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Alonzo Pearis Raymond

Raymond Migrations:
Alonzo Pearis Raymond

By Robert Raymond

Alonzo Pearis Raymond is the son of Pearis Raymond and the grandson of the Paul Raymond of Bristol and Lincoln in Addison county, Vermont. Alonzo lived during a time when U.S. territory would stretch further and further west until filling all the land from the east coast to the west. Alonzo pioneered areas from Vermont to California and several places in between.

Shaded information indicates events that are "out of flow" either chronologically or geographically, or the information presents historical events that place in context the events of the Raymond family.

While quotation marks are not strictly used, language and spelling is often retained from the original sources. The old abbreviation practice of dropping some letters, superscripting the final letter(s), and putting a dash or dot underneath the superscripted letters is shown herein using an apostrophe to show where letters were dropped. For example, if the word "said" is abbreviated by dropping "ai", elevating and underlining the "d" (sd), it is shown here as "s'd". The name of "the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints," commonly called the Mormons, is abbreviated as "the Church of Jesus Christ" or where allowed by context, simply "the Church."

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Page Contents


Bristol, Addison county, Vermont Go to Top

Date Event
14 Feb 1821
Alonzo P Raymond is born in Bristol, Vermont, the son of Pearis and Rebecca. Several different years are given for Alonzo's birth. It often appears that when asked his birthdate, Alonzo reports 14 Feb 1821, but when asked his age, he gives wildly conflicting ages! The earlier the source was created, the more credibility I give it. Sources for the different years is presented below. I think that 1821 is correct.

1814: In the 1870 U. S. Census, Alonzo reports his age to be 46. Kate B. Carter, 20th century author, gives 14 Feb 1814 as Alonzo's birthdate in several books. The Mormon Battalion, 19xx, p. 126; Treasures of Pioneer History, 1955, Vol. 4, p. 513.

1819: The following sources give or suggest an 1819 date.
  • In 1893 when W. G. Raymond helps Alonzo fill out a pension application, Alonzo states he is 74 years old. (Pension, - -1893.) Perhaps William Goodwin Raymond uses 1819 as the birthdate from that point on.
  • For the Utah Pioneer Jubilee of 1897, Alonzo's certificate in The Book of the Pioneers (Geo. Q. Cannon, 1897, p. 132. FHL Film 497713.), states his birth date as 14 Feb 1819. If Alonzo couldn't write his pension application in 1893, he probably had someone such as W. G. help him in 1897 as well.
  • Alonzo's obituary says 1819. (Journal, Vol. XXV, 16 Aug. 1904, p. 1.)
  • Alonzo's death record states he died on 14 Aug 1904, aged 85. (CacheVR, p. 25, no. 40.)
  • Andrew Jenson's Church Chronology... (1914 ).
  • Alonzo 's son William Goodwin Raymond submitted genealogy information to the Genealogical Society of Utah in 1924 stating Alonzo's date of birth as 14 Feb 1819. (GenSurveys, Vol. 25, p. 134.)
1820: The following sources suggest an 1820 date.
  • The birthdate recorded on a Smithfield ward record appears to be 1820. (Smith, p. 30.) Under high magnification, I think the 0 was changed to 1 or vice-versa. The record is made on a standard form that may not have come into use until 1877, so the record was not made before then. ( Lion of the Lord: Essays on the Life and Service of Brigham Young , Susan Easton Black and Larry C. Porter, eds., 1995, pp. 364-365.)
  • Alonzo's application for invalid pension, made 16 November 1885, states he was 65 years old. (Pension, 24-Nov-1885.)
  • Alonzo's medical exam for the pension, made 9 August 1886 , states he was 66 years old. (Pension, 17-Aug-1886.)
1821: The 1820 census shows Alonzo 's father, Pearis, with a wife but no children, so Alonzo was probably not born prior to the 1820 census. Most sources giving 1821 as the birth date predate the other sources. Notice the dates.
  • A record of the Nauvoo seventies quorums recorded on 22 December 1844. (Seventies, 14th quorum, pp. 3,17.)
  • A patriarchal blessing recorded in 1845. (Bless45.)
  • Lehi ward records made between 1850 and 1860. (Lehi, p. 39.)
  • A patriarchal blessing given in 1860. (Bless60.)
  • Smithfield ward records, as mentioned above may specify 1820 or 1821. The record was probably created after 1877. (Smith, p. 30.)
  • Alonzo's survivor pension application, made in 1887, specifies 14 February 1821. (Pension, 6-Dec-1887.)
1824: A Database of the Mormon Battalion: An Identification of the Original Members of the Mormon battalion , by Kieth W. Watkins, c 1987, p. 142 apparently quotes a birthdate of 14 Feb 1824.
1823
Saritta A. Raymond b. about 1823 in Addison Co., Vt., sister of Alonzo. (LoganB85, p. 405.) Death records for the town of Bristol made in 1919, specify "Abigail S." (BrisDeath)
26 Mar 1824
William Wallace Raymond b. in Bristol, brother of Alonzo. (ECIF, film 1750708, "Raymond - William W. 586".)
abt. 1825
Nelson Raymond b. in Lincoln, Addison, Vermont, brother of Alonzo. (LoganB85, p. 404.)
May 1826
Oscar P Raymond b. in Lincoln, son of Pearis.
9 Jan 1827
Clarinda Cutler, future wife of Alonzo is born at Amboy, Oswego Co., New York to Harmon Cutler and Susannah Barton.(ECIF, film 1750708, "Raymond - Clarinda 449.")
20 Feb 1827 Abigail S. Raymond, daughter of P[earis] . & R. Raymond, dies at age of 4 and is buried in Briggs Hill cemetery. (BrisDeath)
14 Mar 1827
Oscar P. Raymond, son of P[earis] . & R. Raymond, dies at age of 10 and is buried in Briggs Hill cemetery. (BrisDeath)
18 Mar 1831
Clarinda G. Raymond b. in Lincoln, sister of Alonzo. Compiled genealogies sometimes specify the name as "Clarinda C.", but this is incorrect as the sources cited here show. (LoganE85, p. 164A.) Apparently, Clarinda G. never marries, so after Alonzo marries Clarinda Cutler, there are two Clarinda Raymonds living in the same or adjoining households. Original records specifying Clarinda C usually refer to Alonzo's wife, not his sister.

In one 1885 record, Clarinda's sister Louisa specifies the name as "Clarinda Jeffries Raymond." (LoganSS85, p. 240.) One record specifies her birth information as 9 Mar. 1830, Bristol, Vermont. (ECIF, film 1750708, "Clarinda Raymond 451.")

1832
Thurston and James Chase and others built the 4th forge in Bristol, which was located on the stream called Baldwin's Creek. “This stream of water was never quite sufficient for the purpose of manufacturing iron, especially in a dry time. But it was prudently managed for the time it was in operation. Philo S. Warner Esq. purchased one half and he and Thurstin Chase ran it for a few years together and made it profitable, but it is now [ca. 1850] gone to decay and not used.” (Check if History of Addison County is the source.)

Baldwin Creek runs alongside the block of Chase/Raymond properties on Bald Hill. It is likely that members of both families learned the craft of milling, as several descendants are known to practice the trade in later years.
26 Jan 1834 Adeline Hatch born in Lincoln, Addison Co., Vermont to Hezekiah Hatch and Aldura Sumner. Her mother died when she was 8. (Adeline and Alonzo's sister, Louisa, both will marry George Barber.) (Pioneer, p. unknown.)
9 Jan 1835
Louisa Elizabeth Raymond b. in Lincoln, dau. of Pearis. (No source. Check patriarchal blessing.)
1840

Sisson Chase, a missionary of the newly established Church of Jesus Christ, arrived in Lincoln. He converted many members in that area, including Francillo and Mariam Durfee, Josephus and Melinda Hatch (Melinda was Francillo's sister), several members of Josephus' family, Lucina Roberts (the daughter of Francillo's oldest sister Polly), Royal and William R. Durfee (sons of Francillo's brother Jedediah) (DurfeeThis link exits to a different website. Click Back to return.).

"Josephus Hatch lived upon the farm now owned by Charles C. Dunshee. His son Jerry, a graduate of Middlebury College, became a Mormon priest." (HisAdd, p. 406This link exits to a different website. Click Back to return.)

Abram Hatch "is the son of Hezekiah Hatch and Aldura Sumner, and was born Jan. 3, 1830, in Lincoln, Addison county, Vermont, in a pleasant farm house near the foot hill of the Green Mountains. He is the fourth son of a family of five sons and two daughters. ... Abram ... had reached the age of ten years when Elder Peletiah Brown came to that section of country, preaching "Mormonism." The entire family, consisting of his grandfather and grandmother, father, mother and their children, joined the Church." (JensonBio, Vol. 1, p.359.)

1 June 1840

1840 U.S. Census Go to Top

The 1840 census shows just 2 of Pearis' sons still at home. (1840 Census Lincoln, Addison County, Vermont, p. 92) Which one is missing?
6 Aug. 1840
Harmon Cutler took his entire family and household effects in wagons of his own make and started on a long journey to Illinois. The trip occupied fifty days, the end of which found them at Nauvoo. (Cutler Memorial and Genealogical History, compiled by Nahum S. Cutler, 1889. p. 255.)
7 Nov 1840
"A conference of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- day Saints is held in Lincoln, Addison, Vermont. Elder Pelatiah Brown was chosen to preside over the conference and J. S. Gleason, secretary. President Brown opened the conference with a short lecture and prayer, after which Brother H. Hatch, J. Houston, B. Miller were set apart for the ministry by the voice of the Conference. They were ordained elders, Brother A. Smith was ordained a Priest, and Brother S. Chase was ordained a Deacon. Brother S. C. Chase [or S. A. Chase?] was chosen by the voice of the Conference to preside over the Lincoln Branch of the church." (Mission, pp. 144-145.)
Fall 1840 or
August 1842
Two conflicting dates:
Abram Hatch's mother died in 1840, and in the fall of that year the family moved to Nauvoo. (JensonBio, Vol. 1, p.359.)
In August 1842 the Hatch family of Lincoln moved to Nauvoo. (Pioneer, p. ?.)

In the fall of 1840, after Abram Hatch's mother died, "the family moved to Nauvoo, where his father bought property, opened up a farm on the prairie and built a brick house on Mulholland street, in the city, three blocks east of the Temple; he died in 1841. Abram became a member of the Nauvoo Legion and served with the posse under Col. Stephen Markham and Sheriff Jacob Backenstos in 1845." (JensonBio, Vol. 1, p.359.)
5 June 1841 Francillo Durfee was ordained to the Aaronic Priesthood by Sisson Chase. (DurfeeThis link exits to a different website. Click Back to return.)
9 August 1841
During a conference under the direction of John Taylor and George A. Smith, the name of the Iowa Stake was changed to the newly reorganized "Zarahemla Stake." John Smith remained as president with David Pettingrew and Moses Nickerson as counselors. (Reference Book for Nauvoo Family History and Property Identification Department, Nauvoo Restoration Incorporated, 1990. FHL 977.343/N1 K2r. pp. 225-226. May be quoting from Journal History for that date.) While Alonzo and the Pettigrews were friends after the Mormon Battalion, I have found no evidence thus far linking the families together in Zarahemla (near present Montrose), Iowa.
February? 1842
The Nauvoo 1842 census, probably enumerated in February, shows no Raymonds in Nauvoo. While it is known to be incomplete, I believe it strengthens the assumption that Alonzo had not reached Nauvoo this early. (FHL 977.343/N1 K2n v.1.)
April 1842
Alonzo P. Raymond baptized a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Sisson Chase and confirmed by Isaac Houston. (Lehi, p. 39; Smith, p. 30.) His obituary states that "while yet a boy working on his father's farm [he] was converted to the faith of the Latter-day Saints under the ministry of Ezra Chase and Isaac Chase and was baptized by Sisson A. Chase. He immediately made up his mind to join the saints in Illinois and went by boat to Buffalo, N. Y. and thence across the country to Nauvoo." (Journal, 16 Aug. 1904, p. 1.) His grandson, William Goodwin Raymond reported that "he was the first of his family to join the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day saints. Shortly after his baptism he was determined to join the saints in Illinois. His family tried to persuade him not to do so but he left his home as a young man and [went to] Nauvoo." (Goodwin)

Some compiled genealogies state that Alonzo's mother, Rebecca, was baptized 7 April 1840, but this is the date Clarinda Cutler Raymond was baptized and is inconsistent with the information above about Alonzo. (Lehi, p. 30.) If Alonzo was the first to join the Church, then Rebecca was baptized in April 1842 or soon afterwards.

Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois Go to Top

Date Event
Spring? 1842
Alonzo Raymond travels to Nauvoo. According to his obituary, "his parents followed him to Nauvoo in the same year." (Journal, 16 Aug. 1904, p. 1.) Perhaps they came in the "Vermont Party," mentioned below.

According to Nauvoo Restoration, Inc., Alonzo was a tenant on the property at Kimball 1st addition, Block 4, Lot 53, Lot 4. (See map.)
June 1842
Residents of Nauvoo with Bristol/Lincoln connections are:
Ebe[neze]r Durfey (2nd ward)
James Huston (2nd ward) [May have no relation to Isaac Houston]
Ezra Chase with Tirzah, Eliza, Nancy Charlotte, Dianna, (under 8:) Dudley, Newton, Juliett (3rd ward)

Residents of Nauvoo with Tiverton/Little Compton, Rhode Island connections are:
Isaac Chase (Ezra's brother) with Phebe, Clarissa, Rhoda (3rd ward)
Jabez (Ebenezer's 2nd cousin) with Elizabeth, Julia, George, Savilla, Rosanna (4th ward)

Also in Nauvoo, in the 3rd ward are:
Harman Cutler with Lucyann W, Clarinda (Alonzo's future wife), Royal J., (under 8:) Samuel B., Bengn L., Orson P. P., and Susanna. ([Nauvoo Wards] Record of members, 1841-1845, FHL film 889392, item 1.)

The Cutlers live on Kimball 1st addition, Block 6, Lot 31, just a couple of lots away from Alonzo. (Cutler, p. 28a.)
Summer 1842
Sometime in the summer of 1842, Sisson Chase led the "Vermont Party" of newly converted members of the Church of Jesus Christ to Nauvoo. (DurfeeThis link exits to a different website. Click Back to return.)
11 Oct 1842
Elder Brown arrives with a camp of fifty Mormons from Addison County, Vt. All in good health and spirits and well pleased with the city of Nauvoo and the country generally. ("More Mormons," The Wasp , Nauvoo, Illinois, 15 October 1842, p. 2 as quoted in Deaths and Marriages in "The Wasp" Newspaper, Nauvoo, Illinois, April 16, 1842 to April 26, 1843 , compiled by Linda Haslam, 1993, p. ?. LDS Historical Department Library, call # CL BOOK AREA M277.7343 D2852 1993.)

I'm guessing the "Vermont Party" led by Sisson Chase and the Addison County, Vermont party with Elder Brown are one and the same.
May 1843
David Pettegrew moves family back to Nauvoo after failure of Zarahemla community. He and son James Phineas suffer sickness for a season until the fall of 1844. (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 208.)
14 Aug 1843 Peariz Raymond of Lincoln and Paul Raymond Jr. of Bristol deed property to Paul Raymond of Bristol. (BrisDeeds, v. 10, p. 312.) Pearis' might have moved to Nauvoo sometime close to this date. (Alonzo history; Journal, 11 Jan. 1916, p. 1.)
1843
Alonzo Raymond tenant (renter) of Kimball 1st addition, Block 4, Lot 53, Lot 4. (Nauvoo Restoration, Inc. Land and Records Office records.) This location is in the Nauvoo 9th ecclesiastic ward. (Nauvoo Ward Divisions 1842, Nauvoo Restoration, Inc., 1971. FHL 977.343-N1 E7md.) And it is located in the Nauvoo 3rd civil ward. A map showing this location is available with other Raymond documents elsewhere on this website.
1843
Pearis Raymond pays Nauvoo city taxes. (Nauvoo Social History Project Master Index, Nauvoo Restoration, Inc., 1982. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Historical Dept. Library, CL Fiche M277.73 N3145 1982. Fiche card 5, Reference 1843 3 4946.)
28 Nov 1843 Pearis, Rebecca, and Alonzo are all in Nauvoo and sign the Missouri Redress petition made by the Church to congress. All sign on page 11, which historians feel contains signatures from residents of Nauvoo's 3rd civil ward. (The Nauvoo Journal , Vol. 1 1989?, No. 3/4 July/October, pp. 58-60, 80. FHL 979.343/N1 H25N)
1 Jan 1844
Pearis Raymond buys 100 acres in Appanoose Township (T.7N.-R.8W.), Hancock county from Robert D. Foster. He paid $1200 for 80 acres in the northeast corner of the NE quarter of section 34 as well as 20 acres, the N ½ of the NE ¼ of the SW ¼ of section 15. (Hancock County Deed Records, Vol. M, 1845, pp. 235-236. FHL Film 954600)
1843-1850
Paul Raymond, father of Pearis, dies. According to Alonzo, his grandfather Paul Raymond dies about 1839. (LoganB85, p. 404.) But the 1840 census shows he's still alive and has moved from Paul Jr.'s house to Pearis's house. And Peariz and Paul Jr. deed property to a Paul Raymond in 1843. By the 1850 census, he is gone.
27 June 1844
Joseph Smith, prophet of the Church of Jesus Christ, is killed by a mob in Carthage, Illinois. Alonzo is in Nauvoo when the bodies of Joseph and Hyrum Smith are brought from Carthage. (San Diego Mormon Battalion Visitors Center, Alonzo P. Raymond history.)
22 Dec 1844 Alonzo P. Raymond is made a member of the 14th quorum of seventy in Nauvoo. (Seventies, 14th quorum, pp. 3, 17.)
Abt 1844 Nelson Raymond, brother of Alonzo dies, according to his brother Alonzo, 40 years later. (LoganB85, p. 405.) Might this have been in Nauvoo?
1 Jan 1845
Possible marriage date of Alonzo and Clarinda Cutler. This date may not be correct. The only source I can find for it is one of Alonzo's pension applications from the 6 December 1887. He specifies the marriage date as First day of Jan. (or Jun.) 1845 and the location as Council Bluffs, Iowa, which can't be so since he wasn't in Iowa in 1845. He specifies Clarinda's death as 10 September 1862, which disagrees with Barber's journal. This source is long after the fact and has known inaccuracies, so it is suspect. (Pension, 6-Dec-1887.)
28 April 1845
"A Blessing by John Smith, Patriach, upon the head of A P Raymond son of Pearis & Rebecca, born Feb 14th 1821, Bristol, Vermont. Br. Alonzo..." He is declared to be of the house of Levi. (Bless45) This was probably in Nauvoo, but historical records might shed light on where John Smith was on this date.
27 Jan 1846
Rebecka [sic] Raymond receives her temple endowment in the Nauvoo temple before noon; this record says she was born Nov'r. 13, 1792 (no other info. given). (NauvWA, p. 323.)

