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Obituaries May - June - July - August, 1918

Typed and Contributed by Linda Carpenter
©2002

(Thursday, May 9, 1918)

In Memoriam

Colby B. Quisenberry Chenault was born in Madison County, Ky., May 19, 1831. He was married to Ariminta Harper, daughter of B. S. and Nancy Harper of Trousdale County, Tenn., May 11, 1854. He died on April 4, 1918, being 86 years, 10 months and 15 years of age, having lived with the wife of his youth 63 years, 8 months and 23 days. To this union nine children were born all of whom survive excepting one son who met with a tragic death. These are the fundamental facts relative to a life that has just closed, and amidst the sunshine and shadows of so long a time it is impossible but that the dark hour must come and disappointments grievous to be bourne must be present, yet with an honor that had a high regard for a pure life and righteous dealing, could not be tempted to lie or do one dishonest thing for the love of money at any time. This man, though reared in luxury, met the pinch of proverty without complaint. During the war between the states he left his wife and child 5 years old unprotected, leaving all alone save a hired man, to fight for the cause he loved, and to say that he did his whole duty is not saying too much. He loved what he thought was right and no man had a more indomitable courage than he; indeed he was a terror to the evildoer on all occasions. He was never known so far as the writer is able to recall, have a lawsuit or any sort of difference with anyone, for his sense of fairness was always felt and then, too, there was something about him that made the other fellow feel that he could not go beyond or fall short of the justice he was willing to mete out to every man alike. That Colby Chenault was a truthful, conscientious and honest man is not questioned by anyone. A dear old friend of his write thus about him: "When we think of the long life of brother Colby we cannot grieve for him, Like myself he had lived long past the allotted space of time of the three score years and ten. I dearly loved to meet him. We would recall our young days. My brother, William, loved him like a brother and they enjoyed being together. We have no more such men. Jim Chenault was my brother and Harvey was Will's in age. Many nights or evening we get together at your father's or ours and the joyous times we had, but Colby was the will and fun maker for all. Oh! Those happy days are past. We could not expect them to last forever. We had a fine time when we were young." *(There is more. Please let me know if anyone wants to read the rest.)

(Thursday, May 9, 1918)

In Memoriam

The blessed light of a wife's devotion and a mother's affection was taken from the home and family of Mrs. Louise Strother by her death, which occurred Sunday night, April, and to the bereaved ones was left the shadow

Which is never lifted. Their bereavement is doubly sad by the very constancy of that devotion and affection through a long life of ministering kindness among those she loved. Mrs. Strother was born Jan 1, 1847. When young she was married to J. E. Strother. Ten children were born to this union, two of whom have preceded their mother to the grave. The parents both grew old and gray in lives of devoted service to their home and family, Mrs. Strother having reached the age of 71 years at the time of her death. She had been a faithful member of the Church of Christ for nearly fifty years. *More

(Thursday, May 9, 1918)

In Memoriam

On April 10th, Mrs. Mattie Campbell, wife of David Campbell, deceased, entered into the abundant life. For several years Mrs. Campbell had been in poor health and her greatest ministry had been in her home where her saintly life was a benediction. *More

(Thursday, May 9, 1918)

In Memoriam

Mrs. Fannie C. Neal succumbed to dread pneumonia after an illness of only a few days, her death having occurred April 4th, 1918 at her home on the Liberty Road. Had she lived until September she would have been 81 years old. *More

(Thursday, May 16, 1918)

Fred W. Smith Killed

In R. R. Accident

Fred W. Smith, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Smith of Cotton Town, was killed in a railroad accident near Goodlettsville Sunday. He was employed by the railroad at the time of his death. He is survived by his wife who was before her marriage a few months ago was Miss Cotton, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Cotton of Red River Road. The burial took place Monday afternoon at the Gallatin Cemetery.

(Thursday, May 16, 1918)

Elmore Patterson Dead

Elmore Patterson, a well known colored citizen, died Sunday night at his home at

Hatton Track. He was 80 years of age and enjoyed the respect of the people of this community of both races.

(Thursday, May 16, 1918)

Westmoreland

The ten-day-old infant of Rev. and Mrs. C. M. Charles died Sunday morning, May 12, at 5 o'clock. After a short service at the parsonage the remains of the little one were conveyed to Pleasant Grove where interment was made. Although the death of the infant was not expected it came as a disappointment to the fond parents with whom we deeply sympathize.

