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The Ancestors of Vickie Beard Thompson

Notes


Reverend William DICKEY

NOTES: I received the following from my father Frank Beard who received it from a Sherry Fayard.
Reverend William Dickey, second son of John and Margaret Hillhouse Dickey, born 6 Dec 1774 in York County, South Carolina died 5 Dec 1857 in Bloomingsburg, Ohio. He spent 55 years of his life as a minister. He was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Transylvania, 8 Oct 1802. William Warren Sweet, Vol. II of his series on "Religion on the American Frontier, records an account of this licensing". Vol. II is on the Presbyterians. On page 188 he states: "Spring Hill Church, 8 Oct 1802. Transylvania Presbytery proceeded to judge of the examination of Mr. Dickey, Mr. Wilson, Mr. Anderson, Mr. Ewing and Mr. King. Having received sufficient testimonials in favor of William Dickey and Joshua L. Wilson, and they having gone through a regular course of literature, of their good moral character, and of their being in communion of the church, proceeded to take the usual parts of trial for their licensure Presbytery did and hereby does license them, the said William Dickey and Joshua L. Wilson, to preach the gospel of Christ."
According to Mrs. Gannon, William Dickey lived about 3 miles east of Marion, Kentucky. In the year 1803 he is said to have organized the church on Crooked Creek, which was named Bethany. He undoubtedly served there as a pastor when another was not in the vicinity. Records show that the Reverend Terah Tamplin was the earliest Presbyterian preacher to visit and preach in Livingston County, and records show that he married many couples during the early years, including some of the Henry children. In 1805 combined congregations of Bethany and Salem sent Samuel Henry an Elder to Presbytery with a request that a regular pastor be assigned to them. It is assumed that the request was for the Reverend William Dickey to become their regular pastor. The request was put to Mr. Dickey who took it under consideration and the next day consented to accept the Transylvania Presbytery, to the full ministry and install him as pastor of Bethany and Salem churches. He served the churches of Bethany and Salem until he moved to Ohio in 1817. (End of note from Sherry Fayard.)


Rebecca F. ROSS

NOTES: She was a sister to Margaret Ross who married John Dickey brother to William.


Reverend William DICKEY

NOTES: I received the following from my father Frank Beard who received it from a Sherry Fayard.
Reverend William Dickey, second son of John and Margaret Hillhouse Dickey, born 6 Dec 1774 in York County, South Carolina died 5 Dec 1857 in Bloomingsburg, Ohio. He spent 55 years of his life as a minister. He was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Transylvania, 8 Oct 1802. William Warren Sweet, Vol. II of his series on "Religion on the American Frontier, records an account of this licensing". Vol. II is on the Presbyterians. On page 188 he states: "Spring Hill Church, 8 Oct 1802. Transylvania Presbytery proceeded to judge of the examination of Mr. Dickey, Mr. Wilson, Mr. Anderson, Mr. Ewing and Mr. King. Having received sufficient testimonials in favor of William Dickey and Joshua L. Wilson, and they having gone through a regular course of literature, of their good moral character, and of their being in communion of the church, proceeded to take the usual parts of trial for their licensure Presbytery did and hereby does license them, the said William Dickey and Joshua L. Wilson, to preach the gospel of Christ."
According to Mrs. Gannon, William Dickey lived about 3 miles east of Marion, Kentucky. In the year 1803 he is said to have organized the church on Crooked Creek, which was named Bethany. He undoubtedly served there as a pastor when another was not in the vicinity. Records show that the Reverend Terah Tamplin was the earliest Presbyterian preacher to visit and preach in Livingston County, and records show that he married many couples during the early years, including some of the Henry children. In 1805 combined congregations of Bethany and Salem sent Samuel Henry an Elder to Presbytery with a request that a regular pastor be assigned to them. It is assumed that the request was for the Reverend William Dickey to become their regular pastor. The request was put to Mr. Dickey who took it under consideration and the next day consented to accept the Transylvania Presbytery, to the full ministry and install him as pastor of Bethany and Salem churches. He served the churches of Bethany and Salem until he moved to Ohio in 1817. (End of note from Sherry Fayard.)


Howell PARKER Sr.

NOTES: Birth dates of Howell's children found on Genforum submitted by: Nancy Vandergriff on 19 June 1999.

HISTORY: Richard Parker I and his descendants by William Ashley Hinson, SLFHL Film #2055176, item 10. From an article by Mrs. G.D.B. Reynolds, dated August 19, 1955, that appeared in the Stanley News and Press HOWELL PARKER WAS NOTED SOLDIER OF THE REVOLUTION "The Revolutionary War soldier, Howell PARKER, who lived, died and is buried on his orginal homestead almost on the edge of the present town of New London, enlisted with the Rowan County Militia in the early days of the war. Records show that he was actively engaged throughout the period of enlistment, first against the Tories, who were following the leadership of the notorious Fanning, recruiting men between Hillsboro and the Yadkin River and later stationed at Wilmington, North Carolina to defend the town and harbor from the British. Tradition says when Wilmington was in command of the British under Major Craig, Howell PARKER was held as a prisoner on a ship in nearby waters. There is no authentic record of these prisoners, but a cherished possession in the hands of a late grandson, Captain M. S. PARKER, was a furlough for the soldier to come home when he learned of the birth of his son, William, who was born October 23, 1781. An incident occurred during this stay at his home, which has been told and retold to each generation of Howell PARKER's descendants and, without question or denial, has been accepted as true under the statement of a North Carolina historian "A statement that has never been doubted, doesn't need to be proven." So the story still holds that Howell PARKER was confronted on the main road near his home by Colonel David Fanning and his band of Tories, and halted. He was asked his name and how he sided with or against the king. PARKER squared his shoulders and said "I am a Patriot, sir," whereupon Fanning asked him to turn his back [ed. for a firing squad], but the answer came back, "A PARKER never turns his back to an enemy." Instead of ordering his men to shoot, all put spurs to their horses and galloped away, thinking they were too near a band of Patriots! The story has been permanently preserved in the records of the National Daughters of the American Revolution in the naming of a local chapter of the organization the Yadkin River Patriots Chapter. The deed to Howell PARKER's land, which has been known to the present time as the Parker Gold Mine, was bought in 1778 from Edward MOORE of Anson County, just prior to the forming of Montgomery from Anson. "A certain tract of land, as appears by patent bearing date of the 22nd day January, in the thirteenth year of the reign of King George, the third, 1773." The callings locate it on the dividing ridge between the Long Branch of Rocky River and Harry's Creek of the Yadkin River. The deed was the first to be recorded in Montgomery County with Will PARKER, clerk, perhaps a brother to Howell, and Henry MUNGER, register of deeds. The children of this patriot were as copied from his Bible: William, Drury, James, Elizabeth, Nancy, Martha, Howell Jr., and John. Howell PARKER, the patriot, died in 1796. He was buried in the family graveyard located on his own property. Today there is a marble shaft in the center of the plot. It is a four sided design about six feet high with inscription on three sides. The overgrowth and undergrowth of this neglected acre set aside forever as a burial plot made it too difficult for a picture of this last resting place of the early settler whose descendants are still citizens and tax payers in Stanley County. More than a score of the descendants of Howell PARKER have become members of the Daughters of the American Revolution in North Carolina through his service, but no recognition has been taken of his grave." Mrs. G. D. B. Reynolds (Elizabeth Parker Reynolds) (born 11-29-1879 died 4-2-1956) Stanley News and Press Firday, August 19, 1955


Mary R. DICKEY

NOTES: She was the mother of 5 children three of which lived to maturity.