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The Ancestors of Vickie Beard Thompson

Notes


George Anderson BEARD

CENSUS RECORDS: He was 8 months old in 1860.

CENSUS RECORDS: He was 13 in 1870 and was working on the farm.

NEWSPAPER: Crittenden Press, Wednesday, July 6, 1881, Our friends James Patmore and George Beard visited Livingston County last week. March 22, 1882, Our esteemed chum, George Beard, will leave us next week for the river bottoms, where he will make his abode. June 28, 1882, Our two worthy bachelors friends George Mays and George Beard, from the Ohio bottoms, were greeting their old "chubs" at this place recently. September 25, 1890, An infant of George Beard's died Saturday.

CENSUS RECORDS: 1 June 1900 Court St, Marion, Crittenden, Kentucky film #1240517, page #362, family #23/24
BEARD, Geo. A. head, age 39, MAY 1861, md 8 yrs, painter, KY KY KY
BEARD, Nina wife, age 24, SEP 1873, mother of 3 all living, KY AR KY
BEARD, Nina R. dau, age 7, OCT 1892, KY KY KY
BEARD, Aubrey son, age 6, APR 1894, KY KY KY
BEARD, Addie dau, age 1, APR 1899, KY KY KY

CENSUS RECORDS: He was 45 in 1910, married 18 years, working as a house carpenter, living on Ferguson St, in Little Prarie Twp, Pemiscot, Missouri.

CENSUS RECORDS: He was 57 in 1920, living in Marion, Crittenden, Kentucky.

NOTES: I have a copy of the newspaper obituary for George.


Nellie F. ELDER

She died during childbirth or shortly after the baby also died.


BEARD

The baby died on a Saturday according to the newspaper..


George Anderson BEARD

CENSUS RECORDS: He was 8 months old in 1860.

CENSUS RECORDS: He was 13 in 1870 and was working on the farm.

NEWSPAPER: Crittenden Press, Wednesday, July 6, 1881, Our friends James Patmore and George Beard visited Livingston County last week. March 22, 1882, Our esteemed chum, George Beard, will leave us next week for the river bottoms, where he will make his abode. June 28, 1882, Our two worthy bachelors friends George Mays and George Beard, from the Ohio bottoms, were greeting their old "chubs" at this place recently. September 25, 1890, An infant of George Beard's died Saturday.

CENSUS RECORDS: 1 June 1900 Court St, Marion, Crittenden, Kentucky film #1240517, page #362, family #23/24
BEARD, Geo. A. head, age 39, MAY 1861, md 8 yrs, painter, KY KY KY
BEARD, Nina wife, age 24, SEP 1873, mother of 3 all living, KY AR KY
BEARD, Nina R. dau, age 7, OCT 1892, KY KY KY
BEARD, Aubrey son, age 6, APR 1894, KY KY KY
BEARD, Addie dau, age 1, APR 1899, KY KY KY

CENSUS RECORDS: He was 45 in 1910, married 18 years, working as a house carpenter, living on Ferguson St, in Little Prarie Twp, Pemiscot, Missouri.

CENSUS RECORDS: He was 57 in 1920, living in Marion, Crittenden, Kentucky.

NOTES: I have a copy of the newspaper obituary for George.


Rose Etta DANIEL

CENSUS RECORDS: She was 5 in 1880.

MARRIAGE RECORD: She was married in the presence of R. C. Haynes and Eura Bigham, by Charles Atchison, MG., at Mrs. Patmor's.

CENSUS RECORDS: She was 24 in 1900, listed as Nina, mother of 3 children all living.

CENSUS RECORDS: She was 34 in 1910, listed as Rosa, mother of 6 children all living.

CENSUS RECORDS: She was 43 in 1920, listed as Rose E.

CENSUS RECORDS: She was 54 in 1930, widowed, working as a nurse in a private family, living in Bowlegs, Seminole, Oklahoma.


Daniel Nunn BEARD

CENSUS RECORDS: He was 1 in 1910.

CENSUS RECORDS: He was 11 in 1920.

CENSUS RECORDS: He was 22 in 1930, single, living with his mother.

NOTES: His nickname was Petey Man and he was mentally retarded. I seemed to remember a story about grandma Rose getting kicked in the stomach by a horse or mule when she was pregnant with him. My Dad, Frank Beard told me that Petey was a twin and the twin died at birth. My Dad, was not sure if it was a male or female.


