Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

Obituaries February - March, 1910

Typed and Contributed by Linda Carpenter

©2002

(Thursday, February 3, 1910)

James Hicks, an old Confederate soldier died at his home near Buntin's Mill last Thursday morning, aged 76 years. His remains were brought here for burial and were interred Friday afternoon in the Brush Cemetery. While the burial was in progress Mrs. Sallie Ann Honeycutt, a sister of Mr. Hicks, who was in attendance at the burial fell backward and expired. It was thought her death was due to heart failure. Mrs. Honeycutt was 73 years of age, and was the widow of Harbard Honeycutt. She was the mother of eight children, four of whom survive. Her remains were buried beside her brother in the Brush Cemetery Sunday morning with prayers at the grave.

(Thursday, February 3, 1910)

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Badgett died here last Sunday morning at 5:30 o'clock. Mr. Badgett had just recently moved here from Trousdale County. They have the sympathy of the entire community in the loss of their only child.

(Thursday, February 3, 1910)

At 4 o'clock Thursday Jan. 20, the Angel of Death entered the home of Mrs. Cam Stinson and bore away the gentle spirit her only daughter, Nettie. Her death came after a long and painful illness. The deceased was twenty-two years of age and was much devoted to her mother and two brothers. She professed religion several years ago but had never joined any church. Everything was done for her that would in any way stay the hand of death…………….the finally came as a relief …..sufferings. Mrs. Stinson and her sons wish to extend their thanks to neighbors and friends for sympathy and many kind acts during the protracted illness of the daughter and sister.

(Thursday, February 3, 1910)

Dr. Collier Dead

Dr. Robert S. Collier died Sunday at the home of his sister, Mrs. M. B. Morton, in Nashville. His remains were taken to his old home at Franklin, Ky., Monday afternoon for burial. Dr. Collier was an Osteopathic physician and was a brother of Dr. J. R. Collier who died at his home in Louisville Christmas day. Another brother, Wm. B. Collier died Jan. 17 in Anaconda, Montana. Three brothers, Dr. J. Earl Collier of Nashville, Dr. Hix F. Collier of Waterbury, Conn., Chas. E. Collier of Eddyville, Ky., and a sister, Mrs. M. B. Morton of Nashville survive him.

(Thursday, February 10, 1910)

Mrs. Martha Harper

Mrs. Martha Harper, wife of the late Wm. Harper, died at the home of her niece, Mrs. John Montgomery on the Dobbins Pike Tuesday at 2:30 p. m. The deceased was 81 years of age and had been confined to her room for several months by injuries sustained in a fall from a stairway. She was a sister-in-law of Mr. Thos. R. Love and was highly esteemed by the people of the community in which she lived. She was a member of the Church of Christ. The burial took place at the Gallatin Cemetery yesterday morning at 11 o'clock with funeral services by Rev. I. C. Hoskins.

(Thursday, February 10, 1910)

Death Of Mrs. E. Dye

Passed Away at Her Home at Fountain Head Last Friday

Mrs. Ellison Dye, wife of D. F. B. Dye, died at her home at Fountain Head last Friday night at 9 o'clock, after an illness lasting several months. Mrs. Dye was about 58 years of age, and leaves surviving, her husband, and two daughters; Mrs. E. L. Keen of Nashville, Mrs. J. H. Caldwell of Westmoreland, and four sons, S. C. Dye of Fountain Head, W. B. Dye of Portland, John H. Dye of Battle Creek, Mich., and Frank Omar Dye of Nashville, and one sister and brother, Mrs. J. Z. Duval of Cold Springs, and Mr. John H. Durham of Franklin, Ky. Mrs. Dye was a daughter of the late Dr. E. M. Durham and Mrs. M. J. Durham who survives her. She was a member of the Christian Church. The funeral service was conducted by C. D. Watwood at her late home Sunday morning in the presence of a wide circle of surviving friends and relatives. The interment followed at the Fountain Head Cemetery. The bereaved family have the sympathy of a host of friends in their sad loss.

(Thursday, February 10, 1910)

W. Tom Kirk Answers Call

Passed Away at His Home Near Cotton Town February 2nd.

W. Tom Kirk died at his home on West Station Camp Creek near Cotton Town last Wednesday, February 2nd, age 66 years. His remains were buried at his late home on Friday, the 4th inst. He is survived by his wife and three children, two boys and three girls. *(Number of children?) The deceased was a member of the Church of Christ and an ex-Confederate Soldier, having fought bravely with Gen. John H. Morgan throughout the war. His death was due to consumption from he had long been a sufferer. Funeral services were conducted Friday at the family residence by Elder D. M. Hamilton of South Tunnel.

