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The Ancestors of Vickie Beard Thompson

Notes


Captain Oliver Perry MOSS

Oliver was a Captain of Company C, Clay County, Missouri Militia during the Mexican War.

MEXICAN WAR PENSION FILES: Oliver Perry MOSS, wife Caroline M., WC-846, 5 May 1887, MO, served Company C, 1st Missouri Mounted Volunteers as a Captain, BLW#7044-160-50

CENSUS RECORDS: 1850 Liberty, Clay, Missouri p.300, #977.816 X2h family #4/4
MOSS, O. P. age 37, male, farmer, $8000.00 KY
MOSS, C. M. age 27, female, MO

CENSUS RECORDS: 1860 Liberty, Clay, Missouri family #714
MOSS, O. P. age 45, male, farmer, KY
MOSS, Caroline M. age 35, female, MO

CENSUS RECORDS:1880 District 124, Liberty, Clay, Missouri Film #1254681, Page 397B
Perry MOSS Self M M W 65 KY
Occ: Farmer Fa: VA Mo: VA
C. M. MOSS Wife F M W 55 MO
Occ: Keeping House Fa: PA Mo: KY
James MAY Other M S W 20 PA
Occ: Laborer Fa: PA Mo: KY
G. W. B. BROWN Other M S W 22 MO
Occ: Laborer Fa: MO Mo: MO
Cathine MOOR Other F M W 60 MO
Occ: Housekeeping Fa: TN Mo: TN
Sarah MOOR Other F S W 18 MO
Occ: Housekeeping Fa: MO Mo: OH
Nancy WELLS Other F W W 25 MO
Occ: Housekeeper Fa: KY Mo: KY
L. WELLS Other F S W 4 MO
Fa: MO Mo: MO


Carolina Margery THORNTON

She was in the 5 to 10 age brackett in 1830. She was 27 in 1850. She was 35 in 1860. Carolina never had any children, at least any that lived very long.

NEWSPAPER: Liberty Tribune 17 August 1866: (Book extractions of newspaper #977.816 D28h) Circuit Court Clay, 31 July 1866. Darwin J. Adkins, vs. - Robert W. Donnell and Mary D., his wife (formerly Thornton), Alex. W. Doniphan and Elizabeth J., his wife (formerly Thornton), John Doniphan and Frances A., his wife (formerly Thornton), Oliver P. Moss and Caroline M., his wife (formerly Thornton), James D. McCurdy & Susan M., his wife (formerly Thornton), Leondidas M. Lawson and Theodocia, his wife (formerly Thornton), and Mrs. Adeliza Morton, (formerly Thornton). Robert W. & Mary D. Donnell and James D. & Susan McCurdy are non-residents of the state. Object partition of real estate.


William MORTON

CENSUS RECORDS: 1850 Liberty, Clay, Missouri p.300, #977.816 X2h family #3/3
MORTON, William age 34, male, farmer, $4000.00 KY
MORTON, A. T. age 25, female, MO
MORTON, John T. age 8, male, MO
MORTON, Thomas age 5, male, MO
MORTON, Elizabeth age 1, female, MO

According to his wife's obit he died far from his home in 1850. Was he off working somewhere and died shortly after the census was taken?


Adeliza Tinmouth THORNTON

She was in the 5 to 10 age brackett in 1830. She was 25 in 1850.

CENSUS RECORDS: 1860 Liberty, Clay, Missouri family #789
MORTON, Adaline age 33, female, MO
MORTON, Thomas age 13, male, MO
MORTON, Lizzie age 10, female, MO
THORNTON, Theodocia age 21, female, MO

NEWSPAPER: Liberty Tribune 17 August 1866: (Book extractions of newspaper #977.816 D28h) Circuit Court Clay, 31 July 1866. Darwin J. Adkins, vs. - Robert W. Donnell and Mary D., his wife (formerly Thornton), Alex. W. Doniphan and Elizabeth J., his wife (formerly Thornton), John Doniphan and Frances A., his wife (formerly Thornton), Oliver P. Moss and Caroline M., his wife (formerly Thornton), James D. McCurdy & Susan M., his wife (formerly Thornton), Leondidas M. Lawson and Theodocia, his wife (formerly Thornton), and Mrs. Adeliza Morton, (formerly Thornton). Robert W. & Mary D. Donnell and James D. & Susan McCurdy are non-residents of the state. Object partition of real estate.

