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Selected Obituaries, 1911 & 1916

Typed and Contributed by Linda Carpenter

©2002

I was browsing some microfilm at Volunteer State Community College and found some
interesting, well written obituaries from 1911 & 1916. They are examples
of information that could be very valuable to someone researching their family
and I wanted to share a few of them with you.


The Sumner County News
Microfilm Roll No. 2, Sumner County News, (Misc.), Gallatin, 1911-1916
Viewed at Volunteer Community College

(Thursday, March 16, 1911)

James House Passes Away

Prominent Business Man of Gallatin Dies From a Paralytic Stroke.

Mr. James House, one of the oldest and best known citizens of Sumner County, died at his home on North Water Street in Gallatin last Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock. His death, which was not unexpected, was due to paralysis with which he was attacked about four weeks ago. Mr. House was 79 years of age and a pioneer businessman of Gallatin. He established the tin shop and queensware business in which he was the senior partner at the time of his death in the same storehouse it now occupies in 1856. Three times fire has destroyed the building on one side or the other of his store, leaving it unharmed. Mr. House was a steward in the Methodist Church, south, at the time of his death, having been a member of that church since October 1865. Within that time he had held every official position within the gift of his church to a layman. He was thrice married, first to Miss Eunice R. Allen of this county. The second marriage was to Mrs. Mollie Schluter and the third to Mrs. Mattie Rikin who survives him. He is survived also by the following children: Mrs. R. G. Connell of Goodletsville, Mrs. R. M. DuBose of Gallatin, Rufus M. House of St. Louis, Walter House of Cin?, K. B. House of Gallatin, and brother R. E. House? of Gallatin also survives, and a sister, Mrs. A. B. Gardner of Goodletsville. Mr. House was at all times a man of earnest convictions and generous impulses and a citizen of sterling worth to his town and county. The funeral services were conducted at the Gallatin Methodist Church Monday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock. The burial followed at the Gallatin Cemetery. * (Parts of this obit was blurry.)

(Thursday, August 24, 1916)

Charles Cox

Charles Cox died Tuesday morning at his home near Bethpage. He was 22 years of age. The deceased was a member of Bethpage Methodist Church. The burial took place yesterday at Bethpage Cemetery. He is survived by his wife and his father and mother.

(Thursday August 31, 1916)

Mrs. Charles Newton

Mrs. Alice Blakemore Newton, wife of Charles Newton a prominent citizen of the second district, died at 8 p. m. Friday, August 25th at her home near Cairo. The deceased was 63 years of age and since childhood had been a devout member of the Methodist Church. She was a loving wife and mother and a kind neighbor and friend. She is survived by her husband and by nine children, also a sister, Mrs. James B. Jenkins. Funeral services were conducted at the family residence at 2:30 p. m. Saturday by Rev. R. H. Hudgens. The interment was at the Blakemore burying ground.

(Thursday, September 7, 1916)

Marvin Estes

The remains of E. Marvin Estes, who died in Little Rock August 31, arrived in Gallatin Friday night and the interment was in the Gallatin Cemetery Saturday afternoon, with funeral services conducted by the Rev. R. H. Hidgens of the Gallatin Methodist Church. The deceased was born and reared in this county and was a son of Mr. R. P. Estes, a well-known citizen. He was 38 years of age and in his younger days served as an apprentice in the old Examiner office, but was a telegraph operator at the time of his death. Mr. Estes is survived by his wife and two sons, besides his father and two sisters, Mrs. J. J. Lanier and Mrs. C. G. Hassell, of this county, and a brother, Sam Estes, of Washington, City.

(Thursday, September 7, 1916)

Erskine Joyner

Erskine Joyner, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. James E. Joyner, died at their home in Nashville yesterday morning. The remains will be brought to Gallatin today on the 4:30 p. m. Interurban. Burial will follow at the Gallatin Cemetery.

(Thursday, September 14, 1916)

Geo. N. Guthrie Passes Away

Death Claims Prominent Gallatin Citizen Last Sunday Morning.