(Thursday, June 6, 1918)

Doctor A. G. Douglass

Native of This County Dies In Birmingham

Of Noted Ancestry

Funeral services for Dr. Albert Gallatin Douglass, who died in Birmingham Wednesday,

were held at Nashville Friday morning at 10 o'clock, after which the remains were interred in the family lot in Spring Hill Cemetery. The Rev. T. B. Fisher conducted the funeral services and the pallbearers were from among the friends of Dr. Douglass in his boyhood and young manhood. Dr. Douglass was born in Cage's Bend, Sumner County. His paternal ancesters were among the first comers to that section and a large, though widely-scattered family connection will regret to know of his death, as will the remaining friends of his youth now residing in many states. Dr. Douglass studied medicine under the late Dr. W. D. Haggard, Sr., and graduated from one of the local medical colleges in 1881. In the same year he settled in Birmingham, then a village of 10,000 people, and had resided there ever since, except a few years spent in the west. Dr. Douglass about twenty years ago married a young woman of Dalton, Ga., but she lived only a few years. His nearest living relatives are his brother, Stephen H. ("Toddy") Douglass of the Orman-Partee Saddlery Company, Nashville, and Miss Eliza Douglass of Los Angeles, Cal.

(Thursday, June 6, 1918)

James Gourley Hamilton

Mr. Hamilton died at his home six miles north of Lebanon on the Hartsville Pike Friday afternoon, May 16, 1918, of lung and kidney trouble. Funeral services were conducted at his home Saturday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock by Rev. W. J. Watson, and were concluded at the grave by A. K. Miller, a Confederate comrade, after which the body was laid to rest in the family burying ground. Mr. Hamilton, aside from being a good man was a gallant soldier, a good citizen, straight forward, positive in every utterance. His word was his bond and he dared not to fight at the drop of a hat for right, justice and humanity.

(Thursday, June 13, 1918)

Mrs. Oliver Kirkham

Mrs. Sallie Kirkham of near Fountain Head died Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock aged

63 years. She was a victim of pellagra of which she had suffered for over a year. She was a devout member of the Methodist Church.

(Thursday, June 27, 1918)

Death Claims H. B. Hale

Prominent Citizen of Ocana

Dies Suddenly at Home Saturday.

Hugh B. Hale, one of Sumner County's most prominent and best beloved citizens, died suddenly at noon Saturday at his home on the Long Hollow Pike near Ocana. He had been in excellent health until a few hours before his death which is supposed to have resulted from apoplexy. The deceased was 76 years of age. He was born and reared near Rome in Smith County but removed with his family to this county some 35 years ago. He was a member of General John H. Morgan's Cavalry during the war and as such distinguished himself as a brave Confederate soldier. A short time after the war he joined the Methodist Church and remained faithful communicant until his death. He was a member of the board of trustees of the Douglass Chapel M. E. Church. Mr. Hale was a man of quiet and unassuming disposition but a man of staunch character and an excellent citizen. He was a member of Donelson Bivouac and the Masonic Fraternity, holding his membership with Beech Lodge. He is survived by his wife and one daughter, Miss Reda Hale. Funeral services were conducted at the residence at 3 0'clock p. m. Sunday by Rev. B. J. Duncan. The burial followed at the Gallatin Cemetery with burial service by Donelson Bivonac and by the Masons.

(Thursday, June 27, 1918)

Joe W. Hamlin

Joe W. Hamlin died at his home on the Hartsville Pike Friday at 12 0'clock from blood poisoning following an operation. Funeral services were conducted at the residence Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock by Rev. M. Bunyan Smith of the Gallatin Baptist Church. Burial was at the Gallatin Cemetery. The deceased is survived by his wife and a daughter, Miss Vesta Mai Hamlin. Mr. Hamlin was born in Pulaski, Tenn., and resided there until about two years ago when he moved to Gallatin and has been in the grocery business here since that time, being a member of the Hamlin & Whitsett. During his residence here he has made many friends throughout the county. He was a highly esteemed citizen and had the confidence of all who knew him. The deceased was about 41 years of age and a member of the Methodist Church.

(Thursday, June 27, 1918)

James Polk Kirk

James Polk Kirk died at his home on the Red River Road Tuesday, June 18th. Mr. Kirk was born July 4, 1845. The deceased was a member of the M. E. Methodist Church South. He is survived by a wife and nine children: W. S. Kirk, Oklahoma; Mrs. O. B. Striplin, of Ga.; C. H. Kirk and Mrs. W. Duke of Nashville; Ben Virrinda, Pauline and Jessie Wright Kirk. Funeral services were conducted at the Polk home by Rev. W. B. Woodall.

(Thursday, June 27, 1918)

Mrs. Kate Leap

Mrs. Kate Leap died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. S. Foree on North Water Street, Gallatin, of heart trouble Thursday. Mrs. Leap was born in Indiana and leaves several children there. She was buried Saturday near Campbelsburg, Ky.

(Thursday, June 27, 1918)

Herschel Goostree

Portland, June 21-Herschel Goostree, died last Friday night in an infirmary in Indianapolis, Ind., as the result of an operation due to a relapse of measles. He was 19 years of age. His remains were shipped here and buried at the Goostree burying ground Monday morning, June 17th.