Rebecca Pierce and Isaac Chase are sealed in the Nauvoo temple at 4:15 pm; this record (shown below) says she was born Nov. 13, 1791, but is somewhat unclear regarding her birthplace. (NauvSeal, pp. 213-214.) The mistake of placing Rhode Island as a county in New York indicates sloppy record keeping. Rebecca might have been born in Little Compton, Rhode Island, since it is accepted that her parents were born there. Or maybe her parents had already moved to New York (as it is assumed they did). Or perhaps her parents moved with the Chases from Little Compton to Colrain, Massachusetts; perhaps the ditto marks for Rebecca were added prior to Isaac's information and apply to "Coldrain," Franklin, Massachusetts.
 213 (C) Sealings Temple Nauvoo Hancock Co. Illinois 214 
Names When Born Where Born Solemnized
By
Place Time When Witnesses Remarks
M. D. Y. Town County State or Nation When M. D. H. Y.
20 √Chase, Ezra   Feb. 4 1796 Coldrain Franklin Massachusetts A.M. Lyman Nauvoo Jan. 27 1.40 1844 B. Young
2021Tirza Wells
July
24
1796
Greenfield
do.
do.
"
"
"
"
p.m.
"
O. Pratt
















2 √Chase, Isaac   
Dec.
12
1791
Little Compton
Rhode Island
New York
A. M. Lyman
Nauvoo
Jan.
27
4.15
1844
H. C. Kimball

3Rebecca Pierce
Nov.
13
1791
do.
do.
do.
"
"
"
"
p.m.
"
John Smith



According to a deed made more than four months later (5 June 1846), Rebecca is still married to Pearis Raymond at the time she is sealed to Isaac Chase. The following helps explain why she was sealed or "celestially married" to Isaac Chase while still "terrestrially married" to Pearis Raymond.
  • Joseph Smith taught that a person whose marriage is not "sealed" can not be exalted. (D. & C. 132:15-17.)
  • We know Pearis never converted to the Church because on 14 April 1885 Alonzo is baptized on his behalf in the Logan Temple. Therefore, Rebecca would have believed her exaltation was in jeopardy because she was not sealed to her husband.
  • Of four temples begun in Ohio, Missouri, and Illinois, only the Kirtland and Nauvoo temples were completed before mob action forced the church to move on. Members of the church feared greatly that if they did not receive necessary ordinances before the mobs drove them from Nauvoo, they might never have another opportunity.
  • According to Church leader John A. Widtsoe, "Another kind of celestial marriage seems to have been practiced in the early days of plural marriage. It has not been practiced since Nauvoo days, for it is under Church prohibition. Zealous women, married or unmarried, loving the cause of the restored gospel, considered their condition in the hereafter. Some of them asked that they might be sealed to the Prophet for eternity. They were not to be his wives on earth, in mortality, but only after death in the eternities. This came often to be spoken of as celestial marriage. Such marriages led to misunderstandings by those not of the Church, and unfamiliar with its doctrines. To them marriage meant only association on earth. Therefore any ceremony uniting a married woman, for example, to Joseph Smith for eternity seemed adulterous to such people. Yet in any day, in our day, there may be women who prefer to spend eternity with another than their husband on earth." (Evidences and Reconciliations, John Widtsoe, p. 343.)
7 Feb 1846
Alonzo RAYMOND and Clarinda RAYMOND receive endowments in the Nauvoo temple. (NauvEnd, p. 48.) This source is a 1924 transcription of early memorandums found with the Nauvoo temple record which was subsequently annotated with maiden names. The original record does not explicitly indicate that the two were married. Most sources specify this as the sealing date for Alonzo and Clarinda. Some indicate the date as the marriage date, while others cite December 1845. It seems likely that Alonzo and Clarinda were endowed and sealed on this date. I haven't found any source, yet, for the December marriage date.
1 May 1846
Public dedication of the Nauvoo Temple.
20 May 1846
David Pettegrew and family leave Nauvoo in Captain Morley's company. David leads a group of fifty. (Endure, vol. 3, p. 209.)
25 May 1846
Harmon Cutler, having retrofitted his wagons and in company with others loaded up his unsold worldly effects, crossed the Mississippi river, journeyed across the State of Iowa, and located at what is now Council Bluffs, arriving there the 16th of July. (Cutler Memorial, p. 255.) As Alonzo's wife, Clara Cutler Raymond, is Harmon's daughter, I assume the Raymonds travelled with Harmon's group. Louisa's obituary says no more than that they left in 1846 and arrived in Council Bluffs, Iowa that same year. (Journal, 11 Jan. 1916, p. 1.)
5 June 1846
Perus Raymond and Rebecca his wife deed to Thomas Wilson of county of Schugler ... Pearis Raymond and Rebecca his wife ... $200 ... Part of section 34 in Township No. ... 7N 8W in NE corner ... 80 acres ... Also 20 acres N1/2 of NE1/4 of SW1/4 of sect. no. 15. (Hancock Co. Deed Records, Vol. 20P, 1846, FHL Film 954602, p. 487.) Is it possible that the Raymonds leave together after this sell and still make it to Council Bluffs in time for Alonzo to volunteer for the Mormon Battalion? I assume Pearis and Rebecca stayed behind to sell their land and Alonzo was travelling with the Cutlers.

Council Bluffs, Pottawatamie, Iowa Go to Top

Date Event
16 July 1846
Harmon Cutler and others arrive at what is now called Council Bluffs. (Cutler Memorial, p. 255.)
July 1846
David Pettegrew reports his family arrives at Council Bluffs on the last day of July. Brigham Young asks him to go join the Mormon Battalion as a kind of "helmsman," or chaplain. (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 209.) More likely than the last day of July, David may have meant the last part of July or the last day of June since the battalion departs on 20 July.

Alonzo likely arrives and establishes camp with the PETTEGREWs, the CUTLERs, and his brother Wallace on the Little Mosquito at a settlement called Springville. This location is not too far from the Indian mill on Mosquito Creek. See "Council Bluffs, 1846-1852."

Mormon Battalion—To California and Back Go to Top

Date Event
July? 1846 "While at Council Bluffs Alonzo Pearis became afflicted with what doctors said was an incurable disease and told him he had not long to live. He was, of course, very despondent about this and one day while sitting down to rest after walking a short distance--for the least exertion seemed to cause him great fatigue--he was approached by Heber C. Kimball who, putting his hand on Alonzo's head, inquired what was troubling him. He told Heber of his affliction. Brother Kimball then asked him why he didn't enlist with the battalion of five hundred men who had been called for a march to Mexico in defense of the flag of his country. This question seemed to him to be foolish on account of his physical condition. He expressed himself to Brother Kimball, who now told him to go and promised he should recover and be able to make that eventful march." (Goodwin.)

"While following the Saints in their hegira [exodus] to the west, he was one of the first to respond to the call of the United States for the Mexican war and was a member of the famous Mormon Batallion. At that time he was in poor health. Heber C. Kimball promised him that he would return to his wife and parents sound and well and this prophecy was fully realized." (Journal, 16 Aug. 1904, p. 1.)
16 July 1846 Alonzo enlists in the Mormon Battalion in Council Bluffs, Iowa Territory. He is a private in Company D with Nelson Higgins, Captain. (BattServ, A. P. Raymond; Pension, 24-Feb-1886.) The mustering grounds are close to the point that Mosquito Creek emerges from the bluffs onto the Missouri River flood plain. This is close to the current Iowa School for the Deaf in Council Bluffs.
20 July 1846
The Mormon Battalion departs. Alonzo Pearis is a private in Company D, as is Abner Chase and James P. Pettigrew. James' father, David Pettigrew, oldest member of the battalion, was asked by Brigham Young to go and serve as chaplain, or as Brigham Young put it, "helmsman." He served in Company E. There are a couple of Browns in D; I don't know if they are connected. Also in Company D is William Dorris Hendricks, one of the youngest members of the battalion, an Anita Wiser Raymond ancestor. (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 209.) A map showing the route of the battalion's march is available elsewhere on this website.
24 July 1846
"Fri., July 24, Rocky Port, Missouri, 5 miles . ...Alonzo Raymond took his place on the march as he had recovered from his illness. He believed Heber C. Kimball's promise was fulfilled." (MorBatt, p. 18.)

"After a few days during which he rode in a wagon he was able to take his place in the ranks of the infantry and the promise of the Prophet of God was literally fulfilled. He recovered fully and upon reaching California he was a strong and vigorous." (Goodwin)
30 July 1846
The Mormon Battalion encamps in the woods. About ten o’clock that night a heavy storm arises and trees are thrown down in every direction around the camp, but not one in their camp. In the morning they find the timber whirled around in every direction. It was truly miraculous that no one was injured or killed. (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 209.)
4 Aug 1846
In his journal, David Pettegrew reports, that "on the 4th day of August, Brothers Hyde and Taylor, Pratt and Little came into our camp, which day and the next we drew our clothing money. We sent forty dollars to the family." (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 209.)
19 Aug 1846
David Pettegrew received a letter from the Patriarch, John Smith, saying, "Inasmuch as you have left wife and children and all things that are near and dear to promote the interest of the Redeemer's kingdom here on the earth, the Lord thy God hath given his angels charge over thee; thou shalt be preserved and not a hair of thy head shall fall by the hand of an enemy; thy life and health shall be preserved; thou shalt return in peace to thy family; ...Therefore, I say unto thee, fear not, neither be troubled about thy family, for they shall be sustained. I seal and confirm all these blessings, with every desire of thine heart, upon thee and thine, by virtue of the Priesthood vested in me, in the name of thy Redeemer, Amen. (Signed) John Smith." (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 210.)
23 Aug 1846
After Parley P. Pratt returned from Fort Leavenworth with the advance pay received by the church on behalf of members of the Mormon Battalion, Brigham Young spoke at Council Point, probably near the camps of many of their families. He explained the object of the meeting was to tell of the church's central camp on the other side of the river and their arrangements for living. He told them they had the privilege of living by themselves, and attending their own herds, but if they got into difficulty, they must not come upon [the church] for help. His principal object in coming over to speak to them was to induce them to unite with them [physically and financially] in the principles of self preservation, including all business matters pertaining to their present [financial and physical] salvation. No people under heaven of his acquaintance would have entered the United States Army under the circumstances their people had. "It is the invisible hand of the Almighty that is favoring Israel. I will tell the people here what to do with the means [thus] received and if they fail to do it, we shall be released from our obligation to look after them."

[If they united together,] the Bishop and High Council would do them the favor of assisting them in expending their funds [buying supplies at wholesale prices] and would have the privilege [and responsibility] of waiting on them till the church got them [across the plains] where they wanted to go. He warranted that they would get double the goods for their means by obeying counsel to what they would were they to have the expending of it [themselves].

Dr. Willard Richards spent the afternoon in the area paying small sums mostly to sisters to give them immediate relief. Mr. Williams Camp took all his share (twenty dollars) notwithstanding Dr. Richards advised him to leave his money in the hands of the brethren, according to counsel. (JH, 23 Aug. 1846.)

24 Aug 1846
Pearis Raymond calls on Dr. W. Richards at Ira Oviatt's and took Alonzo's full twenty dollars advance pay for Alonzo's wife, who was present, and wanted all her money as she was "capable of taking care of it herself." Elizabeth Pettigrew wanted to collect her husband David Pettigrew's pay as well as her son, James Phineas Pettigrew's. While she also declared herself able to take care of it herself, the forty dollars was sent to Harmon G. Cutler, her son-in-law, who also counseled her to take all her money. (JH, 24 Aug. 1846. Emphasis added.)
Before
Sep 1846
Pearis Raymond dies. According to family records, he dies near Mesquite River, Omaha, Nebraska. I haven't found the origin of this information. Since Pearis and his family are known to have lived on and around Mosquito Creek, Iowa, it is likely the reference is actually to Mosquito Creek. More information linking the Raymonds to the Springville Branch on Mosquito Creek is found in this history. For a map of the area, see "Council Bluffs, 1846." (LoganB85, p. 404; Journal, 11 Jan. 1916, p. 1.; SLC10, pp. 66-67.)
31 Aug 1846
Alonzo is near Council Grove on march to Sante Fe. (Pension, 18-Nov-1893.)
23 Sep 1846
The pioneers in Cutler's Park begin moving to Winter Quarters. Work begins on a grist mill on Turkey Creek at the northern end of the community.
12 Oct 1846
David Pettegrew's battalion group, bringing up the rear with the sick, reaches Sante Fe. (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 212.)
30 Oct 1846
David Pettegrew reported they marched sixteen miles through sand chiefly, and in some places the sand was so deep that the men were obliged to assist the team with ropes, etc. They camped by the side of a small town with a water-powered gristmill. David was unimpressed with the mill's design and workmanship. (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 214.)
4 Nov 1846
At reveille the corpse of the latest to die was borne in silence before the lines. David Pettegrew says that "all was silent and we were standing on an elevated point on the banks of the river, the occasional ripple of the waters and the barren and desolate land around us made the scenery solemn and produced a feeling of solemnity in almost every bosom. At this place our rations were again reduced." Already at three-quarter rations, they were reduced to nine ounces of flour per day, one and a half pounds of fresh meat and ten ounces of pork once in four days. (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 214.)

"While on this march of the Mormon Battalion, Alonzo Pearis, with his comrades, suffered greatly for food and water. Many died and were buried on the lonely trackless wastes over which they traveled. To deceive the wild animals, fires were built over the graves, yet some of the bodies were dug up and devoured by the wild beasts." (Goodwin)
21 Nov 1846
"21st—We again took up the line of march and traveled twelve miles and encamped in a valley. Here we carried most of our water two miles and but little of that could be got.
22nd—We traveled twenty-one miles and encamped without water.
23rd—Early in the morning by daylight we started and traveled fourteen miles. Here was a little water which a few men got to drink, but could not get enough for all to drink so we were obliged to march on further, a distance of twenty-six miles, making in all forty miles that we traveled this day and part of the night. We encamped and found some water and were glad to see it." - David Pettegrew. (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 216.)
16 Dec 1846
The battalion reaches Tuscon. (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 218.)
18 Dec 1846
"18th—This morning we took up our march for the Hela [Gila] River, but between us and that place was a vast desert without water or feed for the mules. We traveled forty-five miles and encamped without water.
19th—We started without water and traveled all day and part of the night and encamped without water. We were by this time nearly all of us so weary and fatigued that we could scarcely get along, the weather being very warm. Towards evening men might be seen lying down on the road, overpowered by fatigue and thirst. This day and part of the night we traveled fifty-two miles.
20th—We traveled eighteen miles and came to a place where some water was lying in pools from the rain, and from the dryness of the soil must have fallen a good while ago." - David Pettegrew. (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 219.)
25 Dec 1846
Christmas day was no different than any other. They marched for 24 miles and camped without water. (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 219.)
31 Dec 1846
Alonzo camps on Rio Gila. (Pension, 18-Nov-1893.)

About this time Alonzo becomes afflicted with chronic rheumatism. (Pension, 24-Nov-1885.) Philemon C. Merrill stated, "that the first indication that came to my Special Notice in the case of Alonzo P. Ramond contracting his rheumatism was some time about the 19 of January in the year of 1847 at a place cald Warners Ranch in California. There was a dredfull wind & varey coald rain Storm. The wind blew all the tents down & he there tuck a dredfull coald & it Setled in his limbs. I was Sagt of the Comand & Start? him? (illegible) guard to mount? (illegible) & he was reported to me as unfit for dutey in consequence of this he was released from duty & went on the Sick list with many others. At the Same Time the command had become almost nude in consequence of there long march and were illy prepard for a Storm of that Severity." (Pension, 31-July-1886. Underlining present in the original.)
1 Jan 1847
The year 1847, so significant in Mormon pioneer history, dawned insignificantly for the battalion. They commenced the new year by packing their knapsacks and traveling thirteen miles through thick brush and over rough roads. They camped on the banks of the Gila River. Rations were soon reduced to one ounce of floor per day with two ounces of pork. (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 220.)
16 Jan 1847
"Colonel Cooke feared a complete disaster; with sixty miles left to go he envisioned possible collapse for his exhausted soldiers. If indeed they toppled over from thirst and hunger, they were rolled under a bush or rock, their buddies pressing on. Finally, on January 16, Carrizo Creek was reached, the men gorging themselves on the pure, cold liquid. Then, without rest, the strongest men and teams headed back to the desert with water for their fallen comrades." (Endure, Vol. 6, p.304.)

"On one eventful day as he [Alonzo] dragged his weary body along, he noticed a comrade who had crawled under a scrub bush apparently to die. Unable to render any help he left him there, but on reaching camp a short distance ahead he filled his canteen with water and returned to save his fallen comrade. He was in time to save him and bring him back to the camp. This man remained in Califormia and years later related this incident to a nephew of Alonzo Pearis Raymond." (Goodwin)
22 Jan 1847
The battalion reaches Warner Ranch. (Endure, Vol. 6, p. 305.)
27 Jan 1847
"We shortly came in sight of the Pacific Ocean, which to us was a good sight as we had performed a long and tedious march and suffered many hardships and privations both with weariness, hunger, thirst and cold; most of us were barefoot and our clothes were very ragged." - David Pettegrew. (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 221.)
29 Jan 1847
The battalion reaches the San Diego Mission. (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 221.)
28 Feb 1847
Alonzo stationed at San Luis Mission U Cal (Pension, 18-Nov-1893.)
23 Mar 1847
The battalion reaches Pueblo de Los Angeles.(Endure, Vol. 3, p. 222.)
3 April 1847
Rebecca Peirce and Samuel Williams are sealed by President Brigham Young at Winter Quarters, Douglas, Nebraska. (NauvSeal, pp. 777-778.) Some of the sealings in the record book around this time are noted as "for time only." I assume this marriage was for "time and eternity."
777    W
Sealings    
and Marriages
778
Name When Born Where born Solemnized
By
Place When Solemnized Witnesses Remarks
[5606] M. D. Y. Town County State &c. M. D. H. Y.
7 √
Williams, Samuel
Mar.
22
1789
Russell
Hamden
Massachusett
Prest. B. Young
Winterquarters
Apr.
3
Eve
1847
Willard Richards

8 √
Rebecca Peirce
Nov.
13
1791
____
___
Rhode Island
"
(Nebraska)
"
"
"
"
John Neff

Date Event
21 April 1847
Samuel Williams moves across the river. (WillS, p. 159.) I assume Samuel has been living in Winter Quarters and moves back east of the Missouri. Perhaps Rebecca Pearce Williams was already living in Springville, Pottawattamie, Iowa and wanted to remain there.
30 April 1847
Alonzo stationed at Angeles Cal (Pension, 18-Nov-1893.)
8 May 1847
"On the 8th day of May an express came in from Santa Fe and from Washington, United States, bringing news from the States, also instructions from the President to the General, also some letters from the Church to some few men of the battalion, by which we learned a few items concerning the brethren and the families left back at Council Bluffs. Although the information was but little, yet we were glad to hear from the Church." - David Pettegrew. (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 223.)
15 June 1847
Near Los Angeles, Cal., Alonzo incurred an injury to his left side by being thrown from a horse and by being kicked. (Pension, 17-Aug-1886.)
30 June 1847
Alonzo stationed at Cuidad Los Angeles N Cal (Pension, 18-Nov-1893.)
16 July 1847
After their 2,000 mile march to California, the men of the Mormon Battalion are discharged at Los Angeles, Cal. (Pension, 24-Feb-1886; Journal, 16 Aug. 1904, p. 1.) The Pettegrews and Alonzo are anxious to go back to their families . (Midvale, p. 19.)
22 July 1847
The former members of the battalion organize and set off for the Great Salt Lake Valley. Some stayed at the Sacramento River. About 100 pressed on towards the Great Salt Lake Valley. "[Travelled] 140 miles and came to the sink of St. Mary's River, up that river to the rise, thence to Fort Hall, from thence 200 miles to Salt Lake." (Endure, Vol. 3, pp. 225,228.) "This journey was not made without subjecting him to great dangers and hardships." (Goodwin)
24 Sept 1847
"Captain Lytle finds a note from David Pettegrew in Pace's group stating they caught up with Captain Hunt on 20 September. Lytle and his company passed the Hastings Cutoff on September 26 and ...thought the advance groups had gone that way. Lytle's group camped a little west of the hot springs.

"When they reaced the hot springs, they learned Captains Pace and Hunt did not go on the Hastings route and were only slightly ahead." (MorBatt, p. 179.)
29 Sept 1847
The Lytle soldiers reached Goose Creek and found water and good grazing for thier animals. (MorBatt, p. 179.)
6 Oct 1847
Lytle's group arrives at Fort Hall where they were able to buy bacon and buckskins. All three groups are in Fort Hall. (MorBatt, p. 179.)
7 Oct 1847
Captain Pace and ten men left Fort Hall for the valley. (MorBatt, p. 179.)
16 Oct 1847
Alonzo, David and James Pettegrew, and the rest of their party arrive in the Great Salt Lake Valley. They find their families are still back on the Missouri River. They begin plans to set out at once to join them. (APRaym; Goodwin; Midvale, p. 19; MorBatt, p. 179.)
17 Oct 1847
The High Council of Great Salt Lake City decide that because of his advanced age, Brother David Pettigrew had better remain in Salt Lake and not try to go on to the Missouri to his family this season. Alonzo and James P. Pettigrew decide to return East to fetch their families. David Pettigrew will later become bishop of the 10th ward on 22 Feb 1849 and spends the remainder of his life in Salt Lake. (JH 17-Oct-1847; Endure, Vol. 3, p. 226.)
18 Oct 1847
"Two days after arriving thirty-two men from the Hancock-Sierra company, whose families were not in Salt Lake Valley, left on October 18 to go east. The names of twenty-six men in this group are known: Reddick N. Allred, Elisah Averett, Jeduthan Averett, Robert Bliss, Edward Bunker, Augustus Dodge, John martin Ewell, Levi W. Hancock, Robert Harris Jr., Abraham Hunsaker, William Hyde, Charles Jameson, Hyrum Judd, Andrew Lytle, William Maxwell, Levi H. McCullough, James Myler, George W. Oman, James Pace, David Pettegrew, David P. Rainey, Alonzo P. Raymond, George W. Taggart, Luther T. Tuttle, Daniel Tyler, Joseph White." (MorBatt, p. 180. Also, Endure, Vol. 3, p. 228.)