NEWSPAPER: Liberty Tribune 15 March 1867: (Book extractions of newspaper #977.816 D28h) Deaths: Died in Weston on the 8th instant, Mrs. A. T. Morton, daughter of the late Col. John Thornton, aged about 45 years.

NEWSPAPER: Liberty Tribune 3 May 1867: (Book extractions of newspaper #977.816 D28h) Deaths: From St. Louis, 28 March 1867, to Bro. Wright. Tells of death of Mrs. Adeliza T. Morton who died at the residence of her brother-in-law, Hon. John Doniphan at Weston on March 8th in her 43rd year. She was born in Clay County, daughter of the late Col. John Thornton. Educated by Prof. Patterson at Fayette, Missouri. In 1843, she married Mr. William Morton from Mason County, Kentucky. They had three children. Her husband died far from his home in 1850; her eldest son died in 1852 and her second in 1861. (Long obit) no other family record. Signed, your brother "D".


John Thornton MORTON

He was listed as age 8 in 1850.


Thomas MORTON

He was 5 in 1850. He was 13 in 1860.


Elizabeth MORTON

She was 1 in 1850. She was 10 in 1860.


Colonel John DONIPHAN

John was living in Weston, Platte, Missouri when he married Fanny.

BIOGRAPHICAL: Sketch of Colonel John DONIPHAN, St. Joseph, Buchanan County, Missouri --- From "History of Buchanan County, Missouri, Published 1881, St. Joseph Steam Printing Company, Printers, Binders, Etc., St. Joseph, Missouri. Colonel John DONIPHAN is descended from a Scotch family who emigrated to Virginia soon after the battle of Cullodon. His grandfather, Joseph DONIPHAN, at the age of eighteen was with BOONE, at Boonesborough, and taught the first school in Kentucky at that fort, in the summer of 1778, and was a volunteer at the siege of Yorktown, in 1781. In 1783, he married Ann SMITH, a descendent of Captain John SMITH, who settled Jamestown. In 1790, he moved to Kentucky, and resided until his death, in Mason County. He left three sons, Dr. Thomas S. DONIPHAN, surgeon of the Third Kentucky Volunteers, commanded by Colonel PAYNE, during the war of 1812, and the father of John; George DONIPHAN and General Alexander W. DONIPHAN, of the Mexican War and a distinguished lawyer of Missouri. In 1818, Dr. Thomas S. DONIPHAN married Rebecca FRAZEE, the daughter of Samuel FRAZEE, who was a companion of Simon KENTON in Northern Kentucky, at Washington in Mason County, in the year 1775. He removed to Brown County, Ohio where John was born in 1826, and educated at the Franklin Academy in Kentucky. After the death of his father, in 1843, he entered a printing office at Maysville, Kentucky. In 1844, through the kindness of Colonel MARSHALL of Kentucky, he got a position in the clerk's office in Mason County. He came to Clay County, Missouri in 1846. In 1848, he took a degree at the University of Louisville, and returned to Missouri. In February, 1848, he commenced to practice law in Platte County, where he continued to practice law until 1872, when he removed to St. Joseph. He had however, practiced law in Buchanan County since 1849, and was engaged in some of the most sensational trials in this county, among others the State vs. DOY, for stealing slaves; the State vs. HARDIN, and the State vs. JENKINS, each for murder. In 1854, he was elected to the Legislature from Platte County, as a Whig, against a Democratic majority of over 600, where he was instrumental in passing a bill to remove the Branch of the State Bank from Fayette to Weston, which Governor PRICE refused to sign; and in chartering, with one and a half million of state aid, the Weston & Randolph County Railroad, vetoed by Governor PRICE. This was the revising session, and likewise memorable for the triangular contest for Senator between BENTON, ATCHISON and DONIPHAN. In 1862, Colonel DONIPHAN was elected to the Senate from the Platte District, and served as an active Conservative Democrat during the next four years. He was a bold opponent of the DRAKE constitution and the registration laws, which disfrancised so large a portion of the best citizens. In 1866, he canvassed the Tenth district, denouncing these iniquities at great personal hazard, and wrote the Democratic address for the state committee in 1866, setting forth the enormities of such legislation, and which did much to aid the revolution of popular feeling in 1870. While in the Senate, he was a member of the Judiciary and Internal Improvement Committees, and aided largely in shaping the revision of 1866, and examined and passed upon, by section, the statutes of that year. His is the only solitary vote against the act authorizing the Governor to sell the Iron Mountain & Southwest Branch of the Pacific Railroad. He declared the act was a fraud on the state, to whom the properties were indebted several millions, and that they were worth every dollar of it, but the bill would jeopardize it. His words were prophetic, as the state got practically nothing for the road, while the properties are now worth more than five times that sum, and the state is paying the debt by taxation. In 1861, being a Union man, he was offered the command of a regiment by General LYON, which was declined, as well as several other positions in the army, but in 1862, from the necessities of the times, he was compelled to join the militia to prevent Platte County from being destroyed between the bushwhackers and Redlegs, who were alternately swarming around her, ready to swoop down upon the non-combatants. After serving two months as private, Governor GAMBLE appointed him Lieutenant Colonel of the 39th Missouri Militia, and afterwards Governor HALL appointed him to a like position in the 81st Missouri, where he served, when on duty, until after the PRICE invasion in 1864, when he resigned. It was through his personal intercession with General ROSECRANS, who was a friend, that JENNISON's Regiment was taken from Liberty Landing, to Fort Leavenworth, by steamboat, and thus saved Clay County from being pillaged and burned. In 1867, he was again elected to the Legislature, without opposition, and afterwards was elected Judge of the Weston Court of Common Pleas, during his absence, and without being a candidate. These facts show the estimation in which he was held