(Thursday, July 4, 1918)

William B. Bruce

William B. Bruce, a prominent citizen of the 3rd district, died at 11:30 a. m. Thursday, June 27th at his home on the Coles Ferry Pike. His death resulted from heart disease from which he had been ill for several months. Mr. Bruce was a farmer and contractor and was 75 years of age. He had been for many years a faithful member of the Christian Church. The burial took place at Gallatin Cemetery at 10:30 a. m. Saturday. He was a generous neighbor and a kind husband and father. The deceased is survived by his wife and by ten children as follows: E. B. and G. H. Bruce of North Carolina, D. C., J. T. and John Bruce of Gallatin, Mrs. F. C. Glenn and Mrs. P. S. Caldwell of Nashville, Mrs. Swaney Stratton of Hendersonville, Mrs. W. H. Phelps and Mrs. Lillie Cocke of Gallatin.

(Thursday, July 4, 1918)

In Memoriam

James P. Kirk was born seventy-three years ago and was the last surviving member of a large family of children. Although he had been confined to his home many months, he was critically ill only a few hours before passing away, June 18, at his home on the Red River Road. He was twice married, his first wife being Miss Cassie Rogers. Seven children were born to this union, two of whom with their mother preceded him to the Spirit Land. The second wife was Miss Alice Wright, who together with the four children born to this union, several grandchildren and a large number of nieces and nephews survive him. He was a faithful husband and an indulgent father. He had been a member of the Methodist Church since childhood. Funeral services were conducted at his residence by Rev. W. B. Woodall, after which the remains were interred in the family burial ground. A Niece.

(Thursday, July 18, 1918)

Mrs. Mary B. Whiteside

Mrs. Mary B. Whiteside, wife of J. D. Whiteside of Gallatin, died Tuesday morning at 5 o'clock at the home of her niece, Mrs. Frank Dulin on South Water Street. She had been in declining heath for several months and her death was not unexpected. Mrs. Whiteside was 50 years of age, and a daughter of the late I. N. Guthrie, a well-known and prominent citizen of Sumner County. She was a noble Christian woman, having been a member of the Baptist Church since early childhood. Besides her husband she is survived by two brothers, F. C. and Henry Guthrie of Nashville, and one sister, Mrs. Livar of Mississippi. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. A. R. Shaw at the Dulin residence Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock, burial following at Gallatin Cemetery.

(Thursday, July 18, 1918)

Mrs. Marguerite H. Dorris

Mrs. Marguerite H. Dorris, wife of Sidney C. Dorris, died at their home near Shackle Island Saturday morning, July 13. The funeral services were held at Beech Church Sunday afternoon by the Rev. Mr. Watson of the Baptist Church and the Rev. Mr. Byers of the Presbyterian Church in the presence of a large concourse of sorrowing relatives and friends. Mrs. Dorris was a consistent member of the New Hope Baptist Church, a young woman of genial disposition and of charming personality, loved by a large circle of friends. Before her marriage she was Miss Marguerite Hubinger of Keokuk, Iowa, and she and Sidney C. Dorris, a prominent lumberman and highly respected citizen of this county, were married about seven years ago, and their married life has been a very happy one. They have three small children, which fact adds to the peculiar sadness of the death of the wife and mother. The death of this popular and much loved young woman has cast a gloom over the entire community. The News joins the many sorrowing friends in expressing to the bereaved husband the sincerest sympathy.

(Thursday, July 18, 1918)

Mrs. Mollie Hamilton

Mrs. Mollie Hamilton, wife of the late George Hamilton formerly of the Shackle Island community, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. W. P. Honeycutt in Nashville, Sunday morning, July 14, 1918. The remains were interred in Beech Cemetery Monday morning at 10 o'clock with services conducted at the grave by Rev. W. S. Marshall of Nashville.

(Thursday, July 18, 1918)

Sam Cunningham Dies

From Knife Wounds

Sam Cunningham died last Thursday from knife wounds received in an altercation with Wise Campbell, Monday, July 8. The trouble, it is understood, arose about some wheat. The affair occurred on Cunningham's farm near Station Camp Creek. Campbell is out on bond.

(Thursday, July 18, 1918)

Westmoreland

Mrs. Etta Goad, wife of Wade Goad, died at a hospital in Nashville Monday, July 8, and her remains were brought to Westmoreland on the afternoon train Tuesday and were then taken to Macon County, her home at the time of her death, where the burial took place Wednesday in the presence of a large congregation of friends and relatives. Mrs. Goad formerly lived in Westmoreland where she had many friends. She is survived by her husband, her mother, Mrs. Walden, one brother, Dr. V. A. Walden, and a large family of children.