[INSERT SYNOPSIS OF TRIP BACK]
?
About this time the Springville Branch suffered an episode of apostacy. A man by the name of McCarry who professed to be some great one had converted a good many to his kind of religion. It appears that he understood the slight of hand, the black art, or that he was a magician or something of the kind and had fooled some of the ignorant in that way. Several were drawn in to strange delusions in some unaccountable way that was a mystery and a misery. As soon as the said McCarrey saw that he was found out in his devilment he made his way to Missouri on a fast trot. The following were charged and cut off from the church, but repented and were restored by baptism. All continued faithful afterwards. (Whipple, pp. 71-74.)
Men
Women
Daniel Stanton Sr.
Sylvanus Colkins
John Atchison
Sisson A. Chase
Bro. Eldredge
Jonathan Haywood    
Widow Pulsipher
Her daughter
Meriah Atcheson
Harriet Stanton
Caroline Stanton
Constanza Stanton
Mrs. Sisson A. Chase
Seien A. Chase, a mother upwards of 60
Abt.
1 Dec 1847
Samuel Williams' long- time friend, Nelson Wheeler Whipple, arrives from Garden Grove and finds Samuel comfortably situated. His boys and Wallace Rament had just returned from Missouri with some hogs and other property they had earned in St. Joseph or thereabouts. Nelson stays the night and appreciates the kind treatment from the Williams. The next morning Nelson finds a place in the hollow on Little Mosquito Creek to build his house. This occurs about two weeks plus a day or two prior to the return of Brother Edward Bunker from the Mormon Battalion. (Whipple, pp. 69-71.)
2 Dec 1847
Harmon Cutler, son of Harmon & Lucy Ann Pettegrew Cutler born Springville Potawatamie Co Ioway. (SLC10, p. 66.)
18 Dec 1847
Members of the Battalion arrive in Winter Quarters about sundown. They had made the journey from Salt Lake Valley to the Missouri River in two months. Some of the company found their families in Winter Quarters, while others were in Council Bluffs or Mt. Pisgah. Alonzo found his family all well, but anxious to be on their way across the plains. The soldiers, although respectable, were unavoidably dirty and ragged, yet they found a warm welcome from their people and Mormon authorities. From De Los Angeles to Kanesville the way they traveled was twenty-seven hundred miles. Their four-thousand mile journey was over. (Endure, Vol. 3, p. 228; APRaym ; Goodwin.)

Council Bluffs again and
Crossing the Plains Go to Top

Date Event
27 Dec 1847
Brigham Young is sustained as the president of the Church of Jesus Christ in the new log tabernacle in Kanesville. ("Winter Quarters: Church Headquarters, 1846-1848," Ensign , Sept. 1997, p. 51.) President Young acknowledges and welcomes back the members of the Battalion.
Winter
1847-48
"We lived through the winter very comfortable allthough our food was not of the most delicate. But we had enough of it. It consisted mostly of corn bread and bean porrage or pottage. The corn we had to grind by hand in a little mill of Bro. Lishes. This was rather tedious, but we had but very little else to do except go to meetings, parties, visit our friends, and so on." (Whipple, p. 74.)

"During this winter a large house was built at Kainsville for holding meetings in and all were called to do something towards it. I made the sash for the windows and worked one day on the house. After it was finished their was held in it what they called a Soldiers Jubilee for the Mormon Battalion who had just returned from California. They had a high time." (Whipple, p. 75.)
2 Jan 1848
Samuel Williams is a High Priest in the Springville Branch, Pottawattamie Co., Iowa. (WillS, p. 21.)

The High Priests of the Springville Branch for 1848-1851 are Joseph Mecham, Samuel Williams, Thomas Barisess?, Daniel Stanton, John Stevens, William Woodland, Joseph S. Siske(Fish?), Benjamin Ellsworth, Isaac Houston, Joseph Grover, Elijah Wilson, William A(H?). Histon(Heston?), Thomas A Curtiss. (Pottawatomie Co. Iowa High Priests Record, 1848-1851. Original in Historian's Office. 1939. Pages 4,8. FHL Film 7794 item 2.) Ezra Chase and Sisson Chase live in the Highland Grove Branch. Isaac Houston confirmed Alonzo when he was baptized back in Vermont. Sisson Chase baptized him.

About this time, Samuel Algar accuses Joseph Meekham, the Springville Branch president, of lying and other things and got up a kind of fuss through which he was set aside and Samuel Williams is appointed to the place. Father Williams calls Nelson Whipple and Joseph Lish as his counselors. As Bro. Williams is sick a good deal of the time, Nelson attends to much of the business. (Whipple, p. 71.) Nelson served until he left the Springville Branch (probably in the Spring of 1849 when he moved next to the Coons on the emigration road). He was replaced by Bro. George Tiffany. (Whipple, Anor pp. 39,40,42.)

Members of the branch may have included: (men) Nelson Wheeler Whipple, Samuel Williams, Samuel Williams' boys, Wallace Rament, Joseph Lish, Numan Williams, Joseph Meekham, Samuel Algar, Haward, Sisson A. Chace, Daniel Stanton, Sylvanus Colkins, John Atchison,  Eldridge, Jonathan Haywood, Harmon Cutler, (women) Lucy Stanton, Haward, Widow Pulsipher and daughter, Meriah Atcherson, Harriet Stanton, Carline Stanton, Constanza Stanton, Mrs. Sisson A. Chase, Seien A. Chase (a mother upwards of 60 yrs. old), Harmon Cutler's girls. (Whipple, pp. 69-73.)
20 Jan 1848
Samuel Williams signs petition for a post office in Pottawattamie, Iowa. (WillS, p. 21.)
5 May 1848
Samuel Williams and probably Rebecca move into their new house. (WillS, p. 159.)
6 April 1848
General Conference of the church was held in the Kanesville tabernacle. (Route from Liverpool to Great Salt Lake City ..., Frank Piercey, Franklin D. Richards-pub., James Linforth-ed., Frank Piercy-ill., p. 114.)
29 Dec 1848
Alonzo's first child, Mary Elizabeth Raymond, born at Council Bluffs, Iowa. (Lehi, p. 12; LoganS85, p. 289.) Family group records indicate 1849, but this may be because the Lehi record is hard to read.
May - June
1848
At the request of the U.S. Indian agent, those left in Winter Quarters (many have gone West) go back across the Missouri to Kanesville and other settlements.
Summer 1848
Gerua, sister of Nelson Whipple is sick all summer with the dropsy and canker and suffers much. She dies in September and was buried in the grave yard on the hill at a point of timber near Nelson's house. A man named Jeffs is struck by lightning at this place and instantly killed. (Whipple, Anor p. 39.)
1848
Clarinda G. RAYMOND is baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ according to a report from her sister, Louisa RAYMOND BARBER in 1885. (LoganE85, p. 164A.) Another record says she was baptized 29 Jun 1851. (ECIF, film 1750708, "Clarinda Raymond 451".) This second record is a transcription of a transcription of a record supposedly made at the time, but I am thus far unable to locate the original record. (I have searched FHL films 26675, 26642, and 26851.) I think Clarinda G. was probably first baptized in 1848 or earlier.
Winter
1848-49
The winter was very severe for six weeks. The frost flew in the air every day and the snow was about two feet deep. A man could not go very far without freezing. The saints helped one another. Bro. Perry DURFEE lent Nelson WHEELER a team and driver to haul his wood that winter. He did not charge for it, neighter would he take anything. They held dancing parties in the branch school house. On 14 February 1848 about 20 of them enjoyed themselves first rate. (Whipple, Anor p. 39.)
6 Dec 1848
Alonzo's brother, William "Wallace" RAYMOND marries Almira CUTLER. ("History of Amina Ann RAYMOND STEPHENS," Eric K. EMFIELD, 2002. Available elsewhere on this website.)
17 Apr 1849
Zecheriah, son of Harmon and Lucy Ann PETTEGREW CUTLER born Springville Potawatamie Co Ioway. (SLC10, p. 66.)
31 May 1849
Rebecca PEARCE WILLIAMS' son-in-law, Samuel Eli WILLIAMS, obtains a marriage license while living in Springville, Pottawattamie County, Iowa. Samuel WILLIAMS performs the marriage of Samuel Ely to Mary GALOWAY on 3 June 1849 at the GALOWAY house in Springville Branch. (WillS, p. 21.) Samuel E. WILLIAMS buys Nelson WHIPPLE's old house at the head of the hollow on the prairie. (Whipple, Anor pp. 38-39.)
Fall 1849
The potato rot frost made its appearance in that area and destroyed nearly all the potatoes that season. (Whipple, Anor p. 40.)
21 Nov 1849
Amina Ann Raymond, daughter of W'm Walice and Almira Raymond born at Springville, Potawatamie Co., Ioway. (SLC10, p. 66.) Harman Cutler's daughter Lucy Ann is also born in Springville, so he and his family probably live close to William Wallace Raymond. (SLC10, p. 67.)
Nov 1849
William Wallace Raymond is rebaptized by Samuel Williams. (Lehi, p. 38.)
Winter
1849-50
A great many social parties are held which made the winter pass off quite agreeably. (Whipple, Anor p. 40.)
Spring 1850
Nelson Whipple recounts, "I was fully employed gunsmithing and getting some money as I had nothing towards an outfit for a journey of a thousand miles and I did not think of going to the Valley that season. But to my surprise, as I was out of doors one morning a man, Alonzo Rament, was passing the house, asked me if I was going to the Valley that summer. I answered, No I have not team nor anything else towards an outfit. Says he, as he passed on in a hurry, I will let you have one good yoke of oxen towards a team if that would do you any good. I hallored after him and said if he would do that I would be sure to go. He said I could depend upon his word for the oxen. I went into the house and told my wife and we made preparations from that hour to go that summer." (Whipple, Anor p. 40.)

Those who emigrated early in the season depended on corn to feed their horses on the plains. It was quite remarkable that this spring there is very little corn that would grow. Throughout the country, very little corn would sprout. This made the price increase from 50 cents per bushel to two dollars and a half until the early eimgration had passed. (Whipple, Anor p. 41.)
28 May 1850
Samuel Williams and family depart for the valley. (WillS, p. 22.) With him in the David Evans company are Mrs. Samuel Williams, Alonzo P Raymond, Phineas Pettigrew and wife, and several members of the Hatch family. (PlainsThis link exits to a different website. Click Back to return.)

According to the Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel (1847- 1868) Database (PlainsThis link exits to a different website. Click Back to return.), members of the David Evans company include
Surname Given name Year Company Age Gender   Pioneer Information
Raymond
Alonzo P
1850
David Evans
Unknown  
M

Raymond   Clarinda 1850   David Evans   Unknown
M
[M is obviously an error.]
Raymond Mary Elizabeth 1850 David Evans Infant
F

Hatch
Abram Chase
1850
David Evans
20
M

Hatch
Adeline
1850
David Evans
16
F

Hatch
Aldura
1850
David Evans
Infant
F

Hatch
Elizabeth
1850
David Evans
13
F

Hatch
Jeremiah
1850
David Evans
26
M

Hatch
Lorenzo Hill
1850
David Evans
24
M

Hatch
Louisa
1850
David Evans
25
F

Hatch
Phebe
1850
David Evans
2
F

Pettigrew
Phineas
1850
David Evans
Unknown
M
possibly James Phineas Pettegrew
Pettigrew
[Mrs.] Phineas
1850
David Evans
Unknown
F

Williams
Mary
1850
David Evans
21
F

Williams
Newman Bishop
1850
David Evans
20
M

Williams
Robert Y.
1850
David Evans
Unknown
M
died
Williams
Samuel Ely
1850
David Evans
21
M

Williams
Samuel, Sr.
1850
David Evans
61
M

Williams
[Mrs.] Samuel
1850
David Evans
Unknown
F


Other families in the company were Bair (Belinda Jane, Catharine Elizabeth, John, Lucinda Amanda, Lucinda Owens, Lola Ann, Louise Marie), Ballinger, Barows (Ethan), Buys (Edward), Campbell (Rosette), Clyde (George W., William Morgan), Coleman (Elizabeth, George, Martha Jane, Prime, Rebecca, Sarah Thornton, William), Earl (Sarah, Sarah Syphers, William), Evans (Abigail, Amanda, Barbara Ann Ewell, David, Henry, Joseph, Martha, Sarah, Susannah), Ewing, Farrer (Margaret, Mary, Mary Stubbs, Roger, Roger Jr., Thomas), Fawcett (George William, Hannah Isabel, Jane Corner Smith, Nephi Robert, William), Field (John, Susannah Cooper), Hall (Edward, Mary Ann, Nancy Eleanor Ballinger, Sarah Jane), Hinckley (Eliza, Eliza Jane Evans, Ira Nathaniel, ancestor of Church president Gordon B. Hinckley), Judd (Joel), McArthur (Emeline), McGary (Charles, Charlotte Earl, Eliza Melissa, Ellen, James, Jane, Sarah, William Henry), McKinney, Millet (Joseph), Phelps, Rose, Smith (Ann Coleman, Caroline, Joseph Johnson), Stowell (Hannah, William Rufus Rogers), Thornton (Charlotte), Whipple (Mary, Miranda, Nelson Wheeler, Susan Jane). (Heart, pp. 396-455; PlainsThis link exits to a different website. Click Back to return..) William Wallace Raymond and Harmon Cutler and their families remain in Springville.

Samuel Williams household crosses the plains, including Rebecca, Clarinda, and Louisa. (Journal, 11 Jan. 1916, p. 1.) "[Louisa], a native of Vermont, came to Salt Lake City with her parents in her early childhood, her father, Pierce Raymond, dying on the plains before arriving at the end of his journey, and, after a life of beneficent usefulness, she [Louisa] now resides at Logan at the age of sixty-fix years, being the mother of eight children." (Progressive Men of Bannock, Bear Lake, Bingham, Fremont, and Oneida counties, Idaho , A. W. Bowen & Co., 1904. Page 30. FHL Film 362668.)

Biographies or autobiographies are available for the following members of the David Evans 1850 Company:
  • Evans, Barbara Ann Ewell, [Reminiscences], in Bishop David Evans and His Family, 1972, pp. 51-52.
  • Hatch, Abram. Autobiography brief account of his experiences traveling to Utah (pp. 12-13).
  • Hatch, Lorenzo Hill, Lorenzo Hill Hatch Journal, 1958, pp. 12-13.
  • Jacobs, Elisabeth Coleman, [reminscences], Utah Pioneer Biographies , Vol. 44, p. 67. Her account of the trip, in its entirety, reads: "In the spring of A. D. 1850 we comenced our journey to Utah. Myself and other young persons being under the necesity of walking about all the way and mostly barefooted. ¶ Ariving in Salt Lake City in the fall of that year A. D. 1850. We remained in Salt Lake City that Winter. Then moved out to what was then known as Dry Creek in Utah County. Where we joined with others in founding the City of Lehi."
  • Nixon, Hannah Isabell Fawcett. [Auto]biography. Account of emigration experiences (p. 1).
  • Whipple, Nelson Wheeler. Autobiography and journal. Daily account of his emigration to Utah (pp. 82-92).
1850
After Samuel Williams leaves the Springville Branch, he is replaced as branch president by George Tiffany. After a time Harman Cutler serves as branch president. He was the last, as the branch was afterwards merged with the Carterville Branch. (Whipple, Anor p. 42.)
9 June 1850
Nelson Whipple recorded, "Having made the best arrangements I could for the trip, made my wagon, laid in my flour meal, bacon, candles, sugar, coffee, tea, clothing, etc., etc., on the 9th day of June 1850, we set out for the Great Salt Lake Valley, the place we had long desired to see.

"My team was one yoke of good little oxen, loaned me by my friend Alonzo P. Rament, and one yoke of cows, a tenatable light wagon, and a very good fitout for the journey. My cows had never been yoked before and did not go very well of course, but they soon got learned, so I could drive them without leading.

"My fitout I made all in the spring of '50, not having anything towards it three months before. The first night we stopped at Bro. Tiffanys, 4 miles from where we started from." (Whipple, Anor p. 42.)
10 June 1850
"The next morning we bid goodbye to our friends that were going back, and went on down the river to a place called Bethleham, and camped to await the arrival of others and to be organized for traveling, etc.

"Brother Tiffany went a long ways with us and when he turned to go back our feelings were such that we could not bid him goodby, but he knew our feelings, for he felt the same.

"The company that left Springville when I [Nelson Whipple,] did were: Samuel Williams, Samuel E. Williams Jr., Numan B. Williams, Mary Williams, wife of S. E. Williams, and [Rebecca Pearce Raymond Williams,] the second wife of Samuel Williams Sr. Jeremiah Hatch and family and two sisters, Lorenzo D. Hatch, Abraham Hatch, Phinias Pettegrew (Alonzo's friend from Battalion days) and wife [and] Alonzo Rament." (Whipple, Anor p. 42.)
12 June 1850
"In a few days, Bro. O. Hyde and Bro. Joseph Young and some others came down and examined our wagons and our fitouts, organized us into 10's, 50's, 100's, appointed captains, etc. Bro. David Evans was captain of the first 50 and John Blair of the 2nd 50. There were 105 wagons in all." (Whipple, Anor p. 42.)

Lorenzo Hill Hatch and brothers Jeremiah and Abram cross the Missouri River with three wagons, five yoke of oxen, seventeen cows, clothes, tools, and provisions for their outfit. Jeremiah has a wife and two children. His sister Elizabeth travels with him. Lorenzo, Abram, and their sister Adeline travel together. They travel in the company of Captain David Evans. (LHatch, pp. 12-13.)

"We crossed the river very well without accident, except an old cow that was fool enough to jump over board and came near upsetting the boat and caused us to drift down stream a long ways below the landing, but we tied up and got ashore.

"The Omaha Indains were about there very plenty and some were afraid of them, but they manifested no disposition to do anybody any harm or their property.

"We went 6 miles from the river and camped on a small creek where the mosquitoes were so thick they like to run us all crazy.

"On that night the cholera appeared among us. One Joe Millet that was with the Hatch boys was taken sick about dark and was very bad through the night. But nobody seemed to take much notice of him and did not know what ailed him." (Whipple, Anor p. 43.)
13 June 1850
"The next morning he [Joe Millet] got pretty near over it and we went on for several days." Nelson Whipple. (Whipple, Anor p. 43.)
15 June 1850
The Bishop David Evan's Company starts for Utah after being organized. The cholera soon broke out in camp. (Evans, pp. 51-52.)
Summer
1850
"As we passed along, the great number of new graves by the roadside was truly astonishing. We met scattering remnants of [California] companies going back as so many had died. The few that was left had turned back for home, thinking that they had got quite enough of gold hunting." Nelson Whipple. (Whipple, Anor p. 44.)

"People were stricken down on every side." Barbara Anne Evans, wife of David Evans. (Evans, pp. 51-52.)

"We had not gone far before we saw a grave with the name of Charlott Thornton on the head board. A young woman with which we were all acquainted. We soon came to a camp where two or three had died. One the wife of D. B. Dilley.

"At this many were much alarmed, but this did no good. For we had to face the cholera if we turned back. And if we went on we could run away from it." Nelson Whipple. (Whipple, Anor p. 43.)
Summer
1850
"After traveling a day or two we came to the old Paunee Willage on the South side of the Platt river. Here we stopped early in the afternoon and Samuel Williams and his brother and myself went to examine the Village and get some wood for the night.

"Their wigwams or houses were built quite substantial of cedar wood [that] they had floated down the Platt from Grand Island, a good many miles above. There was not timber in sight of the Village. There were pieces of ground that they had cultivated and raised much corn, but had no fences. There were large holes, like wells dug into the sandy soil where they had deposited their corn. The Indians were all gone having been driven away by the Sioux Indians.

"While we were looking about I began to feel cold and a deathly feeling came upon me. I got two small sticks of [fire] wood and started for camp, a distance of perhaps forty or fifty rods, but before I got there I dropped my wood and made my way the best I could for the wagon, and when there I told my wife that something ailed me and I thought it was the cholera.

