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The Ancestors of Vickie Beard Thompson

Notes


Richard GOLDING Sr.

Information from Evelyn R. Wood 600 Florence Ave, Columbia, MO 65201.

HISTORY: TRACING THE ROOTS - GOLDEN FAMILY HERTAGE, INTRODUCTION -- AND THE EARLY DAYS OF THE FAMILY The surname Golding appears in ancient English and early American records in the various spellings of Golden, Goldin, Goldine, Goldyn, Goldyne, Goldying, Gilden, Gildens and Golding, of which the last is the most commonly used in America at the present time. Families bearing this name resided at early dates in the British Counties of Kent, Cambridge, Oxford, York, Wilts, Suffolks, Nottingham, Essex and in the city and vicinity of London. It appears that they were represented among the landed Aristocracy of Great Britain. The GOLDEN name is very rare and research has shown there is only about one Golden family for every quarter million Americans.
The earliest records of the name in England include those of Golding, Palmarius of Kent in 1273; those of Hilde Golden; Nicholas Goldin of Oxford, and Thomas Golding of Oxford; Hugo Golding of Suffolk at a later date; those of Henry le Golden at Somerset at a later date; and those of William Goldyng of Yorkshire in 1379; those Isabella Goldyng and Robert Goldyng of Yorkshire ten years later; and those of Henry Golding of Maiden Relegh, Bershire, about 1400. The Suffolk and Essex branch of the family was represented in the early part of the fourteenth century by two brothers, Warrin and John Golding. Thomas Golding, a descendant, married Elizabeth Worthie, with whom he resided at the family seat of Belchamp Hall. This manor had been owned by King Athelstan and known then as Bylcham. King Athelstan left it to his son, King Alfred. After the latters death it passed into possession of the Cathedral Church of St Paul's in London. In the reign of Edward the First, the Goldings purchased it and it remained in the family until the seventeenth century.
Thomas and Elizabeth Golding had, among others, a son John, who held the position of Auditor of the Exchequer. He married first Elizabeth Hammond, by whom they had Thomas, William, Margaret, and Elizabeth. By his second wife, Ursula Marston, he had further issue of Arthur, Henry, George, Edward, Frances and Dorothy. John died in 1547 and was succeeded by his eldest son, Thomas.
Thomas, who was knighted while still a young man, held the positions of Commissioner for the certifying of Chantry lands in Essex and Sheriff of Essex and Hertfordshire. During his lifetime Sir Thomas annexed several large estates to the original seat of Belchamp. He married Elizabeth Royden. William, the brother of Sir Thomas married Elizabeth West and was by her the father of Edmund and Dorothy. Margaret, the eldest sister of Sir Thomas, married John de Vere, sixteenth Earl of Oxford.
Edward Golding, a descendent of the aforementioned Henry of Maiden Erlegh, married Anne English, by whom he had Edward, Charles, Charlotte, and Caroline. Caroline married Quilt John Greenly, while Charlotte married the Reverend Henry Winch. Charles, who entered holy orders, married Charlotte Palmer, by whom he had a son Henry, who, like his father, ma Jred the Church as a profession.
Among those of this name who served in the American Revolution were Richard, Robert, Simon, James, Isham, Abraham, Jesse and John Golden of Virginia; Echubod Jr., John, John, Jr., Joseph and Eleazer Golding of Massachusetts. Some of the Christain names preferred by the family for its male offspring are John, Thomas, William, Edward, Charles, Henry, Arthur, and Ephraim. The following are a few of the bearers of the name who have distinguished themselves in America in comparatively recent times:
Louis Thorn Golding (b. 1865), of New Jersey, Editor and publisher.
Frank Henry Golding (b. 1875), of Connecticut, public utility Executive
Louis Golding (b. 1895) of New York, Author.
Edward William Golding (19th century) of New York, Writer.
Claud Golding (19th century) of Pennsylvania, Historian.
One of the oldest and most frequently used of the coats of arms of the Ancient English family of Golding, from which the American families of the name trace their descent, is that described as follows (Burke, Encyclopedia of Heraldry, 18440J) Arms - - "Gules a chevron argent between three bezants." Crest - "A dragon's head erased vertically collared and line or." BIBLIOGRAPHY for Pages 1-3 Information: Bardsley. English and Welsh Surnames, 1901. Savage. Genealogical Dictionary of New England, 1860. Morant. History of Esses, 1778. Nunsell Americna Ancestry, 1887-1899. Burke Extinct Baronetcies, 1844. Burburke Landed Gentry, 1875. Burke Encyclopedia of Heraldry, 1844. William and Mary College Quarterly, 1899-1900. Virginia Magazine of Biography and History, 1915. Halbert's Inc. Bath, Ohio, 1985.


