susquehanna. Freeman T. was drowned at the age of sixteen years. George R. is our subject. William E., a merchant of South Gibson, married Helen Denny. Mary D. is the wife of Jesse L. Holmes, an extensive farmer of South Gibson. Manly T., who married Vianna Pickering, died at the age of forty years.

George R. Resseguie, our subject, remained on the home farm until he attained his majority, assisting his father and receiving the education which the neighboring schools afforded. For one year he worked on a farm. On August 22, 1862, at New Milford, he enlisted in Company F, 141st Regiment P. V. I., Capt. H. F. Beardsley, for three years' service or during the war. He participated in the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Culpepper, Centerville, the Wilderness, etc. At Chancellorville, May 3, 1863, he was severely wounded in the right hand with a minie ball, was taken to Harwood hospital, and thence transferred to McClellan Hospital, Philadelphia, where he remained three months. Rejoining his regiment at Warrenton, Va., he remained with his company until the final musterout, June 7, 1865, at Falls Church, Va., except a few days lost in consequence of a wound in the right shoulder received in the battle of the Wilderness. He was promoted from the ranks to office of sargeant, and on February 14, 1865, became first sergeant.

After his discharge from the army our subject returned to his old home. He was married, in Jackson township, October 22, 1866, to Harriet M. Ehrgood, and to them were born four children: Gracie B., who died aged eleven years; Daisy D., who married Norman N. Howard, a bookkeeper of Scranton, Penn.; Mary M., wife of Fred E. Moore, a farmer and milk dealer of Harford; and Leo E., at home. On August 22, 1899, Mr. Resseguie married, for his second wife, Mrs. Carrie (Johnson) Briggs (widow of William J. Briggs), who was born July 29, 1860, in West Burlington, Bradford Co., Penn., daughter of Henry L. and Mary (Morehouse) Johnson. Her father served in the Civil war as a member of the 207th P. V. I. Mrs. Resseguie is an accomplished musician, both vocal and instrumental, possessing a fine voice which has been thoroughly trained under various teachers of high standing. She pursued her earlier studies under Prof. Marsh, of Elmira, N. Y., where she formerly resided, and later was a pupil of Prof. Courtney, Mrs. Hattie Clapper Morris, and J. Harry Wheeler, in New York City, and of Campanari, in Boston. For several years she sang frequently in the Churches, subsequently for a time in St. Steven's Church, Washington, D. C., and filled various important engagements, acquiring special reputation for her fine powers of interpretation. She taught music for a number of years, being located for three years at Harford, Susquehanna country, where she had charge of the musical instruction in the State Soldiers' Orphans' School, and in this connection the Elmira Advertiser says: "The success which has attended her efforts is another proof of her ability as an instructor in vocal and instrumental music. Her abilities as a vocalist are well known to many outside of Pennsylvania, and the management is to be congratulated in securing the services of such an accomplished musician and instructor." Mrs. Resseguie had two children by her first marriage: M. Edna, who died when two years old; and Henry Jack, who lives with his mother.

Mr. Resseguie purchased and for four years operated the old Resseguie homestead in Gibson township. He then sold it to his brother Charles W. and in 1871 moved to his present farm of 163 acres in Harford township, where in addition to general farming he is largely interested in fruit raising and dairy work; he has six hundred fruit trees on his fertile farm, and is an extensive grower of small fruits. Our subject is an agriculturist of progressive ideas, and by his wide-awake methods has not only brought prosperity to himself, but has been a potent influence for advanced and improved methods throughout the community.

In 1885 Mr. Resseguie was elected a member of the State Legislature, serving with credit to himself and to the full satisfaction of his constituents. He is a man of wide popularity, and has held almost all the local offices, including that of school director for six years. He is a prominent member of A. J. Ropper Post No. 452, G. A. R., at South Gibson. In politics he is a strong Republican, in religious affiliation an active member of the M. E. Church of South Gibson. He has been especially active in the Harford Agricultural Society, of which he has served sixteen years as general superintendent, four years as vice president, and two years as president.



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