(Thursday, February 10, 1910)

Died at Hartsville

Mrs. Annie E. Jones, wife of the late J. E. Jones, died at her home in Hartsville Saturday after a prolonged illness. She was 78 years old and is survived by three sons-Joseph, Seay and John, all of California, and Mrs. B. F. Dodd of Nashville, Mrs. J. L. Dalton, Mrs. M. F. Hall, Mrs. B. D. Lipscomb and Miss Vallie Jones. Funeral services were conducted at the Baptist Church Sunday afternoon in Hartsville by Rev. J. T. Oakley. A large number of relatives and friends assembled to pay the last tribute of respect. *(This obit was on the front page of this newspaper. There was no mention of Sumner County in this obit.)

(Thursday, February 10, 1910)

Mrs. Nathan Green

Mrs. Nathan Green, wife of Judge Nathan Green of Lebanon, for many years Chancellor of Cumberland University, died at her home Saturday night. She had been ill for several months. *(Same note as above.)

(Thursday, February 10, 1910)

Meets An Awful Death

Body of Dick Odom, Colored, Found on Railroad at South Tunnel

Dick Odom, a well-known Negro of Gallatin, was found dead beside the railroad track at South Tunnel yesterday morning about 5 o'clock by Deputy Sheriff Tom Dunham and John Turner, section foreman at that place. Odom's body was badly mutilated, one arm being torn off and carried away. It is supposed that he was intoxicated and sitting down on or near the track was struck by a passing train. The accident evidently occurred between one and five o'clock a. m. Odom and "Bear" Algood, another Negro drove through to Bowling Green several days ago and were returning when the accident occurred. They had ten to twelve gallons of whisky in the wagon and both were drunk. Late in the night Tuesday Deputy Sheriff Dunham received a telephone message from South Tunnel saying that Algood was there terrorizing the village and making himself generally obnoxious. Dunham boarded a midnight freight and on arriving at South Tunnel found Algood still master of the situation. The latter was finally arrested and placed under guard until the arrival of the 7 o'clock a. m. train when he was brought to Gallatin and lodged in jail. It was after the arrest of Algood that Odom's body was discovered. The statement of facts relative to Odom's death is based upon supposition as no witnesses have been discovered.

(Thursday, February 10, 1910)

Died at Dixon Springs

Mrs. Lily Belle Denny died at the home of her brother, Mr. Hulett Denny, at Dixon Springs on Friday of last week, aged 50 years. Her death was due to an attack of la grippe. She was a consistent member of the Methodist Church, and a woman of many noble traits of character. Her remains were interred at the family burying ground the following day.

(Thursday, February 10, 1910)

Died in Florida

Ed A. Ireland, formerly a citizen of Sumner County, died at his home at Jensen, Florida, a few days since. His remains were buried in Mt. Olivet Cemetery from the residence of his nephew, C. B. Glen Nashville, yesterday. Mr. Ireland and his wife spent several weeks last year visiting former friends in this county.

(Thursday, February 17, 1910)

Died at Rich Pond

Mrs. Mable Tanner, daughter of S. E. Cummings of Red River Road, died at the home of her husband at Rich Pond, Ky., Tuesday night. She had been sick only 24 hours and news of her death came as a great shock to her relatives and friends. The deceased was 32 years old and is survived by her husband. The burial will take place here today at 3 o'clock at Cummings grave yard.

(Thursday, February 17, 1910)

Portland

We are grieved to hear of the death of S. C. Jordan on last Saturday near San Antonio, Texas, where he had gone hoping to improve his health. A week ago his wife and children, whom he had left here, were summoned to his bedside. They reached him hardly two days before the end came. We sympathize with them in their great bereavement. Mr. Jordan was a member of the M. E. Church, a noble Christian gentleman and highly esteemed by all who knew him.

(Thursday, February 24, 1910)

Died in Davidson County

Charles P. Wylie, a Former Citizen of This County, Passes Away

Charles P. Wylie, born and reared in this county, but for the last seven or eight years a citizen of Davidson County, died at his home on the pike leading toward Mt. Juliet last Monday, Feb. 21. His death was due to lagrippe. Mr. Wylie was seventy-five years of age and was descended from pioneer stock. He was a son of Maj. George Wylie who came to Tennessee at an early date from Virginia and who married a daughter of Col. George Elliott. Maj. Geo. Wylie in the early days of Tennessee was held in high esteem by Gen. Jackson who regarded him as one of his most faithful and loyal adherents. Charles Wylie was a quiet, peaceful citizen, a man of the highest integrity, a good neighbor and a genial companion. He was a Confederate soldier, having been a member of Bartow's 2nd Tennessee Cavalry, and served through the war with General Nathan Bedford Forrest. He married Miss Pinkie Smith of Wilson County who survives him. He is survived also by a daughter, Miss Sallie Wylie, and two brothers, Allen and Hugh Wylie, both highly esteemed citizens of the 3rd district. Mr. Wylie had been for many years a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church at Gallatin. His remains were buried in the Gallatin Cemetery Tuesday at 2 p. m. with funeral services at the grave by Rev. R. M. DuBose.