James Cansler CLARK

David May's fourth cousin, Jeffrey Clark, has a mimeographed copy of excerpts of letters written by Cordelia Vollintine Willey to her nephew, Edward Witmern Vollintine. Jeffrey transcribed some of the excerpts into an e-mail to me after I asked how he knew the "C" stood for "Cansler." Cordelia says the Clarks were associated with the Hendersons and the Canslers. And, she says her mother's father was James Cansler Clark. From this it could be concluded that the middle initial, "C," in James C. Clark, stands for Cansler. I contacted Jeffrey Clark through the GenForum site on the Internet.

The following narrative concerns the descendants of Joseph Clark and Mary (Golden) Clark of Christian County, KY in the early 1800's. The narrative was by Thomas B. Clark, Joseph's grandson through his son James C. Clark, and was dictated to Thomas' niece, Mary Belle Vollintine, who was the daughter of Thomas' sister Mary Martha Clark. The copy in my possession was mimeographed, so this narrative doesn't come from the original. A few of the dates and the spelling of some names may be slightly in error. Nevertheless, Thomas B. Clark was a contemporary of all the people discussed, and I've found the information to be substantially correct. (Jeff Clark)

James C. Clark was born in Pendleton district, SC, 13 June 1791 - was eldest son of Joseph Clark who was youngest of five brothers. Was of English descent. These five brothers each served in the War of Revolution under General Greene (?), one of whom, Johnathan, was captain of a company. In 1801 Joseph & Johnathan Clark emigrated to Kentucky settling in Christian County of that state -- both taking with him a number of slaves. Joseph liberated his slaves soon afterward. The other brothers of these men remaining in SC & VA. Joseph Clark, of whom the writer is a direct descendent, had a family of four sons namely James C., Lemuel, Johnathan, & Joab and four daughters, Eulibia who married John Brown (they had one daughter named Eulibia), Harriet married L. T. Brazier who had several sons and two daughters, Carrie Ann and Mary Ann. Mary Ann married James Solomon. Carrie Ann died unmarried. The sons Goldsmith, Joab, Larkin, Pingore, Ninian. Lucetta, daughter of Joseph Clark who married Reed Renshaw, their children were Finis, James, Price; the girls who were all married were five in number. Rachel Clark, another daughter of Joseph Clark married David Clark a cousin. Rachel and David moved after marriage in 1842 or 1843 to Mason County in Illinois where all trace of them seems to be lost to us.

Lemuel Clark, the second son of Joseph Clark had seven sons -- namely Milton, Miles, Frank, Mark, Addison, Lemuel, & James, and four daughters named Marthena, Tabitha, Eveline, and Cynthia. The two last marrying in Texas, the two former dying young. The sons were all married and raised large families excepting James who never married. These Clark families were eventually scattered throughout the states of Missouri, Illinois, and Texas. The two oldest sons of Joseph Clark, that is James C. and Lemuel, married sisters, respectively Hannah and Anna Henderson.

Johnathan the third son of Joseph Clark emigrated to Christian County, IL, after his marriage in Christian County, KY to Betsy Jurnigan and raised a family of five sons and four daughters, namely Lewis, James, William, Alfred and Henry. To the writer no record is known of this branch of the family except the fact that both the eldest son and eldest daughter died many years ago, the son being killed by Negroes in Kansas near the end of the war.

Joab the fourth & youngest son of Joseph Clark married Polly Ann Brashear by whom he had four sons and two daughters, namely Gustavus, Goldsmith, Volna Columbus, Hosea Ballew and Sebastian Streator. The two daughters were Harriet and Aurelia. The latter never married. Harriet married James Johnson. Polly died in the year (blank) and Joab married her sister Harriet Brashear, to whom was born one son and four daughters. The son Albert G. Hams was cross-eyed, considered very smart and became a lawyer of considerable note at Hopkinsville, KY. He married a Miss Lawson and had one or two children. Joab and Harriet's daughters were Elizabeth, Victoria, Ellen, & Josie. Harriet, Joab's wife, died, and he married another sister named Nancy. Their children were named Joab and Mary. Joab married Mary Myers, a daughter of George and Salena Myers (cousins of Aunt Lou Clark). Joab Clark was a Universalist preacher from early manhood, preached for more than fifty years in Christian County, KY, building up a church of large membership. The church was organized before his pastorate, James C. Clark and his wife Hannah becoming the first members. This church called (Consolation) was organized at the home of James C. Clark. The entire family of Joab Clark so far as known to the writer has ever since his birth lived in the vicinity of Hopkinsville, KY. Joab Clark represented his county in the legislature for two terms.