by those who knew him well. He has always been prompt to serve the public without pay or reward, and has devoted much time to advance the cause of education and benevolence in the state. In 1848, he joined Phoenix Lodge, I. O. O. F., at Weston, and still remains a member of the lodge and Encampment there, having devoted much time to advancing the order, and has been honored as Grand Master and Grand Representative, has instituted lodges; traveled over the state instructing in the work, lecturing and giving his personal aid to the cause, and invariably refused to accept compensation in any form for these services. In 1852, he married Miss. Fanny THORNTON, of Clay County, a daughter of the late Colonel John THORNTON, and a sister to Mrs. General Alexander W. DONIPHAN, Mrs. Captain O. P. MOSS, Mrs. William MORTON, Mrs. R. W. DONNELL, Mrs. James H. BALDWIN and Mrs. L. M. LAWSON. In 1872, he was appointed attorney of the St. Joseph and Denver City Railroad Company which position he has continued to fill, to the satisfaction of the company and its patrons. In 1859, in connection with Judge James N. BURNES, he organized the Weston and Atchison Railway Company and together paid out of their means the expenses of surveys, plats, etc., having been elected the first President of the company, Colonel DONIPHAN gave a year in hard work to make a success of the project. In 1860, he assisted in the organization of the Missouri Valley Railroad Company, from Weston to Moberly, and was elected attorney of it, and had surveys and estimates made largely at his own expense, all of which were lost by reason of the war. Colonel DONIPHAN has never been a seeker for position or place outside of his profession, and those he has held have been more the result of solicitation than from any desire on his part to secure them. He is domestic in his habits and tastes, and has often said he would rather receive the "Well done", of his wife, than the plaudits of the multitude. As a practicing lawyer for more than thirty years, a member of the Legislature for seven sessions, and an active hard worker of great practical common sense, he has done much to shape the law and political economy of his county and state, and takes a great interest in public enterprises calculated to ameliorate and elevate his fellow citizens; he is a trustee of the Lunatic Asylum No. 2, having been appointed by Governor PHELPS, without his solicitation of knowledge; also the professor of medical jurisprudence in the St. Joseph Hospital Medical College, and several other positions of trust for the public good. Colonel DONIPHAN was attorney of the Weston and St. Joseph Railroad, and its successor, the Missouri Valley, for ten years, and obtained the right of way and assisted in the construction from Kansas City to Hopkins and Forest City, resigning in 1870. He built from Atchison to Edgerton thus making the Atchison Bridge and Winthrop necessities, and additions to the wealth of Buchanan County. In 1879, as agent of Jay GOULD, he built the Hastings and Grand Island and Blue Valley Railroads, as tributaries to St. Joseph. As a lawyer he has been successful in defending over one hundred and sixty cases of felony; he has never had but three clients ultimately convicted, and these were a part of those where he was defending under opposition from the court, and out of over thirty murder cases he has never had a client convicted capitally. Colonel DONIPHAN is an eloquent and forcible speaker, a compact and close reasoner, but seems to use pathos and logic only as a means of conviction. Perhaps the best illustration of his reserved powers as a public speaker was given in opposition to the sell out bill introduced into the State Senate by Hon. David WAGNER, afterwards Chief Justice, in January 1864, by which the State sold the Missouri Pacific Railroad to John C. FREMONT for seven million State bonds, then worth twenty five cents on the dollar. FREMONT was then in the zenith of his fame, a favorite of the Missouri Republicans as against Mr. LINCOLN for the Presidential nomination of 1864. He was in Jefferson City with a large hotel and restaurant run full, with many talented followers and lobyists, of the Senate to favor it, and had it presented suddenly by one of the ablest members in a forcible and clear speech. Immediately upon Judge WAGNER being seated, Colonel DONIPHAN arose, and in a speech of half an hour in length, dealt the proposition such fearful blows, and denounced the measure as one so fraught with peril to the State, that the Senate refused to receive the proposition. The Missouri Republican of the next day, says of the speech: "Thanks to John DONIPHAN when WAGNER, of Lewis County, yesterday, introduced a bill to sell out the Pacific Railroad to John C. FREMONT and others at seven millions of State bonds, the first installment of one million to be paid in 1864, John DONIPHAN, in the right way and on the instant, hit it just in the bull's eye, and WAGNER may be thankful to our friend BUSH that the fraudulent thing ever kicked afterwards. The Senate refused to receive the bill, but the good nature of Mr. BUSH had it so far reconsidered as to refer to a committee. We have seldom seen remarks more pertinent and killing to any measure than those submitted by Mr. DONIPHAN. He exposed with an effect which must have been electric upon the Senate, the infamous character of the proposition. Introduced at an unexpected moment, for it had been understood that the House was first to be favored with the bill, he seems to have comprehended at a glance the enormity of the provisions of the bill, the sacrifice of State, county, city and individual interests, and the disregard of State honor and State independence, and to have denounced it with a vehemence and a sense of the injustice even in entertaining such a proposition, which commands our admiration. We have no fear of the adoption of a sell out proposition while he stands ready to expose it, and we are quite sure he will." Colonel DONIPHAN seems contented in the devotion of one of the noblest of women, and in humbly aiding in the development and advancement of the country.


