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Nobel J. Sarratt*
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The Book
The Sarratt Family,
Published 1897, by Nobel J. Sarratt

  "THE SARRATT FAMILY" [REF:#155] was compiled by Nobel John Sarratt, (1809 - 1897) before his death in 1897, he is the 3rd son of Anthony & Lettitia (ELLIS) SARRATT.
I have tried to copy Nobel's work as close as possible, and I apologized for any mistakes I may have made. My "Orginal" copy is a zerox copy from which I copied at the Gaffney Library in 1981. I't is a 5 1/2 x 8" booklet 20 pages. (some missing!) Paul R. Sarrett, Jr. Jan. 09, 1982.
*This photo was sent to my by Michael E. Burk, imagine@cybertime.net from his private collection on Sep. 12, 2000. ..prs


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Cover Sheet
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                      THE SARRATT FAMILY
                       By Nobel Sarratt
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Page 1 ---------------------------------------------------------

                      THE SARRATT FAMILY
                       By Nobel Sarratt
                          ---------


                          Chapter I
I am now an old man, having lived a long life, almost through this 
eventful nineteenth century, soon to close.

During this period of my own recollection, nations have risen and 
fallen, great wars have devastated different lands, railroads and 
steamships, telegraph and telephones, electric cars, electric lights, 
and hundreds of marvelous inventions, have sprung into operation.

The contrast between the conditions of our country at the early and 
the present portions of my life, are wonderfully interesting to my 
mind.

While new generations now living are absorbed more with the present 
than in the past, old persons like myself delight to recall events 
and conditions of the olden times when primeval simplicity characterized 
our early history.

In tracing a sketch of the SARRATT family in Spartanburg County, 
South Carolina, of which I am a member, and giving the peculiarities 
and struggles of their colonial life. I give facts that will apply 
to all the early settlers who planted civilization in this great country.

End of Page 1 ---------------------------------------------------------



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Top Page 4 --------------------------------------------------------

I will not enter the field of the historian or the biographer but 
simply narrate incidents and facts which came within the range of 
my own observation.

                          Chapter II
I am of the opinion that the first SARRATTS came from Wales and 
settled in Massachusetts, whence they migrated South in the early 
settling of the country.

Grandfather JOHN SARRATT, with his brothers, SAMUEL, LEMUEL, and 
sisters KISSIE and MIRNA, ALLEN SARRATT, MATTHEW SCRUTCHFIELD, EDWIN 
GREEN, THOMAS FARMER and others, all moved from the Yadkin River 
in North Carolina and settled upon the South side of the Broad 
River, near the mouth of Sarratt's Creek, before the Revolutionary 
war between the colonies and England. The mouth of Sarratt's Creek 
is in the northeast portion of Spartanburg County, of South Carolina, 
adjoining York County, which was formerly a portion of the old Ninety-Six 
district.

My Grandfather JOHN SARRATT, bought a tract of land, 220 acres, 
for five pounds, five shillings, sterling money. 
The papers were signed by Wm. MOULTRIE, Governor and Commander in 
Chief, who issued the grant. This tract is now owned by the heirs 
of JAMES ALLISON.

JOHN SARRATT, my grandfather, previous to the Revolution, married 
NANNIE MORGAN, a sister to CHARLES MORGAN, who lived east of the 
Broad River in York County.

My Grandparents reared a family of three sons, ANTHONY, SAMUEL and 
JOHN; and four daughters, REHODY, BARBARY, EDY and NANCY.

ANTHONY SARRATT married LETITIA ELLIS, daughter of JAMES ELLIS. They 
had six sons; OBEDIAH, GILBERT, NOBEL, MADISON, LAWSON, ANTHONY, ALMAN; 
and three daughters, NANCY, ALEY and CORDELIA.


SAMUEL SARRATT married PEGGY QUINN, daughter of PETER QUINN. 
They had four sons; GREEN, HOLDMAN, TILMAN, 

End Page 4 --------------------------------------------------------

SAMUEL; and two daughters, CINTHA MARGARET, and POLLY.
 
JOHN SARRATT married JANE ELLIS, sister to LETITIA (ELLIS) SARRATT 
and reared two sons; IRWINE and JOHN; and five daughters; BARBARAH, 
LOUISA, HARRIET, NARCISSA, and EMLINE.

BARBARA SARRATT married CHARLES HOPPER, of York County, and reared 
five sons and five daughters, born as follows: ELIZA, b. 1810; SALENA, 
b. 1813; SMITH, b. 1811; POSEY, b. 1817; CHARLES, b. 1822; NANCY, 
b. 1821; POLLY, b. 1821; JOHN, b. 1827; ULYSSES, b. 1829; ANTHONY, 
b. 1832. NANCY HOPPER died in 1860; CHARLES HOPPER in 1863; ELIZA 
HOPPER in 1888; and ANTHONY HOPPER in 1893.