James C. Clark & Hannah Henderson were married 7 Dec 1813, in Christian County, KY, twelve miles north of Hopkinsville, where they lived until March, 1844, when they moved to Christian County, IL. About the year 1833 or 1834 he was elected to the legislature of his state, serving one term. He also served as Justice of the Peace for a long term of years, emigrating to Illinois in 1844. Also all his family of eleven [??] children (six sons and seven daughters) except one daughter Minerva who had previous to this time married John W. Thompson and remained in Kentucky. Cynthia the oldest child was born 12 Dec 1814, married to Alfred Curry 29 Aug 1832. Presley H. born 21 Mar 1816, married to Jane B. Johnson 22 Dec 1840. Joseph Harvy Clark was born 6 Apr 1819, married 16 Nov 1840 to Lydia V. Hardy. Young Bolin Clark . . . [SENTENCE PARTIALLY CUT OFF] . . . . . . .24 Oct 1823, died 10 May 1843, married to John W. Thompson 21 Feb 1844. [BELIEVE THE LATTER PART OF THIS SENTENCE CONCERNS MINERVA CLARK - DATE OF DEATH OR MARRIAGE OBVIOUSLY INCORRECT] Mary Martha Clark born 12 Sep 1825, married to G. W. Vollintine 2 Sep 1845, died 30 Aug 1905. Leander Low Clark born 8 Aug 1827, died 30 Jul 1868, married to Rachel Tantum 19 Aug 1852. James L. Clark born 21 Feb 1830, married to Margaret Jernigan 11 Sep 1851. Cyrena A. Clark born 6 Mar 1832, died 9 Jun 1909, married to Henry C. Johnson 4 Dec 1855. Thomas B. Clark born 22 Jun 1834, married to Louisa J. Rice (née Myers) 28 Feb 1866. Irena Lucetta born 24 Sep 1836, married to Robert P. Langley 3 May 1855.

The second wife of James C. Clark (Tyressa Monroe Johnson) married to him 6 Jun 1848, born 7 Dec 1810 in Christian County, KY, died 22 Jul 1863. Their son William Johnson Clark born 24 May 1849, died 6 Jun 1849.

James C. Clark was a man of strong personality, of unusual reasoning power, good conversationalist, jovial disposition, warm in his friendships, liberal in his views, and firm in his beliefs. His perceptive power was great and although his school education was limited his education was self-acquired, was a man of wide reading and kept abreast of the times. Hannah Henderson his wife was of Scotch-Irish descent, a woman much admired and respected, a refined womanly woman with a heart full of kindness & a friend to all whom she knew.


Hannah HENDERSON

Hannah's son, Thomas B. Clark, described her in a narrative as "...of Scotch-Irish descent, a woman much admired and respected, a refined womanly woman with a heart full of kindness & a friend to all whom she knew."

CEMETERY: Inscription "49 years, 7 months, 10 days, Wife of J. C. Clark daughter of N. & M. Henderson


James Cansler CLARK

David May's fourth cousin, Jeffrey Clark, has a mimeographed copy of excerpts of letters written by Cordelia Vollintine Willey to her nephew, Edward Witmern Vollintine. Jeffrey transcribed some of the excerpts into an e-mail to me after I asked how he knew the "C" stood for "Cansler." Cordelia says the Clarks were associated with the Hendersons and the Canslers. And, she says her mother's father was James Cansler Clark. From this it could be concluded that the middle initial, "C," in James C. Clark, stands for Cansler. I contacted Jeffrey Clark through the GenForum site on the Internet.