"She was alarmed at this of course and thought she should be left a widow in short order. She asked me if she could do anything for me. We had a wooden match box full of some kind of pills. I told her to give me some of them. She gave me the box and I took one half of them at once and had Father Williams come and administer to me with some others and for a few hours I suffered much. But after that I seemed to feel alittle better and told my wife I would take the balance of those pills and did so. ... Through the night, I was so restless that I could not lie in one position a single minute, but rolled and tumbled in the wagon. And finally that was not big enough. I got out upon the ground and rolled there for hours."

"In the morning I was comfortable again."

"At the time I was the worst the day before, Mr. Robert G. Williams, a brother of Phinius Pettegrew's wife, was lying in the wagon next ours. He had the cholera and died. I saw him breathe his last, but it did not alarm me at all as to my situation and I do not know as I thought of dying while I was sick. In the norming I was able to letter a tomb board of cedar that Bro. P. Pettengrew had shaved out in good style for that purpose."

"After I had the cholera we passed on day after day. We saw many graves of the California emigrants and of many of our people that had started before us." Nelson Whipple. (Whipple, Anor pp. 43-44.)
27 June 1850
Eliza Jane Evans Hinckley, wife of Ira Hinckley and #1 child of David Evans, passes away leaving a baby daughter. (Evans, p. 18.)

"There were five deaths in our company, my husband's oldest daughter, Mrs. Ira Hinckley, was one among them. That was a trying time." Barbara Anne Evans. (Evans, pp. 51-52.)

"There were some 5 or 6 died of this disease in our company on the forepart of our journey, the names of which I will give as far as I can remember: Cholette Thornton, Sister D. B. Delley, Mr. Robert G. Williams, Miss Emeline McArthur, Sister Hinckley, wife of Ira Hinckley, and daughter of Bishop David Evans." (Whipple, Anor p. 44.)
Summer 1850
"The [discarded] property on the plains this year was enormus in consequence of the much sickness and so many starting out that knew [nothing] about what they needed on such a trip or how they could along best. I am speaking of the gentiles. Wagons, wagon irons, axes, guns, chains, beds, shirts, quilty, paints, tools of almost every description, kegs, barrels were strewn along in great abundance." (Whipple, Anor p. 45.)
Summer 1850
"Nothing of note occurred until we got near the south fork of the Platt where one of the oxen of Bro. A. P. Rayment's that I had, lay down while traveling along and died in five minutes. This left me in a bad situation as there were very few spare cattle in the company.

"For a few days Bro. Rament put on another yoke of his oxen but soon found his load too heavy to spare any team and the Captain took a cow of Ethen Burrows that was able to work and let me have her to work with the other ox for quite a long distance until we got up to Scotts Bluffs where one night as I was on guard an ox came limping into our camp. I took him and tied him up and in the morning examined him but could see nothing the matter of his front foot, but he walked quite lame.

"Captain Evans told me to take him along to a trading post that was a short distance ahead and trade him for a cow or something that would help out for a team. I did so and got for the ox, a cow, and put her into yoke and worked her on for about 300 miles when her feet got very sore and I put her into the loose herd and Bro. Evans let me have a two year old heifer until we got to the Valley.

"The feet of all the cows got very bad. I used to throw mine down and clean out the dirt and gravel and cloth and tar and nail on sheet iron shoes. Those would stay on about a week when I would have to do the same thing again." (Whipple, Anor pp. 44-45.)

"I had heard of the vast number of buffaloes along the Platt, so that the teams could hardly get along for them but we did not see anything of the kind. Some few were seen along the road and one or two killed, but they were very wild and hard to catch." (Whipple, Anor p. 45.)

"We experienced some of the most terrible storms along the Platt, that I had ever known in any country. But we received no particular damage by them. Very few cattle died out of the company and the health of the people was good, after we got away from the cholera, which was about 200 miles from the Missouri River." (Whipple, Anor p. 45.)

"We had, generally, peace in the camp and very little difficulty or contentions. After we passed the South Pass, as it is called, the Captain told his company that if they felt like dancing to dance and enjoy ourselves as he felt as though we were delivered from under the hands of our enemies who would not have the power to abuse us as they had before done." (Whipple, Anor p. 45.)
Summer 1850
"Had it not been for that [horrible disease, cholera], we should have had a pleasant journey. After we arrived at Laramie, we all enjoyed good health." Barbara Anne Evans. (Evans, pp. 51-52.)

"We had some cases of cholera and buried five or six of our numbers. However the trip was a pleasant one." Lorenzo Hill Hatch. (LHatch, p. 13.)
13 Sep 1850
"While we were on the Sweet Water we met Ansen Call and others who told us to take the new road that was called the Golden Pass which turned up [passed up?] the Weber River from the mouth of Echo Canyon and over into Parleys Park and down Parleys canyon. What his object was in telling us to go that way, I do not know. But the road was almost impassable, much worse, we were told, than the other way. But notwithstanding, we got over and on the night of the 13th of Sept. 1850 we came down Parleys canyon into the Valley or near it and camped.

"I was wet to my hips as I had to lead the heifers on the lead and wade at every crossing, what was not a few. After we had camped late in the night they got up a dance and those that felt like dancing joined in. But I did not, but went to bed anxious for morning to come that I might see what was before me." Nelson Whipple. (Whipple, Anor pp. 45-46.)
14 Sep 1850
"In the morning I walked up the bluff or bank at the mouth of the canyon to look about. The first thing I noticed was a good lot of snow on the vast mountains on the east of the Valley. I next began to look for Grat Salt Lake City, as I was told I could see it from that point. I discovered something at a distance of about one mile to the north that looked like a few low huts or cabins which I supposed must be the City, or a portion of it. I saw a small part of Great Salt Lake and the islands in it which all looked barren and dreary and desolate.

"The whole view had the most lonely and isolated appearance that could be. My feelings were the most singular that I ever had when reflected for a moment on the condition of a handfull of people here located at least one thousand miles from all civilized inhabitants in this steril and desolate region of the Rocky mountains, to sustain themselves and become an independent nation which I knew they had to do some where in these mountains.

"After pondering here awhile alone I returned to camp. They were hitching us to start, some for the City, and some went south and some went and scattered and I never saw all of them again. Father Williams, Alonzo Rament, Samuel Williams and myself, and some others went to the City.

"I found on going to the City that it was about 6 miles from where I took my first view of it, instead of one or two as I had supposed. As we went towrds town things began to look more cheering. We passed where Brigham was building a grist mill at the mouth of Parleys canyon. Here there were houses and gardens and to our astonishment all vegetation was as green as ever when two nights before in Parleys Park ice was near one inch thick in the morning.

"As we passed along we had to go through what was called the Big Field or piece acres where we saw corn and potatoes in abundance and some wheat that was not cut yet, although it was the 14th of September. This encouraged us seeing that things would grow here to sustain man and beast.

"When I had fairly got into the City I looked upon the adobe buildings as mean, temporary mud houses which they had built to serve till they could do better. ... [I went] to Bro. Pettegrews where Father Williams and the rest had stopped." Nelson Whipple. (Whipple, Anor p. 46.)

Great Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah Go to Top

15 Sep 1850
David Evan's Company arrives in the Great Salt Lake Valley. (Evans, p. 52.)

"We were just three months on our journey across the plains, a long tedious time of it as every one well knows that has crossed those plains with ox teams or hand carts, as many have done. Our provisions held out well and our cows gave a little milk all the way, and in short we got along very well, I suppose. But it was the hardest three months of my life." Nelson Whipple. (Whipple, Anor p. 45.)

The Hatches arrive the 17th of September 1850. Jeremiah is very sick when they arrive, but he soon recovers. The Hatches remain together and rent a house in the Third Ward, cut some hay in the Big Field, and get a lot in the 10th Ward. Lorenzo is rebaptized and commences anew to keep the commandments of God. They go to work and build a house 32 x 16 feet, one and a half stories high in the winter of 1850-51. (LHatch, p. 13.)

Abram Hatch crosses the plains in 1850 with his brothers and their families. They would spend that winter in Salt Lake City. (JensonBio, Vol. 1, p.359.)
29 Sep 1850
Alonzo P Raymond [re-]baptized in the Salt Lake 10th ward by David Fairbanks, bishop of the 1st ward. This day Bishop Fairbanks also [re-]baptizes James P. Pettegrew, David Evans, Bashary A Evans, Lorenzo H. Hatch, Ryrena Ewell, Emma Evans, Daniel S Thomas, Martha Thomas, Malinda Loverage, John Mower, Alexander H Loveridge, Charity Lewis, James P Terry, Hannah Terry, Sarah An Mower, Elisha Faebon. (SLC10, p. 39.)
?
Alonzo P. Raymond pays $7.00's labor in tax to the building of a school house in the 10th ward. (SLC10, p. 42.)
?
In the 10th ward, block 25 is the public square. On block 26, J.P. Pettegrew lives on lot 6, Daniel Tyler on 7, and David Pettegrew on 8. A. P. Raymond lives on block 30, lot 4. His neighbors are D. Thomas and John Cheany. (SLC10, p. 44-45.)

2 Nov 1850
15 Nov 1850

1850 U.S. Census Go to Top

Meanwhile, back in district No. 21, Pottowatamie. Co., Iowa on 2 Nov 1850 Luke Johnson's 1850 U.S. Census enumeration records the Samuel Williams household, including his wife, Rebecca, and Samuel's son, Newman, and Rebecca's daughters, Clarinda and Louisa. Since Nelson Whipple's journal shows that Father Williams and household were in Utah at this date, I assume that friends, relatives, or neighbors provided the information.

Likewise, on the 15th his enumeration includes the families of Alonzo Pearis Raymond and William Wallace Raymond, even though Alonzo's family had already gone. Wallace probably reported the information for Alonzo's family. Since the data collected is supposed to reflect the official census date of 1 June 1850, perhaps Alonzo's departure was not until after that date. Or perhaps Luke Johnson was under the understanding to include any person who had resided in the enumeration district during the year. For transcriptions of these census entries, see "The Paul Raymond Family in the 1850 Census".

Pearis' children:

  • Alonzo is 29 and living with his wife, Clarrinda, and Mary, his first child.
  • Wallace is 26 and listed adjacent to Alonzo. He also has wife, Almira, and first child, Amena.
  • Nelson would have been 25, but has probably passed away by now. According to Alonzo, Nelson died around 1844. (LoganB85, p. 405.)
  • Clarinda G. is 19 and listed with her mother, Rebecca Williams.
  • Louisa Elizabeth is 16 and listed with her mother, Rebecca Williams. Louisa is also listed living with the Nelson Whipple family. As they have a new baby, presumably she is helping as a nanny.
31 Dec 1850
Rebecca Williams has a dropped letter in the Great Salt Lake City post office. (DesNews, 11 Jan. 1851, p. 190This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
1 Jan 1851
A list of the members of the 10th ward includes the following and their families: David Pettegrew, James P. Pettegrew, Lorenzo H. Hatch, Jeremiah Hatch, and Alonzo P. Raymond. Alonzo's household includes himself, Clarinda, and Mary E. Raymond. (SLC10, pp. 48- 52.)
30 Jan 1851
Alonzo's second child, Susannah Rebecca Raymond, born at Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah. (LoganS85, p. 289.)

Family records sometimes give the year as 1850. This is not correct as the 10th ward membership list taken 1 Jan 1851 only includes the first child, Mary E. (SLC10, p. 50.) Further, Alonzo's 1850 census Iowa enumeration excludes Susannah and when he is enumerated again in Utah in 1851, Susannah is 3 months old. Thus, Susannah was probably born after 1 Oct 1850. Family records often give the birth date as January or June. The June date must be incorrect because Susannah Rebecca is blessed on 6 April 1851. (SLC10, p. 37.)
30 Mar 1851
Lucy Ann Pettegrew Cutler, daughter of Harmon & Lucy Ann Pettegrew Cutler, born in Springvielle Potawatamie Co Ioway. (SLC10, p. 66.)
6 April 1851
Mary Elizabeth and Susannah Rebecca Raymond, daughters of Alonzo P. and Clarinda Raymond are blessed in the Salt Lake 10th ward by Bishop [David] Pettegrew and Daniel Tyler. Bishop Pettegrew also blesses Wm. Williams Pettegrew, son of James P. and Seline Pettegrew. (SLC10, p. 37.)
27 Apr 1851
Elyszibeth L [Louisa Elizabeth] Raymond is rebaptized in the 10th ward by Daniel S Thomas and confirmed by David Pettegrew and Daniel Tyler. She is reported to have been born in Briston [Bristol], Ver, Jan 9 (or 2, it's hard to read), 1835. (SLC10, pp. 58-59.)
May? 1851

1851 Utah Census Go to Top

The 1850 U.S. Census is not taken in Utah (or Deseret) Territory until 1851. Samuel Williams household includes Rebecca, Clarinda [G.], and Louisa (View census image on Ancestry.com or View image for free on RootsWeb.com). Alonzo's family now includes Susannah, a new addition to Alonzo's family, at 3 months old (View census image on Ancestry.com or View image for free on RootsWeb.com). For transcriptions of these census entries, see "The Paul Raymond Family in the 1850 Census".

1 Jun 1851
Samuel Williams is sealed to a third wife, Henrietta Nelson by Brigham Young in the Presiden't Office. (WillS, pp. 24- 25.)
29 Jun 1851
Clarinda [G.] Raymond is baptized by Seth Taft and confirmed by J. Gibson and J. Oakley in Salt Lake. Clarinda's birth information is listed as 9 Mar. 1830, Bristol, Vermont. (ECIF, film 1750708, "Clarinda Raymond 451".) Seth Taft is the bishop of the Salt Lake 9th ward. Thirty-five years later, Louisa reports that Clarinda G. Raymond was baptized in 1848. (LoganE85, p. 164A.) If that is true, then Clarinda's baptism of this date was a rebaptism.

Rebecca Williams is rebaptized and reconfirmed the same day by the same individuals. Rebecca's birthdate is listed as October 1791 and the place as Sangersfield, New York. (ECIF, film 1750726, "Rebecca Williams [Card #]378".)
13 July 1851?
The ward met at the school house. A motion was passed to declare the sale of the land in the ward farm by Alonso Rayment as null and void. (SLC10, p. 62.) The record doesn't state why the transaction would be rejected. Assuming Alonzo was in Midvale by the winter of 1851, this attempted sell may mark the time when Alonzo began his move.
31 July 1851
Rebecca Williams, wife of Samuel Williams, passes away from "palsy" and is buried in the Salt Lake City cemetery. ( [Salt Lake City] Cemetery Records, [Interment?] Book A , p. 5, 1851, #132. FHL Film 1299167.)
1851
"Having spent the winter in Salt Lake City, Abram [Hatch] moved to Lehi, Utah county, in 1851, and assisted to build a grist mill at the mouth of American Fork canyon. ...He made his home in Lehi till 1867 and assisted materially in the development of the place." (JensonBio, Vol. 1, p.359.)

Midvale, Salt Lake, Utah Go to Top

Date Event
Fall 1851
"On his return to Utah he [Alonzo P. Raymond] lived at Salt Lake City for a while and later had a home at Jordan and at Lehi for eight or ten years." (Journal, 16 Aug. 1904, p. 1.)

Alonzo and James P. Pettigrew arrive in Salt Lake with their families. They stay for about a year before pioneering the area that would become known as Midvale, Utah. (Midvale, p. 19.) At the time, Midvale was known as East Jordan.

The first people to settle present day Midvale knew each other in Nauvoo, Illinois in the early 1840's: the Pettigrew, Raymond and Cutler families. Harmon Cutler married Lucy, the daughter of David Pettigrew, Alonzo P. Raymond married Clarinda, the daughter of Harmon Cutler. His brother, William W. Raymond, married Almira, sister of Clarinda Cutler. (See, "Relationships among the Raymonds, Cutlers, and Pettegrews.") In the fall of 1851, Alonzo P. Raymond and James P. Pettigrew moved their families to the east side of the Jordan River (part of the West Jordan precinct, even though it was on the east side of the river), thus becoming the first settlers of what is now known as Midvale. (Midvale, p. 19.)

According to the records, the Pettigrews and the Raymonds were the first and only settlers here the first winter (1851-1852). They settled on the east side of the Jordan River, between the river on the west and the hill on the east at a point about a mile west of the original Midvale First Ward meetinghouse, and immediately north of the road that runs east and west between Midvale and West Jordan. Many histories incorrectly state that David Pettigrew and Wallace Raymond also settled the area in 1851. Jensen (vs. Jenson) states, "All previous histories of Midvale list Alonzo and Clarinda Raymond and David and Emily Pettigrew as the first settlers on the east side of the Jordan River. However, research of available records shows David Pettigrew (no wife Emily) as living in Salt Lake and James Pettigrew and Alonzo Raymond both living in the West Jordan [precinct] area." (Midvale, p. 19; Jenson, p. 498; Tales of a Triumphant People , Francis W. Kirkham and Harold Lundstrom, editors, 1995. SUP Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.)
19 Jan 1852
The Caanan (West Jordan) ward was established. (Mormon Historical Maps, collection in a 3-ring notebook, U.S./Canada Reference Desk, FHL.)
19 May 1852
A P Raymond works on the Big Kanjon [Canyon] ditch for the 1st ward with a group of members in the 10th ward. (SLC10, p. 63.)

If Alonzo was working with members of the 10th ward, was he living in the 10th ward or in Midvale? A clue may be found in The Cutler Family, which states, "Midvale finally grew eastward when men finished digging the canals that brought water from Big Cottonwood Canyon through Fort Union." (p. 37)
June 1852 Wallace Raymond, wife Almira Cutler and family cross the plains in the 12th wagon company of the year. Harmon Cutler was captain over the 12th company, called the Independent (Springville) Company. The company consists of 262 saints, 231 oven, 222 pounds of ammunition, 171 cows, 154 sheep, 63 wagons, 47 arms, 28 spades and shovels, 20 dogs, and 17 horses. Near Fort Laramie, Wyoming the wagon train is attacked by Indians who take all their horses. They continue on with their oxen. They arrive in the Salt Lake Valley near the last of September of 1852 (Cutler states 3 October 1852). (Pioneer, p. 1873, 2926; LoganS85, p. 437; Cutler, p. 30.)
21 June 1852
A. P. Raymond, one of the proprietors of the Salt Lake 10th ward farm, petitions for the right to build a grist mill on the farm's irrigation ditch.
                  June 21st 1852
To the proprietors of the Tenth Ward Farm, I
petition your honors the privilege and right
of putting up a Grist Mill near the? said
farm near my house, also the right of the
water of the irrigating ditch when not used
for irrigating  purposes .  The above will be in
opperation as soon as practible   within?
a year.                Yours with Respect
                         A.P. Raymond
(SLC10, p. 209.)

If Alonzo's house was in the 10th ward, was he living in the 10th ward or in Midvale?
24 Jun 1852
On the 24th he was authorized to build a mill if he used the water only when not used for irrigating. But the owners reserved the right to enlarge the race and use the additional water flow for their own and to exert control of the water for any purpose, and to hold the mill liable for all damages occurred. (SLC10, p. 209-210.)
Whereas A.P. Raymond, one of the Proprietors of the Tenth
Ward Farm has petitioned the proprietors of said farm
for Mill privileges on Lot No. 2 of said farm
    Resolved therefore that Said A.P. Raymond be and
is hereby authorized to locate a Grist Mill on
said Lot and use the water from the irrigation
ditch when it is not wanted for irrigating or other               
purposes by the owners of said farm, provided
however that any person or persons wishing to locate
Mills or other machinery either above or below and
having a grant from the owners of said farm shall
have the privilege of enlarging the Race [millrace] and using
all of the water thus added.
    Resolved second that the proprietors of said Farm
do hereby reserve to themselves the entire control
[New Page]
of the irrigating ditch at such times as they need
it for any purpose whatsoever.
    Resolved third that said Mill shall be
holden [liable] for any and all damages occurred
by its location to any of the owners of said
Farm.
        Signed?      June 24th, 1852
21 July 1852
Veness S. [Spencer Vaness] Raymond, son of William Wallace and Almira Raymond is born on the Platt River, Pawnee Nation. (SLC10, p. 66.) Later records specify Loup Fork, Nebraska. (Pioneer, p. 1873, 2926; LoganS85, p. 437.)
Sep 1852
Wallace Raymond, Harmon Cutler, with his sons, Royal and Ben, and Charles Brown settle with their families on the east side of the Jordan. (Jenson, p. 498; Midvale, p. 19.)
3 Oct 1852
Alonzo's third child, Harriet Raymond, born in Midvale. Only a handful of families live east of Jordan at this time, so the area is part of the West Jordan district (Midvale, p. 19).