Frances Ann THORNTON

She was 18 in 1850 and had $4000.00

Biographical Sketch of Colonel John Doniphan, St. Joseph, Buchanan County, MO From "History of Buchanan County, Missouri, Published 1881, St. Joseph Steam Printing Company, Printers, Binders, Etc., St. Joseph, Missouri. --- In 1852, Colonel John Doniphan, married Miss Fanny Thornton, of Clay County, a daughter of the late Colonel John Thornton, and a sister to Mrs. General A. W. Doniphan, Mrs. Captain O.P. Moss, Mrs. William Morton, Mrs. R.W. Donnell, Mrs. James H. Baldwin and Mrs. L.M. Lawson.

NEWSPAPER: Liberty Tribune 17 August 1866: (Book extractions of newspaper #977.816 D28h) Circuit Court Clay, 31 July 1866. Darwin J. Adkins, vs. - Robert W. Donnell and Mary D., his wife (formerly Thornton), Alex. W. Doniphan and Elizabeth J., his wife (formerly Thornton), John Doniphan and Frances A., his wife (formerly Thornton), Oliver P. Moss and Caroline M., his wife (formerly Thornton), James D. McCurdy & Susan M., his wife (formerly Thornton), Leondidas M. Lawson and Theodocia, his wife (formerly Thornton), and Mrs. Adeliza Morton, (formerly Thornton). Robert W. & Mary D. Donnell and James D. & Susan McCurdy are non-residents of the state. Object partition of real estate.

NEWSPAPER: Liberty Tribune 26 August 1887: (Book extractions of newspaper #977.816 D28h) Will of General A. W. Doniphan - Appoints Dr. John M. Allen & J. M. Sandusky of Liberty his executors. Buried in New Cemetery in Liberty with deceased wife and children. Releases nephew John Doniphan from debts incurred 20 years ago. C. T. Garner, Sr. borrowed money from him and executed notes. They are cancelled. Also, other notes on others. Leaves bequests to friends Alexander Proctor, Wm. B. Hudgins & wife, Geo. W. Wymore (for naming a son for him). Portion of estate to wife's sisters, Fannie A. Doniphan and Theodocia T. Lawson. A portion to Mary Ann Shawhan, only child of his sister Matilda, residing in Cynthiana, KY, and to his niece Jennie Hockaday, daughter of his nephew Newton Hockaday, late of Plattsburg. Library to John & Fanny Doniphan.


Colonel John Calhoun Caldwell THORNTON Sr.