RHODY SARRATT married REDRICK ARNOLD. Their children were: RICHARD, 
DELILAH, DANIEL, LILIAH, and POLLY.

EDY SARRATT married ELIJAH TURNER, whose children were; JOHN, THIAS, 
ROSS, PHILLIP, ELIJAH, SILVEY, TILDY, NANCY, ARRENA and ALLEN.

NANCY SARRATT married JOHN HOPPER and their children were: LILIAH, 
EDY, LANSFORD and MELTON.


Grandfather JAMES ELLIS married PEGGY HOPPER. He and his brother 
came from Massachusetts, his brother settling in Lincoln County, 
North Carolina. JAMES ELLIS settled near Ellis's Ferry, Cleveland 
County, on the Broad River. His children were born as follows: 
MARY ELLIS, b. 1761; 
WILLIAM,    b. 1767; 
ANN,        b. 1769; 
REBECCA,    b. 1771; 
JAMES,      b. 1773; 
ELIZABETH,  b. 1776; 
BENJAMIN,   b. 1782; 
LETTIE,     b. 1785; 
ABSALOAN,   and 
NANCY       birth dates not on hand.


MARY ELLIS married NED CANTREL and reared, one son. DAVID. 

JAMES ELLIS, Jr. married WILLIAM HOPPER'S daughter. HANNAH ELLIS, 
daughter of JAMES ELLIS, Jr. died in 1811, aged 66 years. MARY R. 
ELLIS died Feb. 18, aged 25 years. His son ABSALOM ELLIS, died April 
23, 1851, aged 25 years. All are buried at the homestead of JAMES, 
Sr., near Ellis's Ferry.

ELIZABETH ELLIS married MOTZ GILLIAM. They had three children: MARTIN, 
PEGGY and ELLIS.

REBECCA married JOHN WILSON. NANCY married ATTY WILSON
her children were: NANCY, EPHRIAM, THOMAS and KIZZIE.

BENJAMIN ELLIS married POLLY HOPPER, a daughter of JOSEPH 

End Page 5 --------------------------------------------------------


HOPPER. They had six sons: CHARLES, J. R. ELLIS, ALONZO, MARENS, WILLIS, 
MAREILY, and five daughters; AMELIA, LOUISA, SALLIE, DORA and DAVID.

JOHN SARRATT, Sr., his wife, his brother SAMUEL, sisters KIZZIE 
and MIRNA, his son SAMUEL and wife, SAMUEL's son HOLDMAN, and SAMUEL 
were all buried on the place he bought about half a mile from Broad 
River. Only one tombstone is found there, that of SAMUEL, JOHN'S 
son. It bears the following inscription: "Died June 27, 1851, 
aged 61 years." There is a rock wall around the graves of the 
others not much decayed.

JOHN SARRATT, Jr., and wife, where buried near there upon Mike's 
Creek, where he first settled. A couple of tombstones mark their 
resting place. JOHN died Sept. 13, 1851, aged 69 years, 7 months and 
10 days; JANE, his wife May 11, 1833, age 51. [or 54]

ANTHONY SARRATT, born Aug. 9, 1781, died Sept. 30, 1850, aged 70 years, 
1 month and 25 days.

OBEDIAH's son ANTHONY died Jan. 28, 1880, aged 81 years. His remains 
were buried at Buffalo Creek Church. SARAH, his wife died Sept. 
24, 1843, aged 48 years.

ABSALOM ELLIS'S children were named BETSEY, ADALINE, POLLY, 
JAMES, SOLOMON, GREEN, BENJAMIN, JOHN, ABSALOM, and JOSEPH.

BENJAMIN ELLIS, Sr., died June 21, 1870, aged 87 years, 
8 months and 29 days. MARY, his wife, died June 23, 
1874, aged 93 years, 9 months and 11 days. HANNAH,
daughter of JAMES ELLIS, died in 1844, aged 66 years.
MARY R. ELLIS, died Feb. 18, aged 25 years. His son ABSA-
LOM, died April 23, 1851, aged 25 years. ABSALONE ELLIS, son 
of BENJAMIN, Sr., died April 23, 1851, aged 25 years. 

JAMES ELLIS, Sr and wife, with those last named, buried
at the old homestead of JAMES, Sr., near Ellis's Ferry.

Aunt EDY SARRATT married ELIJAH TURNER, who died Dec. 
2, 1811, aged 66 years. 

End Page 6 --------------------------------------------------------


MARY MAREILLA ELLIS died March 26, 1817, aged 11 years 
and 14 days. 

DAVID ELLIS died in 1857, aged 17 years; MARY M. ELLIS, 
died May 5, 1847. 