The following narrative concerns the descendants of Joseph Clark and Mary (Golden) Clark of Christian County, KY in the early 1800's. The narrative was by Thomas B. Clark, Joseph's grandson through his son James C. Clark, and was dictated to Thomas' niece, Mary Belle Vollintine, who was the daughter of Thomas' sister Mary Martha Clark. The copy in my possession was mimeographed, so this narrative doesn't come from the original. A few of the dates and the spelling of some names may be slightly in error. Nevertheless, Thomas B. Clark was a contemporary of all the people discussed, and I've found the information to be substantially correct. (Jeff Clark)

James C. Clark was born in Pendleton district, SC, 13 June 1791 - was eldest son of Joseph Clark who was youngest of five brothers. Was of English descent. These five brothers each served in the War of Revolution under General Greene (?), one of whom, Johnathan, was captain of a company. In 1801 Joseph & Johnathan Clark emigrated to Kentucky settling in Christian County of that state -- both taking with him a number of slaves. Joseph liberated his slaves soon afterward. The other brothers of these men remaining in SC & VA. Joseph Clark, of whom the writer is a direct descendent, had a family of four sons namely James C., Lemuel, Johnathan, & Joab and four daughters, Eulibia who married John Brown (they had one daughter named Eulibia), Harriet married L. T. Brazier who had several sons and two daughters, Carrie Ann and Mary Ann. Mary Ann married James Solomon. Carrie Ann died unmarried. The sons Goldsmith, Joab, Larkin, Pingore, Ninian. Lucetta, daughter of Joseph Clark who married Reed Renshaw, their children were Finis, James, Price; the girls who were all married were five in number. Rachel Clark, another daughter of Joseph Clark married David Clark a cousin. Rachel and David moved after marriage in 1842 or 1843 to Mason County in Illinois where all trace of them seems to be lost to us.

Lemuel Clark, the second son of Joseph Clark had seven sons -- namely Milton, Miles, Frank, Mark, Addison, Lemuel, & James, and four daughters named Marthena, Tabitha, Eveline, and Cynthia. The two last marrying in Texas, the two former dying young. The sons were all married and raised large families excepting James who never married. These Clark families were eventually scattered throughout the states of Missouri, Illinois, and Texas. The two oldest sons of Joseph Clark, that is James C. and Lemuel, married sisters, respectively Hannah and Anna Henderson.

Johnathan the third son of Joseph Clark emigrated to Christian County, IL, after his marriage in Christian County, KY to Betsy Jurnigan and raised a family of five sons and four daughters, namely Lewis, James, William, Alfred and Henry. To the writer no record is known of this branch of the family except the fact that both the eldest son and eldest daughter died many years ago, the son being killed by Negroes in Kansas near the end of the war.

Joab the fourth & youngest son of Joseph Clark married Polly Ann Brashear by whom he had four sons and two daughters, namely Gustavus, Goldsmith, Volna Columbus, Hosea Ballew and Sebastian Streator. The two daughters were Harriet and Aurelia. The latter never married. Harriet married James Johnson. Polly died in the year (blank) and Joab married her sister Harriet Brashear, to whom was born one son and four daughters. The son Albert G. Hams was cross-eyed, considered very smart and became a lawyer of considerable note at Hopkinsville, KY. He married a Miss Lawson and had one or two children. Joab and Harriet's daughters were Elizabeth, Victoria, Ellen, & Josie. Harriet, Joab's wife, died, and he married another sister named Nancy. Their children were named Joab and Mary. Joab married Mary Myers, a daughter of George and Salena Myers (cousins of Aunt Lou Clark). Joab Clark was a Universalist preacher from early manhood, preached for more than fifty years in Christian County, KY, building up a church of large membership. The church was organized before his pastorate, James C. Clark and his wife Hannah becoming the first members. This church called (Consolation) was organized at the home of James C. Clark. The entire family of Joab Clark so far as known to the writer has ever since his birth lived in the vicinity of Hopkinsville, KY. Joab Clark represented his county in the legislature for two terms.

James C. Clark & Hannah Henderson were married 7 Dec 1813, in Christian County, KY, twelve miles north of Hopkinsville, where they lived until March, 1844, when they moved to Christian County, IL. About the year 1833 or 1834 he was elected to the legislature of his state, serving one term. He also served as Justice of the Peace for a long term of years, emigrating to Illinois in 1844. Also all his family of eleven [??] children (six sons and seven daughters) except one daughter Minerva who had previous to this time married John W. Thompson and remained in Kentucky. Cynthia the oldest child was born 12 Dec 1814, married to Alfred Curry 29 Aug 1832. Presley H. born 21 Mar 1816, married to Jane B. Johnson 22 Dec 1840. Joseph Harvy Clark was born 6 Apr 1819, married 16 Nov 1840 to Lydia V. Hardy. Young Bolin Clark . . . [SENTENCE PARTIALLY CUT OFF] . . . . . . .24 Oct 1823, died 10 May 1843, married to John W. Thompson 21 Feb 1844. [BELIEVE THE LATTER PART OF THIS SENTENCE CONCERNS MINERVA CLARK - DATE OF DEATH OR MARRIAGE OBVIOUSLY INCORRECT] Mary Martha Clark born 12 Sep 1825, married to G. W. Vollintine 2 Sep 1845, died 30 Aug 1905. Leander Low Clark born 8 Aug 1827, died 30 Jul 1868, married to Rachel Tantum 19 Aug 1852. James L. Clark born 21 Feb 1830, married to Margaret Jernigan 11 Sep 1851. Cyrena A. Clark born 6 Mar 1832, died 9 Jun 1909, married to Henry C. Johnson 4 Dec 1855. Thomas B. Clark born 22 Jun 1834, married to Louisa J. Rice (née Myers) 28 Feb 1866. Irena Lucetta born 24 Sep 1836, married to Robert P. Langley 3 May 1855.

