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Obituaries January - February, 1918

Typed and Contributed by Linda Carpenter
©2002

(Thursday, January 17, 1918)

Death Follows Long Illness

Death has claimed another venerable citizen of Gallatin, Mr. Benjamin Seay died Friday night at his home on East Main Street following an illness of several months. He was born in Buckingham County, Virginia, on March 9th, 1839. When the Civil War broke out he volunteered in the Confederate Army, enlisting in Company A, 57th Virginia Regiment, Picketts's division, Longstreet's corps. He fought through the entire four years of the war and was paroled by General U. S. Grant at Farmville, Virginia. He had an honorable record as a soldier and enjoyed the highest esteem of his comrades. He was a contractor by trade and as long as he was physically able worked industriously at his vocation. Mr. Seay was first married to Miss Nannie T. Coleman on December 12th, 1866. To this union two children were born, George Seay of Gallatin and Mrs. Sallie Jones. Following the death of his first wife he was married on October 4th, 1875, to Miss Ella M. Shackleford, who survives him. Of this union the following children survive: Alderman Frank Seay, Misses Nanie Bell, Mary, Virginia and Agusta Seay. Mr. Seay was not a member of any church but was a professed believer in the Christian religion. He was an excellent citizen and throughout a long life had the confidence and respect of all his neighbors and associates. The burial took place Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Gallatin Cemetery.

(Thursday, January 17, 1918)

Sam Barnes

Sam Barnes, age 46 years, died Sunday night at his home near South Tunnel. The burial took place Tuesday at Salem with funeral services by Rev. R. H. Hudgens.

(Thursday, January 17, 1918)

J. Branch Donelson

Dies in Birmingham

J. Branch Donelson, for many years a prominent citizen of Gallatin and ex-Mayor of this place, died suddenly of heart failure at his home in Birmingham at 8:30 o'clock Sunday night. He was buried in Birmingham Tuesday. Mr. Donelson was the only surviving son of the late General Daniel S. Donalson. His wife was Miss Jennie Alexander, daughter of the late Mr. James Alexander, a well known citizen of Gallatin. Mr. Donelson is survived by his wife and by four children as follows: Eugene and John Branch Donelson, and Mrs. Underwood, formerly Miss Eurma Donelson, all of Birmingham and Mrs. Joe Chew of Houston, Texas.

(Thursday, January 17, 1918)

Westmoreland

Mrs. Nellie Wix, wife of Ben Wix, died at her home Tuesday, Jan. 8th, after a lingering illness the result of typhoid fever. Funeral services were conducted Wednesday at Pleasant Grove Church by Rev. Mr. McReynolds, after which interment was made in the Pleasant Grove Cemetery. Mrs. Wix is survived by her husband and three children: also by her father, Mr. James Brown, and six brothers, Squire Robert Brown, John Brown, Otis Brown, Martin Brown, Brodie Brown and Rev. J. T. Brown of Culleoka, and one sister, Mrs. Fannie Troutt.

(Thursday, January 24, 1918)

Chas. A. Foster Passes Away

Prominent Citizen Succumbs Friday To Attack of Pneumonia

Chas. A. Foster, one of Gallatin's most prominent citizens and business men, died at 6 o'clock Friday morning at his home on South Water Street following a short illness of pneumonia. His death brings sincere sorrow to relatives and his many friends. Mr. Foster was born in Gallatin on February 1, 1849. He was a son of the late Mr. John B. Foster, a former mayor of Gallatin. In early life he served as a printer's apprentice under Col. Thomas Boyers of Gallatin. Following this he worked as a printer in Lebanon, Tenn., and Russellville, Ky., and after this was for several years a cow boy in the West. Returning to Gallatin he engaged in business and was associated with the Walter Witherspoon Grocery Company. In later years he was a member of the grocery firms of Foster & Brown and Foster & Wemyss. Because of ill health he retired from active business several years ago. He was interested in the banking business and was for many years a director in the First National Bank of Gallatin. He was a devout member of the Gallatin Methodist Church, and at the time of his death had long been a member of the board of stewards. Mr. Foster was a man of purest moral character and of the highest integrity. He was a man of strong convictions and at all times stood unflinchingly for what he thought to be the right. He is survived by a brother, Mr. John B. Foster of Gallatin, and two sisters, Mrs. Minnie Brown of Gallatin and Mrs. Ellen Jones of Dardanelle, Arkansas. Funeral services were conducted at the residence Saturday at 11 a. m. by Rev. R. H. Hudgens. The burial followed at the Gallatin Cemetery.