Aunt EDY and ELIJAH TURNER and the others just named are buried at 
the ELIJAH TURNER'S old place, north of Grassy Pond.

Of the ANTHONY SARRATT children, I am all that is left; and of JOHN 
SARRATT's, IRVINE alone is living. Of SAMUEL SARRATT's family, GREEN 
and MARGARET are the living. All of EDY'S children are dead. BARBARA, 
SMITH, JOHN, CELIA and POLLY are dead. NANCY's EDY is still alive. 
All of Uncle BENJAMIN ELLIS's children are gone to their graves.

JAMES ELLIS's brother, who settled in Lincoln County, North Carolina, 
married HENRY QUINN's daughter.

WILLIAM SARRATT, brother to JOHN, married THOMAS COLE's sister.

ALLEN SARRATT had a son named WILLIAM SARRATT.

Grandfather was a Free Mason. His apron is now at the old OBEDIAH 
SARRATT homestead. He was a Silversmith, and made a great many knee-buckles, 
worn in his day. He was deputy sheriff of Spartanburg County for several 
years. He joined the Baptist Church at Buffalo, York County, when 
BERRY HICKS and DREWRY DOBBINS supplied that church.
 
SAMUEL SARRATT, lived in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, in 
1868, and there are still SARRATTS in that County and Davidson.

JOHN SARRATT, also was a Silversmith.

                      ---------
                      Chapter III

The work and habits of our fathers were different in many respects 
from those of this generation. 

The raised flax and made there clothes with it. When ready to reap 
they cut the flax and soaked it for several 

End Page 7 --------------------------------------------------------

days in a pond of water. It was taken out, dried, beaten with poles, 
and "backled" on a board full of spikes, resembling a hair 
brush. It was then separated from the rough bark and made into fine 
shreds and spun on the little old time spining wheels, some which 
are still found as also the  hackles," in some of the old families.

Their dishes were made of "puter", and their forks out of 
reeds. Pocket knives were used to eat with.

Their farming tools were few and rough. Their plow stocks were made 
at home, and as iron and blacksmiths were scarce in those days, hickory 
grubs were used for "false coulters", to keep the foot and 
beam together, put on with iron bands and tightened with wedges. The 
foot piece was hewed down and the plow fastened on with iron bands 
and wooden wedges to hold it tight. They used a "bisher" plow 
with a wooded mouldboard on it to turn the land with.

Their "bridles" were made out of ropes, and the had ropes 
for chains, and mullberry bark for hamestrings.

Their bedsteads were made in the corners of their houses, holes bored 
in the logs, and pieces of fence rails sharpened and driven in the 
holes, the ends resting on upright forked posts. Boards were then 
placed across, or hickory withes for bed cords, to put their bedding 
on to lie on.

There were no wagons or anything of the kind to haul on. Dead bodies 
were carried by human hands to the grave yard.

The farmer then planted not more than five acres in corn. He would 
plow his horse or ox till twelve, then "bell" him and turn 
him out to pick grass.

The first crop that ANTHONY SARRATT made was tobacco. He packed 
his tobacco in "hogsleds", then put "rims or felloes" 
around the barrel, bored holes in the ends of the "hoghead," 
fixed shafts to it and rolled it to Charleston, taking his provisions 
on the horses' backs. He sold tobacco and 

End Page 8 --------------------------------------------------------

bought a broadcloth suit for his wedding.

After his marriage he put up a very fine home. He sawed the lumber 
by hand with a "whipsaw," the teeth of which were about one 
foot apart. They made a gangway to roll the log upon. Then they "skelped" 
the log and lined it with a cord dipped in  pokeberry" juice, 
making straight lines end to end, the thickness they wanted the lumber. 
One man would lie on his back on the ground under the log with a hankerschief 
over his face. Another man would stand over the log, and the two would 
draw the saw up and down, cutting the line from end to end. This was 
the saw mill of that day.

Farming was the common occupation in those early times.

Cotton was planted on a small scale, but the mode of its culture was 
far behind that of the present day. It required two persons to hoe 
one row; one on each side, scraping the ridge. They never chopped 
through or thinned the row.

The seeds were picked from the lint, at first, by finger power. The 
lint wasthen washed, made into cakes, and dried before a fire. The 
men usually picked the seeds out, while the womenprepared, carded, 
and spun the lint into thread, on the lod time spinning wheels. It 
was then woven into cloth on the hand looms. Wool was served up, in 
very much the same way.

Later, when the raising of cotton was increased, small gins began 
to take place of "finger ginning" Then came into use the primitive 
invention for packing the lint cotton into bales. After constructing 
a kind of box, the size they wanted the bale, the lint was tramped 
in and then pressed by a long log, which was used as a lever, after 
the style of an old time cider press, the lever being held down by 
logs and rocks. For ties, they used white oak splits, on which there 
was no "tariff."