While later records give a birthdate of 3 Aug 1851 (LoganS85, p. 289), a record apparently made 13 Nov 1852 in the 10th ward specifies 3 Oct 1852 (SLC10, p. 67). The record says Harriet was born "G. S. L. Valley Oct 3rd 1852." Since the birthdate would have been known with great clarity when this record was made, 3 Oct 1852 is the most likely date.

It should be noted that in the 10th Ward record, the "Oct" is difficult to read and could be misintrepreted as "Ast", a plausible abbreviation for August. But looking at the clerk's other uppercase A and O's (see p. 80's "Oxford"), lowercase s and o's, and abbreviations for August and October, I am quite certain this record specifies "Oct."
13 Nov 1852
The following children are blessed by David Pettegrew and Daniel Tyler of the Salt Lake 10th Ward:
Amina Ann Raymond, daughter of W'm Walice and Almira Raymond, born 21 Nov. 1849 at Springville, Potawatamie Co., Ioway.
Veness S. Raymond, son of d'o [ditto], born on Platt River Pawnee Nation 21 July 1852.
Lucy Ann Pettegrew Cutler, daughter of Harmon & Lucy Ann Pettegrew Cutler, born in Springvielle Potawatamie Co Ioway Mch 30th 1851.
Harriet Raymond, daughter of Alonzo P. & Clarinda Cutler Raymond, born G. S. L [Great Salt Lake] Valley 3 Oct 1852.
Harmon Cutler, son of Harmon & Lucy Ann Pettegrew Cutler born Springville Potawatamie Co Ioway 2 Dec 1847.
Zecheriah, son of Harmon and Lucy Ann Pettegrew Cutler born Springville Potawatamie Co Ioway 17 Apr 1849. (SLC10, p. 66.)

The following are rebaptized by David Pettegrew in the Salt Lake 10th Ward:
Harmon and Lucy Ann Cutler
Susanah Cutler
Royal J. Cutler
Clarinda Raymond
W'm W. and Almira Raymond (SLC10, pp. 80-81. ECIF specifies 19 Sep 1852.)
28 Dec 1852
Ward members of the "Little Cottonwood" Ward include: Harmon Cutler, Royal J. Cutler, James P. Pettegrew, A.[P.] Raymond, and W. W. Raymond. David Pettegrew is in the Salt Lake City 10th Ward. Samuel Williams and Newman B. Williams are in the 15th Ward. (Reg1852, p. 70.)

Lehi, Utah County, Utah Go to Top

Date Event
1853
Wallace and family move to Lehi. (Pioneer, p. 2926.) Presumably, Alonzo and family move at this time as well. Abram Hatch had located to Lehi in 1851. (Source?) David Evans and family had located to Dry Creek, later called Lehi, 15 February 1851. (Evans, p. 52.)
21 May 1854
Alonzo's fourth child, Lydia Raymond, born at Lehi, Utah County, Utah. (LoganS85, p. 289.)
25 May 1854
Alonzo P. Raymond is listed as a member of the 14th Quorum of the Seventies, residing in Great Salt Lake City. (DesNews, 25 May 1854, p. 3This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
26 Jan 1855
Adaline (HATCH) BARBER (1834-1918)
Adaline (HATCH) BARBER (1834-1918)
George BARBER (1826-1890)
George BARBER
(1826-1890)
Louisa Elizabeth (RAYMOND) BARBER (1835-1916)
Louisa Elizabeth (RAYMOND) BARBER (1835-1916)
Louisa Elizabeth Raymond (Alonzo's sister) marries and is sealed to George Barber in the President's office, SLC. He had previously married Adeline Hatch, I believe of Bristol/Lincoln, Addison, Vermont. I believe he was living in Nephi, Juab, Utah when he married Louisa. In 1856 called on a mission to settle Fort Supply, Green River Co. Abandoned their home at 12 hours notice on account of [Johnson's] Army. (Barber, pp. 4-5.) I suppose they went and stayed in Lehi with Alonzo and Wallace.
10 Aug 1855
Alonzo's fourth child, Lydia Raymond, dies at the age of 14 months. (LoganS85, p. 289.) She is probably buried in the old Lehi pioneer cemetery.
3 Sep 1855
Alonzo and William W have several lots surveyed in "American Creek" and Lehi City:

Certificate No. 499/ Utah Territory/ Utah County/ Surveyors Office/ Provo City Sept 3, 1855/ American Creek survey of farm land/ Alonzo P Raymond S. half Lot 2 in/ Block 99 containing Twenty acres./ James C Snow/ County Surveyor.

Certificate No. 500/ Utah Territory/ Utah County/ Surveyors Office/ Provo City Sept 3, 1855/ American Creek survey of farm & Meadow Land/ Alonzo P Raymond W. half of Lot 1 in/ Block 56 Containing Twenty Acres./ James C Snow/ County Surveyor.

Certificate No. 501/ Utah Territory/ Utah County/ Surveyors Office/ Provo City Sept 3, 1855/ American Creek survey of farm & Meadow Land/ William W Raymond East half of Lot 1 in/ Block 56 Containing Twenty Acres/ James C Snow/ County Surveyor.

Certificate No. 505/ Utah Territory/ Utah County/ Surveyors Office/ Provo City Sept 3, 1855/ Lehi City Survey of Building Lots/ Alonzo P Raymond Lot (8) Eight in Block (2) Two Continuing 52 / 160 of an Acre/ James C Snow/ County Surveyor.

(Territorial Deeds, Utah Territory, Utah County, Book B, pp. 172-173. Microfiche archive at Utah County Recorders Office, Provo Utah.)
? 1856

1856 Utah Census

The 1856 Utah Territorial Census seems to have been conducted as part of efforts for the territory to show a large enough population to obtain statehood. Some sources claim it contains the names of deceased people and immigrants still enroute. Alonzo P. Raymond appears with his family and his brother William W[allace] Raymond's family on the 10th page of Lehi residents. (Page 891 according to Ronald V. Jackson's Accelerated Indexing Systems' index.View record on Ancestry.com) An image of this census page is available elsewhere on this website.

Name
M  
F  
Notes
Alonzo P Raymond    
1


Clarinda   "

1
Alonzo's Wife
Mary E     "

1
Daughter, 1849
William W "
1

Alonzo's Brother
Veness S "
1

Van Ness Spencer, William's son, 1852
Susannah "

1
Daughter, 1850
Lydia       "

1
Daughter, 1854, died in 1855
William W jr
1

Wallace's son, 1854
Clarinda 2d "

1
Alonzo's Sister
Anna et*   "

1
Probably Amina Ann, Wallace's daughter, 1849  
  Not Listed:
Almira   "

1
Wallace's wife
Harriet   "

1
Daughter, 1851
* The symbol transcribed here as "et" meant etcetera.

Why were Almira and Harriet excluded? Why was Lydia, who had passed away, included? Did a neighbor or church clerk attempt the enumeration without consulting the family? If an enumerator visited the household, as Alonzo is listed first, he is likely the person consulted. It seems more likely that a father would forget his brother's wife than either his brother or either of the wives. The same can be said about forgetting one of the children (according to my wife!). Perhaps Almira was away on the enumeration date and should have been enumerated in the household where she was visiting. Perhaps the enumeration instructions were to include the recently deceased.
24 Dec 1856
Alonzo Jr., son of Alonzo and Clarinda is born in Lehi, Utah County, Utah Territory.
1858
George and Louisa BARBER move to Lehi. (Barber, p. 5.)
Fall 1858
Wallace RAYMOND "joined 13 other men to seek a new area to relocate to, and upon consulting President Lorin FARR, President of the Ogden Branch, he introduced them to an area of fertile soil and lots of water just ten miles northwest of Ogden. They named their new home "City of the Plains", but it was later shortened to "Plain City", as it is known today. Two months after settling there, [Wallace] was called to be the President of the newly formed Plain City Branch." (Emfield)

Wallace and family are called to settle Plain City, just about ten miles Northwest of Ogden. (Pioneer, p. 2926.)
10 Mar 1859
"On March 10, 1859, quite a large body of colonists left Lehi to come North and located upon the site chosen in Weber County, the fall before. They were seven days on the trip making seven camps as follows:

"1. On the Jordon River this side of the point of the mountain.
2. Where Murray is now situated.
3. Upon the site where Centerville is now located.
4. Kay's Crek, now Kaysville.
5. A dry camp north of the sand ridge.
6. On the Weber River northwest of the sugar factory.
7. Plain City on March 17, 1859." (History of Plain City, March 17th 1859 to 1977, Lyman Cook and Dorthy Cook, editors, 1977?, p. 2.)

"One of the first things to do after arrival was to survey the townsite and assign lots to the settlers, so they could get some kind of shelter for their families. [Those] who surveyed Plain City had in mind their old home, the city of Nauvoo, and followed the pattern as nearly as possible. ... Each block contained five acres and is divided into four lots. Each settler was allowed some choice in the selection of his lot, and each settler was alloted twenty acres of farm land on the out skirts." (Cook, p. 80.)

Emfield indicates that Wallace was called as branch president 2 months after his arrival. Since he was called as branch president in May of 1859, I presume he came in this first company. If so, he could have helped them locate good places to camp along the Jordan River, as he had probably lived alongside it in the area of the current city of Midvale.

"Among those who built adobe houses were ... William Raymond ...." (Cook, p. 12.) This must have occurred when he first came to Plain City, as he later acquires a log house.
May 1859
"Plain City Branch was organized in May, 1859, by President Lorin Farr and Bishop Chauncy W. West. William Wallace Raymond was appointed President of the branch with Danial Collett and Heppe G. Folkman, counselors and John Spiers as clerk.

"Danial Collett moved to Cache Valley that same year, so John Carver was called to fill the vacancy.

"At this meeting the settlement received its name of 'Plain City.' Someone had suggested [']City of the Plains,' but this was rejected as being too long, so the name of Plain City was chosen." (Cook, p. 16.)

"Presiding Elders
William W. Raymond 1859 - 1863
John Carver 1863 - 1866
William W. Raymond 1866 - 1870"
(Cook, p. 35.)
Fall 1859
In the fall, William SKEEN rode a horse back from Plain City back to Lehi and led another group to Plain City. (Cook, pp. 3, 6.)

"Joseph Skeen built the first log house in the fall of 1859. William W. Raymond moved one from Slaterville to Plain City in the same year." (Cook, p. 11.)
Nov 1859
Smithfield Branch organized in Smithfield, Cache, UT. (Smith, film header.)
18 Jan 1860
Louisa, daughter of Alonzo and Clarinda is born in Lehi, Utah, Utah. George BARBER blesses her 15 Jan. 1861 in Smithfield. (Smith, pp. 1, 25.)
9 Feb 1860
"Patriarchal Blessing given at Lehi, Feb. 9, 1860, by John Young, upon the head of Alonzo O. Raymond, born Feb 14, 1821 in (Bristol), Addison County Vermont." (Bless60)

Plain City, Weber, Utah Go to Top

Date Event
1860
A map of early Plain City indicates that Wallace RAYMOND came to Plain City in 1859 and Alonzo RAYMOND and George BARBER "came later."

"'Becoming discouraged by the experiences of 1859, [the lack of teams and farming implements, the lack of irrigation water, the lack of a hay harvest, and the weakened condition of their stock,] some of the settlers went to Cache Valley. Among them being Ruben and David Collett, Samuel Cuspins, Ezekiel Hopkins' mother and sister, and Mr. Lilly. ... Others came from Lehi to temporarily fill the ranks, some of whom later moved to Cache Valley.' Willard Carver's statement." (Cook, p. 5.) Alonzo RAYMOND and George BARBER seem to fit this description, staying just a short time before moving on to Cache Valley.

"Came in 1860:

"Alonzo Raymond and wife and children
   Lori Raymond
   Mary Raymond
   Ida Raymond
   Susannah Raymond

"William Wallace Raymond and wife, Almira
   Spencer Raymond
   William Raymond
   Mina Raymond
   Seretha Raymond" (Cook, p. 4.)

"Many of the early settlers of Plain City went with the intention of engaging in the cattle business. ... William Wallace Raymond had his pasture out west towards the lake." (Cook, p. 9.)
12 Feb 1860
W. W. Raymond publishes a notice in the Deseret News that claim holders for the joint enclosure in Plain City must have their share of the fence built by April 1st or their claim would be forfeited. (DesNews, 29 Feb. 1860, p. 12This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
9 July 1860
1860 U.S. Census Go to Top

Pearis and Rebecca RAYMOND's children:

  • Alonzo P. RAYMOND is 40 and is enumerated in [Plain City,] Weber county, Utah.
  • Wallace is 36 and is 6 houses away from Alonzo.
  • Nelson would have been 35. According to Alonzo, Nelson died around 1844. (LoganB85, p. 405.)
  • Clarinda G. is 29 and living with Alonzo's family.
  • Louisa Elizabeth BARBER is 24 (not 26?) and living in the household of George BARBER in Cache county, unknown township.
Location
(page)
Dwelling houses num. Families num. Name of every person in this family Age Sex Color Profession Real
Estate
Value
Personal
Estate
Value
Place
of
Birth
See key
below
Notes

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
[Plain City], Weber, Utah
Territory (p. 124)View census image on Ancestry.com View image for free on RootsWeb.com
950
851
W. W. Raymond
36
M

Farmer
400
1815
Vt.




William Wallace



Almira      "
30
F




N. Y.








Almina A. "
10
F




Iowa.




Amina Ann



Spencer   "
7
M




U. T.




Utah Territory



W. W.      "
5
M




U. T.




William Wallace



Amina S.  "
3
F




  "




Almira Seretta
[Plain City], Weber, Utah
Territory (p. 125)View census image on Ancestry.com View image for free on RootsWeb.com
956
857
Alonzo P. Raymond
40
M

" [Farmer]
300
100
Vt








Clarinda     "
33
F




N. Y.








Clarinda G. "
29
F




Vt




Alonzo's sister



Mary E.       "
11
F




Iowa








Susanah     "
9
F




U. T.




Utah Territory



Harriet        "
7
F




  "








Alonzo        "
3
M




  "








Louisa        "
6/12
F




  "





, Cache, Utah
Territory (p. 253)View census image on Ancestry.com View image for free on RootsWeb.com
1951
1879
Geo. Barber
32
M

Farmer
460
580
Eng.








Adaline     "
26
F




Vt





(p. 254)View census image on Ancestry.com View image for free on RootsWeb.com

Louisa Barber
24
F




Vt




26 years old?



Alonzo G.  "
6
M




U. T.

1






Walter      "
2
M




  "








Lamoni     "
9
M
Ind



  "

1



Key:
1 - Dwelling-houses numbered in the order of visitation
2 - Families numbered in the order of visitation.
3 - The name of every person whose usual place of abode on the first day of June, 1860, was in this family.
6 - Color (White, black, or mulatto).
7 - Profession, Occupation, or Trade of each person, male and female, over 15 years of age.
8 - Value of Real Estate.
9 - Value of Personal Estate.
10 - Place of Birth, Naming the State, Territory, or Country.
11 - Married within the year.
12 - Attended School within the year.
13 - Persons over 20 y'rs of age who cannot read & write.
14 - Whether deaf and dumb, blind, insane, idiotic, pauper, or convict.

Smithfield, Cache, Utah Go to Top

Date Event
1860
George and Louisa BARBER move up to Cache county and settle at Smithfield. (Barber, p. 5.)
Lehi being overcrowded, a number of families decided to help settle cache valley. They left 1 April and arrived 17 April, the company including William RIGBY, William HYDE, Robert FISHBURN, Thomas WINN, Samuel TAYLOR and others. (Our Pioneer Heritage, Kate B. Carter, 1958–1977. Vol. 4, p. 253.)
Perhaps the BARBER family joined them as they passed through Plain City?
1860
Alonzo P. Raymond moves to Smithfield. George G. Merrill and Robert A. Bain, who have lived near Alonzo since 1853, move to Smithfield also. (Pension, 11-June-1886.)
1860
One of the first needs of the pioneers was for a sawmill, which was built in 1860, by Ezra G. Williams and Mr. Brunson, about seven miles up Main canyon. Mr. Brunson sold his interest as well as his home in the fort to Alonzo P. Raymond. (HisSmith, p. 63.)
?
"He [Alonzo] was among the first to settle in Cache Valley where he was active in building the town of Smithfield. He helped to build the first saw mill and grist mill at this place." (Goodwin)

"We now have a grist mill erected at second east and first north street, the site of Pugwahnee's camp. ... A sawmill was installed at the mouth of the canyon. There was now a grist mill operated by Alonzo P. Raymond, Thomas Tarbet and Thomas Hillyard with John Aherns as miller." (Canyons, pp. 33-34.)
15 Jan 1861
Louisa, daughter of Alonzo P. Raymond and Clarinda Cutler Raymond is blessed by George Barber in the Smithfield Branch. (Smith, p. 1.)
9 April 1861
Alonzo was assisted by his brother-in-law, George Barber, hauling brush and hunting down a lost cow. (Barber, p. 9.) Stock wondering away from the herd seemed to be commonplace, as well as their recovery.
5 May 1861
Smithfield Ward. John Glover Smith, bishop. George Barber, clerk. Martin Harris is a member of the teachers' quorum. George Barber, Pres't Lessor P'hood. (Smith, p. not numbered.)
27 Sep 1861
Wallace Raymond shows prize quality stock at the Ogden City Fair. Choice specimens of the Durham and Devonshire breeds were present. (DesNews, 23 Oct. 1861, p. 6This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
31 Oct 1861
George Barber finds A P Raymond staying with Wallace in Plain City, waiting for him to return from Salt Lake City so he could help drive A P's sheep home. They would sometimes herd their sheep together. The next day went with George down to Salt Creek about 3 miles distant [from Ogden? Plain City?] and gathered up about 10 bushel of nice salt. (Barber, pp. 26, 32.)
22 Dec 1861
In Sunday evening meeting, one particular item was to observe the counsel given by President Young and President Kimball so often to store up a supply of grain against the time of famine which is close at our doors. (Barber, p. 29.)
25 Dec 1861
Rainy weather. The ground is bare of snow. This is Christmas day and the prospects are not very flattering for a merry Christmas. Then Alonzo's and Louisa's households put together an excellent dinner and invited a few friends to partake with them. About noon several concocted a plan to get up a party at the School House. They succeeded and enjoyed themselves about right until about 12. They returned home highly gratified with their evenings amusements. (Barber, p. 30.)