(Thursday, January 24, 1918)

Died in Nashville

Mrs. Mable Apgar Bloodworth died Wednesday morning at 1 o'clock at St. Thomas Hospital, Nashville. The remains will reach Gallatin today on the 1 o'clock train and burial will follow at Gallatin Cemetery.

(Thursday, January 24, 1918)

Sam Hartman Killed By Leo Wege

Sam Hartman was shot and killed Friday at Nashville in his office at the Ideal Laundry by Leo Wege also of Nashville. The trouble arose over a business settlement. Hartman was for many years a prominent brewer of Nashville and at one time a few years ago owned Fairview Farm in this county.

(Thursday, January 24, 1918)

Claude Hassell

Claude Hassell of Cotton Town died January 15 at the home of his mother, Mrs. Blount Hassell, Claude had fought bravely for many months against the great, White Plague, and his death, while not unexpected, was a new sorrow to his home and community, he being the third member of the family who has crossed to the Great Beyond recently. Claude was an industrious, quiet and mainly boy of eighteen, was loyal to his home, his friends, his church and school. The world is much better for having those like him pass this way. The burial took place at the Hassell burying ground near Cotton Town Thursday at 2 p. m.

(Thursday, January 24, 1918)

Epperson Springs

On the 19th of Jan. 1918, God saw fit in his omnipotent wisdom to call home Mary, the wife of Andrew Merriman, in the full bloom of womanhood, aged 29 years. She had been a patient sufferer of the "White Plague" for several weeks. In her sweet and gentle way she won the hearts of all who knew her. Her generous heart and hands were always extended to those in need. The neighborhood in which she had always lived feels the loss of one of its purest women, and extends its sympathy to her husband and little son, J. T., her father, Joe Law, and two brothers, Dr. B. A. Law and Bud Law, who survive her. The funeral services were conducted at Pleasant Grove by Bro. Pearson of Scottsville, Ky., and Bro. Harrison of Westmoreland, Tenn. A Friend.

(Thursday, January 31, 1918)

Mrs. William Clark

Mrs. William Clark, wife of William Clark, formerly of Gallatin, died Friday, January 10, at her home at Jefferson, Texas, after a brief illness from pneumonia. She was a daughter of Dr. Goodlett and a sister of the wife of the late Major W. H. Joyner of Gallatin.

(Thursday, January 31, 1918)

John F. Duncan

The remains of John F. Duncan, who died at Live Oak, Fla., Friday reached Gallatin Sunday morning and were taken to the residence of his brother, Jas. Duncan on Winchester Street, where later they were carried to Hartsville for interment. The remains were accompanied to Gallatin by a brother and sister of the deceased, Mrs. Morris and Walter Duncan. Mr. Duncan was unmarried and about 52 years of age. He was a cousin of Mrs. W. T. Jones of Gallatin.

(Thursday, January 31, 1918)

Mrs. Juliet Zdanowicz

The many friends of Mrs. Juliet Zdanowicz will be greatly pained to learn of her death in the early hours of Monday, January twenty-eight. While she had been seriously ill for several months, the illness only reached a critical stage some days ago, and even then her strong vitality and courageous struggle gave hope until the very last. She passed away at the old homestead near Salem surrounded by her brothers and sisters who had watched over her most tenderly. Her son, who is on the staff of the army Y. M. C. A. at Fort Oglethorpe, was also able to be with her. The deceased was the widow of Prof. Casimir Zdanowicz, who at the time of his death, was professor of modern languages at Vanderbilt University and had been a distinguished educator of this county. Her maiden name was Juliet Glass Douglass, and her father, the late Cullen E. Douglass, was for many years a magistrate and leading citizen of Sumner County. Mrs. Zdanowicz resided for a long time in Nashville and more recently had made her home in Madison, Wisconsin, with her son who is on the faculty of the state university there, but now on a leave of absence for war service. In both places her active, energetic disposition, warm sympathy and cordial hospitality won her numerous friends. Funeral services were conducted at the old home Tuesday morning at eleven o'clock by Reverend W. F. Tillett of Vanderbilt, a former colleague of her husband, assisted by Reverend A. R. Shaw of the Gallatin Presbyterian Church. Interment was in the Gallatin Cemetery. Besides her son, Dr. Casimir D. Zdanowicz, she leaves the following brothers and sisters: Misses Henrvella, Nannie, Delia, and Mary Douglass, Mrs. W. J. Douglass, Mrs. Wm. L. Robb, *(The rest of this obit was cut out.)

