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[TOC] [part 2]DONIPHAN COUNTY 1882 PLAT BOOK, PART 1

HISTORY OF KANSAS

POPULATION OF KANSAS BY COUNTIES.


FROM THE UNITED STATES CENSUS OF 1860, 1870 and 1880,
AND THE STATE CENSUS OF 1865 AND 1875.
County      1860.   1865.   1870.   1875.   1880.
_________  ______  ______  ______  ______  ______

Allen       3082    2737    7022    6638   11463
Anderson    2400    2659    5220    5800    8991
Arapahoe   .....   .....   .....   .....       3
Atchison    7729    8929   15507   20191   26488
Barbour    .....   .....   .....     367    2661
Barton     .....   .....       2    2106   10326
Bourbon     6101    7961   15076   16879   20518
Brown       2607    2891    6823    8728   12830
Buffalo    .....   .....   .....   .....     191
Butler       437     294    3035    9840   18591
Chase        808     870    1975    3000    6089
Chautauqua .....   .....   .....    7634   11078
Cherokee    1501   .....   11038   13393   22075
Cheyenne   .....   .....   .....   .....      37
Clay         163     238    2942    6648   12320
Clark      .....   .....   .....   .....     163
Cloud      .....   .....    2323    7195   15348
Coffey      2842    3383    6201    7239   11456
Comanche   .....   .....   .....   .....     372
Cowley     .....   .....     117    8927   21561
Crawford   .....   .....    8160    9383   16642
Davis       1163    1189    5526    4765    6996
Decatur    .....   .....   .....   .....    4180
Dickinson    378     442    3043    6911   15621
Doniphan    8083    9595   13969   13923   14624
Douglas     8637   15814   20592   18365   21773
Edwards    .....   .....   .....     234    2419
Elk        .....   .....   .....    5300   10665
Ellis      .....   .....    1336     942    6183
Ellsworth  .....   .....    1185    1761    8529
Foote      .....   .....   .....   .....     411
Ford       .....   .....     427     813    3123
Franklin    3030    3695   10385   10039   16852
Godfrey       19   .....   .....   .....   .....
Gove       .....   .....   .....   .....    1197
Graham     .....   .....   .....   .....    4262
Grant      .....   .....   .....   .....      10
Greeley    .....   .....   .....   .....       3
Greenwood    759    1188    3484    6642   10560
Harper     .....   .....   .....   .....   21139
Hamilton   .....   .....   .....   .....      68
Harvey     .....   .....   .....    5050   11478
Hodgeman   .....   .....   .....   .....    1708
Howard     .....   .....    2794   .....   .....
Hunter       158   .....   .....   .....   .....
Jackson     1936     296     665     684   10722
Jefferson   4459    5853   12526   11654   15574
Jewell     .....   .....     207    7652   17524
Johnson     4364    6093   13684   14582   16958
Kansas     .....   .....   .....   .....       9
Kearney    .....   .....   .....   .....     159
Kingman    .....   .....   .....   .....    3730
Labette    .....   .....   9973    14568   22753
Lane       .....   .....   .....   .....     634
Leavenworth12606   24256   32444   27738   32345
Lincoln    .....   .....     516    2492    8586
Linn        6336    6543   12174   11546   15326
Lyon        3197    2248*   8014    9578   17379
Marion        74     162     768    5904   12471
Madison      636   .....   .....   .....   .....
Marshall    2280    2349    6901    10818  16147
McPherson  .....   .....     738     6202  17145
Meade      .....   .....   .....    .....    296
Miami       4980    6151   11725    12680  17806
Mitchell   .....   .....     485     5182  14917
Montgomery .....   .....    7564    12177  18124
Morris       770    1141    2225     4595   9228
Nemaha      2436    2638    7339     7103  12468
Neosho        88     777   10206     9763  15136
Ness       .....   .....       2    .....   3322
Norton     .....   .....   .....      901   7004
Osage       1113    1169    7648    10281  19654
Osborne    .....   .....      33     3466  12472
Ottawa     .....     178    2127     4430  10325
Ottoe        238   .....   .....    .....  .....
Pawnee     .....   .....     179     1006   5349
Phillips   .....   .....   .....     2817  12042
Pottawatomie1529    2119    7848    10342  16347
Pratt      .....   .....   .....    .....   1890
Rawlins    .....   .....   .....    .....   1626
Reno       .....   .....   .....     5114  12776
Republic   .....   .....    1281     8050  14945
Rice       .....   .....       5     2455   9297
Riley       1224    1813    5105     7066  10408
Rooks      .....   .....   .....      567   8062
Rush       .....   .....   .....      451   5498
Russell    .....   .....     150     1054   7357
Saline     .....     473    4248     6359  13861
Scott      .....   .....   .....    .....     43
Sedgwick   .....   .....    1095     8162  18928
Sequoya    .....   .....   .....    .....    568
Seward     .....   .....   .....    .....      5
Shawnee     3513    3458   13121    15389  29120
Sheridan   .....   .....   .....    .....   1574
Sherman    .....   .....   .....    .....      9
Smith      .....   .....      66     3915  13904
Stafford   .....   .....   .....    .....   4768
Stanton    .....   .....   .....    .....      5
Stevens    .....   .....   .....    .....     12
Sumner     .....   .....      22     4925  20944
Thomas     .....   .....   .....    .....    161
Trego      .....   .....     166    .....   2535
Waubansee   1623    1081    3362     4694   8761
Wallace    .....   .....     538    .....    686
Washington   383   .....    4081     8548  14825
Wichita    .....   .....   .....    .....     14
Wilson        27   .....    6694     9752  12764
Woodson     1488    1307    3827     4472   6539
Wyandotte   4827    4827   10015    12385  19152
Total     107206  140179  364399   531156 996296
        * Only partial return