(Thursday, February 24, 1910)

Died Near Bransford

Miss Luella Defrees, daughter of D. H. Defrees, for many years constable of the 11th district of this county, died Tuesday at the home of her grandmother, Mrs. F. M. Defrees near Bransford. Deceased was 19 years of age and died of epilepsy from which she had long been a sufferer. The burial occurred yesterday at the family burying ground near the home of Mrs. Defrees.

(Thursday, February 24, 1910)

Wm. Dempsy

Wm. Dempsy, a highly respected citizen of the 9th district, died at his home near Capt. A. E. Bell's last Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock. His death was due to pneumonia. Deceased was sixty years of age and a Christian gentleman of the highest type, having been for many years a member of the Baptist Church. He is survived by his wife and two sons; also two sisters and a brother. The burial took place Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Dempsy burying ground near the late home of the deceased.

(Thursday, February 24, 1910)

Well Known Here

W. R. Cornelius, Sr., the veteran undertaker of Nashville died at his home on Acklen Avenue last Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Mr. Cornelius was well known here having married in 1850 Miss Martha P. Dorris, sister of the late Rev. W. G. Dorris of the 4th district, who was for many years a prominent minister of the Tennessee Conference. He was perhaps the dean of Southern undertakers, and was a pioneer in the Nashville commercial world. He was a landmark in the history of that city, and few men have ever been more widely beloved. He remained until the end the head of the firm of W. R. Cornelius & Co., the business to which he had devoted his life. He maintained an activity which many men his junior lack until last fall, when he was taken ill. He was 85 years of age and naturally recovered from the disease but slowly. However, for the past few weeks he was seen again at his office, and to all outward appearances was as cheerful and bright as was his wont. He was born in Lewisburg, Pa., December 23, 1824, and was consequently 85 years of age last December. He learned the trade of cabinet maker and went to Buffalo, N. Y., where he worked at his trade for a while, but later, in 1849, came to Nashville and accepted a position with McComb & Carson, leading cabinet-makers and funeral directors of that day. Mr. Cornelius had been for many years one of the leading members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, which recently became the Presbyterian Church, U. S. A. He was a charter member of the Russel Street Cumberland Presbyterian Church and a ruling elder of that congregation for thirty-five years. He had also been long affiliated with the Odd Fellows. Funeral services were held at Moore Memorial Church, Nashville, Saturday afternoon at 2:30 by Rev. Geo. W. Shelton and Rev. R. W. Binkley.

(Thursday, March 3, 1910)

Mrs. Jennie C. Youree

Wife of Mr. Thomas Youree Passes Away at Her Home Near Gallatin

Mrs. Jennie C. Youree, wife of Thomas P. Youree, died at their home on the Hartsville Pike last Saturday morning, February 26th. She had been seriously ill for several weeks but her death came as a shock to her relatives and many friends to whom she had endeared herself by her kindly nature and beautiful Christian character. She was formerly Miss Jennie Cleaves of Memphis and was first married to Mr. John B. Boddie of Birmingham who died a number of years ago. On Jan. 8, 1906, she married Mr. Thomas P. Youree of this county who survives her. She was forty-seven years of age and had long been a consistent member of the Methodist Church. The burial took place at the Gallatin Cemetery Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock with funeral services at the grave by Rev. W. B. Lowry.

(Thursday, March 3, 1910)

In Memoriam

Alexander, Tenn., Feb. 28, 1910

Sumner County News, Gallatin, Tenn.

Dear News: At Sparta, Tenn., on the morning of February 24 at 12:15 the spirit of my dear mother, Miranda Jarvis, took its flight back to the God who gave it. For a number years she had been an invalid, a great sufferer, but immediate cause of her death was acute pneumonia. She lived only a few hours after it developed. She lacked only a few weeks being seventy-one years old. Nearly fifty-two years ago she was married to my father Sylvester Jarvis, who survives her. She was the mother of nine children, seven boys and two girls. Eight of the children are now living and were present at the funeral. One of the chief joys of her life was that she had given to the Lord in the ministry two of her sons. The Rev. Robt. Jarvis of Winfield, Kansas, who had charge of the funeral, assisted by my mother's pastor, Rev. J. E. Woodward, of Sparta Station, and the writer. The six sons acted as pall bearers, refusing to relegate this last sad service even to life long friends. It was a bright day at noon time, not a cloud in the sky when in the presence of a large number of relatives and friends we tenderly laid her precious body away to rest in the Old Mt. Gillead Cemetery there to await the resurrection of the just. She had labored long and well and was tired. God needed her, and called her home. We give back to Him, but cherish her memory with an undying love and devotion. Rest in peace, precious one until we meet again. Sorrowingly. H. M. Jarvis.