A humorous entry exists in George Barber's journal near this time. On the 29th, a number of the townspeople urgently compelled him to teach a writing and spelling school. On the day he took charge of the spelling school (January 16th), he wrote, "Hauld a load of wood for E T Benson took charge of Spelling School[.]" Not long after he records he's "itch'd up my Ponys" for a sleigh ride, attendance at the class dwindled and he lamented that, "there seems to be a great lack of interest amongest the young folks to acquire Knowledge and to learn the art of penmanship[.]" (Barber, pp. 31, 32, 39, 40.)
1 Jan 1862
Sister [Clarinda] Raymond assists the Barber household in organizing a dinner. They invited a few friends, enjoyed themselves first rate during the day and in the evening were pleasantly entertained at a New Year's party at the school house. (Barber, p. 31.)
20 Jan 1862
Louisa Raymond Barber taken very sick. Her husband recorded the following in his journal:

"Tues'y 20th Wea'r [weather] warm Louisa taken verry sick to day
Wed'y 21st Wea'r As yesterday Little Albert [a nine-month-old twin] taken verry Sick to day His mother no better in consequnce of which could not attend seventies meeting Admisistered to Louisa and her baby several times to day
Thur'y 22nd Wea'r turning cold and freezing Feel verry anxious about my little boy who is verry Sick His mothers health is improving but the cold having settled in her breast pains her much
Fri'y 23rd cold freezing hard of nights Louisa still afflicted with her breast my little boy still very sick
Sat'y 24th Cold & clear Louisa in much dread of her disease terminating in a broken breast Albert am happy to say a little better Got the assistance of Sister Grey an excellent nurse

"Sun'y Cloudy and cold Sister Grey administering mild medicines to Louisa and baby her breast paining her much got no rest with it all night Sisters Grey And Smith set up with her all night Administerd to her several times to day
Mon'y 26th Wea cold Adeline [George's first wife,] is 28 years old Louisas Weding day my folks still verry Sick
Tues'y 27th Cold freezing Weather my little boy somewhat better Louisas breast no better
Thur'y 29th Still verry cold Louisa had her breast lanced by Dr Willams Little Albert still verry sick
Fri'y 30th Cold & clear My little boy a trifle better Louisa somwhat better
Sat'y 31st Wea verry cold

"Febr'y
Mon'y 2 Wea'r Cold and Cloudy my little boy still Sick feel verry anxious about him
Tues 3rd Snowing all forenoon
Wed 4th Cold and clear Albert somewhat worse to day
Thur'y 5th Cold and clear Louisa had her breast lanced in consequence of her breast being so bad had to wean one of her babies
Fri'y 6 Weather still verry cold At home my little boy no better
Sat 7th [Weather] As yesterday Louisa better Albert no better

"Sun'y 8 Wea verry cold Attended meeting
Mon'y 9th Wea'r verry cold My little boy failing slowly but yet perceptable
Tues'y 10th Cold & clear
Wed'y 11th As Yesterday
Wed'y 12th Still very cold My little boy still verry Sick
Thur'y 13th Cold and clear Louisa considerable better but little Albert dangerously Sick had him administerd to a number of times frequently with good effect
Fri'y 14th Still very cold
Sat'y Wea'r verry cold Fasting and praying for my little boy to day feel anxious about him

"Sun'y Wea'r moderating Attended meeting in forenoon and evening
Mon'y 17th Still verry cold little Albert no better
Tues'y 18th Cold and cloudy At home to day Anxiously watching over my little boy fixing up round home
Wed'y 19th Cold and Foggy Fixing up my floor and hearth Little Albert still verry sick
Thu'y 20th Cold and foggy Went downto Logan to regulate the tithing books whilst absent my little boy was taken worse... notwithstanding on my return he was a little better and our hopes again revived
Fri'y 21st Morning Foggy After part of day clear At home to day Attending to various dutys My little boy no better we all feel verry uneasy about him yet feel to trust to the Almighty And pray earnestly that he may raise him up
Sat'y 22nd Snowing this forenoon After part of day thawing rapidly to all appearances little Albert no better

"Sun'y 23rd Last night verry Stormy wind blew furiously and snow fell about 6 inches were it was drifted did not attend meeting in consequence of my dear little boy being so much worse to all appearances NO hopes of his recovery remains unless the Lord regards our prayers And interposes in his behalf a number of Brethren and Sister Visited us to day to inquire after and see our dear little boy and kindly offerd their services some of which was thankfully received every time two or three of the brethren met together we adminsterd to him This is one of the winter days of Sorrow and affliction in my Loving and affectionate family long to be remembered by us all Yet hopes bright cheering Star is not entirely extenguishd while life remains
Mon'y 24th Thawing fast a little Snow fell during the night Anxiously watching over my dear little Albert nearly all night fully realizing the feeling of angish a parent alone can experience over their to all appearances dying child Yet one consoling hope remains to cheer our drooping Spirits which hope extends beyond this vale of tears Long lookd for morning dawns and our beloved child is no better Still we feel to plead with our Father in Heaven who is yet able to raise him up
Tues'y 25th Thawing pleasant weather to all appearances winter is broke My little boy has symptoms of being a little better which causes us to rejoice once more
Wed'y 26th Wea Pleasant Snow disappearing fast at home all day not daring to leave home in consequence of the precarious situation of our Sick baby
Thur'y 27th Wea'r Pleasant muddy under foot Around home Little albert somewhat worse to day Symptoms rather discouraging very restless all night

"Fri'y 28 Wea'r to day corresponds with the State of my feelings And also that of my family Dull and disconsolate in consequence of my dear little boy Albert who is past all hope of recovery to all human appearances but we feel to trust in the Lord our God who is yet able to raise him up This is a trial far beyond my power of expression and which those alone can realize who have drank of the bitter cup it is Sun Down and our baby yet lives With Fathers tender Loving care I bend over my dear babe Watching every motion And anticipating every want of the little sufferer As the cooling draught is aplied to his fevered lips whilst beside him Sets one whose tear wash'd cheeks and long dran Sigh denotes the feeling of that Mothers bursting heart[.] besides the Silent watchers there is yet One Other Whoes kind and tender care to the beloved Infant With the consent of his natural Mother Gave her the name of Mother and Such She truly was to him even An Adopted Son This my beloved Adeline last tho not least affected by the pain and distress of the dear little Sufferer At 11 P M he breath'd his last this I can truly Say was a relief As his sufferings were now over and Soul at rest After five weeks and 3 days distressing Sickness caused through sucking at the breast at the time when his Mother was undergoing a Severe attack of fever which finally Settled in her breast

"Sat'y March 1st Wea'r cool & cloudy Around home preparing for the funeral of my poor babe
Sun'y 2 Wea'r Cloudy Attended Meeting in forenoon Brother Thomas Smith preach'd my babes funeral discourse After meeting attended to the interment of my little boy on arriving at the grave yard the corpse was removed from the wagon and placed beside its earthly bed The Choir sang an Affecting yet consoling Hymn Selected for the occasion After which Elder Sam'l B Merrill offer'd up a beautiful prayer to Our Father in Heaven the corpse was then lower'd into its resting place And cover'd up for a short Season and a Fathers Hope lies there entomb'd untill the resurrection morn farewell" (Barber, pp. xx-xx. Line and paragraph breaks introduced.)
14 April 1862
Wallace Raymond comes from Plain City to visit in Smithfield. He returns home ten days later after buying out the doctors part of the Mill. (Barber, pp. 44-45.) Alonzo and Wallace now completely own the mill.

"Dr. [Ezra G.] Williams put up a saw mill in Summit Creek Canyon with Edwin Ruthvon Bronson as partner—the first in the locality. But his practice was so large that they sold the mill to Alonzo Raymond." (After One Hundred Years, Nancy Clement Williams, 1951, p. 186. BYU HBLL BX8670.1 .W672.)
April-May 1862
George Barber assists Alonzo sowing and harrowing his oats for several days and then helps him with his potatoes and corn. (Barber, pp. 45-47.)
June 1862
Alonzo moves the saw mill further up the creek into the timber. His sister Louisa comes up to see it July 10th. (Barber, pp. 48, 51.)

The creek is running extremely high and running rapidly. On the 6th, Sister Hodgett drowns attempting to cross the creek on the running gears of the wagon at an old ford above the bridge. The weather continues wet and on the 15th the bridge at the upper end of the fort is carried away and substantial farmland flooded. Only by constructing a levee are they able to confine the creek within its banks. (Barber, pp. 48-49.)
14 Sep 1862
Wallace Raymond discovers that Indians have stolen a band of about 30 head of horses off the range. About 18 belong to residents of Smithfield and the rest to Hyde Park. (Barber, p. 55.)
23 Sep 1862
Clarinda, who is expecting, takes sick during the night. This morning her condition is rapidly deteriorating. George Barber rides hard to Logan before breakfast to get Dr. Dilly to assist Dr. Williams in operating upon her. But George can not prevail upon Dilly to come, so he races back, making the 18 mile ride in about an hour and a quarter. In a desperate attempt to save her life, the still born baby is taken by force. (Barber, p. 56.) Family records list James as the baby's name.
24 Sep 1862
It has been barely 6 months since George and Louisa lost little Albert. For these months they have watched Clarinda bloom while they mourned their loss. Now George and Louisa do all they can to assist Alonzo in his hour of affliction. George superintends the funeral of the babe. Meanwhile, Clarinda's condition continues to worsen. There is little hope entertained of her recovery. That evening about a quarter past eleven Alonzo's beloved partner dies, leaving him with five children to mourn her loss. Clarinda Cutler Raymond is buried about sunset the following day. (Barber, pp. 56-57; LoganS85, p. 289.)

"Here in the old fort which he helped build for protection against the Indians, his wife, Clarinda Cutler, died bringing to him great sorrow. She was a very estimable woman and had endeared herself to all who knew her, especially the Indians whose sick children she would nurse and doctor until they recovered. It is said that at her funeral the Indians gathered and chanted [a] mournful cry expressing their grief at the loss of their friend." (Goodwin)
Nov 1862
George Barber, and probably Alonzo too, hauled lumber from the canyon. He loaded up 1000 feet of lumber and took it to Plain City to trade for salt. Alonzo and his family accompany George on the trip back to Smithfield. The salt he traded for wheat. George and Louisa make a trip to Salt Lake City, staying the second night with Wallace on the way. The next night they camped at the mouth of Farmington canyon when the winds picked up to gale force, the wagon cover was shredded and lost about 2 in the morning. Exposed to the cold piercing blast, Louisa is nearly chilled through and they seek safety at a nearby settler's cabin. They have a pleasant visit in Salt Lake City for two nights. On the return trip they find Wallace and family expecting them with a warm supper ready to eat. George says, "we certainly done justice to" it. The next morning Louisa is not feeling well and Wallace prevails upon them to stay and visit another day. When they leave, Wallace trades teams with them and gets them started in good time. (Barber, pp. 61-62.)
7 Dec? 1862
The Smithfield ward is reorganized with Samuel Roskelly from Richmond as bishop and George Barber as clerk. (Barber, p. 63.)
25 Dec 1862
Alonzo's and Louisa's families prepare a good family dinner and invite a few friends. George is president of the ward committee for some cotillion parties; he takes Adeline to the party this evening. Presumably, Louisa stays home with Alonzo who must face his first Christmas without his beloved Clarinda. (Barber, p. 64.)
31 Dec 1862
Large snowfall this day and the following; the first of consequence this winter. Louisa Barber falls while climbing over a fence, but doesn't seem to be seriously hurt. George is employed getting the cotillion party up and going. He dances "the old year out and the new one in" such that he feels the effects the next day. (Barber, p. 65.)
1 April 1863
Sarah Ida, Louisa and George Barber's daughter, is born. (Barber, p. 70; Smith, p. 2.)
10 Jun 1863
Alonzo P. Raymond marries Zilpha Noble. (GenSurveys, Vol. 25, p. 134.) Bishop Samuel Roskelly performs the ceremony. (Pension, 14-Dec-1901.) She is 16 years old.
1863
Epidemic amongst the people throughout the valleys. George Barber laments that, "I never have seen as much sickness or heard of as many deaths since I have been in the mountains." His comment is made between July 10th and Dec. 2nd. (Barber, p. 79.)
12 Dec 1863
Zilpha Raymond (Alonzo's new wife), daughter of William G. Noble is rebaptized by S. A. Andersen. He also rebaptizes Harriett Raymond (age 12) and Susannah Raymond (age 11), two of Alonzo P. Raymond's children (by Clarinda). They are all confirmed on 30 Jan 1864, Zipha by B. Hopkins and Harriett and Susannah by P. J. Morehead. (Smith, p. 21.)
1863
In 1863 a shingle mill was commenced by Thomas Tarbet, A. P. Raymond, and Thomas Hillyard. About a year later a grist mill was added, with John Ahrens as the first miller, and succeeded by Sylvester Lowe, Sr., after a short time. This first mill was built on the site of the lower grist mill. It was purchased in 1868 by James Mack, who made it the first merchant mill in the county. (HisSmith, p. 65.)
22 April 1864
William Wallace Raymond set apart as a missionary to England. He returned 27 Aug 1866. (MRI, Film 1913096, Card "Raymond, William Wallace.")
17 July 1864
Elder W. W. Raymond arrives in Liverpool, England on the steamship Pennsylvania, having sailed from New York on the 2nd of July, in the company of Orson Pratt of the Twelve and 10 other elders. He is assigned to work in the Derbyshire Conference under the direction of Elder S. W. Alley.(Milstar, Vol. 26, p. 491This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return.; DesNews, 19 Oct. 1864, p. 2This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)

(DesNews, XX XXX 18XX, p. This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
1864
Alonzo and Zilpha build a home on Main Street (where, in 1976 Marv's Cafe stood).  (The Citizen, "Profiles From the Past," Theoda Downs, Historical Heritage Society of Smithfield Chairman, Thursday, January 22, 1976, p. 4.) "Mr. Raymond was an excellent gardner and provided an abundance of fruits and vegetables for his family." ("Life Sketch of Zilpha Noble Raymond," by Elthura Raymond Merrill, a granddaughter.)
1 May 1864
William Goodwin Noble Raymond born in Smithfield, son of Alonzo and Zilpha Noble Raymond. (Smith, p. 30; LoganS85, p. 289; Pension, 14-Dec-1901.)
2 Oct 1864
W. W. Raymond attended a conference held in Nottingham, England. "Present on this occasion, of the First Presidency of the Church and of this Mission, Elder Daniel H. Wells; James Townsend, President of the Nottingham District; Heber John Richards, President of the Nottingham Conference." (Milstar, Vol. 26, p. 766This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
5 Oct 1864
W. W. Raymond and W. Vandyke of Plain City advertise an award for finding "a yoke of large red OXEN, branded with an ox yoke on left side and the figure 5 on left hip. One has a piece broken off right horn, white spot on the head, white on belly—the other a little white on the head, crescent shape. Ear marks forgotten." Since Wallace is still in England, perhaps Brother Vandyke was caring for his stock in his absence. (DesNews, 5 Oct. 1864, p. 5This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
Dec 1864
The Smithfield Ward considers the necessity of purchasing a stove. They decide to hold three parties to raise the funds. The parties are held in Dec'r 1864 and Jan'y 1865. A. P. Raymond donates 29 P. of W [wheat] to the endeaver. (Smith, p. not numbered.)
About 1865
Paul Raymond, Jr., Alonzo's uncle passes away, according to Alonzo 20 years later. (LoganB85, p. 404.) Apparently, Alonzo has heard news from back East to know of his uncle's passing. Perhaps Wallace stopped to visit relatives to or from his mission in England.
1 Jan 1865
A District Conference was held in the Odd-Fellows' Hall, Birmingham, England at which W. W. Raymond was present. (Milstar, Vol. 27, p. 49This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
3 Jan 1865
A Council Meeting was held in the Hockley Chapel, Birmingham, England. Among the Elders present—D. H. Wells, B. Young, jun., O. Pratt, sen., A. Hatch, and W. W. Raymond. "Elder A. Hatch is removed from laboring in the Birmingham Conference, to preside over the Manchester District, comprising the Manchester, Liverpool and Preston Conferences.... Elder W. W. Raymond is removed from laboring in the Derby Conference, to the Presidency of the Norwich District, comprising the Norwich and Bedfordshire Conferences." (Milstar, Vol. 27, pp. 44-45This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
March 1865
The Millennial Star reports that W. W. Raymond and G. W. Mousley's address is Chapel House, St. Pauls Opening, Norwich, England. (Milstar, Vol. 27, p. 192This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
5 March 1865
W. W. Raymond attends a district conference held in the Music Hall, Store Street, Tottenham Court Road, London. Daniel H. Wells of the First Presidency presided. (Milstar, Vol. 27, p. 257This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
12 April 1865
A Conference was held in Norwich at which Elder W. W. Raymond was present. (Milstar, Vol. 27, p. 253This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
20 June 1865
It is reported that, "our District President, W. W. Raymond, is one with us, and visits much with us amongst the different Branches." (G. W. Mousley, Milstar, Vol. 27, p. 445This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
9 July 1865
A conference was held in the Odd-Fellows' Hall, Upper Temple Street, Birmingham, England at which W. W. Raymond was in attendance. (Milstar, Vol. 27, p. 545This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
11 Aug 1865
William S. Warren arrived in England and was appointed to travel and preach in the Norwich Conference, under the Presidency of Elder William W. Raymond. (Milstar, Vol. 27, p. 555This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return.; Milstar, Vol. 28, p. 145This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return.; Milstar, Vol. 29, p. 348This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return.)
15 Sept. 1865
In 1901, Alonzo states that Clara Raymond Done, still alive at that time, was born on this day. (Pension, 14-Dec-1901.) According to church records made close to the time of her birth, Zilpha Clarinda (Zylpha Clara) was born on this date in 1868. (Smith, pp. 7, 30.)
1 Oct 1865
W. W. Raymond, President of the Norwich District, attended a District Conference held in the Music Hall, Store Street, Tottenham Court Road, London, England. In the 2:30pm session, "Elder Orson Pratt then presented the Authorities of the Church at home and abroad in the usual manner. The several motions were unanimously sustained by the congregation. ¶ Elder W. W. Raymond spoke of the Gospel as a system which, if lived up to, would bring us back into the presence of God our Father. Reasoned upon the error and inconsistency of believing that God had revealed all the knowledge necessary for the salvation of man. Said it was as necessary for God to reveal himself now as it was in any past age, and exhorted the brethren to live so that men might see their good works and glorify our Father in heaven." (Milstar, Vol. 27, pp. 785, 787This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
5 Jan 1866
A General Council was held in the Farm Street Chapel, Birmingham, England at which W. W. Raymond attended as president of the Norwich District. (Milstar, Vol. 28, p. 49This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)

"Abram Hatch said—I have listened with much interest to the under the various reports given. I arrived in this country in the year 1864, having crossed the Plains and the ocean in company with Presidents D. H. Wells and Brigham Young, jun. After laboring a short time in the Birmingham Conference, under the direction of Elder William H Shearman, I was appointed to the Presidency of the Manchester District, a position I have filled up to this date. The district is composed of three Conferences—namely the Manchester, Liverpool and Preston Conferences, which consist in all of thirty-five Branches. The total number of members is 1285. During the past year we have baptized 164 and emigrated 61. The majority of the people are striving to live their religion, and the brethren laboring in the various Conferences have been diligent in the performance of their duties.

"Elder William W Raymond said—I arrived in this country in the year 1864 and labored first in the Derbyshire Conference. I was next called upon to preside over the Norwich District, and in my travels there I have found that the majority of the people are good Saints. I have not preached a great deal, but have borne my testimony to the truth of the Work, knowing that it is true. I love my religion. My interests, my labors and my all are in it, and I have striven to overcome my weaknesses. I acknowledge the hand of god in all things, and know that he will bless us if we put our trust in him, and depend for help not upon our own wisdom, but on the revelations God has given." (Milstar, Vol. 28, p. 178This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)

7 Jan 1866
A district conference was held Sunday, 7 January 1866 in the Glasgow Dining Hall, Cambridge Street, Birmingham, England. Present on the stand were Brigham Young, Jun., President of the European Mission; Orson Pratt, Sen., of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles; Abram Hatch, President of the Manchester District; William W. Raymond, President of the Norwich District; among others. (Milstar, Vol. 28, p. 209This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..) Elder W. W. Raymond offered the invocation for the 6:30pm session. (Milstar, Vol. 28, p. 241This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
20 Jan 1866
"Elder William W. Raymond is released from the Presidency of the Norwich District, to return home." (Milstar, Vol. 28, p. 42This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)
11 Mar 1866
A conference was held in Emmanuel Chapel, Norwich. "There were present on the stand—President Brigham Young, jun.; Elders James McGaw, President of the Norwich District; Geo. W. Gee, President of the Norwich Conference; William S. Warren, President of the Bedfordshire Conference; William W. Raymond and John L. Dolten.

"11 a.m.
Meeting opened by singing and prayer. The Branch Presidents were called upon to report their respective Branches, which they did. These reports showed that the Saints, as a general thing, were striving to do the best they could, and to emancipate themselves from these lands, with some few exceptions, but that the Conference as a whole was in a good condition.

"President B. Young, jun., expressed his satisfaction with the reports of the brethren, and exhorted the Saints to diligence, to press on and do the best they could, to comply with every call, to pay their Tithing, and that in doing so the Lord would bless them...

"2.30 p.m.
Meeting opened as usual, by singing and prayer. The Financial and Statistical Reports of the Conference were then read and approved.

"Elder Raymond gave a report of his labors in the Norwich Conference. Said that the reports of the brethren concerning the Branches were correct, and that the Saints were the best people on the face of the earth. Said he knew this Work to be the Work of God, and that it would triumph over every opposing power. He gave some good instructions upon the law of Tithing, and the blessings to be obtained by obeying the same. Exhorted the Saints to be humble and prayerful, for that in so doing God would bless them according to promise." (Milstar, Vol. 28, pp. 305-306This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)

27 March 1866
Logan & Richmond Canal. Preportion of wheat for Alonzo P. Raymond: 5 Bls(?), $25.00. Labor on side hill for Alonzo P. Raymond: $7.00.