EARLY DISCOVERIES.

The soil of Kansas was first trodden by Europeans in the winter of 1541- 2, by a Spanish expedition from Mexico, under Coronado, who passed through the State from south to north. The general direction of his march may now be indicated by a line drawn from Barbour County to Nemaha County.

In the year 1719, Kansas was visited by a Frenchman, M. Dustine, who was sent from New Orleans. He traveled up the Osage and Kansas Rivers as far as the mouth of the Republican, and then went over two hundred miles in a westerly or northwesterly direction, thus crossing Coronado's trail near the point where Fort Riley is now situated. He took possession of the entire country, in the name of France.

The next year a large expedition was sent from New Mexico by the Spaniards, to conquer the Indians who had been friendly to the French. The Missouris and Pawnees were at war, and the Spaniards attempted to form an alliance with the former to destroy the latter. They mistook a Missouri for a Pawnee village, and laid their plans before the tribe which they proposed to destroy. The Pawnees delayed their answer until their warriors could assemble, and then two thousand of their braves fell upon the invaders and destroyed the whole body except one priest, who returned to Santa Fe.

Fort Orleans was then established by the French on an island in the Missouri River, near the mouth of the Osage, and a continuous trade was carried on with the Indians.

In 1762, Louisiana, including all Kansas, except that portion which lies south of the Arkansas River, and west of the Twenty-third Meridian west from Washington, was ceded by France to Spain, and, in 1800, was retroceded by Spain. In 1803, Louisiana was purchased by the United States. That part of the State not included in the Louisiana purchase was ceded by the State of Texas in 1848.

In 1823, the overland commerce between Missouri and Santa Fe was established, and, two years later, the "Santa Fe Trail" was surveyed by the United States Government. Fort Leavenworth was established in 1827. The Baptist Shawnee Mission was begun in 1831, and the Methodists' one year later. The site of Fort Scott was selected as a military post in 1842.

In 1850, the Government surveyed the military road from Fort Leavenworth to Fort Kearney.

In 1853, Fort Riley was established. In 1845, the Mormons assembled near the present site of Atchison, to commence their journey across the plains, and from that time the soil of Kansas has been crossed in all directions by the trails of emigrants bound for the Rockies and beyond. Until the spring of 1854, traders, missionaries and Indian agents were the only white persons to whom the country was open.

TERRITORIAL HISTORY.

May 30, 1854, President Pierce signed the Kansas-Nebraska bill and it became a law. The following is copied from the act:

[Section 19.] And be it further enacted, That all that part of the territory of the United States included within the following limits, except such portions thereof as are hereinafter expressly exempted from the operations of this act, to wit, beginning at a point on the western boundary of the State of Missouri, where the thirty-seventh parallel of north latitude crosses the same; thence west on said parallel to the eastern boundary of New Mexico; thence north on said boundary to latitude thirty-eight, thence following said boundary westward to the eastern boundary of the Territory of Utah, on the summit of the Rocky Mountains; thence northward on said summit to the fortieth parallel of latitude; thence east on said parallel to the western boundary of the State of Missouri; thence south with the western boundary of said State to the place of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, created into a temporary Government, by the name of the Territory of Kansas; and when admitted as a State or States, the said Territory, or any portion of the same, shall he received into the Union with or without slavery, as their constitution may prescribe at the time of their admission. Provided, That nothing in this act contained shall be construed to inhibit the Government of the United States from dividing said Territory into two or more Territories, in such manner and at such times as Congress shall deem convenient and proper, or from attaching any portion of said Territory to any other State or Territory of the United States. Provided further, That nothing in this act contained shall be construed to impair the rights of person or property now pertaining to the Indians in sold Territory, so long as such rights shall remain unextinguished by treaty between the United States and such Indians, or to include any territory, which, by treaty with any Indian tribe, is not, without the consent of said tribe, to he included within the Territorial limits or jurisdiction of any State or Territory, but all such territory shall be excepted out of the boundaries, and constitute no part of the Territory of Kansas, until said tribe shall signify their assent to the President of the United States, to be included within the said Territory of Kansas, or to affect the authority of the Government of the United States to make any regulation respecting such Indians, their lands, property or other rights, by treaty, law or otherwise, which it would have been competent to the Government to make if this act had never passed.