End Page 9 --------------------------------------------------------

Hauling in those days was done on "sledges" boxed up, in which 
they hauled their corn and other products. Logs were hauled on what 
was called a "lizzard sledge," which was simply a section 
of a forked tree, hewn into shape.

They raised wheat in those days, and the harvesting was done with 
"reap hooks." The harvest working was a great day on the farm. 
The neighbors who were invited would come before breakfast. The farmer 
would kill a pig. They would boil the pig's head and make a big pot 
of soup and have corn bread and pig's head soup for breakfast. Then 
all to the field, to cut down the wheat, each one with a "reap 
hook." At dinner the first thing set out was a bucket of "Mintsling"  and 
a gourd in it to drink it out of.

The dinner was pig feet, backbone and corn bread. The working party 
and their wives stayed all night with the farmer. When bed time came, 
they spread down quilts and all slept together.

To thrash the wheat they made what they called a "treading yard" 
dug away the surface to the clay and packed it with mauls.

The wheat, hauled in from the field on sledges, was placed on this 
yard and tramped out with horses. They took away the long straw with 
their hands, "sived" the wheat to get out the fine straw, 
and fanned it with sheet to blow away the chaff. On windy days, I 
have seen men stand on stump or chair, hold up a measure of wheat, 
and pour it down on sheet, the wind blowing away the chaff.

They went to work in the field before daylight; then at nine o'clock; 
they went to their breakfest; worked again till three o'clock when 
they went to dinner; then worked till the whippowills cried at night.

The way they went to preaching was walking and on horse back, no buggies 
and carriages in those days. Now 

End Page 10 --------------------------------------------------------

and then, a "gig" or an old fashioned stage coach could be 
seen passing along leading roads.

The better class of young men, in those days, would take their sweethearts 
up behind them. So, too, the husband would carry his wife, some times 
each carrying a child.

There was nothing to make hats out of in those days, only wheat straw 
this they "platted" and made into hats.

They tanned their own leather and made their own shoes, but never 
made them before Christmas.

The women wore home-made cotton dresses to preaching, but there was 
often much taste and pride exhibited in the designs, coloring and 
make-up of their dresses. The dresses were made with draw strings 
around the neck and the waist. Two widths made a skirt.

The men wore home-made pants, dyed with "copperas" and hickory 
bark.

The first set of knives and forks, plates, tin cups, etc. which my 
father ANTHONY SARRATT bought was at MIKE GAFFNEY'S store, in 
the year 1800, where Gaffney City now stands.

They used tin cups and gourds to drink milk and water out of. As for 
coffee it was made for the old folks only, every Sunday morning. It 
was made in a skillet. They didn't have but one flat pan to cook in.

There was but one mill in our section in that day, and it was a corn 
mill on Mike's Creek. When they ground wheat in it, they "bolted" 
the flour in a bolting machine turned by a wooden crank.

My father ANTHONY SARRATT went to Lincolnton and bought his first 
wagon he bought the woodwork there, brought it home and had 
it ironed. His and two others were all the wagons in the settlement.

They made their chimneys out of sticks and dirt.

                   -------------
                     Chapter IV

The first store established in this section, was that

End Page 11 --------------------------------------------------------

owned by MIKE GAFFNEY and his co-partner McCARTON. It was located 
at first, a few miles west of the point where Gaffney City now stands, 
not far from Thickety Creek Mr. McCARTON came ahead of Mr. GAFFNEY 
and established the store. Mr. GAFFNEY seems to have been the leading 
man of the business, for he arrived in Charleston from New York, 
Feb. 3, 1800. He spent the summer in Charleston, where he had a 
severe attack of fever. "By this time," Mr. GAFFNEY says 
in his journal, "I was beginning to get pretty tired of Charleston. 
It made me think of going to my partner, a Mr. McCARTON, who lived 
about 250 miles up the country north-west of Charleston." He 
left Charleston on Dec. 11, 1800, and arrived at "our new home 
in 6 days," which was Dec. 18, 1800.

The coming of this remarkable man into this locality, was an important 
event in the history of our section of the country.

The store was soon moved from its first location to the place long 
known as Gaffney's Cross Roads, now Gaffney City.

In his journal, MIKE GAFFNEY records the following remarks about 
this settlement:
   "I expected to see a fine country, but was surprised 
to find it poor, sandy, rocky and hilly. The people are poor. Their 
dress generally is a hunting shirt and trousers of coarse cotton yarn. 
Every farmer or planter is his own shoemaker, tanner, tailor, carpenter, 
brasier, and in fact, everything else. Everything comes by the farmer 
or his family. It is the business of the wife and daughter to pick 
cotton and have it brought home, pick it from the seed, spin it, weave 
it, and make it ready for your back. Some of the girls make very handsome 
cloth."