The second wife of James C. Clark (Tyressa Monroe Johnson) married to him 6 Jun 1848, born 7 Dec 1810 in Christian County, KY, died 22 Jul 1863. Their son William Johnson Clark born 24 May 1849, died 6 Jun 1849.

James C. Clark was a man of strong personality, of unusual reasoning power, good conversationalist, jovial disposition, warm in his friendships, liberal in his views, and firm in his beliefs. His perceptive power was great and although his school education was limited his education was self-acquired, was a man of wide reading and kept abreast of the times. Hannah Henderson his wife was of Scotch-Irish descent, a woman much admired and respected, a refined womanly woman with a heart full of kindness & a friend to all whom she knew.


Tyressa Monroe JOHNSON

My reading of her headstone on August 30, 1996 was somewhat difficult. Headstone on ground just south of J. C. Clark headstone. Lettering weathered. Her name bold at top of stone "TYRESSA", Second line: "Wife of", third line big: "J. C. Clark" My read of parentage was "dau. of ?Wind . ?ivindell?" Next line: "?Julin - ?on". I read "Died Jul. 22, 1-63 Aged ?52y ?2mo 15 d". "8" in 1863 gone except for crossbar. Reading by Christian County Genealogical Soc. in 1990, Vol. IX, no. 1, Spring Quarterly was "Tybessa Clark w/o JC d/o Wm & Eiza. Johnson, 22 Jul 1863, 52 y 7m 15d." Photo of headstone shows "R" in "TYRESSA" could be a "B", but bottom is not clearly rounded.


Lemuel Marion CLARK Sr.

NOTES: Lemuel and his wife were early members of the Consolation Universalist Church of Christian County.

NOTES: Lemuel served one term as Sheriff of Christian County, Kentucky in 1846.


Lemuel Marion CLARK Jr.

NOTES: He was living with his brother Joseph Milton in 1850 and was 20 years old working as a farmer.


Mary Eveline CLARK

NOTES: She was living with his brother Joseph Milton in 1850 and was 18 years old.


Tabitha CLARK

NOTES: She was living with his brother Joseph Milton in 1850 and was 16 years old and was attending school.


James J. CLARK

NOTES: He was living with his brother Joseph Milton in 1850 and was 13 years old and was attending school.


Cynthia E. CLARK

NOTES: She was living with his brother Joseph Milton in 1850 and was 11 years old and was attending school.


Eusibia BROWN

She was mentioned in her grandfather Joseph Clark's Will..


Reed RENSHAW

HISTORY: Perrins History of Christian County, Kentucky. SLFHL Book #976.978 H2c
Reed was 1 year old when his parents came to Kentucky in 1808, then moved to Missouri in 1818 with his parents. After his father died in 1822 he and his mother came back to Kentucky in 1826. Farmed in Hamby Precinct from 1826 to 1839 then moved to Bainbridge Precinct where he farmed until 1875, when he came to Hopkinsville. Where he resided until he died. Reed, was a member of the Universalist Church since 1842. He was an active member of the order A.F. & A.M., and was a Republican in politics. He was also a butcher in his early life and for many years was a Magistrate of the county.

He was 43 in 1850 Dist #1, Christian County, Kentucky.

He was 54 in 1860 living in Hopkinsville PO, Christian, Kentucky.

He was 73 in 1880 living in Bainbridge, Christian, Kentucky.

NOTES: I went to the cemetery on 19 July 2001, there is no marker anymore for Reed or Lucetta that I could find.


Lucetta CLARK

She was 41 in 1850.

She was 51 in 1860.

She was 71 in 1880.

NOTES: She was the mother of eleven children of whom only eight were living by 1890.

NOTES: I went to the cemetery on 19 July 2001, there is no marker anymore for Reed or Lucetta that I could find.