He was 16 in 1850 and had $4000.00

John married a lot of couples in Clay County before moving west and was listed as a Reverend on the marriage records. By the time he was out west he was working as a lawyer and was called Colonel John Thornton.

CENSUS RECORDS: 1880 Butte City, Deer Lodge, Montana Film #1254742, Page 116B
John C. THORNTON Self M M W 45 MO
Occ: Lawyer Fa: KY Mo: PA
Louisa A. THORNTON Wife F M W 39 MO
Occ: Keeping House Fa: AL Mo: TN
Lizzie THORNTON Dau F S W 15 MO
Fa: MO Mo: MO
John C. THORNTON Son M S W 13 MT
Fa: MO Mo: MO
Mary THORNTON Dau F S W 11 MT
Fa: MO Mo: MO
Willie THORNTON Son M S W 10 MT
Fa: MO Mo: MO
Ada THORNTON Dau F S W 8 MT
Fa: MO Mo: MO
Lucy THORNTON Dau F S W 6 MT
Fa: MO Mo: MO
Carrie THORNTON Dau F S W 5 MT
Fa: MO Mo: MO
Fannie THORNTON Dau F S W 1 MT
Fa: MO Mo: MO
Josephine CASSIN Other F S W 24 IA
Occ: Seamstress Fa: MD Mo: PA

NEWSPAPER: Liberty Tribune 28 Oct 1887: (Book extractions of newspaper #977.816 D28h) Long article about Col. John C. Thornton (and a picture), who died at Butte City, Montana, 15 Sept 1887. He was son of the late Col. John Thornton and Elizabeth Trigg Thornton of Clay County, MO, and the brother of Mrs. A. W. Doniphan and Mrs. Wm. Morton deceased; of Mrs. O. P. Moss, Mrs. John Doniphan, of St. Joseph, MO, Mrs. J. D. McCurdy of Idaho, and Mrs. R. W. Donnell and Mrs. L. M. Lawson, of New York. He was the only son. Graduate of Bethany College in VA. Alexander Campbell's college. Studied law under his brother-in-law, Gen. A. W. Doniphan. Then moved to Leavenworth, then St. Joseph. (goes on with career). Left wife and children.


Louisa A. ARCHER

She was 39 in 1880.


Elizabeth THORNTON

She was 15 in 1880.


Mary THORNTON

She was 11 in 1880.


William D. THORNTON

He was 10 in 1880.


Adelaide THORNTON

She was 8 in 1880.


Lucille THORNTON

She was 6 in 1880.


Caroline THORNTON

She was 5 in 1880.


Frances THORNTON

She was 1 in 1880.


Robert W. DONNELL

Robert came to Clay County sometime after 1839 from Guilford County, North Carolina.

CENSUS RECORDS: 19 Aug 1850 Washington Twp, Buchanan, Missouri page #7, family #80/80
DONNELL, Robert age 33, male, merchant, $20,000.00, NC
DONNELL, Mary age 20, female, CreO
They are living in a hotel.

NEWSPAPERS: New York Times 8 August 1878
Supreme Court of New York - plaintiffs: Leonidas M. LAWSON, Robert W. DONNELL and George M. SIMPSON against Charles M. GRIFFING defendant court case 5 June 1878

CENSUS RECORDS:1880 New York, New York, New York Film #1254895, Page 472A
Robert W. DONNELL Self M M W 65 NC
Occ: Banker Fa: NC Mo: NC
Mary T. DONNELL Wife F M W 50 MO
Occ: Keeps House Fa: PA Mo: KY
Leonidas LAWSON Bro-in-Law M M W 42 MO
Occ: Banker Fa: KY Mo: KY
Theodsia LAWSON Sister-in-Law F M W 36 MO
Occ: At Home Fa: PA Mo: KY
William LAWSON Nephew M S W 18 MO
Occ: At School Fa: MO Mo: MO
Leonidas LAWSON Nephew M S W 9 NY
Fa: MO Mo: MO
Edward NORTON Other M M W 40 IRE
Occ: Coachman Fa: IRE Mo: IRE
John SIMNINS Other M M B 33 VA
Occ: Servant Fa: VA Mo: VA
Rosa CUMISKY Other F S W 28 IRE
Occ: Servant Fa: IRE Mo: IRE
Bridget MC CLOSKEY Other F S W 22 IRE
Occ: Servant Fa: IRE Mo: IRE


Mary Dinah THORNTON

She was in the under 5 age brackett in 1830. She was 20 in 1850.