(Thursday, March 3, 1910)

Dr. Hawthorne Dead.

Dr. J. B. Hawthorne, one of the ablest and most eloquent ministers in the Southern Baptist Church died in Richmond, Va., at an advanced age last Thursday. Dr. Hawthorne was for several years pastor of the First Baptist Church of Nashville. He dedicated the present Baptist Church in Gallatin and is pleasantly remembered by the local public. Dr. Hawthorne is said to have been the original hero of St. Elmo, the famous novel by the late Augusta Evans Wilson.

(Thursday, March 3, 1910)

William H. Franklin Dead

Passed Away at His Home on Smith Street Thursday Evening

A sad death which occurred at 8:15 o'clock was that of Rev. William H. Franklin, colored, after being confined to his bed for seven weeks. He was fifty-two years of age. At the time of his death he was employed in the Civil Service, holding the position of Rural Route Carrier where he had faithfully served for seven years and bore the confidence and respect of all the patrons of his route, both white and colored, making friends with all whom he came in contact. Previously he had seen twenty-four years of service as a soldier in the United States regular army. For his bravery, skill and gallant fighting while there he was promoted to the position of Lieutenant, holding same until he was forced to retire on account of illness, he being honorably discharged. He figured prominently in the bloody skirmishes of the late Spanish American War. He leaves a wife, Ophelia B., a mother, four sisters, four brothers and a host of relatives and friends to mourn his loss. Funeral services was conducted at Winchester Street Baptist Church at 2:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon. His burial being in charge of the Grand United Order of Odd Fellows of which he was a loyal member. Services were conducted by Revs. Peter Vertrees and D. T. Burch. A beautiful floral design was given by his Post Office friends among whom he was known as "Uncle Billy." His burial was attended at the grave by Postmaster, Harry Swaney and all Rural Carriers in a body, thus showing the esteem in which he was held in that capacity. Interment took place at Gallatin Cemetery.

(Thursday, March 3, 1910)

Phillis House, colored, wife of Lee House mail carrier to and from the depot to post office, died at her home on Friday. She had been confined to her bed for several months and her death was not unexpected. Funeral services were conducted at Key Chapel M. E. Church last Sabbath morning at 10:30 o'clock. She was a member of the Household of Ruth of which had charge of her burial. Services being held by Rev. D. T. Burch and Rev. Peter Vertrees.

(Thursday, March 3, 1910)

Mallie Read, col. aged sixty-five years died at the home of her son, William Read on Depot Avenue, Friday. She was taken ill in Nashville and was removed from there to his home here, where death came in a few days thereafter. She was a member of the Baptist Church and belonged to Queen Esther Court No. 9 of Nashville under whose direction her burial was conducted. Funeral services was conducted at Winchester Street Baptist Church, Sunday afternoon by Rev. Joe Key, her pastor of Nashville. The burial took place at Gallatin Cemetery.

(Thursday, March 3, 1910)

Frank Fulton, colored, died at his home on Lucus Street Friday night of pneumonia. His burial took place Sunday morning at Gallatin Cemetery.

(Thursday, March 10, 1910)

Miss Martha Woods

Miss Martha Woods, aged 80 years died at Westmoreland yesterday at the home of her sister, Mrs. Summers. She was a native of Wilson County. Deceased had been a member of the Baptist Church for sixty years. Her death was due to pneumonia. The burial will take place at Siloam today at 10 o'clock a. m. with funeral services by Rev. Joe Lee Hawkins.

(Thursday, March 10, 1910)

Mrs. Mallie Jones

Mrs. Mallie Montgomery Jones wife of Chas. Jones died at the residence of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Montgomery, last Thursday morning at 3 o'clock. Deceased was born April 19th, 1885, and was married October 12th, 1907. She and her husband had made their home at her father's during her illness which had lasted for about ten months. She had been for a number of years a consistent member of the Christian Church, and during the months preceding her death had endured her suffering with Christian fortitude. Funeral services were conducted at the family residence Friday morning at 10 o'clock by Elder Isaac C. Hoskins of the Gallatin Christian Church. The burial followed at the Gallatin Cemetery.

 


Sumner County, Tennessee Obituary Index

Genealogist's Companion to Research in Sumner County, Tennessee