George N. Guthrie, a prominent and highly-esteemed citizen of Gallatin, died of heart failure at 6 o’clock Sunday morning at his home on North Water Street. He had been in failing health for several months and for two weeks had been confined by illness to his home. Mr. Guthrie had long been prominent in public affairs and his death came as a shock to many friends here and throughout the state. He was a man of broad culture and of genial disposition whose presence in the community will be greatly missed. The deceased was the son of the late Isaac N. Guthrie, a prominent farmer and stock raiser of the Fourth Civil District of Sumner County, and was born February 18, 1850. He was married to Miss Ellen Hobson of Richmond, Va., who survives him. He attained his education in the schools of his native county and subsequently graduated in law at Cumberland University, Lebanon, and for a number of years was identified with the local bar and gained many distinctions as an attorney. Mr. Guthrie had long been a prominent figure in the business affairs of both the town and county, having served as mayor of Gallatin continuously from 1883 to 1895, and for many years had held the offices of justice of the peace and magistrate, being at the time of his death a prominent member of the Sumner County Court. He was also a member of the city board of education for two terms and always took an active interest in education affairs. He was affiliated with the Knights of Phythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and had passed through all the chairs in the lodges of the K. P. and of the Odd Fellows, at one time holding the highest position in the state in the latter. He was a life-long Democrat in politics and had been a member of the Baptist Church since early manhood. Besides his wife Mr. Guthrie is survived by the following children: Miss Clara Guthrie, Dr. George N. Guthrie of Cookeville and Joseph Guthrie of Sumpter, S. C., also by the following brothers and sisters: F. C. Guthrie and Henry Guthrie of Nashville, Mrs. Lizzie Livar and James Guthrie of Mississippi and Mrs. James D. Whiteside of Gallatin. Funeral services were held at the grave Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock, conducted by the Rev. Wilson Woodcock, pastor of the local Baptist Church, and the burial at Gallatin Cemetery in charge of the I. O. O. F. Lodge.

(Thursday, September 28, 1916)

George W. Wise

Mr. George W. Wise, a prominent and highly esteemed citizen of this county, died at his home near Number One at 4:15 o’clock Sunday morning. The deceased was a native of Sumner County and was 73 years of age. He was a gentleman of the old school and a most excellent citizen whose influence upon public questions was always the right side. He had been for many years a faithful member of the Methodist Church and was also a member in high standing of the Masonic Order. Funeral services were conducted at the residence at 12:30 p. m. Monday by Rev. T. B. Fisher. The burial followed at the Gallatin Cemetery with Masonic honors conducted by members of Saundersville Lodge.

(Thursday, September 28, 1916)

Mrs. Mahala Absher

Portland, Sept. 14-Mrs. Mahala Absher, aged 88 years and 8 months, died Tuesday night, September 12 at 9 o’clock at the home of her son, Mr. L. A. Absher, in North Portland. The burial took place in the Durham Cemetery near Nubia Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Funeral services were held at the grave: conducted by Rev. S. C. Pressnell, pastor of the Oak Grove Presbyterian Church, in the presence of a large crowd of sorrowing relatives and friends. Before her marriage to Lyple Absher, who preceded her in death some years ago, she was Miss Mahala Durham. To this union nine children were born, all of whom survive her and are as follows: Mesdames Delia Street, Lydia and Dollie Denning of near Brackintown and Isabelle Clark of White Bluff, Tenn., Messrs.: Robert Absher of Brackentown, Marion Absher of West Frankfort, Ill., George Absher of Texas, L. A. Absher of Portland and Dr. J. R. Absher of Poss, Okla.,: also two brothers: Messrs. John Durham of Franklin, Ky., and George Durham of Nubia.

(Thursday, September 28, 1916)

Laverne McNeill

The hearts of many were saddened by the untimely death of Laverne McNeill, little 8 year old daughter of Dr. and Mrs. J. H. McNeill, which occurred at their home Mitchellville, Wednesday evening at 6:30 o’clock. Laverne had been ill for about a week with diphtheria, but was recovering and thought to be out of danger, and death is supposed to have been due to heart failure. –Portland Herald.

(Thursday, October 8, 1916)

Mrs. Charles M. Lamb

Mrs. Chas. M. Lamb, age 32 years, died of typhoid fever at Shackle Island, Sept. 29th. Remains were carried to Petroleum, Ky., Saturday afternoon and were interred in the Walker’s Chapel Cemetery at Chapel Hill Sunday morning. Mrs. Lamb had been a member of the Methodist Church for a number of years. Deceased leaves her husband and two daughters, ages 14 and 12, respectively.