Labor done on canal by those sharing land inside the fence. A. P. Raymond: 30 acres, tax = $13.50, Amt worked = $32.00, excess = $18.50. (Smith, pp ??.)
5 May 1866
In London, Elder W. W. Raymond performed the marriage of Eli Claysen and Rhoda Burrls of the Bedfordshire conference. (Milstar, Vol. 28, p. 368This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)

The ship Caroline sailed from London with 34 Swiss, 17 Hollanders, and 286 English. The ship had a comfortable 8½ feet between decks. The Saints who sailed this season were promised that if they lived their religion, they would not suffer from cholera as other emigrants did. The Saints were organized with Elder Samuel H. Hill as President, and Elders W. W. Raymond and J. S. Fullmer as Counsellors. (Milstar, Vol. 28, pp. 313-314This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..) The ship is divided into seven wards. It reaches the Isle of Wight by May 11th. (Milstar, Vol. 28, p. 332This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)

16 May 1866
Meeting held in the school house to collect subscriptions for the purpose of obtaining means to purchase material to erect Telegraphic Communications between Logan Cache co. & St. George Washington co. and to assist missionaries to the Sandwich Islands. A. P. Raymond paid $3.00 in wheat. (Smith, pp. ??.)
10 June 1866
The following names are ordered by the Bishop [Roskelley ] to be recorded as being called upon to take part in getting and erection of Telegraph poles for this district: Fourth [group]: To get poles, James Mack, Harrison A. Thomas, & Thomas S. Hillyard. To haul poles to Logan, George Barber, Robert P. Gibson, & Alonzo P. Raymond. (Smith, pp. ?-?; Canyons, p. 35.)
27 June 1866
"AMERICA.
Wyoming, N. T., June 27, 1866.
President Brigham Young, jun.

"Dear Brother, — Knowing how anxious you always are to learn of the condition and welfare of the emigrating Saints, we pen you a few lines at this time....

"On the 21st, brother Andrew Harvey and a few Saints (37 in number), who sailed on the Caroline, and who had been left in New York, but afterwards forwarded by the merchants, arrived by express in excellent health and spirits; and this morning the remainder of the Saints who came on that vessel, arrived in charge of Elders S. H. Hill, W. W. Raymond, and J. S. Fullmer, in good health.

"The latter company met with two accidents on the rail between New York and St. Joseph: one of the luggage vans caught fire, and was burnt partially up, but the railway company indemnified those who had lost luggage, for nearly the whole amount; on the other occasion six cars ran off the track, and two of them turned over and were somewhat smashed, but owing to the overruling hand of God, not a person was killed, but four or five were slightly bruised, not a bone was broken. We have, indeed, great cause to be thankful to our heavenly Father for the miraculous preservation of his Saints in this accident.

"Two mule trains, and most of the ox-wagons, have arrived in tolerably good condition, considering the quickness of the trip they have made across the Plains.

"We hope that in a few days we shall be able to start the Saints towards their future home....

"We remain your brethren,
Isaac Bullock,
W. W. Riter." (Milstar, Vol. 28, p. 492This link opens a different website in a new window. Close the window to return..)

2 July 1866
"Meeting held to make arrangements to build or make a corral or corrals for securing our Horses and other stock, Council having been received from Pres't Young to the authorities in this county to prepare themselves and the people for an expected attack of Indians, by removing from their city lots, and building of a fort for the protection of the women & children.

"The Bishop Said the object of the meeting was to state Pres't Maughans mind relative to building a substantial coral or corals that an Indian or white man cant get animals out of. He had selected the location in the Tithing house ground and hauled considerable rock on the ground, also sand & clay, with the intention of putting up the east line of fence, with a rock wall 6 feet high.

"The work was to commence on Thursday July 5th .

"The Following named were called upon to get poles to fence the South Skiry(?) and for the centre fences for the divisions for Horses, Cattle, Sheep etc. S B Merrill, S. Langton, John McCrakin, R. S Bain, A P Raymond, G Barber." (Smith, p. not numbered.)
8 July 1866
Alonzo [Jr.] (age 9), son of A. P. [and Clarinda ] Raymond is baptized (or rebaptized?) by A. A. Anderson and confirmed the same day by E. M. Greene. (Smith, p. 24.)
29 July 1866
Did Alonzo and Zilphia have a child named Ephraim, born 29 July 1866 that died about 1870? Or was he born 2 Dec 1869?
27 Aug. 1866
William Wallace Raymond returns from mission to England. (MRI, Film 1913096, Card "Raymond, William Wallace.")
29 Oct 1866
A. P. Raymond credited with $6.00 for 2 days labor on the telegraph poles and use of a team (of horses). (Smith, p. ?; Canyons, p. 36.)
15 Sept. 1867
In 1901, Alonzo states that Laura Raymond Toolson, still alive at that time, was born on this day. (Pension, 14-Dec-1901.) According to church records made close to the time of her birth, Laura P. was born on this date in 1870. (Smith, pp. 7, 30.)
29 Dec 1867
Louisa Raymond, the daughter of Alonzo P. [and Clarinda] Raymond, who was born 18 Jan'y 1860 in Lehi, Utah, Deseret, is baptized. (Smith, p. 25.) Isn't this 2 weeks short of her 8th birthday?
3 Jan 1868
"A Relief Society was organized in Plain City on January 3, 1868, with Almira Raymond as President, Margaret Shoemaker as First Counselor, Mary Ann Carver as Second Counselor, Victorine Musgrave as Secretary." (Cook, p. 22.)
3 May 1868
Alonzo enters into a plural marriage with Elizabeth Hillyard Thompson, widow of Robert Thompson. Robert died 12 May 1865 in Smithfield. Elizabeth's children by Robert are Thomas William (1858), Heber John (1860), Elizabeth Ann(1863), and Loretta (1865). This marriage is "for time" only.
20 May 1868
Alonzo is elected to Smithfield's first city council. It appears this is for a two year term. (HisSmith, p. 70.) He uses the position to encourage early settlers to plant trees and berries. (Nauvoo Restoration Inc. Land and Records Office, Alonzo Pearis Raymond file.) "Mr. Raymond worked in civic affairs and helped get a city charter in 1868 when he was serving on the city council." ("Life Sketch of Zilpha Noble Raymond," by Elthura Raymond Merrill, a granddaughter.)
15 Sep 1868
Zilpha Clarinda (Zylpha Clara), daughter of Alonzo P. and Zilpha Raymond is born in Smithfield, Cache, Utah. She is blessed 29 Nov 1868 by W. G. Noble.(Smith, pp. 7, 30.) In 1901, Alonzo states that Clara Raymond Done, still alive at that time, was born on this date in 1865. (Pension, 14-Dec-1901.) According to the record above, recorded much closer to the time of birth, he had the birth year incorrect.
6 Dec 1868
Bill of indebtedness tendered(?) by Logan Authorities as follows, being the Smithfield proportion.
Support of the telegraph operator in Logan with board etc.
The employment of a man (and erecting a dwelling house in Wellsville Kanyon) to keep the road open during the winter and assist travellers, when necessity requires. $110.00.
For a steer got from Thomas Richardson for Bannock Indians. $35.00
For the payment of the board of Susannah Raymond and Harriett Raymond, with Joel Ricks during the time they were learning the art of Telegraphy in Logan. $60.00
For the payment of an instrument to learn the art of telegraphy purchased by Samuel Roskelley. "
For lamps, chimneys, globes & oil for the use of the ward meetings
(Smith, p. not numbered.)
?
F[emale] R[elief] Society donations. Adeline Barber, $1.00; Zilpha Raymond, 0.50; Louisa Barber, 1.00; Elizabeth Raymond, .25. (Smith, ?.)
14 March 18??
Sunday. Conference. The report of the Female Relief Society was read by the clerk. No. of members this date last year, 121. Average attendance, 12. Funds rec'd during the year $78,02. Donated to poor, paid school bills & temple, $92.76. The organization is prosperous. Zilpha Raymond and Ann Thomas are sustained as teachers in the 4th district. (Smith, p. not numbered.)
26 Dec 1868
Alonzo P Raymond belongs to the School of the Prophets. (Smith, p. not numbered.)
18 Mar 1869
Zylphia Amelia, daughter of Alonzo and Elizabeth is born. (Smith, p. 30.) Zylphia is Elizabeth's 1st child by Alonzo and her 5th overall.
6 May 1869
An entry is made in the Smithfield Ward records for a child of Alonzo and Elizabeth to be blessed by S. B. Merrill. The entry is then marked through with no child's name entered. (Smith, p. 8.) I assume Zylphia Amelia Raymond would have been blessed this day, but plans changed.
10 May 1869
Transcontinental Railroad completed at Promotory Summit, northwest of Plain City.
3 Aug 1869
Meeting held to settle a difficulty between A. P. Raymond and Ja's Jos'h Juckaw, to the tithing office.

Present, Bp S[amuel] Roskelley, A[ndrew] A Anderson, T[homas] G Winn, G[eorge] Barber, A[ndrew] McCombs, E[van] M Greene, C[harles] Wright, A[lonzo] P Raymond, J J Juckau, and J[ames] S Cantwell.

The meeting was opened with prayer by the Bishop.

The clerk read the following written charge, or charges: preferred by James Joseph Juckaw against Alonzo Pearis Raymond.

I, Ja's Jos'h Juckaw prefer these charges against Alonzo P Raymond.

First. For unchristian like conduct in falsifying his word in calling me a liar twice when I wasn't.

Second, Saying that I was a botch and that my work was worthless.

Third. Laying violent lands on me, disregarding an appeal to his better judgment to settle the dispute without resorting to brute force, Wherein that he caused me to become disabled from pursueing my labors for the support of my family, by throwing me over the fence regardless of consequences; he dislocated my limb, thereby causing much pain, and in proof of his wilfulness, he threatened to repeat the offence, and, while I was laying on the ground accused me of being such a liar no one could believe anything I said, And that I was only pretending I was hurt. Thomas G Winn santioning the deed and words, and contrary to my will, threw me into a wagon, increasing the injury. And at investigation the said Raymond denied the first charges before the Teachers. And T G Winn testified to the truth of them. The said T G Winn said I was only trying to obtain means from them under false pretences.

Towith, I Charge Thomas G Winn in not acting as an Elder in Israel, or an officer of the law as he is appointed.

The Bp Then asked A P Raymond if he was guilty. The Answer was No! This was on the general character of the first count, or charge.

On the Second charge, Juckau said his work was as good as any other man in the quality of labour and could prove it. Raymond said the work done for him was good for nothing.

Testimony was then taken regarding the quality of his work.

T G Winn said Chairs rough. Wheel inferiour

C Wright said Some Strong, Some poor.

A McCombs said Wheel rough

S Roskelley said Chairs rough but strong

J S Cantwell said Chairs rough but strong

A P Raymond said he made a chair & wheel. They came to pieces. Juskau denied making him a wheel only a chair. Raymond insisted on his statement both determined to have their own way. no proof of right or wrong.

The Bp said it was evident his work was not of the best quality. Juskau siad he didn't say his work was of the best. So it rests.

In summing up the substance of the 3rd count it appears that A P Raymond and T G Winn was doing some labor at the house of the latter when J J Juckau came and made application for a small amount due for work done, and the question regarding the Quality of Juckau's work was called up, when it was rebutted by the latter (Juckau) and met in the same spirit by A P Raymond. Angry words ensued and the word liar was freely used by both. Wherepon A P Raymond went to J J Juskau (who was standing with his back to the fence) and suddenly seizing him by the legs threw him over into the street, alighting on his hip thereby causing the injury. And after laying there some time, both Raymond and Winn put him, or threw him into a wagon making sport of the operation: taking him home, where he was obliged to stay for two weeks.

Shortly after, J J Juckau summoned them before a teachers meeting, and the decision not being satisfactory, the present meeting was called.

After the charge was read, A P Raymond admitted that he threw him over the fence, and did'nt believe he was hurt, only pretending, denying that they threw him into the wagon, but put him in carefully. He also said he did not do so intentionally, altho he Juskau used violent and abusive language which ended in the present result. Threatened several times to put him in the ditch if he did'nt cease his abuse.

The Bishop in summing up the above said it was a case of aggravation on both sides and called on them to become reconciled, as they both belonged to the School. If they did'nt settle it immediately he would give a decision. As they had not acted as latter day Saints in taking this view of the case, and from the evidences He considered A P Raymond much more to blame than J J Juchau as he had broken the peace.

J J Juckau said his hip was dislocated but from questions by The Bishop & E M Greene and A A Anderson, It could not be proven and consequently could not be believed.

The decision was, that as J J Juckau had lost two weeks work, A P Raymond was to pay him $15.00, one third in wood one third in flour, and the rest in some other Kind of good pay. And they both make acknowledgment of their faults and also to a justice for breaking the peace.

The last charge was answered by T G Winn, who said he ought to be in the line of his duty, but did not think of it as Juckau had a bad tonge. Would rather put him in the ditch and pay the fine for it. It would have been satisfactory.

J. J Juckau said something of an apologetic character, but the spirit of it was not received.

The meeting was dismissed with prayer by E M Greene.

J. S Cantwell Clerk
(Smith, pp. ?-?.)
22 Aug 1869
Sunday evening. There was a general meeting at the school house to take into consideration the necessity of forming a co-operative body for the purpose of sowing fall wheat and protecting it from the ravages of grasshoppers by enclosing it by a ditch, and acting in concert, thus bringing it forward, to be enabled to withstand its attacks when they were ready to fly.

Considerable discussion ensued as to the most feasible method. After which A A Anderson and A P Raymond was appointed to make the selection, and make a report by Wednesday the 25 in the evening at which time an adjourned meeting would be held to consider the same. (Smith, p. not numbered.)
25 Aug 1869
Wednesday the 25th PM. Adjourned meeting from the 22nd. Those appointed [A A Anderson and A P Raymond] gave their report, and presented their selection which was on the south side of the creek.

It was canvassed, some affirmative, and some negative. Nothing definite was determined on and laid over with the injunction that those who wished to co-operate to sign their names at the co-operative store during the next few days.

The above meetings are held by the Request of Pres't E T Benson.

J. S Cantwell Clerk.
(Smith, p. not numbered.)
2 Dec 1869
Ephraim, son of Alonzo & Z. Raymond born. He only lives 3 years 4 months 2 days. (Smith, p. 8?)
24 Dec 1869
In 1901, Alonzo states that Pierce Raymond, still alive at that time, was born on this day. (Pension, 14-Dec-1901.) This can't be correct because,
  • This date is too close to Ephraim's birth on 2 Dec. 1869. (Smith, p. 8?)
  • Church records made close to the time of his birth indicate Peris was born on Christmas Eve in 1872. (Smith, p. 30.)
  • The 1870 census shows no newborns in Alonzo's families.
1869
Alonzo sells his interests in the mills. (SOURCE? Nauvoo Restoration Inc. Land and Records Office.)
22 May 1870
"President [William Wallace] Raymond resigned his position as President of the Plain City Branch." (Cook, p. 16.)
2 Aug 1870
1870 U.S. Census Go to Top

Alonzo Pearis RAYMOND is enumerated in Smithfield, Cache, Utah Territory with wife 3rd wife, Elizabeth. His 2nd wife, Zipha C.[?] [NOBLE] RAYMOND, is listed in an adjoining house/family with her two children, William [Goodwin] and Zilpha [Clara]. Also with Zilpha are Alonzo and Louisa, two of Clarinda CUTLER RAYMOND's children. Clarinda's other children are not listed: Mary Elizabeth married Moroni PRICE in 1865, Susannah Rebecca married William HOMER earlier in 1870, Harriet married Robert BYBEE in 1868, Lydia died in Lehi in 1855, and James was stillborn in 1862.

Louisa RAYMOND BARBER is enumerated just a few households later in the Charles [George] BARBER household. George is a missionary! And a U.S. citizen. Living with the BARBERs is Clarinda [G.] RAYMOND, who can read, but not write. One wonders if Clarinda G. is physically handicapped, as she has lived with relatives her whole life, is not married at age 40, doesn't write, and isn't listed as having a mental condition.
Location
(page)
Dwelling houses num. Families num. Name of every person in this family Age Sex Color Profession Real
Estate
Value
Personal
Estate
Value
Place
of
Birth
See key below
Notes

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
Smithfield, Cache, Utah Territory (p. 16)
119
117
Raymond Alonzo
46
M
W
Farmer
400
380
Vermont








1

View census image on Ancestry.com



-------- Elizabeth
33
F
W
Keeping House


England
1
1








HILLYARD.



-------- Thomas
14
M
W
At School


Utah

1


1





THOMPSON. Not age 12?



-------- Heber J
9
M
W
At School


Utah

1


1





THOMPSON. Not age 10?



-------- Elizabeth
8
F
W
At School


Utah

1


1





THOMPSON



-------- Loretta
5
F
W
At home


Utah

1


1





THOMPSON.



-------- Amelia
1
F
W
At home


Utah

1








Zilphia Amelia.

120
118
-------- Zilpha C
24
F
W
Keeping House


England

1








Not age 26?



-------- William
6
M
W
At School


Utah

1


1









-------- Zilpha
1
F
W
At home


Utah

1












-------- Alonzo
13
M
W
At home


Utah

1








Clarinda's.



-------- Louisa
11
F
W
At School


Utah

1


1





Clarinda's.
Not age 10?
Smithfield, Cache, Utah Territory (p. 17)
125
123
Barber Charles
40
M
W
Missionary
500
200
England
1
1






1

View census image on Ancestry.com George



-------- Adaline
36
F
W
Keeping House


Vermont














-------- Louisa
35
F
W
Keeping House


Vermont














-------- Alonzo A
14
M
W
At home


Utah
1



1





Father foreigner.
School this year.




-------- Walter R
12
M
W
At School


Utah
1



1





Father foreigner.
School this year.




-------- Herbert P
11
M
W
At School


Utah
1



1





Father foreigner.
School this year.




-------- Ida
7
F
W
At School


Utah
1



1





Father foreigner.
School this year.




-------- Solane N
4
M
W
At home


Utah
1









Father foreign.



-------- Adaline
1
F
W
At home


Utah
1









Father foreign.



Raymond Clarinda
40
F
W
Vermont


Vermont






1



Alonzo's sister. Cannot write.



Hatch Arabell J
12
F
W
At School


Utah











Key:
1 - Dwelling-houses enumerated in the order of visitation.
2 - Families enumerated in the order of visitation.
3 - The name of every person whose usual place of abode on the first day of June, 1870, was in this family.
4 - Age at last birth-day. If under 1 year, give months in fractions, thus 3/12
5 - Sex-Male (M), Female (F).
6 - Color-White (W);, Black (B); Mulatto (M); Chinese, (C); Indian, (I).
7 - Profession, Occupation, or Trade of each person, male or female.
8 - Value of Real Estate.
9 - Value of Personal Estate.
10 - Place of Birth, Naming State or Territory of U.S.; or the Country, if of foreign birth.
11 - Father of foreign birth.
12 - Mother of foreign birth.
13 - If born within the year, state month (Jan., Feb., &c.)
14 - If married within the year, state month (Jan., Feb., &c.)
15 - Attended School within the year.
16 - Cannot read.
17 - Cannot write.
18 - Whether deaf and dumb, blind, insane, or idiotic.
19 - Male Citizens of U.S. of 21 years of age and upwards.
20 - Male Citizens of U.S. of 21 years of age and upwards, where right to vote is denied or abridged on other grounds than rebellion or other crimes.

