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The Ancestors of Vickie Beard Thompson

Notes


John WARFORD I

NOTES: John Warford (ca. 1650 - ca. 1699) emigrated from England and was admitted as an inhabitant of Eachester, New York, in 1680. He married twice and was the father of at least three children. He migrated to Baltimore County, Maryland, ca. 1688 and probably died there. (Warford, Fisher, Kaes-Kuhl, Stout, Pinckney families - by: Laurence Lee Hill in 1996 SLFHL Book #929.273 W231h located at JSMB)


William HENRY

CENSUS RECORDS: 1800 Pendleton District, South Carolina, William HENRY, with 2 males under 10, 1 male 26 to 45, 1 female under 10, 1 female 26 to 45, no slaves -page 26- (Could this be the brother to Samuel that we have listed???)

In 1810 there are 2 William Henry's listed in the census records on pages 143 and 159, in Pendleton District, South Carolina. One of which could be our William.

By 1820 there are NO Henry's listed in the census records for Pendleton District, South Carolina.


HENRY

He was in the under 10 years age bracket in 1800.


HENRY

He was in the under 10 years age bracket in 1800.


HENRY

She was in the under 10 years age bracket in 1800.


Richard STOUT Sr.

PROBATE RECORDS: Monmouth County, New Jersey
STOUT, Richard, His WILL, was written 9 June 1703 and was probated 23 Oct 1705 at Perth Amboy, Middlesex, New Jersey.
Know all men by these presents that I, Richard Stout of Middletown, in the county of Monmouth, in East Jersey, being of sound Mind and disposing memory, do make and ordain this to be my last will and testament which is as followeth: I will that all my just debts be paid: I give and devise unto my loving wife, during her natural life, all my orchard and that part of rooms of the home she now lives in, with the cellar, and all the land I now posses. I give and bequeath unto my loving wife, all my horse kind, excepting one mare and colt my son Benjamin is to have for keeping my cattle last year.
I give unto my sons, John, Richard, James, Johnathan, David and Benjamin, one shilling each of them.
I give unto my daughters, Mary, Alice and Sarah, each of them one shilling.
I give to my daughter-in-law, Mary Stout, and her son John one shilling each of them.
I give and bequeath unto my kinswoman Mary Stout, the daughter of formerly Peter Stout, one cow to be paid within six days after my wife’s death.
All the remainder of my personal estate whatsoever, I give and bequeath unto my loving wife, and to this, my last will and testament, I make my son John and my son Johanathan my executors to. For this my will performed, in witness hereof I have hereunto put my hand and seal, June the ninth day, in the year one thousand seven hundred and three. Richard Stout, (Made his mark, so apparently he could not write.)
Signed, sealed and published in the presence of us: Richard Hartshorne, John Weakham, Peter Vandervere

HISTORY: Richard, came from a well to do family. His father interfered in a love affair with a young woman beneath his rank. So Richard, got angry and went to sea in a man-of-war, and served seven years. He was discharged at New York, and lived there for some time when he met Penelope, and then married her. He was a resident of New Amsterdam in the spring on 1643, employed by Governor Kieft as a soldier in the February uprising of that year. Named under the “Monmouth Patent”, accompanied Lady Moody and others to settle Gravesend between her arrival in June and October of that year. In 1646 he received lot 16, in Gravesend where he grew tobacco. In 1657, 17 of his 20 acres were under cultivation. In 1661, he bought an adjoining farm of William Griffin. The Stout family was an important one in the Hopewell settlement. Many descendants of their family can to this day be found in northeastern New Jersey. This Baptist family originated from one woman. The story of Penelope Stout, once butchered and left for dead in the wilderness, is a stirring and fascinating one, which gives the reader an idea of the hardships settlers faced. About 1624, in New Amsterdam, Richard Stout, a native of England, married her. He was 40 while she only 22. She induced him to sail across the bay and settle at Middletown, near those who saved her. Many of his friends visited this contented couple and took up residence there. When they had two young children, an uprising was stirring. One of Mrs. Stouts’ Indian friends came to warn her, and she was able to escape again to New Amsterdam with her children. There are references to Richard Stout attempting to settle Middletown in 1655, which were aborted. This may have been temporary due to Indian problems. Later, a general conference was held in which the white men agreed to buy the lands from the Indians. Deeds were granted, signed and duly paid for and witnessed. This led to relative peace in the area. Penelope went on to bear 10 children; seven sons and three daughters: Jonathan (founder of Hopewell), John, Richard, James Peter, David, Benjamin, Mary, Sarah and Alice. Penelope lived to be 110 years old and saw 502 offspring in 88 years.