He further says, "The women in this country live the poorest 
lives of any people in the world. Here they must do everything from 
cooking to plowing, and after that they 

End Page 12 --------------------------------------------------------


have no more life than Indian squaws. They hardly ever sit down to 
the table with there husbands, but wait on them like menial servants."

Allowances must be made for this description given by one fresh from 
the old country and used to city life, as was the case with MIKE 
GAFFNEY, the pioneer merchant of our section. The lot of our mothers 
in colonial times, was indeed, a hard one as compared with that of 
women in the mother-countries, of that date, or with the women of 
our time even here. But our mothers were brave and industrious and 
acted their part in life voluntarily and with fortitude.

I have not mentioned the fact that JOHN SARRATT, my grandfather, 
sympathized with KING GEORGE in the Revolution of 1776, and remained 
loyal to the mother country. This subjected himself and my grandmother 
to very sever trials. A party of American soldiers raided his home 
one night, to capture my grandfather; but my grandmother shut the 
door and stood guard of her house on the door steps and forbade the 
soldiers to enter. They "parlied" a little and said, "they 
could not further annoy as brave a women as that," and they went 
away.

                        ----------
                        Chapter V.

The making of liquors in those days was a free privilege. There were 
no barrooms, but liquor was sold at all hotels, inns, and stores, 
and at public gatherings, was usually kept and used in the homes of 
well-to-do people. Nearly every farmer had his fruit distilled and 
spirits were used for making pickles, and in sickness, as well as 
for a beverage.
 
The "decauter" was common on the sideboards, and the hospitable 
host set it before his guest, the preacher of those times generally 
using it as other people.

Drunkenness was not as common nor as fatal as it has

End Page 13 --------------------------------------------------------

been in later times, though nearly all the men and sometimes the women, 
learned to use it freely. I was one of that number. It has become 
a saying that NOBLE SARRATT never tasted any bad liquor. It was 
to him always "good, better, best." I generally found it 
that way. There is a great temptation about liquor, and I would advise 
all persons not to acquire the habit of drinking.


OBEDIAH SARRATT, first son of ANTHONY SARRATT, married SARAH BONNER, 
daughter of BRYANT BONNER and ANNIE HARRIS, who lived near Grassy 
Pond, Spartanburg County, South Carolina. OBEDIAH and wife settled 
first upon Sarratt's Creek near Grassy Pond. SARAH, his wife, 
died there Sept. 24, 1813, aged 48 years, 1 month and 11 days, and 
was buried there. After her death OBEDIAH SARRATT purchased lands 
in York County, S. C., established a ferry on Broad River and 
followed farming and other industries. He accumulated a considerable 
amount of lands, negroes and other personal property. He was a very 
perserving man, with large ideas. but for the disaster of the Confederacy, 
a whole county would scarcely have satisfied him in lands. He was 
an able advocate of the Confederate cause, and much of his means went 
in that direction. He was very liberal to the poor. He died at his 
home near Buffalo Church, York County, S.C. Jan. 28, 1880, aged 
81 and was buried in the grave yard of that church.

There were born to OBEDIAH and SARAH SARRATT, ten children. These 
were ADALINE, EMELINE, MINERVA, MASCILLANY/MISSALANY, LAWSON, JOHN, 
FIDELO, ALIN, CANNILLUS, and COLUMBUS.

ADALINE SARRATT, married D. B. ROSS, third and youngest son of SAMUEL 
S. ROSS and JANE BUCHANNAN, who came from Newark, N. J. and settled 
Northeast Spartanburg on Broad River, three miles from Grassy Pond 
They and their two sons LAWSON BUCHAMMAN ROSS and ORVIEDIEN ALLISON 
ROSS are buried on that place. 

End Page 14 --------------------------------------------------------

D.B. ROSS was born at High Shoals, now Henrietta, Rutherford Co., 
N. C. His father established the first iron works at that place. He 
moved from their and established a similar plant on Sarratt's Creek 
D. B. ROSS was 11 years old then. He kept the works up after his father's 
death till after the late War. At the end of the War he had a large 
number of slaves and much land. After the War, he farmed until stricken 
with paralysis, four years prior to his death, which took place Dec. 
7, 1889, age 78. He was buried at Bulah Church, Grassy Pond, of 
which church he was a member. His wife ADALINE SARRATT, born 1820, 
was a devoted wife and mother, charitable to all. Many now living 
remember her kindness in sickness and other misfortunes. She was an 
invalid and cripple some years prior to her death, which occurred 
June 6, 1893. She was buried beside her husband at Bulah Church. 
This couple have two sons SAMUEL S. ROSS, who resides at Gaffney City, 
and ORVIEDIEN ALLISON ROSS. 