Date Event
15 Sep 1870
Laura P, daughter of Alonzo and Zilpha is born in Smithfield. (Smith, p. 30.)
18 Sep 1870
In Plain City, "W. W. Raymond, William Geddes, and William VanDyke were appointed to act as school trustees. This new meeting and school house was completed in 1873 or 1874." (Cook, p. 17.) "The bible was the principle textbook used. Those who could afford slates had them. The first slate I ever had was a piece given to me by Seretta Raymond. It had broken off from her slate. [M. A. Geddes]" (Cook, p. 18.)
3 Jun 1871
Alma Raymond, son of Alonzo and Elizabeth is born. (Smith, p. 30.) Alma is Elizabeth's 2nd child by Alonzo and her 6th overall.
10 Oct 1871
Alonzo P. Raymond set apart to serve a mission in the United States. (MRI Film 1913096, Card "Raymond, Alonzo P.") If the mission was away from his family, he probably returned in less than six months for the conception of his next child, "Peris."
22 Aug 1872
In 1901, Alonzo states that Abl'a Raymond Done, still alive at that time, was born on this day. (Pension, 14-Dec-1901.) According to church records made close to the time of her birth, Abigail was born on this date in 1874. (Smith, p. 30.)
24 Dec 1872
Peris, son of Alonzo P. and Zilpha Raymond is born in Smithfield, Cache, UT. He is blessed 7 Feb. 1873 by R A Bain. (Smith, p. 30.) In 1901 Alonzo claims that Pierce Raymond, still alive at that time, was born on this date in 1869. (Pension, 14-Dec-1901.) According to the record above, recorded much closer to the time of birth, he had the birth year incorrect.
12 July 1874
William G. Raymond, [son of Alonzo and Zilpha] is baptized by F. B. Thybergh and the same day is confirmed by G. Coleman. (Smith, p. 31.)
22 Aug 1874
Abigail, daughter of Alonzo and Zilpha is born in Smithfield. (Smith, p. 30.) In 1901, Alonzo states that Abl'a Raymond Done, still alive at that time, was born on this date in 1872. (Pension, 14-Dec-1901.) According to the record above, recorded much closer to the time of birth, he had the birth year incorrect.
11 July 1875
Louisa E [Raymond] Barber rebaptized by S. R. [probably Samuel Roskelly]. (Smith, p. not numbered.)
18 July 1875
Alonzo P. Raymond and wife Zilpha Noble Raymond rebaptized by P. J. Morehead. (Smith, p. 30.)
Aug. 1875
Clarinda G. Raymond dies, according to her sister Louisa Raymond Barber, nearly 10 years later. (LoganE85, p. 164A.)
16 Nov 1875
In Plain City, "French Retrenchment Society/Organized by Eliza R. Snow on November 16, 1875. Emily Wainwright Shurtliff was appointed President, with Mary Raymond as First Counselor, Bertha Lund as Second Counselor, and Jane Stewart as Third Counselor." (Cook, p. 23.)
26 Jan 1877
Wallace, son of Alonzo and Zylphia Raymond is born in Smithfield. He is blessed 8 April 1877 by W'm. G. Noble. (Smith, pp. 30, 34.)
26 Sep 1877
Alonzo P Raymond land patent under authority of May 20, 1862: Homestead Entry Original (12 Stat. 392), NW ¼ of section 21, township 13 North, range 1 East, 160 acres in Cache County. (Bureau of Land Management, document number 691, accession/serial number UTUTAA 011640. (Image.)
2 Aug 1879
Aquilla Raymond, son of Alonzo P and Zylpha Noble Raymond is born. (1880 U.S. Census; Smith, p. 30.)
1 June 1880
1880 U.S. Census Go to Top
Cities H. # F. # Name Description Bir.
Mon.

Relation Married M.
M.
Occupation Sick? Health
Education
Birthplace
St. # Col
or
Sex
Age
S.
M.
W.
D.
Profession,
Occupation
U.
M.
bl
nd
de
af
id
it
in
sn
m
att
yr.

re
ad
wr
te
Self
Father
Mother


1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22
23
24
25
26
View census image on Ancestry.com Smithfield, Cache, Utah Territory (p. 1)



5
Raymond, A. P. W
M
59



1


Farmer










Vermont
Vermont
[Illegible]




---------, Zilpah
W
F
34

Wife

1


Keeping house










England
England
[Illegible]




---------, W'm. G.
W
M
16

Son
1



Works on farm

-----





1


Utah






---------, Clarinda
W
F
11

Daughter
1



At home







1


Utah






---------, Laura
W
F
9

Do.
1














Utah






---------, Perris
W
M
7

Son
1














Utah






---------, Abigail
W
F
5

Daughter
1














Utah






---------, Wallace
W
M
3

Son
1














Utah






---------, Aquilla
W
M
10
12

Aug
Son
1














Utah


View census image on Ancestry.com Smithfield, Cache, Utah Territory (p. 4)



37
Raymond, Elizabeth
W
F
42

Wife

1


Keeping house










England
England
England




---------, Zylpha
W
F
11

Daughter












1


Utah






---------, Alma
W
M
9

Son












1


Utah


Key
In Cities
 - Name of street.
 - House number.
1 - Dwelling houses numbered in order of visitation.
2 - Families numbered in order of visitation.
3 - The Name of each Person whose place of abode on 1st day of June 1880, was in this family.
Personal Description
4 - Color—White, W; Black, B; Mulatto, Mu; Chinese, C; Indian, I.
5 - Sex—Male, M; Female, F.
6 - Age at last birthday prior to June 1, 1880. If under 1 year, give months in fractions, thus: 8/12
7 - If born within the Census year, give the month.
8 - Relationship of each person to the head of this family—whether wife, son, daughter, servant, boarder, or other.
Civil Condition
9 - Single
10 - Married
11 - Widowed, divorced
12 - Married during Census year
Occupation
13 - Profession, Occupation or Trade of each person, male or female.
14 - Numbers of months this person has been unemployed during the Census year.
15 - Is the person (on the day of the enumerator's visit) sick, or temporarily disabled, so as to be unable to attend to ordinary business or duties? If so, what is the sickness or disability?
Health
16 - Blind
17 - Deaf and dumb
18 - Idiotic
19 - Insane
20 - Maimed, crippled, bedridden, or other wise disabled
Education
21 - Attended school within the Census year.
22 - Cannot read
23 - Cannot write
Nativity
24 - Place of Birth of this person, naming State or Territory of United States, or the Country if of foreign birth.
25 - Place of Birth of the father of this person, naming State or Territory of United States, or the Country if of foreign birth.
26 - Place of Birth of the mother of this person, naming State or Territory of United States, or the Country if of foreign birth.

Date Event
9 Aug 1881
William Wallace Raymond dies in Plain City, Weber, Utah.
18 Mar 1882
Mary Ann, daughter of Alonzo and Zilpha is born. (Smith, p. 30.) In 1901, Alonzo states that Mamie Raymond Bowens, still alive at that time, was born on this date in 1886. (Pension, 14-Dec-1901.) According to the record above, recorded much closer to the time of birth, he had the birth year incorrect.
3 Oct 1884
Louisa Elizabeth Raymond Barber stands as proxy for Clarinda G. Raymond, endowment, Logan Temple (LoganE85, p. 164A.) Presumably, this means Clarinda never married.
15 Oct 1884
In 1901, Alonzo states that Sylvanus Raymond, still alive at that time, was born on this day. (Pension, 14-Dec-1901.) According to church records presumably made close to the time of his birth, Sylvanus was born on this date in 1885. (Smith, p. 30.) A family group sheet of unknown origin in the possession of the Smithfield Historical Museum states that Sylvester and Sylvanus were born 15 October 1884 and Sylvester died 18 October 1884.
14 April 1885 Alonzo and his sister Louisa submit the following genealogical data to the Logan Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ. (LoganB85, pp. 404-405.) Alonzo is listed as grandson to five men. As Paul Raymond and Simeon Perce are known to be his grandparents, the question remains as to his relationship to the others: Benjamin Raymond, Lemuel Raymond, and Samuel Raymond. He knows his father and grandfather to be born in Vermont, but lists U.S. as the birthplace for Benjamin, Lemuel, and Samuel. I take this to mean that the relationship was more distant than that for whom he knew the birthplace. Perhaps Benjamin, Lemuel, and Samuel were brothers of his grandfather, Paul.
Ref # Name When
Born
Town County Country When
Died
When
Baptized
Heir or
Proxy
Relation
to the
Dead
Page 404
14542 Pearis Raymond Abt. 1791

VT Sep. 1846 14 Apr 1885 Alonzo Pearis Raymond Son
14543 Paul Raymond
Of Lincoln, Addison

"

Abt. 1839

"

"

Grd. Son
14544 Paul Raymond Jun.

"

"

"

Abt. 1865

"

"

Nep.
Page 405
14545 Benjamin Raymond


U.S.
14 Apr 1885 Alonzo Pearis Raymond Grd. Son
14546 Lemuel Raymond


"


"

"

"

14547 Samuel Raymond


"


"

"

"

14548 Nelson Raymond Abt. 1825
Addison Vt.

Abt. 1844

"

"

Bro.
14549 Simeon Perce


U.S.

"

"

Grd. Son
14550 Rebecca Raymond


"

N.Y. State

"

Louisa Raymond Barber Grd. Dau.
14551 Elizabeth Simmons


"


"

"

"

14552 Abigail Perce


N.Y.

"

"

Niece
14553 Julia Maria Perce


"


"

"

"

14554 Saritta A. Raymond Abt. 1823
Addison Vt. Abt. 1834

"

"

Sister
15 April 1885
Alonzo stands as proxy for his father, Pearis Raymond, and Louisa Elizabeth Raymond Barber stands as proxy for her aunt, Julia Maria Perse, for endowments in the Logan Temple. (LoganE85, pp. 428-429.)
16 April 1885
Alonzo stands as proxy for his grandfather, Simon Perce, and Louisa Elizabeth Raymond Barber stands as proxy for her grandmother, Elizabeth Simmons, for endowments and sealing in the Logan Temple. (LoganE85, pp. 430,432; , LoganSS85 p. 240.)

Louisa Elizabeth Raymond Barber stands as proxy for one Clarinda Jeffries Raymond, who is dead, in a husband-wife sealing to Louisa's husband, George Barber. While no relationship is specified, Louisa lists the same birthday and place for this Clarinda Jeffries Raymond as she does for her sister, Clarinda G. Raymond. It is likely that the two are the same. (LoganSS85, p. 240.)
17 April 1885
Alonzo stands as proxy for his brother, Nelson Raymond who is dead, and Louisa Elizabeth Raymond Barber stands as proxy for her sister, Saretta Raymond who is dead, for endowments in the Logan Temple. (LoganE85, pp. 434-435.)
15 Oct 1885
Sylvester and Sylvanus, twin sons of Alonzo and Zilpha are born, according to a church record, possibly made near the time of the birth. (Smith, p. 30.) In 1901, Alonzo states that Sylvanus is still alive at that time, and was born on 15 October 1884. (Pension, 14-Dec-1901.) A family group sheet of unknown origin in the possession of the Smithfield Historical Museum states that Sylvester and Sylvanus were born 15 October 1884 and Sylvester died 18 October 1884.
21 Oct 1885
Most of Alonzo's children by Clarinda Cutler, are sealed to him and Clarinda in the Logan Temple. William Goodwin Noble Raymond, son of Alonzo and Zilpha Noble Raymond, is sealed to them. (LoganS85. p. 289.) Why were other children not sealed? Were Alonzo and Zilpha sealed between William's birth and the next child?
16 Nov 1885
Alonzo P. Raymond applies for an invalid's pension for injuries he received as a member of the Mormon Battalion. He reports he is 65 years old, 5 feet 5 inches tall, has a light complexion, light hair, and blue eyes. While a member of the Mormon Battalion, in the service and in the line of his duty at Seria Nevada Mountain, in the State of Cal. on or about the last day of Dec., 1846, he contracted rheumatism which has become chronic. Also about the same time and place he was thrown from his horse, receveding internal injury to the left side. He has not been employed in the military or naval service otherwise. Since leaving the service he has resided in the Town of Smithfield in the State [Territory] of Utah, and his occupation has been that of a Rancher. Prior to his entry into the service he was a healthy man. He is now partly disabed [disabled]. He has not previously received nor applied for a pension. Alonzo's application is personally signed. It is also witnessed by W. D. Hendricks and W. H. Homer. (Pension, 24-Nov-1885.)
18 Mar 1886
In 1901, Alonzo states that Mamie Raymond Bowens, still alive at that time, was born on this day. (Pension, 14-Dec-1901.) According to church records made close to the time of her birth, Mary Ann was born on this date in 1882. (Smith, pp. 7, 30.)
11 June 1886
Alonzo P. Raymond says that since his discharge from the Mormon Battalion, he has always been in the habit of prescribing for and treating himself for the chronic rheumatism and injuries to his left side contracted while in the service because he has lived almost exclusively in a comunity where there has been no practicing physician. He suffers from rheumatic pains in his right leg. He was thrown from the horse and kicked in the left side. (Pension, 11-June-1886.)
9 August 1886
Alonzo is examined by Dr. J. C. House in Oxford, Idaho for his pension application. Near Los Angeles, Cal., about 15 June 1847, Alonzo had incurred an injury to his left side when thrown from and kicked by a horse. Additionally, he had contracted rheumatism. His pulse was 63 beats per minute, his respiration, 18. His temperature was 98 degrees, his height, 5 foot 6 inches, his weight, 120 pounds. He states his age to be 66. Alonzo states to the doctor that he was thrown from a horse and kicked in the left side. He states that he has considerable pain at times in left side every since time of injury, that the pain is always worse at night, that it becomes more severe as he grows older, that there is not a night but what he has to get out of bed and sit up for a time on account of the pain, that he cannot lay on right side but a little while at time on account of dragging pain caused in left side, that rheumatic pain is mostly in the right hip and leg to the knee, he has pain in hip so severe that he has to stop if walking, when walking he has to support his hip with his hand, he states that he is not able to work at all.

The examination revealed three scars on his left side near the bottom ribs, the rib has been fractured, "an adhesion of the tissue to the 7th rib at point of fracture tenderness on pressure over the seat of injury, the side slightly contracted. In my opinion from contraction of the Serratus magnus muscles. No Paralysis. The hip joint of the right leg enlarged, tendenitas or presure over joint, the joint stiffened about ¼ degree, atrophy of the adductor longus, sartorius and gracilis muscles, measurement of right leg around place of said muscles 12½ inches. Measurement of left leg same location 14 inches, length of right leg, 36½ inches, of left leg 38 inches, from hip bone to sole of foot, other joints normal, no lesions of the heart.

The doctor rules that it is probable that the disability is as claimed and gives Alonzo a rating of 6/18 for the injury to his side and 10/18 for the Rheumatism, and an aggregate score of 16/18. (Pension, 17-Aug-1886.)

14 May 1887
Frank Lester, son of Alonzo and Zilpha is born. (Smith, p. 30.) Did he die 9 April 1889?
14 Dec 1887
Alonzo receives Mormon Battalion survivers benefit, $8 a month and bounty land claim 16901-160-47. (Pension, 14-Dec-1887.) What does the land claim mean?
2 Aug 1888?
Aquilla Raymond, son of Alonzo P and Zylpha Noble Raymond is baptized by R. A. Bain. (Smith, p. 30.)
25 Jan 1889
The Farmers Union [grist] Mill begins operation one-fourth mile upstream from the original grist mill, now owned by James Mack. (The Mack family was originally the McCracken family.) (Canyons, pp. 36, 50.) The location is now that of the James Mack Memorial Park. (HisSmith, p. 107.)

1890 U.S. Census Go to Top

The 1890 U.S. Census records were destroyed by a fire in 1921.
Date Event
5 Nov 1890
Louisa's husband, George Barber dies in Colonia, Diez, Mexico. He is buried 8 Nov 1890 in Smithfield Cemetery.
5 Oct 1893
At Alonzo's dictation, W. G. Raymond writes Alonzo's application to increase his pension. The application states that Alonzo is 74 years old. This is probably the source of the 1819 birthdate that William Goodwin Raymond uses thereafter. Alonzo states, "that he is totally disabled for manual labor in consequence of Rheumatism & stiff hip joint making it necessary to use a staff and causing constant pain. That he suffers from indigestion and great pain in left side caused from a kick by a horse making it impossible for him to sleep at night. The above disabilities have troubled him for years growing worse constantly until at the present time hes almost unable to dress himself or to rest day or night. That his present means of subsistense is $800 per month pension and the proceeds of two(2) city lots containing one acre each. That his sole property a house and two city lots situated in Smithfield, County of Cache, Ter. of Utah. Value $50000."

Margin note: "That the amount of alonzs his income from his property and from all sources exclusive of pension will not exceed $2.00 per month." (Pension, 9-Oct-1893.)
24 Nov 1893
Alonzo's pension increases to $12/month. (Pension, 04-Dec-1893.)
8 April 1894
Wilford Woodruff, president of the Church of Jesus Christ, in General Conference commands members to "trace their genealogies as far as they can .... [having] children sealed to their parents, and run this chain through as far as you can get it." Previously, members of the church might do genealogy for only a few generations, then sealing an ancestor to a prominent church leader. This landmark talk changes that.
6 Feb 1895
Alonzo begins temple work for many, many Raymonds and their kin.

"They [Alonzo and Zylpha] made Smithfield their home until their deaths. During his later years and until he became disabled he labored in the Logan Temple for many of his kindred dead--a work which he deemed very important." (Goodwin)
Jun 1900
1900 U.S. Census Go to Top

For a complete description of each column, see the key below the table.
Loc.
Name
Relation
Personal Description
Nativity
Citizenship
Occ, Trade, Pro
Education
Owner of Home
H.
#
F.
#
Relation
To head
of House
Co
lor
S
e
x
Birth
A
 g
  e
Sin
Mar
W.D

Yrs
Mar

Mom
#
Kids
#
Liv
ing

Birthplace
Yr.
imm
gra
#
yrs
US
Nat
rali
za.
Occupation
M.
U.
Att
Sch
Mon

Re
ad
Wr
ite
En
gli
sh
Own
or
Rent
Free
or
Owe
Farm
or
Hous
#
Farm
Sche
Mon
Year
Self
Father
Mother
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
View census image on Ancestry.com Smithfield, Cache, Utah (p. 1A)
3
3
Plowman Christian
Head
W
M
Oct
1862
37
M
10


Denmark
Denmark
Denmark
1866
34
'
dry[?]farmer


yes
yes
yes
O
F
F
4


---------    Milly
Wife
W
F
Mar
1869
31
M
10
3
2
Utah
England
England






yes
yes
yes






---------    Vira
Daughter
W
F
Oct
1890
9
S



Utah
Denmark
Utah



to school

10
yes
yes
yes






---------    Ada
Daughter
W
F
Nov.
1898
1
S



Utah
Denmark
Utah















Raymond Elizabeth
Mother in
          law
W
F
Jan
1838
62
WD

6
4
England
England
England






yes
yes
yes




View census image on Ancestry.com Smithfield, Cache, Utah (p. 1B)
14
14
Raymond Alonzo
Head
W
M
Feb
1819
81
M
37


Vermont
Vermont
Vermont






yes
yes
yes
O
F
H



---------    Zilpha
Wife
W
F
Apr
1847
53
M
37
12
9
England
England
England

Na




yes
yes
yes






---------    Wallace
Son
W
M
Jan
1878
22
S



Utah
Vermont
England



Day laborer


yes
yes
yes






---------    Vane .
Son
W
M
Oct.
1884
15
S



Utah
Vermont
England



to school

10
yes
yes
yes






Bowen William
Son in Law
W
M
Sept
1873
26
M
1


Utah
Vermont
Vermont



Cattle Raiser


yes
yes
yes






---------    Marrie
Daughter
W
F
Mar
1882
18
M
1
1
1
Utah
Vermont
England






yes
yes
yes






---------    Baby
daughter
M
F
May
1900
0/12
S



Utah
Utah
Utah













View census image on Ancestry.com Smithfield, Cache, Utah (p. 10A)
185
186
185
186
Raymond Alma
Head
W
M
June
1871
28
M
8


Utah
England
England



farmer


yes
yes
yes
R
F
F
108


---------    Delia
Wife
W
F
Aug
1873
26
M
8
3
3
Utah
Pennsylvania
Alabama






yes
yes
yes






---------    Alma
Son
W
M
Feb
1896
4
S



Utah
Utah
Utah















---------    Wickliffe
Son
W
M
Mar
1898
2
S



Utah
Utah
Utah















---------    Baby
Son
W
M
May
1900
0/12
S



Utah
Utah
Utah













Date Event
14 Aug 1904 Alonzo dies at 6:30 in his home on a Sunday morning. According to the death record, Alonzo was a farmer, aged 85, born in Vermont. He was a married, white, Caucasian of Smithfield, Utah. Asthema was the cause of death. Pearis Raymond reported the death. (CacheVR, p. 25, no. 40; Journal, Vol. XXV, 16 Aug. 1904, p. 1.)

"Alonzo Pearis Raymond died on 14 August 1904, as a consequence of great exposure, hard work and hardships. He contracted rhematism which caused him great suffering and finally his death. Before he died he became helpless....The name of Alonzo Pearis Raymond stands out prominently as a man of faith and integrity and industry in the early history of Smithfield, Utah." (Goodwin)

Alonzo is survived by his 2nd and 3rd wives, Zylpha and Elizabeth.
16 Aug 1904
Alonzo's funeral is held at 3:00 pm in the Smithfield tabernacle and he is interred at the Smithfield cemetery. (Journal, Vol. XXV, 16 Aug. 1904, p. 1.)
8 Jan 1916 Louisa Elizabeth Raymond Barber dies at Logan, Cache, Utah. (Journal, 11 Jan. 1916, p. 1.) She is buried in the Smithfield Cemetery. Thus passed the last sibling of Alonzo Pearis Raymond.

Related Articles Go to Top

Further Research Suggestions Go to Top

Sources Go to Top