NEWSPAPER: Liberty Tribune 17 August 1866: (Book extractions of newspaper #977.816 D28h) Circuit Court Clay, 31 July 1866. Darwin J. Adkins, vs. - Robert W. Donnell and Mary D., his wife (formerly Thornton), Alex. W. Doniphan and Elizabeth J., his wife (formerly Thornton), John Doniphan and Frances A., his wife (formerly Thornton), Oliver P. Moss and Caroline M., his wife (formerly Thornton), James D. McCurdy & Susan M., his wife (formerly Thornton), Leondidas M. Lawson and Theodocia, his wife (formerly Thornton), and Mrs. Adeliza Morton, (formerly Thornton). Robert W. & Mary D. Donnell and James D. & Susan McCurdy are non-residents of the state. Object partition of real estate.

Mary was 50 in 1880.


James Harris BALDWIN

When they married it said he was an Attorney at Law from Platte City.

CENSUS RECORDS: 29 Oct 1850 Carroll Twp, Platte, Missouri page #417, family #207/207
BALDWIN, James H. age 35, male, Lawyer, $10,850.00, KY
BALDWIN, Susan age 22, female, MO
BALDWIN, John age 3, male, MO
BALDWIN, James age 6/12, male, MO

MISSOURI PIONEERS of Clay County - #977.816 H2m
James H. Baldwin - Will written 1 May 1855 and probated 11 June 1855; mentions wife Susan M. Baldwin, and sons: John T. and William Baldwin; witnesses: A. J. & W. A. Morton (p.83 Will Book D)


Susan Melinda THORNTON

She was in the under 5 age brackett in 1830. She was 22 in 1850.

NEWSPAPER: Liberty Tribune 17 August 1866: (Book extractions of newspaper #977.816 D28h) Circuit Court Clay, 31 July 1866. Darwin J. Adkins, vs. - Robert W. Donnell and Mary D., his wife (formerly Thornton), Alex. W. Doniphan and Elizabeth J., his wife (formerly Thornton), John Doniphan and Frances A., his wife (formerly Thornton), Oliver P. Moss and Caroline M., his wife (formerly Thornton), James D. McCurdy & Susan M., his wife (formerly Thornton), Leondidas M. Lawson and Theodocia, his wife (formerly Thornton), and Mrs. Adeliza Morton, (formerly Thornton). Robert W. & Mary D. Donnell and James D. & Susan McCurdy are non-residents of the state. Object partition of real estate.


James BALDWIN

He was 6 months old in 1850.


Doctor James D. MCCURDY

CENSUS RECORDS:1880 Walla Walla City, Walla Walla, Washington Film #1255398, Page 174D
Jas. D. MCCURDY Self M M W 57 KY
Occ: Physician Fa: KY Mo: VA
Susan M. MCCURDY Wife F M W 45 MO
Occ: Keep. House Fa: PA Mo: KY
Phila. LAFOUNTAIN Other F S W 16 CANADA
Occ: Domestic Fa: CAN. Mo: CAN.
Baptiste LAFOUNTAIN Other M S W 8 CANADA
Occ: Stable Boy Fa: CAN. Mo: CAN.


Susan Melinda THORNTON

She was in the under 5 age brackett in 1830. She was 22 in 1850.

NEWSPAPER: Liberty Tribune 17 August 1866: (Book extractions of newspaper #977.816 D28h) Circuit Court Clay, 31 July 1866. Darwin J. Adkins, vs. - Robert W. Donnell and Mary D., his wife (formerly Thornton), Alex. W. Doniphan and Elizabeth J., his wife (formerly Thornton), John Doniphan and Frances A., his wife (formerly Thornton), Oliver P. Moss and Caroline M., his wife (formerly Thornton), James D. McCurdy & Susan M., his wife (formerly Thornton), Leondidas M. Lawson and Theodocia, his wife (formerly Thornton), and Mrs. Adeliza Morton, (formerly Thornton). Robert W. & Mary D. Donnell and James D. & Susan McCurdy are non-residents of the state. Object partition of real estate.


Leonidas Moreau LAWSON Sr.

HISTORY: Missouri State Legislators 1820-2000: LAWSON, Leonidas M. Party - Whig, Office - Representative, County - Platte, Elected in 1860.