William Ernest TEAGUE

He was killed in a car accident.


Jessie Holeman DOSS

HISTORY: Mama Jessie was real supertitious. Some of her things were whatever door you come in thats the door you leave out of. Don't put a baby in front of a mirror before they are a year old or they'll die before they are 21 years old. When Mama Jessie was three years old she moved to Charleston, Missouri. They lived in a tent while her daddy was cutting timber. Snakes were all over the places. She didn't go to school until she was about 7 or 8 years old because her mom wouldn't let her, this school was in Clay. She hated school didn't like it at all. The last school she went to was at Wheatcroft and she only went to 5th grade then quit and never went back. Her nickname was Judy. From Charleston they moved back to Kentucky then over to Illinois in about 1908 lived in Marion, Illinois then moved over to Harrisburg, Illinois and lived there for a while then moved back to Kentucky. While they lived in Harrisburg her brother George Doss and Will Smith were working in the coal mines together. It was almost quitting time some slate fell from the ceiling and squashed George and he was smashed up pretty good. He lived for about four days after the accident. He called everyone in to talk to them before he died. Mama Jessie was the last one he called in and he put his hand on her hand and said Judy you be a good girl now and then he died. I don't think she ever got over his death completely. Mama Jessie was married to Burt Ward for about two weeks when she found out he was already married. I don't know if the marriage was annulled or if there was a divorce. Mama Jessie was living in Kansas City, Missouri when she found out he was a bigamist. This info was given to me by my Aunt Helen Beard Loftis. I wish Mama Jessie was here to tell me the story of her life. About all I can do is try to remember some of the things I've been told over the years. Mama Jessie always insisted she was born in 1900, but all the records including the Social Security Death Index and the 1900 Census show her born 5 March 1899. I guess she just felt that being born in the 1800's made her seem too old. Mama Jessie was a very pretty girl and woman before age took it's toll. Before my Dad (Frank Beard) was born his Mom and Dad used to dance a lot to waltz music. My Dad and I have developed a great love for waltzes. For many years Mama Jessie took in washing and ironing for people in the area where she lived. My Dad recalls many times seeing her heating water in a big black kettle in the back yard. She as many other women of the time also made her own lye soap. When the song "Grandma's Lye Soap" came out in the 50's, it brought back a lot of memories to my Dad. I can remember her making the lye soap and her having me stir the big black kettle out in the yard while the soap was doing whatever it was suppose to do. It was real hot work and made you sweat. As far as I know Mama Jessie never worked outside the home, but with 10 children to raise it would explain why. Mama Jessie was a great story teller and some of the stories she told us kids have been passed on to her grandchildren, great and great-great-grandchildren. Mama Jessie didn't have much formal education but was always ready to share her knowledge and experience with family and friends. I guess most everyone thinks their mother was the best cook in the world and my Dad is no exception. No one could cook beans and cornbread that tasted as good as Mama Jessie's. One of my favorite foods that Mama Jessie made for us was called "Plain Cornbread". It would last for several days or even weeks and never go bad. My Dad used to take it with him on his travels about the country. It also served him as a weapon to throw at dogs or other animals that got aggressive and tried to bite him. The bread was as hard as a rock, but tasted great. One of my Dad's good cousins in Hopkinsville, Kentucky named Wallace Marquess, sent him a picture of Mama Jessie when she was a baby, less than a year old. Now I can see why she was such a pretty woman, she was a beautiful baby. Mama Jessie did not like to think of herself as old enough to have grandchildren and so she came up with the name of Mama Jessie for all of her grandchildren to call her. We never called her grandma, mamaw, granny or anything like that, she would not stand for it. If you would give her a hug and a kiss before you left after your visit she would give you a quarter to take home. We always seem to stop in and get us an ice cream cone on the way back to our house. She had a little dog named Tina. (Just some rememberance of my Daddy's Mom by me Vickie Beard Thompson 28 April 2003.)