PERSONAL SECTION

Richard E. Douglass of Nashville was here Tuesday to attend the funeral of his sister, Mrs. Juliet Zdanowicz.

Dr. Casimir Zdanowicz was called here several days ago from Fort Oglethorpe by the serious illness and death of his mother.

Mrs. Augusts Aycock and daughter, Miss Annie Aycock of Nashville were here Friday to attend the burial of Mrs. B. F. Stainback.

(Thursday, January 31, 1918)

In Memoriam

After an illness of nearly a year, Claude Hassell died Tuesday night, Jan. 15, 1918, a victim of tuberculosis at the home of his mother, Mrs. Roberta Hassell. He obeyed the gospel two years ago under the preaching of Elder L. L. Yegley and remained a faithful member of the Church of Christ at Cotton Town until his death. He is survived by the following brothers and sisters: Virgil Hassell, Montgomery, Ala.; Henry Hassell, Gallatin; Mrs. Henry Taylor, South Tunnel; Mrs. Loren Baker and Eugene Hassell of Cotton Town. From a human standpoint we cannot understand why he was taken in the morning of his life, being only eighteen years of age, and it is peculiarly sad, especially so to the mother and little brother who looked to him for support. Elder D. M. Hamilton, who conducted the funeral service, paid a splendid tribute to his boy's chaaracter and spoke words of comfort to the grief stricken family, which for the second time in two years has been stricken by death. The boys of his Sunday school class acted as pall bearers, after which the remains were interred in the family burying ground. A Friend.

(Thursday, February 7, 1918)

Mrs. Sallie Davis

Mrs. Sallie Davis, aged 91 years, died Thursday, Jan. 31, at the home of her grandson, E. W. Davis near Number One. Her death was due to the infirmities of old age. Mrs. Davis was a devout Christian lady having been for 60 years a faithful member of the Methodist Church. The burial was at Pleasant Grove Friday with funeral services by Rev. C. N. Simmons.

(Thursday, February 7, 1918)

Mrs. Rachael Corum

Mrs. Rachael Corum, aged 77 years, died Thursday, January 31, at her home in Belote's Bend. She had been for many years a member of the Baptist Church. The burial occurred Friday at the family burying ground near Corum's Hill.

(Thursday, February 7, 1918)

Robert N. Morris

Robert Newton, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert O. Morris, of Dennison, Texas, died at Bowling Green last Friday evening Jan. 25, at the home of Mrs. Morris' mother, Mrs. Margaret Newton. They were there on a visit when the boy was taken ill. He was a grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Rob Morris of this place. Portland Herald.

(Thursday, February 7, 1918)

Mrs. Cora Lee Edmonds

The Cotton Town community was shocked and made a sorrowing one when the death angel paused and took from among us last Friday one of our most lovable young woman, Mrs. Cora Lee Edmonds, wife of Richard Edmonds, and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.B. Barrett, at whose home her death occurred. Mrs. Edmonds was in the bloom of young womanhood, being in her 26th year at the time of her death. Though her span of life on this earth has been brief in point of years it has been rich and full in deeds of love and service to all who came in touch with her. Cora Lee, in a most peculiar way, was quiet and unobtrusive in her daily walks, but those who really knew her, knew her to love her for the sweet simplicity of her character. She was ever a dutiful and respectful daughter, a faithful and affectionate wife, a true and loyal friend, and an earnest and consecrated Christian. With the bereaved husband and the sorrowing father and mother the whole community are in deepest sympathy. May we not see that our loss is Heaven's gain and sometimes, somewhere, we shall see and know Cora Lee again, and her going only strengthens the chain which will forever hold her in the hearts of those she loved. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Robert Woodall of the Baptist Church at Cotton Town Sunday at 10 o'clock, after which the body was laid to rest at the Gallatin Cemetery. A Friend.

