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The Ancestors of Vickie Beard Thompson

Notes


Colonel Ephraim Washington HILL

He was Colonel of the Livingston County Militia.

CENSUS RECORDS: 9 Sep 1850 District #1, Crittenden, Kentucky 410/410,
He was 45 and had $3000.00 and was farming.

CENSUS RECORDS: 1860 Marion, Crittenden, Kentucky

CENSUS RECORDS: 1880 Marion, Crittenden, Kentucky Film #1254410, Page 27C
E. W. HILL Self M M W 75 KY
Occ: Farming Fa: NC Mo: NC
Mary S. HILL Wife F M W 31 KY
Occ: Housekeeping Fa: TN Mo: KY
Nancy E. HILL Dau F S W 12 KY
Occ: At Home Fa: KY Mo: KY
William H. HILL Son M S W 9 KY
Fa: KY Mo: KY
James E. HILL Son M S W 4 KY
Fa: KY Mo: KY

NEWSPAPERS: Crittenden Press Newspaper 13 April 1893, includes a picture of E. W. HILL
Of the men who first looked upon what is now Crittenden County, before but little of its virgin forest had faded before the woodsman's ax, but few are still living today. Among the thinned ranks of these pioneers is Col. E. W. HILL born 7 August 1805, at the old HILL farm about one mile south of Marion, and for 88 years he has been a citizen of this section. He was in Marion yesterday and spent the day with his granddaughter Mrs. J. T. ELDER. His father Col. David HILL, came from North Carolina 100 years ago this fall; he was a young man and accompanied James RICHEY, a well-to-do man, who settled here and opened a farm, building a cabin on what is known as the Wm. CLEMENT farm. The next year, or about 1784, Mr. HILL returned to North Carolina for a visit and returned to Kentucky accompanied by a number of settlers. Col. HILL remembers when his father left home and joined the ranks of the soldiers who fought in the War of 1812. In the early days when people gathered regularly to muster, E. W. HILL, being versed in military tactics, was chosen to command and rose to the rank of Colonel. Col. HILL was happily married to Mary B. PORTER, daughter of E. P. PORTER. Three children were born to them, two of them yet living, E. P. HILL and Mary DOWELL, wife of Judge DOWELL of Kansas.


Mary B. PORTER

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She was 45 in 1850.


Colonel Ephraim Washington HILL

He was Colonel of the Livingston County Militia.

CENSUS RECORDS: 9 Sep 1850 District #1, Crittenden, Kentucky 410/410,
He was 45 and had $3000.00 and was farming.

CENSUS RECORDS: 1860 Marion, Crittenden, Kentucky

CENSUS RECORDS: 1880 Marion, Crittenden, Kentucky Film #1254410, Page 27C
E. W. HILL Self M M W 75 KY
Occ: Farming Fa: NC Mo: NC
Mary S. HILL Wife F M W 31 KY
Occ: Housekeeping Fa: TN Mo: KY
Nancy E. HILL Dau F S W 12 KY
Occ: At Home Fa: KY Mo: KY
William H. HILL Son M S W 9 KY
Fa: KY Mo: KY
James E. HILL Son M S W 4 KY
Fa: KY Mo: KY

NEWSPAPERS: Crittenden Press Newspaper 13 April 1893, includes a picture of E. W. HILL
Of the men who first looked upon what is now Crittenden County, before but little of its virgin forest had faded before the woodsman's ax, but few are still living today. Among the thinned ranks of these pioneers is Col. E. W. HILL born 7 August 1805, at the old HILL farm about one mile south of Marion, and for 88 years he has been a citizen of this section. He was in Marion yesterday and spent the day with his granddaughter Mrs. J. T. ELDER. His father Col. David HILL, came from North Carolina 100 years ago this fall; he was a young man and accompanied James RICHEY, a well-to-do man, who settled here and opened a farm, building a cabin on what is known as the Wm. CLEMENT farm. The next year, or about 1784, Mr. HILL returned to North Carolina for a visit and returned to Kentucky accompanied by a number of settlers. Col. HILL remembers when his father left home and joined the ranks of the soldiers who fought in the War of 1812. In the early days when people gathered regularly to muster, E. W. HILL, being versed in military tactics, was chosen to command and rose to the rank of Colonel. Col. HILL was happily married to Mary B. PORTER, daughter of E. P. PORTER. Three children were born to them, two of them yet living, E. P. HILL and Mary DOWELL, wife of Judge DOWELL of Kansas.