Jessie Holeman DOSS

HISTORY: Mama Jessie was real supertitious. Some of her things were whatever door you come in thats the door you leave out of. Don't put a baby in front of a mirror before they are a year old or they'll die before they are 21 years old. When Mama Jessie was three years old she moved to Charleston, Missouri. They lived in a tent while her daddy was cutting timber. Snakes were all over the places. She didn't go to school until she was about 7 or 8 years old because her mom wouldn't let her, this school was in Clay. She hated school didn't like it at all. The last school she went to was at Wheatcroft and she only went to 5th grade then quit and never went back. Her nickname was Judy. From Charleston they moved back to Kentucky then over to Illinois in about 1908 lived in Marion, Illinois then moved over to Harrisburg, Illinois and lived there for a while then moved back to Kentucky. While they lived in Harrisburg her brother George Doss and Will Smith were working in the coal mines together. It was almost quitting time some slate fell from the ceiling and squashed George and he was smashed up pretty good. He lived for about four days after the accident. He called everyone in to talk to them before he died. Mama Jessie was the last one he called in and he put his hand on her hand and said Judy you be a good girl now and then he died. I don't think she ever got over his death completely. Mama Jessie was married to Burt Ward for about two weeks when she found out he was already married. I don't know if the marriage was annulled or if there was a divorce. Mama Jessie was living in Kansas City, Missouri when she found out he was a bigamist. This info was given to me by my Aunt Helen Beard Loftis. I wish Mama Jessie was here to tell me the story of her life. About all I can do is try to remember some of the things I've been told over the years. Mama Jessie always insisted she was born in 1900, but all the records including the Social Security Death Index and the 1900 Census show her born 5 March 1899. I guess she just felt that being born in the 1800's made her seem too old. Mama Jessie was a very pretty girl and woman before age took it's toll. Before my Dad (Frank Beard) was born his Mom and Dad used to dance a lot to waltz music. My Dad and I have developed a great love for waltzes. For many years Mama Jessie took in washing and ironing for people in the area where she lived. My Dad recalls many times seeing her heating water in a big black kettle in the back yard. She as many other women of the time also made her own lye soap. When the song "Grandma's Lye Soap" came out in the 50's, it brought back a lot of memories to my Dad. I can remember her making the lye soap and her having me stir the big black kettle out in the yard while the soap was doing whatever it was suppose to do. It was real hot work and made you sweat. As far as I know Mama Jessie never worked outside the home, but with 10 children to raise it would explain why. Mama Jessie was a great story teller and some of the stories she told us kids have been passed on to her grandchildren, great and great-great-grandchildren. Mama Jessie didn't have much formal education but was always ready to share her knowledge and experience with family and friends. I guess most everyone thinks their mother was the best cook in the world and my Dad is no exception. No one could cook beans and cornbread that tasted as good as Mama Jessie's. One of my favorite foods that Mama Jessie made for us was called "Plain Cornbread". It would last for several days or even weeks and never go bad. My Dad used to take it with him on his travels about the country. It also served him as a weapon to throw at dogs or other animals that got aggressive and tried to bite him. The bread was as hard as a rock, but tasted great. One of my Dad's good cousins in Hopkinsville, Kentucky named Wallace Marquess, sent him a picture of Mama Jessie when she was a baby, less than a year old. Now I can see why she was such a pretty woman, she was a beautiful baby. Mama Jessie did not like to think of herself as old enough to have grandchildren and so she came up with the name of Mama Jessie for all of her grandchildren to call her. We never called her grandma, mamaw, granny or anything like that, she would not stand for it. If you would give her a hug and a kiss before you left after your visit she would give you a quarter to take home. We always seem to stop in and get us an ice cream cone on the way back to our house. She had a little dog named Tina. (Just some rememberance of my Daddy's Mom by me Vickie Beard Thompson 28 April 2003.)