Penelope KENT

STORY: There is a remarkable story told about Penelope when she was a young woman. It goes has follows: She and a first husband a Jan VanPrincin, had left Holland and were on there way to America. Their ship wrecked off the coast of New Jersey, by a place called Sandy Hook. This was in about 1642. The crew and some of the passengers made it to shore. But Penelope's husband was either sick or injured, and so they were left behind, as she would not leave him. They, the crew promised to send help back. They had not been alone long when some Indians killed them both (or so they thought) by skinning them alive. However Penelope came to after the Indians had left. Although her skull was fractured and her left shoulder was so hacked that she could never use that arm like the other. She also was cut across the abdomen so that her bowels were hanging out, she pushed them back in with her hands. She continued this way for about 7 days, taking shelter in a hollow tree and eating the excrescence of it. About the seventh day she saw two Indians and hoped that they would put her out of her misery. One went to do exactly that but the other Indian an older man stopped him. This Indian put his coat around her and took her to his wigwam and doctored her cuts and bruises. As soon as she was well enough to travel he took her to New York and made a present of her to her countrymen, viz: an Indian present, expecting ten times her value in return. She lived in New York and it was there that she meet and married Richard Stout and bore him 7 sons and 3 daughters. She lived to be 110 years of age and she had 502 decendants when she died.

STORY: Now about Penelope. She was the daughter of the Rev. Kent from England and Holland. I have not been able to find his first name yet. She was married to Jan VanPrincin first in Holland around 1642. Shorthly after their marriage they left Holland for America. Close to the New Jersey shore a severe storm hit and the ship crashed on the rocks. Most of the crew and passengers died, however, Penelope and her husband Jan along with a few crew members made it to shore. Jan was hurt pretty bad as were a few of the crew members. There were maybe 4 or 5 that weren't hurt and so they left to go find help. Penelope stayed with her husband and the other men and tried to doctor them the best she could. A day or so later Indians found them and killed all the men including Jan. They scalped Penelope and skinned her alive, however she did not die. Then they slit open her belly and pulled her intestines out and she still was alive. About this time an old Indian stopped the warriors and said to leave her alone and she would die eventually. The Indians left and the old Indian sewed up her stomach and then doctored her with plants from the forest and kept her feed. At least a month or two past and then the old Indian took her to a fort up around New York somewhere and traded her for some food and supplies. The men at the fort did not think she would live and were surprised when she told them how long ago it had been since the ship wreck and since the Indians had tortured her. No one ever heard about the men that had left them in the forest and it was assumed that the Indians that found her probably had killed them before finding Penelope and the others. Penelope, however, did survive the ship wreck and the torture and in about 1644 she married James Stout who was living there at the fort that the old Indian had taken her too. Penelope eventually had 10 children and none of these children died young. They all married and had families. For that time period it was very unusal as the mortality rate was very high for infants. They say she never grew much hair back just a few tufts here and there and she always wore a stocking cap to cover her head and long sleeves always so that no one could see her arms. Her body was covered in scars similiar to 3rd degree burns. She lived to be 110 years of age and when she died it is said that she had 502 descendants also living at that time. The story has been told along the New Jersey coast ever since with very little varation over the last 360 years. Her husband Richard Stout lived to be 90 years of age, so between the two of them they must have come from some very sturdy stock.


Jan VAN PRINCIN

His was murdered by indians when there ship wrecked off the coast of New York
somewhere.