(Thursday, February 7, 1918)

Hartsville News

Mrs. Elizabeth Pardue, one of the oldest women of the county, died last Sunday at the home of her son, M. F. Pardue, near Templow. She had been ill for about three weeks, pneumonia development, that together with the infirmities of age, causing her death.

(Thursday, February 7, 1918)

In Memoriam

George T. Charlton departed this life early Thursday morning January 24th, 1918. He has gone to that bright and happy home that the Savior has prepared for all that live a true Christian life as Mr. Charlton did. He was a true Christian everyday. He was a devoted husband, a loving father and a kind neighbor. He was always ready to lend a helping hand and made friends where ever he went. Grieve not, dear family, for you can go to him, for the Savior said: "I go to prepare a place for you," and we may have a hope of meeting him in that Celestial City in the sky where its walls are decked with jewels, its gates are made of peal and its streets are of gold. No more sad good byes and no more parting tears are shed, for he is only asleep in Jesus a waiting the judgment day. Mr. Charlton leaves a wife and eight children besides a host of friends to mourn his death. He was a member of the Pleasant Grove Methodist Church. A precious one from us is gone, A voice we loved is still; A place is vacant in his home Which never can be filled. A Neighbor.

(Thursday, February 7, 1918)

Westmoreland

Mrs. Sallie Davis, known throughout Sumner County as "Aunt Sallie" Davis, died Thursday morning, Jan. 31st, at the home of her grandson, Mr. Ras Davis, of near Gallatin. "Aunt Sallie" had for some time prior to her death been suffering to some extent with indigestion, but was not thought to be in immediate danger until Thursday, when she became seriously worse, death soon following. Her remains were taken to Pleasant Grove Friday where a large crowd was present to attend the funeral services which were conducted by Rev. C. N. Simmons, after which interment was made in the Pleasant Grove Cemetery. "Aunt Sallie" had passed her ninety first year, but her faculties were remarkably preserved for one her age. She is survived by several grandchildren and great grandchildren who deeply loved her in life and who will cherish many fond memories of her. A great many other relatives and friends are left who regret that she had to go even though she had far outlived the time allotted unto man.

(Thursday, February 14, 1918)

Mrs. Mary J. Gillespie

Mrs. Mary Jane Gillespie, widow of the late Mr. Foster Gillespie, died suddenly at noon Thursday, February 7th, at her home on the Dobbins Road. Her death is supposed to have resulted from heart failure. The deceased was 66 years of age and before her marriage to Mr. Gillespie was Miss Mary Jane Wallace. For many years she had been a faithful member of the Christian Church. She was a kind and generous hearted neighbor and friend and a devoted wife and mother. She is survived by two brothers, J. R. and Ed Wallace of this county and by four sons and one daughter, as follows: Wallace, Jesse, Charles and Robert Gillespie of this county, and Mrs. Gus Enoch of Nashville. Funeral services were conducted at the family residence at 10 o'clock a. m. Friday by Rev. H. L. Olmstead. The burial followed at the Gallatin Cemetery.

(Thursday, February 14, 1918)

Capt. J. N. McKoin

Captain John Nicholas McKoin, a prominent ex-Confederate soldier and citizen of the Ninth District, died at six o'clock a. m. Friday, February 8th, at his home on the Douglass Pike following an illness of only a few days. He was born in Clarksville, Tennessee, on December 4th, 1842. At the age of 19 years he joined the Confederate Army and was awarded the rank of captain of a company from Clarksville which belonged to Helm's 1st Kentucky Regiment. He fought bravely through the war, the end of which found him a prisoner at Rock Island, Illinois. Following the war he returned to Clarksville and later was married to Miss Emma Sugg of that place. To this union four children were born, two of whom died in infancy. He is survived by his wife and two sons, John G. McKoin of Savannah, Georgia, and Henry S. McKoin of this county. He was a devoted husband and father and was idolized by his family. The burial was at Clarksville Saturday with funeral services by Rev. J. W. Cherry.