O. A. ROSS, born Dec. 17, 1842, was a soldier in the Confederate War 
and has farmed on the old ROSS homestead since then. He is married 
and is a member of Bulah Church.
 
EMELINE SARRATT, second daughter of O. SARRATT and SALLIE BONNER, 
married PRESTON GOFORTH, son of PRESTON GOFORTH, Sr. and MARY ANN 
BOSTIE who lived near King's Mountain, Chapland Co., S. C. PRESTON, 
Jr., first married MAHIA LINDER, of Spartanburg. They had two children 
MARY ANN and JOHN JEFFERSON GOFORTH. MARY ANN married WILLIAM FULTON 
of Cleveland County, N.C. She now lives a widow at Paris Texas. JOHN 
JEFFERSON GOFORTH married MARY LINDER, they have six children, two 
sons and four daughters; JOHN PRESTON, GEORGIA, DOTTIS, LIMBER, LUEY, 
and DAISY, all single. 

Mrs. JOHN GOFORTH died, 1893, at Parker's Store, Hart County, GA. 

End Page 15 --------------------------------------------------------

PRESTON P. GOFORTH and wife EMELINE SARRATT, now live near Grassy 
Pond where they have resided since their marriage. He is 77 years 
and she is four years younger. They have six children: WILLIAM BOSTIE, 
OBEDIAH LAFAYETTE, SARAH ADALINE, MINERVA, ALIE ZULEIKA, MAGGIE ELIZA, 
PRESTON P. and LOTTIE E.

WILLIAM BOSTIE GOFORTH, the eldest, was killed on the battle field 
near Drandrage, Tenn., Jan. 17, 1861, and his remains brought home 
and buried at Obediah Sarratt's Cemetery.

LAFAYETTE GOFORTH married ELLA HIGGINS of Mcdowell County, 
NC. who died leaving one child, MINNIE GOFORTH. He afterwards married 
his first wife's sister MARY HIGGINS. They still live near Nealsville, 
Mcdowell County.

MINERVA GOFORTH, married E. P. HOLLIS, son of JESSE HOLLIS and HESTER 
BOBO. They have six children living and one dead. The oldest son WALTER 
EDWIN HOLLIS, died at the age of two years. The living are; FRED GOFORTH, 
ANNIE LELIA, HARRY HAMPTON, LUCY GERTRUDE, and ANNIE MAY.

ZULEIKA GOFORTH married JOSEPH THOMPSON WOOD, son of HENRY WOOD 
and SUSIE WADKINS, of Cleveland County, NC. They have five children 
living and two dead; WILLIAM PRESTON, died 1886; DAISY, MAGGIE, CLYDE 
FULTON, JOSEPH HENRY, and LOTTIE ALINE. They live at Waverly, Cleveland 
County, NC.
  
MAGGIE GOFORTH married THOMAS JEFFERSON ALEXANDER, son of WILLIAM 
ALEXANDER and ESTHINE BEAM, of Cleveland. County, NC. They have three 
children; ANNIE LAURIE, ALBERT AARON and JESSE E.

PRESTON P., Jr. and LOTTIE GOFORTH are single and live with their 
parents.

P. P. GOFORTH, Sr. and family are members of old Bulah Church. He 
is a very ingenious and preserving man, having built many corn and 
merchant mills and residences in various counties. He has stood in 
the front ranks in 

End Page 16 --------------------------------------------------------

the purchase of improved machinery, fine blended wool, advocating 
improvement in the culture of crops. Though advanced in years, he 
manages in person his mill and farm.
Pg17
ALIE SARRATT, born Aug. __ 1829, married N. N. THOMASSON, of York Co., 
SC., a son of POLLARD THOMASSON who was born in Louisa Co., VA. and 
ALEDA THOMASSON, a daughter of NATHANIEL THOMASSON, of Indian Land, 
York County, SC. They have four living children and one dead. Dr. 
PRESTON VALDURAN, SALLIE ADALINE, JACOB CARPENTER, and EDGAR. Dr. 
PRESTON VALDURAN THOMASSON, still single, lives at Hickory Grove, 
SC., is in the mercantile business and cotton buying. 

SALLIE ADALINE THOMASSON married JOHN R. HEALAN who is railroad agent 
at Blacksburg, SC. They have three children; WILLIE NEWTON, LUNA MAY 
and EDNA ALIE.

JOHN THOMASSON married AVALONA GIPSON and lives at Earl's Station, 
on the 3C's railroad. The names of their children are; CARL, ETHEL, 
PEARCE and HOMER, the first named being dead. JOHN THOMASSON is a merchant 
and cotton buyer.