(Thursday, October 8, 1916)

Miss Fannie Penn

Miss Fannie Penn died Monday night at 7 o’clock at the home of her father, Mr. N. Penn on the Coles Ferry Road, after an illness of several months. The deceased was 18 years of age and a young lady of beautiful character whose untimely death is mourned by many friends. Funeral services were conducted yesterday at the Gallatin Christian Church of which the deceased was a devoted member. Burial followed at the Gallatin Cemetery.

(Thursday, October 8, 1916)

Bertha R. Freeman

Bertha R., infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Freeman, died early Monday morning at their home on the Dobbins Pike. The burial took place at the Gallatin Cemetery Monday afternoon with funeral services by Rev. Mr. Lipscomb of the Christian Church. Mr. and Mrs. Freeman have the sympathy of many friends in their sad bereavement.

(Thursday, October 8, 1916)

Found Dead In Field Near Town

Jim Nixon, a highly respected negro man, was found dead in a field on the farm of Mr. W. Y. Allen near town Saturday morning. A coroner’s inquest showed that he fell dead from a wagon some twenty-four hours before his body was found. The team of mules he was driving had wandered around all day and night but had done no damage to the wagon. The deceased was a trusted employee of Mr. Allen, having been a laborer on his farm for six years.

(Thursday, October 26, 1916)

Thomas R. Love Passes Away – Prominent Citizen Died Yesterday After Protracted Illness

Thomas R. Love, for many years a prominent citizen of this county, died at 7 o’clock yesterday morning at his home on the Dobbins Pike, after an illness of several months. His death was due to the infirmities of old age. The deceased was a native of Sumner County. He was born February 1, 1835, therefore was in his 82nd year. He was married three times, first to Miss Caroline Cole. Following her death he was married to Miss Lydia Wallace. His third marriage was to Miss Alice Donnell, who survives him. He is survived also by one daughter, Mrs. Nora Law of Nashville. He was an ex-Confederate soldier having served the war in Barton’s Regiment, 2nd Tennessee Cavalry, Forrest’s Command. For a number of years he had been an honored member of Donelson Bivonac. Mr. Love was a man of unusual intelligence and was possessed of strong convictions which made him, throughout his long life, an important factor in the public affairs of the county. Funeral services will be conducted at 10 a. m. today at the family residence. Burial will follow at the Gallatin Cemetery.

(Thursday October 12, 1916)

Chess McMurry

Chess McMurry, a well-known colored man formerly of Gallatin, died in Nashville last Thursday morning. His death resulted from an attack of apoplexy with which he was stricken some two weeks before. The deceased was 45 years old and was a brother of George McMurry.

(Thursday, October 26, 1916)

J. S. Addy

J. S. Addy, for many years a well-known citizen of Sumner County, died Wednesday, September 25th, at the Confederate Soldiers Home near the Hermitage. He had been a resident of this home for about three years. The deceased was born in South Carolina on January 9th, 1836. He was twice married. His second wife was Miss Mary Neel of the Dry Fork community of this county, where they resided for a number of years. Mr. Addy was a faithful member of the Baptist Church. The burial was at the Soldiers Home.

(Thursday, October 26, 1916)

Aged R. R. Engineer Passes Away

James Church, probably the oldest locomotive engineer in point of service with the L. & N. Railroad, died Saturday afternoon at his home in Scottsville. During the course of his long career no accident had ever occurred on any train of which he had charge. His death resulted from a stroke of paralysis suffered some three weeks before. Mr. Church had been for many years a faithful member of the Baptist Church. The burial took place at the Gallatin Cemetery at 10:00 a. m. Monday, with funeral services by Rev. Wilson Woodcock.

(Thursday, October 26, 1916)

Miss Mattie L. Sheppard

Miss Mattie Lou Sheppard died Friday, October 13th, at the home of her mother, Mrs. B. F. Sheppard on Winchester Street. The deceased was 43 years of age and since childhood had been a faithful member of the Christian Church. The burial took place Friday afternoon at the Gallatin Cemetery. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Mr. Burton of Hartsville. Surviving besides her mother are the following sisters and brothers: Mrs. J. L. Maddox, Mrs. W. D. Cothron and Miss Daisy Sheppard of Gallatin, R. M. Sheppard of Hartsville and Walker Sheppard of Alabama.