(Thursday, July 18, 1918)

Shackle Island

C. C. Waggoner and mother of Nashville attended the funeral of their cousin, Mrs. Sidney Dorris, Sunday.

Several from this place attended the funeral of Mrs. Carriene Dillon Mitchener at Hendersonville.

(Thursday, August 8, 1918)

Death claims Dr. J. C. Baker

Prominent Sumner County Physician and Citizen Passes Away

Dr. Julian C. Baker, prominent physician, and one of Sumner County's best-known citizens, died at 1 o'clock a. m. Tuesday, August 6, at his home on the Red River Road. He had been in declining health for several months and three weeks ago went to a Nashville hospital for an operation, hoping that thus his health might be restored. Physicians at the hospital found that he was too weak for an operation and he was brought back home where he gradually sank to his death. The deceased was a son of the late Leonidas Baker and was in the 61st year of his age. He was a graduate of Vanderbilt Medical College and for many years had been a successful practitioner in his home community. He is survived by an only brother, Capt. Jack Baker, with whom he lived. Dr. Baker was a man of high education and personal attainment. He was a great lover of nature and a genial gentleman of the old school who numbered his friends by the hundreds. His death is the occasion of sorrow to many. Funeral services were conducted at the residence at 4 o'clock Tuesday afternoon by Rev. R. J. Craig, of Cookeville, former pastor of the Gallatin M. E. Church and Rev. B. J. Duncan. The burial followed at the Gallatin Cemetery.

(Thursday, August 8, 1918)

Mrs. C. L. Lawrence

Mrs. Cynthia L. Lawrence died at 4 o'clock a. m. yesterday at the home of her brother, Thomas S. Ellis, on North Water Street. Mrs. Lawrence was a native of Sumner County and was born July 12, 1844. Her husband, the late Thomas J. Lawrence, preceded her to the grave only a few months. She was a devout member of the Christian Church. The burial took place at the Gallatin Cemetery at 5 o'clock p. m. yesterday.

(Thursday, August 8, 1918)

Mrs. Walter Penn

Dies From Injury

Mrs. Walter Penn of Greenwood died at 6 o'clock yesterday morning at her home as a result of burns received the night before. Mrs. Penn was passing from her room to the veranda with a lighted lamp in her hand. A screen door flew back and struck the lamp, breaking it and scattering the oil, set fire to her clothing. She was so severely burned that death resulted a few hours later. Mrs. Penn is survived by her husband and four small children. Before her marriage she was Miss Lucy Neel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Neel of Dry Fork.

(Thursday, August 8, 1918)

Pleasant Hill

The remains of Mrs. Wile, who committed suicide, were laid to rest at this place Sunday in the presence of a large concourse. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Carley Hunter, have the sympathy of many relatives and friends in this community.

(Thursday, August 15, 1918)

John Fry Passes Away

Well Known Business Man and Former Mayor Dies Tuesday Night

John Fry, one of Gallatin's most popular citizens, a well known business man and former Mayor of the city, died at 11:30 Tuesday night at his home on West Main Street. He retired from business several years ago because of ill health from the effects of which ill health he gradually sank to his death. Mr. Fry was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, near Monongahela, on July 20, 1849. He came to this county in 1870. Following this for 35 years he conducted a successful business at Gallatin. He owned and operated a tan yard and a harness and saddlery shop and meat market. In these lines of business, to which he gave strict personal attention, he acquired a comfortable fortune. On December 24, 1878, he was married to Miss Nannie E. Parnell of this county. He is survived by his wife and three daughters as follows: Mrs. Charles Murphy of Nashville and Mrs. Margaret Franklin and Miss Nancye Fry of Gallatin. He is survived also by the following brothers and sisters: Messrs. Henon, Abe, Al and W. H. Fry, Miss Belle Fry and Mrs. Bray Mitchell of this county, Mrs. James Evans and Mrs. Henry Furmer of Charlarol, Pennsylvania. From 1881 to the time of his death Mr. Fry served various terms as a member of the board of Alderman, and in January, 1915 was elected to fill out the unexpired term of Will B. Brown as Mayor of Gallatin. At the end of his term as mayor he declined to be a candidate for re-election though in all probability he would have had no opposition. Mr. Fry was a Republican in politics and for many years was the leader of his party in this county. He was a good citizen of the highest integrity and throughout a long life enjoyed the entire esteem and confidence of the citizenship of this community. Funeral services were conducted at the residence at 4 o'clock p. m. yesterday by Dr. A. R. Shaw, pastor of the Gallatin Presbyterian Church. The burial followed at the Gallatin Cemetery.

 

 


Sumner County, Tennessee Obituary Index

Genealogist's Companion to Research in Sumner County, Tennessee