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The Ancestors of Vickie Beard Thompson

Notes


Philippe Anton DU TRIEUX

HISTORY: The Du Trieuxes were Walloons, people of Celtic stock in northeast France (present day Belgium), French speaking, who became Protestant in large numbers at the Reformation. This small area of Europe, which at the time was under Spanish rule, was marked by bloodshed, repression and widespread loss of life. Many of the Du Trieux family fled. Some found sanctuary in England and a large family group went, in exile, to the Netherlands. In the Netherlands, which had recently declared its independence from Spain, the Du Trieuxes and other Walloon families settled in Leiden and Amsterdam. As skilled artisans, these Walloons found employment, assistance, civil and religious freedoms. Among these was Philippe Du Trieux, born ca. 1586 at Roubaix, France. By 1614, Philippe was a skilled craftsman in Amsterdam, serving as a dyer. In 1615, in the Walloon Church of old Amsterdam, he married Jaquemine Noiret, a fellow Huguenot from Lille, France. In 1620, Jacquemine died, leaving Philippe with three small children. In 1621, he married Susanna Du Chesne, a Huguenot from Sedan, France. In the meantime, the West India Company was being established to develop international commerce and to serve as a military arm of the Netherlands. Philippe and his family had long wanted to come to America. His family along with 29 other families, largely of Walloon stock, entered into a contract with the West India Company to relocate to America. Then at the beginning of April 1624, they left on the ship New Netherland and arrived at present day New York in mid May. He became an employee of the West India Company and served until his death as the court messenger or marshall. Philippe and his son Philippe Jr. were killed by Indians in 1652.


John EDDIE Sr.

CHURCH RECORDS: EDDIE, John son of William EDDIE from Christening record from extracted records of Church of Scotland at the Parish Church of Old Machar, Parish registers covering time period of 1621 to 1854. (Not sure if this is our John are not but the date is perfect to be him. Still need to do more searching to be sure.)

HISTORY: John may have come to America around 1702 or 1703 possibly from Scotland. He is buying land around Woodbridge, New Jersey in 1709. John sold his land in Woodbridge in 1734. Sometime after 1736 he decides to move to the Marsh Creek Settlement (Manor of Maske) in what is now called Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Presumably to reside near his two brothers not sure which 2 at this time. This was around 1741. According to the records about the Manor of Maske all, or virtually all residents of the Marsh Creek Settlement were Scotch-Irish. These people were Scots whose families had lived in Ireland for a century are more because the British had invited them to go there from Scotland. Convinced that the British Goverment had not kept their promises a large number of these Scotch-Irish had been coming to America since the second decade of the 18th century. In November 1742 Thomas Cookson told Thomas Penn that the settlement was "full of ye poorest of ye Irish," of people who were characterized by "a factious Spirit". Before he died John owned a plantation of 205 acres just northwest of the present town of Gettysburg on a site near where the first shot of the Civil War at Gettysburg would eventually be fired. The property John owned is located on the Chambersburg Pike Road and there is now a cemetery on his property. The cemetery name is Oak Lawn Memorial Garden's. From Gettysburg heading out of town on the Chambersburg Pike Road it is on the left hand side of the road. His home according to the man at the Historical Society was still standing until 1947 when it burned. The home was located in about the center of the present day cemetery. From the cemetery you can look northeast and see Seminary Ridge about a mile away. His son Samuel Eddy owned the property up until 1809 when he died. According to different sources it was still in the Eddy family at the time of the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. (I went to this site in July of 2002, Vickie)

PROBATE RECORDS: York County, Pennsylvania WILL of John EDDY of Woodbridge, New Jersey
In the name of God Amen this 18th Day of September 1750 I John Eddy being weak of Body but of perfect mind and memory blessed be God for it do order this my last will and Testament first of all I my Soul to the hands of God who give it and my body to the dust to be buried in a Christian like and decent mannor at the will of my Executors and as for my worldly possessions I Divide it as following, all my Lawfull debts to be paid first of all as for my Dear and well beloved wife Jenat Eddy alias
McColluagh I order her to have her Choice of any two cows she thinks fit to take, and said two Cows to be kept from of all Charges to her, together with her maintenance of the plantation during her widow-hood, and the bound servant at her disposal, with the half of the household furniture, as for my two youngest children Agnes and Alexander Eddy I order each of them thirty pounds currancey
to be paid when come of age and my youngest son Alexander to be put to which he thinks file to chigo as for my youngest Daughter Agnes I order her the other half of my household furniture as for my firsts wife children Elles (Allison), Maryann (Meriam), James, Joan (Jeane), Gayon (Gavin), Robert (crossed out on will) John, William and Thomas Eddy I do order Each five Shillings as for my Son Robert Eddy I order him a three year old horse and my body clothes and as for my two sons Samuel and David Eddy I order to them my plantation which I now together with all the remainder of my worldly possesions which remains undivided, I order my two sons Samuel and David to build to their mother a convinient house at their charges if she demands it I order Walter Buchanan and my son Samuel Eddy to be my Executors to do justice to my children wife and children according to the true intent of this my last will and testament written on this day and date above mentioned Witness present: William Eddy his mark John Eddy his mark; Walter Buchanan; Janet Eddy her mark


John EDDY Jr.