HISTORY: The excerpt below is taken from B. H. Roberts, New Witnesses for God , Vol. 1, p. 298:
The following prophetic incident is given upon the authority of Mr. Leonidas M. Lawson, now of New York City, formerly a resident of Clay county, Missouri, and a brother-in-law of General Doniphan. "In the year 1863," says Mr. Lawson, "I visited General A. W. Doniphan at his home in Liberty, Clay county, Missouri. This was soon after the [Civil War] devastation of Jackson county, Missouri under what is known as 'Order No. 11.' This devastation was complete. Farms were everywhere destroyed, and the farm houses were burned. During this visit General Doniphan related the following historical facts and personal incidents." Then follows in Mr. Lawson's account a recital of the treatment meted out to the Saints in Missouri from the time of their first arrival in 1831, to their expulsion, including recitals of the personal relations of General Doniphan and Joseph Smith, including the following incident which occurred during the Prophet's imprisonment in Liberty jail:
"On one occasion General Doniphan caused the sheriff of the county to bring Joseph Smith from the prison to his law office, for the purpose of consultation about his defense. During Smith's presence in the office, a resident of Jackson county, Missouri, came in for the purpose of paying a fee which was due by him to the firm of Doniphan & Baldwin, and offered in payment a tract of land in Jackson county. "Doniphan told him that his partner, Mr. Baldwin, was absent at the moment, but as soon as he had an opportunity he would consult him and decide about the matter. When the Jackson county man retired, Joseph Smith, who had overheard the conversation, addressed General Doniphan about as follows: "'Doniphan, I advise you not to take that Jackson county land in payment of the debt. God's wrath hangs over Jackson county. God's people have been ruthlessly driven from it, and you will live to see the day when it will be visited by fire and sword. The Lord of Hosts will sweep it with the besom of destruction. The fields and farms and houses will be destroyed, and only the chimneys will be left to mark the desolation.' "General Doniphan said to me that the devastation of Jackson county forcibly reminded him of this remarkable prediction of the Mormon Prophet. . . . In a letter from Mr. A. Saxey of Spanish Fork, Utah to Mr. Junius Wells treating further of the fulfillment of this prophecy, so well attested, Mr. Saxey under date of August 25, 1902 says: "In the spring of 1862 my regiment went south, and it was during that time that "Order No. 11" was issued, but I was back there again in 1864, during the Price raid, and saw the condition of the country. The duty of executing the order was committed to Colossians W. R. Penick's regiment, and there is no doubt but that he carried it into effect, from the howl the copperhead papers made at the time. I went down the Blue river, we found houses, barns, outbuildings, nearly all burned down, and nothing left standing but the chimneys which had, according to the fashion of the time, been built on the outside of the buildings. I remember very well that the country looked a veritable desolation."

NEWSPAPERS: New York Times 8 August 1878
Supreme Court of New York - plaintiffs: Leonidas M. LAWSON, Robert W. DONNELL and George M. SIMPSON against Charles M. GRIFFING defendant court case 5 June 1878

CENSUS RECORDS:1880 New York, New York, New York Film #1254895, Page 472A
Robert W. DONNELL Self M M W 65 NC
Occ: Banker Fa: NC Mo: NC
Mary T. DONNELL Wife F M W 50 MO
Occ: Keeps House Fa: PA Mo: KY
Leonidas LAWSON Bro-in-Law M M W 42 MO
Occ: Banker Fa: KY Mo: KY
Theodsia LAWSON Sister-in-Law F M W 36 MO
Occ: At Home Fa: PA Mo: KY
William LAWSON Nephew M S W 18 MO
Occ: At School Fa: MO Mo: MO
Leonidas LAWSON Nephew M S W 9 NY
Fa: MO Mo: MO
Edward NORTON Other M M W 40 IRE
Occ: Coachman Fa: IRE Mo: IRE
John SIMNINS Other M M B 33 VA
Occ: Servant Fa: VA Mo: VA
Rosa CUMISKY Other F S W 28 IRE
Occ: Servant Fa: IRE Mo: IRE
Bridget McCLOSKEY Other F S W 22 IRE
Occ: Servant Fa: IRE Mo: IRE

NEWSPAPERS: New York Times 28 March 1882
Leonidas M. LAWSON vice-president of the American Exchange with offices at 162 Broadway in New York City.

DIRECTORYS: Kansas City, Kansas 1890; LAWSON, Leonidas M. was vice-president of the Kansas City Water Company from 1889 to 1891. He gave two addresses in Kansas City at 2016 North 3rd and 813 North 6th and his secondary address was New York City.