The people of the Eastern States had expected the bill to pass, and both North and South were prepared for the fight between slavery and freedom. In March, 1854, Eli Thayer, of Boston, Mass., proposed the establishment of a society whose chief object should be the settlement of Kansas by Free-Soilers. The society was organized under the name of the "New England Emigrant Aid Society," with a capital limited to $1,000,000; only one-tenth of this sum was used by the society.

Secret societies were formed in Missouri and other Southern States, whose object was to settle Kansas with Pro-slavery men, and to drive out and hinder the Free-Soilers from coming in. Two months after the President signed the Kansas-Nebraska bill, the first party of New Englanders reached the borders of Kansas, and, the next day, August 1, founded the city of Lawrence; a similar colony founded Topeka, December 5, 1854.

In June, 1854, the Leavenworth Town Company was organized in Missouri, and, in July, the Atchison Town Company; during the summer, both towns were commenced by Pro-slavery men.

By the act of Congress creating the Territory, Fort Leavenworth was named as the temporary seat of government.

The first officers of the Territory of Kansas were: Andrew H. Reeder, of Easton, Penn., Governor; Israel B. Donaldson, of Illinois, United States Marshal; Daniel Woodson, of Lynchburg, Va., Secretary; Samuel D. Lecompte, of Maryland, Chief Justice; Saunders W. Johnston, of Ohio, and Rush Elmore, of Alabama, Associate Justices; John Calhoun, of Illinois, Surveyor General; T. J. B. Cramer, Treasurer. October 7, 1854, Gov. Reeder arrived in the Territory, and established the executive office temporarily at Fort Leavenworth.

November 29, 1854, an election for Delegate to Congress was held. Gen. J. W. Whitfield, the Pro-slavery candidate, was elected.

A census was taken in January and February, 1855, which showed a population of 8,601, with 2,905 voters.

An election of members of the Territorial Legislature was, held March 30, 1855. As in the preceding November, many Missourians crossed the river and voted, swelling the number of votes to 6,307. Gov. Reeder refused to issue certificates of election until he was compelled to do so by the use of pistols in the hands of those who claimed to be elected. The Governor ordered a new election in the districts where the fraud had been committed. This election was held May 22, 1855.

Gov. Reeder called a session of the Legislature to meet at Pawnee. This was a town near Fort Riley, laid out by some of the officers of the fort, in the fall of 1854. By order of Jefferson Davis, Secretary of war, the boundaries of the Military Reserve were so enlarged as to absorb the town, which was destroyed by the United States troops in the fall of 1855.

The Territorial Legislature, convened on Monday, July 2, 1855. Thomas Johnston was elected President of the Council, and Gen. Stringfellow, Speaker of the House of Representatives. The Free-Soil members, elected in May, were unseated, and the Pro-slavery men, elected in March, were seated in their places.

The Legislature located the seat of government at Shawnee, notwithstanding the Governor's veto, and, on July 6, adjourned to that place.

It re-assembled at Shawnee Mission July 16. The Missouri code of laws was enacted, changing the words where necessary, to make State apply to Territory.

The patronage of the Territory was given to the Legislature and its appointees, so that the present and future Governors should be powerless to secure fair play to the people. Gov. Reeder vetoed all their bills, on the ground that they were not legally constituted, but the bills were passed over his veto.

The Free-Soil men had met in a convention at Lawrence, June 25, and came to the conclusion that whatever laws might be passed by the Legislature, could have no authority over them. President Pierce removed Gov. Reeder, August 1, 1855, and Secretary Woodson became Acting Governor until the arrival of Hon. Wilson Shannon, of Ohio, who was appointed Governor. At an election ordered by the Shawnee Legislature, on October 1, Gen. Whitfield was elected Delegate to Congress; he was the only candidate, and two-thirds of his votes came from Missouri. October 9, the Free-Soil party held an election for the same office, and chose Gov. Reeder. Congress refused to admit either of them - Gov. Reeder, because he was not elected in accordance with the regulations of the Territorial Legislature, and Gen. Whitfield, because the frauds at his election were too manifest to be overlooked.

[TOC] [part 2]