He was a witness to his father's WILL.


William EDDY

He was a witness to his father's WILL.


John EDDIE Sr.

CHURCH RECORDS: EDDIE, John son of William EDDIE from Christening record from extracted records of Church of Scotland at the Parish Church of Old Machar, Parish registers covering time period of 1621 to 1854. (Not sure if this is our John are not but the date is perfect to be him. Still need to do more searching to be sure.)

HISTORY: John may have come to America around 1702 or 1703 possibly from Scotland. He is buying land around Woodbridge, New Jersey in 1709. John sold his land in Woodbridge in 1734. Sometime after 1736 he decides to move to the Marsh Creek Settlement (Manor of Maske) in what is now called Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Presumably to reside near his two brothers not sure which 2 at this time. This was around 1741. According to the records about the Manor of Maske all, or virtually all residents of the Marsh Creek Settlement were Scotch-Irish. These people were Scots whose families had lived in Ireland for a century are more because the British had invited them to go there from Scotland. Convinced that the British Goverment had not kept their promises a large number of these Scotch-Irish had been coming to America since the second decade of the 18th century. In November 1742 Thomas Cookson told Thomas Penn that the settlement was "full of ye poorest of ye Irish," of people who were characterized by "a factious Spirit". Before he died John owned a plantation of 205 acres just northwest of the present town of Gettysburg on a site near where the first shot of the Civil War at Gettysburg would eventually be fired. The property John owned is located on the Chambersburg Pike Road and there is now a cemetery on his property. The cemetery name is Oak Lawn Memorial Garden's. From Gettysburg heading out of town on the Chambersburg Pike Road it is on the left hand side of the road. His home according to the man at the Historical Society was still standing until 1947 when it burned. The home was located in about the center of the present day cemetery. From the cemetery you can look northeast and see Seminary Ridge about a mile away. His son Samuel Eddy owned the property up until 1809 when he died. According to different sources it was still in the Eddy family at the time of the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. (I went to this site in July of 2002, Vickie)

PROBATE RECORDS: York County, Pennsylvania WILL of John EDDY of Woodbridge, New Jersey
In the name of God Amen this 18th Day of September 1750 I John Eddy being weak of Body but of perfect mind and memory blessed be God for it do order this my last will and Testament first of all I my Soul to the hands of God who give it and my body to the dust to be buried in a Christian like and decent mannor at the will of my Executors and as for my worldly possessions I Divide it as following, all my Lawfull debts to be paid first of all as for my Dear and well beloved wife Jenat Eddy alias
McColluagh I order her to have her Choice of any two cows she thinks fit to take, and said two Cows to be kept from of all Charges to her, together with her maintenance of the plantation during her widow-hood, and the bound servant at her disposal, with the half of the household furniture, as for my two youngest children Agnes and Alexander Eddy I order each of them thirty pounds currancey
to be paid when come of age and my youngest son Alexander to be put to which he thinks file to chigo as for my youngest Daughter Agnes I order her the other half of my household furniture as for my firsts wife children Elles (Allison), Maryann (Meriam), James, Joan (Jeane), Gayon (Gavin), Robert (crossed out on will) John, William and Thomas Eddy I do order Each five Shillings as for my Son Robert Eddy I order him a three year old horse and my body clothes and as for my two sons Samuel and David Eddy I order to them my plantation which I now together with all the remainder of my worldly possesions which remains undivided, I order my two sons Samuel and David to build to their mother a convinient house at their charges if she demands it I order Walter Buchanan and my son Samuel Eddy to be my Executors to do justice to my children wife and children according to the true intent of this my last will and testament written on this day and date above mentioned Witness present: William Eddy his mark John Eddy his mark; Walter Buchanan; Janet Eddy her mark


Janet MCCOLLUAGH

She was also a witness to her husband's WILL.


Samuel EDDY

He was one of the exceutors of his father's WILL in 1750.

He became known as Samuel Edie and "was a prominent member of Adams County who held a number of important offices including Justice of the Peace.


William EDDIE

CHURCH RECORDS: EDIE, William to Janet PREIST marriage from extracted records of Church of Scotland at the Parish Church of Old Machar, Parish registers covering time period of 1621 to 1854.


David EDDIE

CHURCH RECORDS: EDDIE, David son of William EDDIE from Christening record from extracted records of Church of Scotland at the Parish Church of Old Machar, Parish registers covering time period of 1621 to 1854.