Jessie Holeman DOSS

HISTORY: Mama Jessie was real supertitious. Some of her things were whatever door you come in thats the door you leave out of. Don't put a baby in front of a mirror before they are a year old or they'll die before they are 21 years old. When Mama Jessie was three years old she moved to Charleston, Missouri. They lived in a tent while her daddy was cutting timber. Snakes were all over the places. She didn't go to school until she was about 7 or 8 years old because her mom wouldn't let her, this school was in Clay. She hated school didn't like it at all. The last school she went to was at Wheatcroft and she only went to 5th grade then quit and never went back. Her nickname was Judy. From Charleston they moved back to Kentucky then over to Illinois in about 1908 lived in Marion, Illinois then moved over to Harrisburg, Illinois and lived there for a while then moved back to Kentucky. While they lived in Harrisburg her brother George Doss and Will Smith were working in the coal mines together. It was almost quitting time some slate fell from the ceiling and squashed George and he was smashed up pretty good. He lived for about four days after the accident. He called everyone in to talk to them before he died. Mama Jessie was the last one he called in and he put his hand on her hand and said Judy you be a good girl now and then he died. I don't think she ever got over his death completely. Mama Jessie was married to Burt Ward for about two weeks when she found out he was already married. I don't know if the marriage was annulled or if there was a divorce. Mama Jessie was living in Kansas City, Missouri when she found out he was a bigamist. This info was given to me by my Aunt Helen Beard Loftis. I wish Mama Jessie was here to tell me the story of her life. About all I can do is try to remember some of the things I've been told over the years. Mama Jessie always insisted she was born in 1900, but all the records including the Social Security Death Index and the 1900 Census show her born 5 March 1899. I guess she just felt that being born in the 1800's made her seem too old. Mama Jessie was a very pretty girl and woman before age took it's toll. Before my Dad (Frank Beard) was born his Mom and Dad used to dance a lot to waltz music. My Dad and I have developed a great love for waltzes. For many years Mama Jessie took in washing and ironing for people in the area where she lived. My Dad recalls many times seeing her heating water in a big black kettle in the back yard. She as many other women of the time also made her own lye soap. When the song "Grandma's Lye Soap" came out in the 50's, it brought back a lot of memories to my Dad. I can remember her making the lye soap and her having me stir the big black kettle out in the yard while the soap was doing whatever it was suppose to do. It was real hot work and made you sweat. As far as I know Mama Jessie never worked outside the home, but with 10 children to raise it would explain why. Mama Jessie was a great story teller and some of the stories she told us kids have been passed on to her grandchildren, great and great-great-grandchildren. Mama Jessie didn't have much formal education but was always ready to share her knowledge and experience with family and friends. I guess most everyone thinks their mother was the best cook in the world and my Dad is no exception. No one could cook beans and cornbread that tasted as good as Mama Jessie's. One of my favorite foods that Mama Jessie made for us was called "Plain Cornbread". It would last for several days or even weeks and never go bad. My Dad used to take it with him on his travels about the country. It also served him as a weapon to throw at dogs or other animals that got aggressive and tried to bite him. The bread was as hard as a rock, but tasted great. One of my Dad's good cousins in Hopkinsville, Kentucky named Wallace Marquess, sent him a picture of Mama Jessie when she was a baby, less than a year old. Now I can see why she was such a pretty woman, she was a beautiful baby. Mama Jessie did not like to think of herself as old enough to have grandchildren and so she came up with the name of Mama Jessie for all of her grandchildren to call her. We never called her grandma, mamaw, granny or anything like that, she would not stand for it. If you would give her a hug and a kiss before you left after your visit she would give you a quarter to take home. We always seem to stop in and get us an ice cream cone on the way back to our house. She had a little dog named Tina. (Just some rememberance of my Daddy's Mom by me Vickie Beard Thompson 28 April 2003.)