DIRECTORYS: New York City 1890; LAWSON, Leondias M. was a banker at 102 Broadway, his home address was 651 Madison Ave. There is also a Louisa A. LAWSON who is a sculptor at 24 East 59th and her home address is 651 Madison Ave.


Theodosia Amanda THORNTON

She was 14 in 1850 and had $4000.00

She was 21 in 1860 and was living with her sister Adeliza Morton, who was a widow.

NEWSPAPER: Liberty Tribune 17 August 1866: (Book extractions of newspaper #977.816 D28h) Circuit Court Clay, 31 July 1866. Darwin J. Adkins, vs. - Robert W. Donnell and Mary D., his wife (formerly Thornton), Alex. W. Doniphan and Elizabeth J., his wife (formerly Thornton), John Doniphan and Frances A., his wife (formerly Thornton), Oliver P. Moss and Caroline M., his wife (formerly Thornton), James D. McCurdy & Susan M., his wife (formerly Thornton), Leondidas M. Lawson and Theodocia, his wife (formerly Thornton), and Mrs. Adeliza Morton, (formerly Thornton). Robert W. & Mary D. Donnell and James D. & Susan McCurdy are non-residents of the state. Object partition of real estate.

She was 36 in 1880.

NEWSPAPER: Liberty Tribune 26 August 1887: (Book extractions of newspaper #977.816 D28h) Will of General A. W. Doniphan - Appoints Dr. John M. Allen & J. M. Sandusky of Liberty his executors. Buried in New Cemetery in Liberty with deceased wife and children. Releases nephew John Doniphan from debts incurred 20 years ago. C. T. Garner, Sr. borrowed money from him and executed notes. They are cancelled. Also, other notes on others. Leaves bequests to friends Alexander Proctor, Wm. B. Hudgins & wife, Geo. W. Wymore (for naming a son for him). Portion of estate to wife's sisters, Fannie A. Doniphan and Theo. T. Lawson. A portion to Mary Ann Shawhan, only child of his sister Matilda, residing in Cynthiana, KY, and to his niece Jennie Hockaday, daughter of his nephew Newton Hockaday, late of Plattsburg. Library to John & Fanny Doniphan.

CENSUS RECORDS: 2 Jan 1920 Washington Twp, Buchanan, Missouri Page #68, SD#4, ED#93, Sheet #2B, Family #34/40, living at 1019 Olive St.
LAWSON, Theodosia T. head, age 79, widow, MO PA KY
LAWSON, William T. son, age 57, single, lawyer, MO MO MO

CENSUS RECORDS: 22 April 1930 Washington Twp, Buchanan, Missouri Page #2, SD#1, ED#11-35, Sheet #23A, Family #427/569, living at 1019 Olive St.
LAWSON, Theodosia T. head, age 93, widow, MO US US
LAWSON, William T. son, age 66, single, lawyer, MO MO MO


William LAWSON

He was 18 in 1880.

He was 57 in 1920 single, living with his widowed mother and working as a lawyer.

He was 66 in 1930 single, living with his widowed mother and working as a lawyer.


Leonidas Moreau LAWSON Jr.

He was 9 in 1880.


Elizabeth THORNTON

She was in the 15 to 20 age brackett in 1830 living with her brother John M. Thornton in Ray County, Missouri.


Daniel THORNTON

Daniel served with Captain Gregory's Tennessee Militia during the War of 1812. Pension #WO-2398.

He came to Saline County, Missouri in June of 1816 and his father came in November of 1816. Is his father really Capt. John Thornton that is buried in Saline County, Missouri?

HISTORY: Saline County, Missouri written in -1881- and another one in -1910-
According to the 1910 history Daniel was the son of John and Polly THORNTON of Charleston, South Carolina and was the third of their four children. When just a youth he moved with his parents to the eastern part of Tennessee, where he assisted his father on the farm until 20 years of age, when he married. Eight years after his marriage he and his family moved to Missouri arriving there in June of 1816. They had traveled by water down the Ohio and up the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, pulling the boat with ropes and poling it against the currents.

PROBATE RECORDS: Will Abstracts of Saline County, Missouri #977.847, (page 296 in Will book)
THORNTON, David (Should be Daniel), Written:11 August 1855, Recorded:4 Sept 1855, mentions wife: Mary; daughters: Lydia, Nancy, Mary, Polly, Rebecca, Catherine and Elizabeth; sons: John, Isaac, George Henderson, and Andrew Jackson; executor: Howard CAMERON; witnesses: William M. DAVIDSON & William L. ISH