Penelope KENT

STORY: There is a remarkable story told about Penelope when she was a young woman. It goes has follows: She and a first husband a Jan VanPrincin, had left Holland and were on there way to America. Their ship wrecked off the coast of New Jersey, by a place called Sandy Hook. This was in about 1642. The crew and some of the passengers made it to shore. But Penelope's husband was either sick or injured, and so they were left behind, as she would not leave him. They, the crew promised to send help back. They had not been alone long when some Indians killed them both (or so they thought) by skinning them alive. However Penelope came to after the Indians had left. Although her skull was fractured and her left shoulder was so hacked that she could never use that arm like the other. She also was cut across the abdomen so that her bowels were hanging out, she pushed them back in with her hands. She continued this way for about 7 days, taking shelter in a hollow tree and eating the excrescence of it. About the seventh day she saw two Indians and hoped that they would put her out of her misery. One went to do exactly that but the other Indian an older man stopped him. This Indian put his coat around her and took her to his wigwam and doctored her cuts and bruises. As soon as she was well enough to travel he took her to New York and made a present of her to her countrymen, viz: an Indian present, expecting ten times her value in return. She lived in New York and it was there that she meet and married Richard Stout and bore him 7 sons and 3 daughters. She lived to be 110 years of age and she had 502 decendants when she died.

STORY: Now about Penelope. She was the daughter of the Rev. Kent from England and Holland. I have not been able to find his first name yet. She was married to Jan VanPrincin first in Holland around 1642. Shorthly after their marriage they left Holland for America. Close to the New Jersey shore a severe storm hit and the ship crashed on the rocks. Most of the crew and passengers died, however, Penelope and her husband Jan along with a few crew members made it to shore. Jan was hurt pretty bad as were a few of the crew members. There were maybe 4 or 5 that weren't hurt and so they left to go find help. Penelope stayed with her husband and the other men and tried to doctor them the best she could. A day or so later Indians found them and killed all the men including Jan. They scalped Penelope and skinned her alive, however she did not die. Then they slit open her belly and pulled her intestines out and she still was alive. About this time an old Indian stopped the warriors and said to leave her alone and she would die eventually. The Indians left and the old Indian sewed up her stomach and then doctored her with plants from the forest and kept her feed. At least a month or two past and then the old Indian took her to a fort up around New York somewhere and traded her for some food and supplies. The men at the fort did not think she would live and were surprised when she told them how long ago it had been since the ship wreck and since the Indians had tortured her. No one ever heard about the men that had left them in the forest and it was assumed that the Indians that found her probably had killed them before finding Penelope and the others. Penelope, however, did survive the ship wreck and the torture and in about 1644 she married James Stout who was living there at the fort that the old Indian had taken her too. Penelope eventually had 10 children and none of these children died young. They all married and had families. For that time period it was very unusal as the mortality rate was very high for infants. They say she never grew much hair back just a few tufts here and there and she always wore a stocking cap to cover her head and long sleeves always so that no one could see her arms. Her body was covered in scars similiar to 3rd degree burns. She lived to be 110 years of age and when she died it is said that she had 502 descendants also living at that time. The story has been told along the New Jersey coast ever since with very little varation over the last 360 years. Her husband Richard Stout lived to be 90 years of age, so between the two of them they must have come from some very sturdy stock.


Arent Isaacszen VAN HOECK

HISTORY: 'The Descendants of Arent Issacszen Van Hoeck Immigrant to New Amsterdam', complied and edited by Matthew Van Hook, published by Higginson Book Co. Salem, MA in 1997.
Arent was a shoemaker and was in America by 1655.


Catherina VAN HOECK

HISTORY: 'The Descendants of Arent Issacszen Van Hoeck Immigrant to New Amsterdam', complied and edited by Matthew Van Hook, published by Higginson Book Co. Salem, MA in 1997.


Maria VAN HOECK

HISTORY: 'The Descendants of Arent Issacszen Van Hoeck Immigrant to New Amsterdam', complied and edited by Matthew Van Hook, published by Higginson Book Co. Salem, MA in 1997.


Roelof VAN HOECK

HISTORY: 'The Descendants of Arent Issacszen Van Hoeck Immigrant to New Amsterdam', complied and edited by Matthew Van Hook, published by Higginson Book Co. Salem, MA in 1997.