(Thursday, October 26, 1916)

Thomas Rose

George Thomas Rose, an aged and highly respected citizen of Gallatin, died Tuesday morning at his home on West Main Street. The deceased was 74 years of age and had been for many years a faithful member of the Gallatin Christian Church. Mr. Rose was an ex-confederate soldier. His death was due to the infirmities age. The burial took place at Hartsville yesterday afternoon.

(Thursday, October 26, 1916)

Henry Smith

Henry Smith, the well known colored shoemaker, died suddenly at 2 a.m. Tuesday at his home on Winchester Street. He was one of the oldest residents of Gallatin and was well and favorably known by the people of this section.

(Thursday, October 26, 1916)

Thos. H. King, Jr.

Thomas H. King, Jr., died at 2 o’clock p. m. Friday at his home on North Water Street after an illness of six weeks. Though not unexpected, his death came as a shock to many relatives and friends throughout this section. The deceased was 43 years of age, having been born and reared at Gallatin. He was a son of the late Mr. Thomas H. King, for many years a prominent citizen of this place. He is survived by wife, who before her marriage was Miss Lina Lewis, and by one child, a daughter, Miss Frankie King. Mr. King was a member of the Masonic Order, the members of which had charge of the burial services. The burial took place at the Gallatin Cemetery Saturday afternoon. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. R. H. Hudgens of the Methodist Church.

(Thursday, October 26, 1916)

Miss Bessie Miller

A telegram Monday brought to Gallatin relatives the sad news of the death of Miss Bessie Miller, oldest daughter of Woods L. Miller of St. Anthony, Idaho. The cause of her death is not known here. The remains will be brought to Gallatin for burial and funeral services will be held at the residence of Mrs. John Miller at 2:30 p. m. Saturday, October 28th.

(Thursday, November 23, 1916)

Native Of Sumner Dies At Jackson

Jackson, Nov. 18….J. T. Merritt, aged 89, who made the harness for Andrew Jackson, that was kept at the Hermitage for many years after “Old Hickory’s” death, died Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the home of his grandson, Joe M. St John, 345 Highland avenue. His death was due to old age. He was born in Sumner County, Tenn., October 13, 1827, moving at the age of 14 to Nashville, where he became an apprentice at the harnessmaker’s trade. In the capital city he spent fully fifty years of his life. He was intimately acquainted with Andrew Jackson. He had voted for every democratic presidential nominee since he was 21 years of age, with the exception of one, and that was during the civil war. He never enlisted in the Confederate army, but went along as harnessmaker with a Nashville company. He served four years of the war in this capacity. He had lived in Jackson nine years. He is survived by one son, four grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock at the residence with interment at Hollywood cemetery.

(Thursday, November 23, 1916)

Mrs. Homer E. Reese

Mrs. Ettie L. Reese, wife of Dr. Homer Reese, died at 6 o’clock Thursday evening at their home on the Dobbins Pike after an illness of only a few days. Mrs. Reese was deservedly popular with a large circle of friends and her untimely death is universally mourned. Before her marriage the deceased was Miss Ettie L. Carn of Chattahoochie, Florida. She was married to Dr. Reese at her Florida home on November 25, 1914. Since coming with her husband to this county Mrs. Reese had been active in the social life of the community and especially in the missionary and other philanthropic enterprises of the Methodist Church of which she had been a faithful and consistent member since childhood. Her beautiful Christian character will always remain an example to those with whom she was associated here. Mrs. Reese was 36 years of age and a native of Florida. Funeral services were conducted at the Gallatin Methodist Church at 11 o’clock a. m. Saturday by Rev. R. H. Hudgens in the presence of a large assembly of sorrowing relatives and friends. Burial followed at the Gallatin Cemetery.