EDGAR THOMASSON married ELLA HEALAN, daughter of Rev. JAMES HEALAN, 
and sister to JOHN R. HEALAN. They have two living children; PAUL 
EDGAR and ADALINE. They live at Blacksburg, SC. He is a railroad 
auditor.

N. N. and ALIE (SARRATT) THOMASSON are members of the Blacksburg Baptist 
Church J. R. HEALON and family and ADALINE/ELLA (THOMASSON) HEALON 
are Methodists. PRESTON VALDURAN THOMASSON is a member of the Hickory 
Grove Baptist Church

OBEDIAH SARRATT'S son, CAMILUS married LENORA RAMSEUR, the second 
daughter of FRED LUNAY, son of PHILLIP. Mrs RAMSEUR'S father was DAVID 
RAMSEUR, of Lincoln County, NC. Their four children are; EULAR CLARENCE, 
LILLIAN, BELLE, HATTIE LENORA.

CAMILUS SARRATT entered the Confederate Army in 1861, Com-

End Page 17 --------------------------------------------------------

pany G, 5th S.C. Regiment, JENKINS commanding. He received wounds 
at the first and second battle of Manassas and also at Gaine's 
Mills. This Regiment became the Palmetto Sharpshooters, after General 
JENKINS was killed, in 1862, with Col. JOE WALKER as commander.

After the War in 1867, CAMILUS SARRATT moved to the place he now owns, 
near Sticy's Shoals, Cleveland County, NC. He has made farming his 
principal employment. He has nice buildings and a well improved farm. 
Their children are; EULAR, CLARENCE, BELLE and HATTIE, single and 
living with their parents. The family are members of the Buffalo 
Baptist Church.

COLUMBUS SARRATT married NANNIE MORGAN, daughter of ELIAS MORGAN and 
DELILAH GILMORE. They have three children; MATTIE LEON, ANNIE MAY 
and ELIAS AUGUSTUS. MATTIE LEON SARRATT, is married. Their mother 
died Sept. 1882. Their father COLUMBUS SARRATT, married SALENA MOSS, 
daughter of WILLIAM MOSS and BETSY MOORE, JOHN MOORE'S daughter, who 
lives near Blacksburg, SC. By his second with COLUMBUS SARRATT has; 
WILLIAM LAINAH, PEARL, ELIZABETH and MARY EARLE CUSTER. He has farmed 
his home on the Broad River in Cleveland County, NC. for many years. 
The family are connected with Buffalo Church.

MILFORD CICERO SARRATT, son of MISSALANY SARRATT, was born in July 
16, 1866. He married MATTIE SARRATT, daughter of COLUMBUS SARRATT. 
They have a son LECTOR LELAND SARRATT, and own's a portion of the 
old OBEDIAH SARRATT homestead, on the Broad River, York County, 
SC., Post Office Erwinville, SC.

MINERVA and LAWSON SARRATT live with CICERO SARRATT, their nephew. 
He is a member of the Buffalo Church, while his Aunt MINERVA SARRATT 
is a Methodist and a member of the Bulah Church.

ALFRED R. TURNER son of JOHN TURNER and SUSAN, daughter of JOE HOPPER, 
born May 11, 1827, married UNICA AMELIA PRUIT, daughter of THOMAS 
PRUIT and JANE HAMRICK. He entered the Confederate Army in 1862, 
18th S.C. Regi-

End Page 18 --------------------------------------------------------

ment, Captain P. O. McARTHUR, Col. WALLACE commanding. He served in 
South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, North Carolina and Virginia and 
surrender with LEE at Appomatox, never receiving a single wound. He 
now lives two miles east of Grassy Pond He is a farmer and has no 
children.

DRATON, brother of ALFRED TURNER, born in 1829, married SALLIE daughter 
of Dr. NANCE and MARY LIPSCOMB. They had four children; ADELIA, Dr. 
ALSTON, TEXAS, OCTAVIA.

ADELIA TURNER, married BERRY LEDFORD. ALSTON married JOANIVA HAMRICK, 
daughter of JAMES HAMRICK and LUERETIA JOLLY. They have a family of 
Six children; JATANA, MATTIE, CLEOPHUS, SUSANNA, LAMAL, VAUGHN, and 
JAMES. The parents are both dead and buried at Buffalo Baptist Church.

PHILLIP WALTON TURNER, son of JOHN TURNER, born in 1831, married MARY 
BROCK, daughter of JACOB BROCK, of Jackson County, GA. They had three 
children; JOHN DYE, JAMES, WALTON. JAMES and WALTON are married and 
live in Jackson Co., GA.

RICE TURNER, son of JOHN TURNER, born 1821, married BETSY BROCK. He 
served in the Confederate War and was killed at Petersburg and 
buried at Buffalo Creek Baptist Church, York County, SC. His widow 
and children live in Jackson County, GA.