(Thursday, February 14, 1918)

Prof. John Jackson Killed By Tree

Former Sheriff Frank Patton of the 6th district was in Gallatin yesterday. He brought news of the accidental death of Prof. John Jackson on Tuesday at his home near White Hill. Prof. Jackson was cutting down a tree when a limb fell striking him on the back of the neck and killing him instantly. Prof. Jackson was a brother of Judge George W. Jackson of the 6th district and a prominent and highly esteemed citizen of the White Hill community.

(Thursday, February 14, 1918)

Capt. H. A. Parish

The following article relative to the death of Capt. H. A. Parish is taken from the Sherman (Texas) Courier of January 20th: The whole city was shocked to learn yesterday of the death of Captain H. A. Parish, which occurred yesterday morning at his home, 512 North Walnut Street. Captain Parish was a native of Gallatin, Tennessee, having been born there on May 17, 1833, and would have, had he lived to his next birthday, been 85 years of age. He came to Sherman in 1863. In 1868 he was married to Miss Annie Elise Fenet, who survives him. The following children also survived: A. K. Parish of Sherman, H. A. Parish, Jr., of McKinney, Frank F. Parish of Graham, and Misses Mary and Annie Parish of this city. Captain Parish was one of the first movers in the organization of the Episcopal Church here and was always active in its affairs. Giving much and doing much to advance its interests. He served as superintendent of the Sunday school and anywhere that he could be of use. For four years he did good service in the cause of the Confederacy and left a revered name among his associates in the army. As a Christian, citizen, soldier, patriot, he stood four-square to the world. He left a good example to the world, an honored name to his family, and host of friends who gave him love and respect in life and honor his memory in death. The funeral services will be held this afternoon at 3 o'clock at the family home, followed by interment in West Hill Cemetery.

(Thursday, February 14, 1918)

J. K. P. McGlothlin

Portland, Feb. 8-J. K. P. McGlothlin died Thursday at his home one mile east of town, aged 70 years. He was a member of the Christian Church for a number of years. He is survived by his wife and three children. He is also survived by two brothers, W. T. and J. M. McGlothlin. Mr. McGlothlin was a very successful farmer and fruit grower and was first to venture into the strawberry industry years ago.

(Thursday, February 14, 1918)

Mrs. John F. Searcy

Mrs. Annie Searcy, wife of John F. Searcy, died at her home near Mulloys Tuesday morning, February 5, of tuberculosis, aged 28 years. She was the daughter of the late Mr. W. H. Johnson of the Parham community. Aside from her husband she leaves her mother and three brothers to survive her, Will A. Johnson, who lives with his mother, J. O. and R. E. Johnson of Nashville.

(Thursday, February 14, 1918)

O. J. Staggs Dies Monday at Portland

Portland, Feb. 9.-Mr. O. J. Staggs a highly respected citizen of this community died Monday morning, Feb. 4th, of heart trouble, age 61 years. Mr. Staggs had been in usual good health up until Friday night; at which time he felt his first attack and it was almost without warning to the family that the end would come so soon. Mr. Staggs was a member of the Baptist Church and a man of a great deal of integrity. Funeral services were conducted from the residence by Mr. R. D. Moore and interment at Portland Cemetery.

(Thursday, February 14, 1918)

Mrs. Mary Wilson

Mrs. Mary Wilson of the White House community, died Wednesday evening, Feb. 6th, with paralysis, age 74 years. Funeral services were conducted by the pastor of the Methodist Church and her remains were laid to rest in the city cemetery.

(Thursday, February 14, 1918)

Fairfield

Death has again visited our community and taken from our midst our friend and neighbor, Mr. Abanathy Graves. The deceased was the son of Alford and Angeline Graves. He was born in this county in the year of 1856, and departed this life Jan. 25th, 1918. He was married to Miss Fannie Cline, daughter of George W. and Alsie Cline, in the year 1876. To this union was born seven children, two of whom have gone on before. He leaves a widow and five children-four boys and one girl, to mourn his loss. He professed faith in Christ nearly forty years ago. He did not take an active part in public affairs, but seemed to be content by living a peaceable and quiet life in his home. Some time ago when informed that the end was near he said that the religion he had received several years ago had often given him comfort and consolation in his deepest troubles and he felt that it would carry him through. Just a short time before he died he asked for the old testament which was placed in his lap, and he went down unto death singing and shouting praises unto God. He leaves four brothers, Bird, Wilford and Dock, who were with him most of the time for the last few days before he died, and Morgan Graves of Portland, this county who was unable to visit him probably because of the extreme cold weather. To all the connection we extend our deepest sympathy, and to his dear companion who has suffered the greatest loss of any of us. He was laid to rest at Fairfield the following day with funeral services conducted by Rev. G. D. McReynolds. A Friend.