Esquire Elias STILLWELL

MILITARY RECORD: Elias, at the age of 70 renounced his King, resigned his commission as Justice of the Peace, picked up his rifle, saddled up one of his horses and rode off to fight in the Revolution.

PROBATE RECORDS: Elias made his WILL 30 Aug 1785 and proved in Bedford County, Pennsylvania 27 Feb 1792, in which he set forth that he was: "Elias Stillwell, Sen., of Bethel Twp, Bedford County & state of Pennsylvania, Esquire, being very old and stricken in years, but of good and perfect memory, etc. He willed to his dear and beloved wife Mariam Stillwell the one-third of his lands during her life (excepting his lands in the big cove), and one-third part of his personal and moveable estate, "with her choice of a riding beast, saddle and bridle and bed and furniture," no to be appraised in her third. The land in the great cove was to be sold and the profits arising there from to be made a part of his personal and moveable estate; to his grandson Elias Stillwell, son of Obadiah Stillwell, deceased, L5, of Pennsylvania currency; to "my three grandchildren, the children of Obadiah Stillwell, deceased, namely, Elinor Stillwell, Susanna Stillwell & Obadiah Stillwell," L30, of Pennsylvania currency, equally between them; to "my son Jeremiah Stillwell" L100, of Pennsylvania currency, to be paid by my son John Stillwell out of my real estate ...... and all my back amounts against him I make null and void; to "my grandson Elias Pain, son of Samuel Pain" L5, Pennsylvania currency, when he comes of age; "unto my friend the Rev. Joseph Powell, the present Baptist Minister of this place, for the love I bear to him," L5, Pennsylvania currency; "It is my will and I order that the sum of money given me credit for, at a settlement in the Baptist Church book, of this place, to be laid out for the use of the said Baptist Church;" to "my grandson Elias Stillwell, son of John Stillwell," L5, Pennsylvania currency, when he comes of age. The remainder of his personal estate is given equally, "unto my five daughters, namely, Elizabeth Graham, widow, Rebecca Coombes, Sarah Truax, Mary Pain and Rachel Warford;" to "my son John Stillwell all my land where I now live, containing about two hundred and fifty acres, .... which I hold by a Maryland Survey," etc. Executors: his "beloved John Stillwell and my loving friend Jacob Wink." Witnesses: Benjamin Truax (his mark), Jacob Hart and Joseph Truax. Signed: Elias Stillwell

CEMETERY RECORDS: His tombstone says the following: Elias Stillwell departed this life February the 4th Anno 1790 aged 84 years, Good God or what lender Hang everlasting things Thee al___ of all the dead Upon lifes feeble brings Made by W. Blair (in cursive writing) (This inscription was sent to me by Scott Duncan email: maizeblue6@onemain.com on 19 May 2001) I went to the cemetery myself in July 2002 the marker is very faded but can still be read fairly well. I found the following inscription in a book entitled: "The History of Captain Nicholas Stillwell son of Lieutenant Nicholas Stillwell and his Descendants" by John E. Stillwell, M.D., published in 1930, Elias Stillwell departed this life Feb. the 4, 1792 Good God on what a strand Hang everlasting things The eternal fates of all the dead Upon life's feeble strings.

NOTES: Tonoloway Primitive Baptist Church ---- Within sight of the Mason-Dixon line on Route 655, the first Tonoloway Baptist Church was built in 1752 by some of the earliest settlers in Fulton County. Rev. Joseph Powell became pastor in 1765 and also served as our colonial delegate to state and national constitutional convention. His gravestone still stands in the cemetery. The present brick meetinghouse remains unchanged, both inside and out, since its erection in 1828. Union troops used it as a temporary hospital during the Civil War. The Friends of Tonoloway hold periodic meetings and renactments here. (found on internet)

NOTES: Tonoloway Primitive Baptist Church ---- Ten miles south of Needmore on PA 655 in southern Fulton County. This was the tenth Baptist church built in America, first built in 1752 and rebuilt in 1804. It served as a hospital during the Civil War. The very old cemetery adjoins the church lot. (found on internet)

NOTES: Union surgeon Samuel E. Blake's used Tonoloway Primitive Baptist Church as a field hospital for troops defending nearby Hancock, Maryland on 5 Jan 1862 when the town was being shelled by Confederate General Stonewall Jackson. Jackson's guns were positioned along what is now the West Virginia side of the Potomac River across from Hancock. The Tonoloway Primitive Baptist Church is just north of the Pennsylvania border and was out of range of Jackson's guns. More than 100 soldiers were treated in the church. At least nine died, according to historical society records. Though renovated some over the years, the old church still stands. (found on the internet)