LAMEL VAUGHN SARRATT, son of CHRISTMAS TURNER, was born July 30, 1864, 
married VICTORIA BLANTON, daughter of X. BLANTON and CASANDRA PEARSON 
of Spartanburg County, SC. VAUGHN and wife have two children, one 
dead; ALTA VOLENA and LESLIE STALLA. VAUGHN is a farmer and lives 
on Sarrett's Creek, near Grassy Pond.

HARRIET C. ELLIS and DAVID H. GRAMBLING, were married in Sep. 2, 1856. 
JOHN SIMPSON BOBO, was married to JOSIA CHAPIN, May 4, 1890.

Mrs. DAVID GRAMBLING, daughter of J. R. ELLIS, and are living at the 
JOHN ELLIS old place, near the ferry. She had

End Page 19 --------------------------------------------------------

only one child, BENJAMIN BRECKENRIDGE ELLIS GRAMBLING who died June 
1890, unmarried.

MELVINA NARCISA ELLIS, third daughter of J. R. ELLIS, married J. C. 
CARTER, a Baptist Minister.

*****************

S. J. SARRATT, son of G. B. SARRATT, and BETSY VINCETTE, born 1850, 
was married to MOLLIE PARKER, daughter of ELIJAH PARKER and MARGARET 
CORUTHERS, of Union County, SC. at the residence of E. PARKER, then 
living near Smith's Ford, on Jan. 4, 1871, by JOHN TOLLESON, a Baptist 
Minister. They have a family of boys and girls; 
1) NORAH, 
2) MAGGIE, 
3) ELIJAH, 
4) WILLIAM, 
5) M. B. SARRATT, 
6) JOHN and 
7) MORRIS CONKLING.

2) MAGGIE SARRATT, married JOE HUMPHRIES, 
son of THOMAS HUMPHRIES, the vocalist.

ELIZAH married a daughter of JAMES PETIT and MILLIE KIRBY of Union.

J. Q. SARRATT left here in 1865 and lived with his Uncle JOHN WEBER,
three years. In 1868 he came home and worked with his father, and
made enough money to buy a jeans suit and got married in it. 

******************

NANCY SARRATT, daughter of NOBEL and DEBORAH SARRATT, married 
JOHN NICHOLSON, son of ANGUS NICHOLSON and SALLIE GWINN, of Chester County, 
SC., Oct. 1 1850. They have eleven children, four boys and seven daughters; 
NOBLE ANGUS, FERNANDEZ, ALSTON and CHARLIE, SARAH, MOLLIE, BELL, GRACE, 
VENITIA, CATHERINE and LIZZIE.

ANGUS NICHOLSON, married HATTIE LEMONS, daughter of P. O. LEMONS and 
EMALINE CAMP, of Grassy Pond, Spartanburg County, SC. They have 
six children; JOHNNIE, EULAR, PEARL, BECKFORF, ETHER.  They now live 
in Camden, SC.

LIZZIE married DRURY HAMRICK, son of ASA HAMRICK and  LUCINDIA BRIDGES, 
of Boiling Springs. They have two boys and four girls; BLANCHE, 
NANNIE, JOHN, BERTHA, CLARENCE and MARGARET. They live also in Boiling 
Springs. Both ALSTON? and CORTEZ are also married; the others are 
single.

NANCY and JOHN NICHOLSON, live near Camden, SC.

End Page 20 --------------------------------------------------------

Last page Blank!

*******************************

Source and Reference Notes!

   File: NOBEL-BK.TXT
   This file Created: Jan. 15, 1982 prsjr
   By Paul R. Sarrett, Jr. (prsjr@aol.com)
   Source: REF: #155; In the sarratt/Sarrett/Surratt Profile!
   "THE SARRATT FAMILY: By Nobel Sarratt, Ed. c1897"

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SFA Series! These records are part of the "Genealogy Computer Package" *** PC-PROFILE *** Volume - II. Sarratt/Sarrett/Surratt Family Profile© Compiled and self Published in Oct. 31, 1989 by Paul R. Sarrett, Jr. with the assistance of my late mother
Mrs. M. Lucille (WILSON) SARRETT (1917-1987) The SFA "Work-Books" were compiled by "States" listing the various families, born, married, died, and a history of that family branch. In 1996 I started "Up-Loading" this material on the Sarratt/Sarrett/Surratt Families of America (SFA)© site. ..prs
Would like to Exchange and Share information on SARRATT / SARRETT / SURRATT Families, contact me at:
E-Mail: Paul R. Sarrett, Jr. Auburn, CA.

Text - Copyright © 1996-2008 Paul R. Sarrett, Jr.
Created: Dec. 01, 1996; Jan 13, 2001;  Jun 20, 2008;