(Thursday, November 23, 1916)

Zack B. Lane

Mr. Zank B. Lane, a well known and highly esteemed citizen of Gallatin died suddenly at his home on Franklin street Saturday afternoon. His death resulted from heart failure. He had bee in declining health for several weeks but it was not known that his condition was serious. Mr. Lane was 67 years of age. He was a native of Sumner County and here his entire life had been spent. Early in life he was married to Miss Lula Ann Gaines also of Sumner County. To this union five children were born three of whom survive as follows: George and Edwin Lane of Gallatin and Mrs. J. S. Kirkpatrick of Nashville. He is survived also by his wife. Mr. Lane was a man of quiet and peaceful disposition. He was a genial gentleman of the old school and though unostentatious in his life, he numbered his friends by the hundreds. Funeral services were conducted at the residence at 2:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon by Rev. R. H. Hudgens. Burial followed at the Gallatin Cemetery.

(November 9, 1916)

Logan H. Gray

News was received here this week by relatives of the death of Mr. Logan H. Gray, a former citizen of Gallatin, at St. Louis, Mo. He was about 58 years of age and was a son of the late Esq. Slaughter Gray. Besides a wife he leaves one sister, Mrs. Etta Brown, Of Paris, Texas. Mr. Gray left Gallatin in 1883, going to Paris, Texas, where he resided a short time, after which he removed to St. Louis where he remained until his death.

(November 9, 1916)

Mrs. Charity E. Stratton

Mrs. Charity Elizabeth Stratton, wife of the late John A. Stratton, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. G. M. Carroll,1001 Montrose Avenue, Nashville, Saturday night. She was 67 years of age. She is survived by four sons, J. E. Stratton of Nashville, J. T., J. A. and Swaney Stratton of Gallatin; four daughters, Mrs. G. M. Carroll and Miss Alice Stratton of Nashville, Mrs. H. A. Womack of St. Francis, Ark., and Miss Dixie Stratton of Gallatin. Prayers were said at the residence at 6:30 o’clock Monday morning and funeral services were held from the family home, three miles west of Gallatin Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock, conducted by the Rev. Wilson Woodcock. The interment was at the Horn Graveyard on the Long Hollow Pike.

(November 9, 1916)

Miss Bessie Miller

The remains of Miss Bessie Miller, daughter of Mr. ad Mrs. Woods L. Miller, who died Monday, October 23rd, at her home in St. Anthony, Idaho, were buried at the Gallatin Cemetery Saturday afternoon. Funeral services were conducted at the residence of Mrs. Kate Miller at 2:30 o’clock Saturday. The deceased was 26 years of age and a young lady of beautiful character and sweet disposition. She was educated at Ward Belmont College in Nashville, and while a student there often visited in Gallatin where she made many friends. The remains were accompanied to Gallatin by Mr. and Mrs. Woods L. Miller and by Misses Nellie and Woodie Miller, sisters of the deceased.

(November 2, 1916)

Mrs. Ellen H. Guthrie

A telegram was received by relatives here Saturday announcing the death of Mrs. Ellen H. Guthrie which occurred Friday at the home of her brother, Mr. Joseph Hobson, of Provost, Virginia. Mrs. Guthrie just left a few weeks ago to make her home in Virginia and announcement of her death came as a shock to her many relatives and friends in this section. The deceased, who was a native of Richmond, Va., was about 72 years of age, and the wife of the late Squire George N. Guthrie, who died at his home here on September 10. After the death of her husband Mrs. Guthrie went to live with her brother, but the shock occasioned by his death was so great that she never recovered from its effect. She is survived by her daughter and two sons, Dr. George N. Guthrie, of Cookeville, and Joseph Guthrie, of Sumter, S.C. The interment was in the old Hobson family burying ground at Richmond, Va. The deceased had long been a member of the Episcopal Church and had a wide circle of friends here, who deplore her untimely death.

(November 2, 1916)

In Memoriam

Mr. T. R. Love was born in Sumner County, Tenn. Feb. 1, 1835, died Oct. 4, 1916 at his home near Gallatin and was buried in the Gallatin Cemetery, Oct. 5, 1916. The death of Mr. Love is a distinct loss to his immediate community and to the county at large. He was a true, sincere friend and a citizen who held the confidence and esteem of his fellow men. In him the widows and orphans especially found an ever ready sympathizer not alone in words but deeds as well. We extend to his bereaved wife heart felt sympathy. She who has shared with him for so long the vicissitudes of life will miss him sadly. She was a faithful companion and a great comfort to him, especially during his months of suffering previous to his death. A Friend.

 


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