Mary Susan Elizabeth WILLIAMS

She was 31 in 1880.


William H. HILL

He was 9 in 1880.


James E. HILL

He was 4 in 1880.


Reverend James Henry DICKEY

NOTES: James states in his history that his parents were married in York County, South Caroline in 1779. That they were refuges that winter and following spring in Halifax County, Virginia. While Lord Cornwallis occupied most of the area around Mecklenburg County, North Carolina and York County, South Carolina. James states that he was born in Halifax County, Virginia before they went back to York County, South Carolina.

HISTORY: At a meeting of the Orginial Cumberland Presbyterian Church held at Ridge Meeting House, April 2, 1805, a call was issued from the Bethany and Salem congregations for James to be ordained to preach at their meetings. He accepted and was asked to preach a sermon on the middle clause of Romans 8:13. Mr. Dickey was a licentiate from the Transylvania Presbytery, two years before. There came also to the Chillicothe Presbytery in early years, James H. Dickey, born in Virginia in 1780, and William Dickey, a native of South Carolina. James began his ministerial career as a missionary in Tennessee, but freed the slaves inherited by himself and his wife, and went to South Salem, Ohio, in 1810, where he became widely known for his antislavery work. William Dickey moved with his family from South Carolina to Kentucky where he preached for seventeen years. He went to Ohio, organized a church at Bloomingsburg in 1818, and served as its pastor for forty years. Finally, there came from Pennsylvania by way of Kentucky, Samuel Crothers. He had intended to make Winchester, Kentucky, his home, but moved to Ross County, Ohio, where he preached from 1810 to 1820 and then went to Greenfield, where he organized the Paint Valley Abolition Society. Gilliland, Rankin, the two Dickeys, and Samuel Crothers made the Chillicothe Presbytery of Ohio an antislavery stronghold before 1820. Rankin quickly emerged as a national figure in the movement.

MARRIAGE RECORDS: Consent given by father of the bride his name not mentioned. Test-Enoch Prince, Signers- James Dickey and William Dickey.


Reverend James Henry DICKEY

NOTES: James states in his history that his parents were married in York County, South Caroline in 1779. That they were refuges that winter and following spring in Halifax County, Virginia. While Lord Cornwallis occupied most of the area around Mecklenburg County, North Carolina and York County, South Carolina. James states that he was born in Halifax County, Virginia before they went back to York County, South Carolina.

HISTORY: At a meeting of the Orginial Cumberland Presbyterian Church held at Ridge Meeting House, April 2, 1805, a call was issued from the Bethany and Salem congregations for James to be ordained to preach at their meetings. He accepted and was asked to preach a sermon on the middle clause of Romans 8:13. Mr. Dickey was a licentiate from the Transylvania Presbytery, two years before. There came also to the Chillicothe Presbytery in early years, James H. Dickey, born in Virginia in 1780, and William Dickey, a native of South Carolina. James began his ministerial career as a missionary in Tennessee, but freed the slaves inherited by himself and his wife, and went to South Salem, Ohio, in 1810, where he became widely known for his antislavery work. William Dickey moved with his family from South Carolina to Kentucky where he preached for seventeen years. He went to Ohio, organized a church at Bloomingsburg in 1818, and served as its pastor for forty years. Finally, there came from Pennsylvania by way of Kentucky, Samuel Crothers. He had intended to make Winchester, Kentucky, his home, but moved to Ross County, Ohio, where he preached from 1810 to 1820 and then went to Greenfield, where he organized the Paint Valley Abolition Society. Gilliland, Rankin, the two Dickeys, and Samuel Crothers made the Chillicothe Presbytery of Ohio an antislavery stronghold before 1820. Rankin quickly emerged as a national figure in the movement.

MARRIAGE RECORDS: Consent given by father of the bride his name not mentioned. Test-Enoch Prince, Signers- James Dickey and William Dickey.