(Thursday, February 14, 1918)

Cotton Town

Death has again visited our community and removed one of our beloved friends, Mrs. Etta Dudney, aged 56 years who departed this life Friday evening, February 1st, 1918, at 6 o'clock. Mrs. Dudney had been sick only a short time. On January 20th she was stricken with pneumonia, death resulting almost immediately. She was a member of the Christian Church. Her example as a Christian neighbor, wife and mother was worthy of emulation. Mrs. Dudney was born in Jackson County, Tennessee, Nov. 9, 1861, and was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. P. Hale. She was married to Mr. Kenner Dudney Sept. 7, 1881. She was the mother of thirteen children of whom twelve survive her as follows: Mrs. Maggie Gregory of Fountain Head, Mrs. Mary Allen, Mrs. Nannie Meadows, Misses Ida and Bennet Dudney of Nashville, and Mrs. Carrie Dunagan of Dyer, Tenn., Mrs. Mattie Whitaker of Oklahoma, George Dudney of Greenville, S. C., Frank, Joshua, and Lola B. of this place.

(Thursday, February 21, 1918)

Westmoreland

Mrs. Mary Jones, wife of Wiley Jones, died at her home on the Epperson Pike Friday afternoon, Feb. 15. Her death was a great shock to the community as she had been ill but one day and was not thought to be in immediate danger until a few minutes before her death, which was the result of an attack of gallstones. Funeral services were conducted at the home Saturday evening at 7:30 o'clock by Rev. C. M. Charles. Early Sunday morning the remains were conveyed to Long Creek Cemetery where interment was made. Mrs. Jones is survived by her husband and three children, Misses Hester and Versie Meador and Perry Meador, children by her former marriage. She is also survived by her father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Johnson of Macon County. The family had been living in Westmoreland one week at the time of her death, but as they had been former residents of this place, they had many friends here who deeply sympathize with them in their sorrow. Mrs. Jones was known to be a kind neighbor, an affectionate mother and a Christian woman.

(Thursday, February 21, 1918)

Mrs. Lula Bradley

Bethpage, Feb. 15. - Mrs. Lula Bradley, wife of the late Charles Bradley, died Thursday at the home of her father, T. N. Hunter, after a lingering illness. She was 36 years of age and a devout member of the Methodist Church at Mt. Vernon. She was of a sweet, amiable disposition, and loved by everyone. She is survived by three sons, Harris, Harry and Roy; besides her father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. T. N. Hunter. She was buried today.

(Thursday, February 21, 1918)

Wm. H. Edwards Dies In Los Angeles

The following account of the death of Wm. H. Edwards, formerly of Saundersville, this county, is taken from the Nashville Banner of Friday: Mr. Jo Edwards, who resides on the Gallatin Road, received a telegram last night bringing the news of the death of his brother, W. H. Edwards, which occurred in Los Angeles. The latter was born in Nashville, but spent his boyhood and early manhood in Saundersville, Sumner County. He removed to Los Angeles about thirteen years ago. He was 65 years of age and his death came suddenly from paralysis due to a clot on the brain. Mr. Edwards is survived by his wife, Mrs. Robina Foster Edwards, a sister of r. E. W. Foster of this city, and one child, Miss Mary Edwards; two sisters, Mrs. John McCreery of Nashville and Mrs. Woods Foster of Los Angeles, and one brother, Jo Edwards, of this city. The funeral takes place today in Los Angeles. Mr. Edwards had many friends in Nashville as well as in Sumner County, and was a man beloved by all who knew him. He possessed an unusually genial nature and all his dealings with his fellows was on a high plane. He was a devoted member of the Presbyterian Church. The news of his death here is received with profound sorrow.

 


Sumner County, Tennessee Obituary Index

Genealogist's Companion to Research in Sumner County, Tennessee