HISTORY: The following was taken from the Heady Family Newsletter. "The stream now known as Tonoloway Creek, but called 'Konolawa' by the Indians living along its bank and 'The Conolloways' by the white settlers, follows a meandering course through the southern part of present Fulton County, Pennsylvania crossing the boundary line into Maryland about three miles before it joins the Potomac at a point just below that river's northern most bend. The Big and Little Tonoloway Settlements lay about five miles north of the Potomac along branches of Tonoloway Creek and immediately west of the large and small basins named, respectively, the Great (Big) Cove and Little Cove. These settlements had been founded by a few Scotch-Irish immigrants, at least one Welch family (that of Evan Shelby), and a band of Monmouth and Middlesex county, New Jersey families, which included those of Moses Graham, William Linn, Joseph Warford, Adam Stiger, John Melott, Benjamin Truax, and Elias, Richard and Jeremiah Stillwell, Thomas Heady, Gavin Eddy, Samuel Hedden, the Coombs, Belieus, Applegates and no doubt others. Whether the Monmouth and Middlesex county families came as a unit or over a period of several years, is not known but they were all there by 1765 or earlier.


Meriam EDDY

NOTES: She was a Scotch woman who was a great doctress, and who judging by her handwriting was a woman of education and culture.

CEMETERY RECORDS: Her tombstone says the following: In Memory of Mariam Stillwell Wife of Elias Stillwell Esq. Who departed this life Oct the 19th Anno 1803 aged 95 years, My loving mate did survive And true my ___ real (unreadable line) Where behold my fate (This inscription was sent to me by Scott Duncan email: maizeblue6@onemain.com on 19 May 2001) I went to the cemetery myself in July 2002 the marker is very faded but can still be read fairly well. I found the following inscription in a book entitled: "The History of Captain Nicholas Stillwell son of Lieutenant Nicholas Stillwell and his Descendants" by John E. Stillwell, M.D., published in 1930, Mariam Stillwell departed this life Oct. 19, 1803 aged 95 years My loving mate I did survive And true my age was great, I lived the years of 95 But here behold my fate.


James Washington FISHER Sr.

NOTES: In 1834, James and his wife Elizabeth, joined the Little Flock Baptist Church in Bullitt County, Kentucky and in 1848 moved there membership to the Mt. Holly Methodist Church at Fairdale.

CENSUS RECORDS: 12 Sep 1850 Dist #2, Jefferson County, Kentucky film #442973

NOTES: He submitted an affidavit on 30 March 1889, saying that he was 76 years old and the brother of John who died of disease in the hospital in Louisville. So that Eliza Ann Graham Fisher could get a pension.


Elizabeth Ann GRAHAM

NOTES: She was the widow of Levi Morgan, when she married James Fisher. She was 15 years older then James. She was 90 years old when she died.


John FISHER

He was 29 in 1850 living in Dist #2, Jefferson County, Kentucky.

He was 40 in 1860 living in Morganfield PO, Union, Kentucky.

MILITARY RECORDS: He entered the service in the Union Army during the Civil War 10 July 1863 as a Private in Company A, 48th Kentucky Regiment and died at the Army hospital in Louisville, Kentucky of disease contracted while in the service of his country. I have a copy of his pension records in my files.


Eliza Ann GRAHAM

She was 29 in 1850.

She was 39 in 1860.

CENSUS RECORDS: 22 Sep 1870 Lindle Pct, Union, Kentucky page #311, family #87/89
FISHER, Eliza A. age 48, female, keeps house, KY
FISHER, Manuel age 19, male, farm hand, KY
FISHER, Sarah J. age 15, female, KY
FISHER, Deborah age 13, female, KY
FISHER, Elizabeth age 9, female, KY

CENSUS RECORDS: 1880 Clayville, Webster, Kentucky Film #1254446, Page #119
Eliza FISHER Head F W W 56 KY
Occ: Housekeeper Fa: KY Mo: KY
Manuel FISHER Son M S W 28 KY
Occ: Farmer Fa: KY Mo: KY
Elizabeth FISHER Dau F S W 19 KY
Fa: KY Mo: KY


James Washington FISHER

He was 9 in 1850.

He was 17 in 1860.

MILITARY RECORDS: He served in the Union Army during the Civil War in the same company as his father. I have found no pension for him.


Emmanuel Bridgewater FISHER

He was 9 in 1860.

He was 19 in 1870.

He was 28 in 1880, single, living with his mother.

He was 48 in 1900, single, living with his nephew John Washington Fryar Jr.

He never married.


Buford Henry FISHER

He was 7 in 1860.


Sarah Jane FISHER

She was 5 in 1860.

She was 15 in 1870.

She was 19 in 1880, single, working as a servant in the home of J. A. and Mary Whitesides in Clayville, Webster, Kentucky.