Jessie Holeman DOSS

HISTORY: Mama Jessie was real supertitious. Some of her things were whatever door you come in thats the door you leave out of. Don't put a baby in front of a mirror before they are a year old or they'll die before they are 21 years old. When Mama Jessie was three years old she moved to Charleston, Missouri. They lived in a tent while her daddy was cutting timber. Snakes were all over the places. She didn't go to school until she was about 7 or 8 years old because her mom wouldn't let her, this school was in Clay. She hated school didn't like it at all. The last school she went to was at Wheatcroft and she only went to 5th grade then quit and never went back. Her nickname was Judy. From Charleston they moved back to Kentucky then over to Illinois in about 1908 lived in Marion, Illinois then moved over to Harrisburg, Illinois and lived there for a while then moved back to Kentucky. While they lived in Harrisburg her brother George Doss and Will Smith were working in the coal mines together. It was almost quitting time some slate fell from the ceiling and squashed George and he was smashed up pretty good. He lived for about four days after the accident. He called everyone in to talk to them before he died. Mama Jessie was the last one he called in and he put his hand on her hand and said Judy you be a good girl now and then he died. I don't think she ever got over his death completely. Mama Jessie was married to Burt Ward for about two weeks when she found out he was already married. I don't know if the marriage was annulled or if there was a divorce. Mama Jessie was living in Kansas City, Missouri when she found out he was a bigamist. This info was given to me by my Aunt Helen Beard Loftis. I wish Mama Jessie was here to tell me the story of her life. About all I can do is try to remember some of the things I've been told over the years. Mama Jessie always insisted she was born in 1900, but all the records including the Social Security Death Index and the 1900 Census show her born 5 March 1899. I guess she just felt that being born in the 1800's made her seem too old. Mama Jessie was a very pretty girl and woman before age took it's toll. Before my Dad (Frank Beard) was born his Mom and Dad used to dance a lot to waltz music. My Dad and I have developed a great love for waltzes. For many years Mama Jessie took in washing and ironing for people in the area where she lived. My Dad recalls many times seeing her heating water in a big black kettle in the back yard. She as many other women of the time also made her own lye soap. When the song "Grandma's Lye Soap" came out in the 50's, it brought back a lot of memories to my Dad. I can remember her making the lye soap and her having me stir the big black kettle out in the yard while the soap was doing whatever it was suppose to do. It was real hot work and made you sweat. As far as I know Mama Jessie never worked outside the home, but with 10 children to raise it would explain why. Mama Jessie was a great story teller and some of the stories she told us kids have been passed on to her grandchildren, great and great-great-grandchildren. Mama Jessie didn't have much formal education but was always ready to share her knowledge and experience with family and friends. I guess most everyone thinks their mother was the best cook in the world and my Dad is no exception. No one could cook beans and cornbread that tasted as good as Mama Jessie's. One of my favorite foods that Mama Jessie made for us was called "Plain Cornbread". It would last for several days or even weeks and never go bad. My Dad used to take it with him on his travels about the country. It also served him as a weapon to throw at dogs or other animals that got aggressive and tried to bite him. The bread was as hard as a rock, but tasted great. One of my Dad's good cousins in Hopkinsville, Kentucky named Wallace Marquess, sent him a picture of Mama Jessie when she was a baby, less than a year old. Now I can see why she was such a pretty woman, she was a beautiful baby. Mama Jessie did not like to think of herself as old enough to have grandchildren and so she came up with the name of Mama Jessie for all of her grandchildren to call her. We never called her grandma, mamaw, granny or anything like that, she would not stand for it. If you would give her a hug and a kiss before you left after your visit she would give you a quarter to take home. We always seem to stop in and get us an ice cream cone on the way back to our house. She had a little dog named Tina. (Just some rememberance of my Daddy's Mom by me Vickie Beard Thompson 28 April 2003.)


George Samuel DOSS

He was 1 in 1850.

He was 12 in 1860.

CENSUS RECORDS: 11 July 1870 Providence, Webster, Kentucky book #976.9883 x2f
He was living with James and Rebecca Woodson and was 21 years old and working in the woolin mills.

CENSUS RECORDS: 1880 Hamby, Christian, Kentucky film #1254409, page 147A
G. S. DOSS Self M M W 30 KY
Occ: Farmer Fa: VA Mo: KY
Lue J. DOSS Wife F M W 23 KY
Occ: Keeping House Fa: KY Mo: KY
Linnie A. DOSS Dau F S W 8M KY
Fa: KY Mo: KY

CENSUS RECORDS: 1900 Clay, Webster, Kentucky film #1244098

CENSUS RECORDS: 1910 Clay, Webster, Kentucky film #1370489

MARRIAGES: Christian County, Kentucky

VITAL RECORDS: Kentucky Births and Deaths 1921-25 film #209615

CEMETERY: Webster County, Kentucky Book 2 #976.988v22a

NOTES: Uncle Bill Teague said that his grandpa Doss nickname was Kookie. He got the name from Tarzan's son in an old radio show.


Nancy Lougena WOOSLEY

She was 3 in 1860.

She was 12 in 1870.

She was 23 in 1880.

OBITUARY: The Twice A Week Providence Enterprise Newspaper in Webster County, Kentucky.
Aged Clay Woman Dies There Friday 6 March 1931, Mrs. Jeany DOSS, 75, died at 10 o'clock Friday night in Clay. Senility is thought to have caused her death. Five brothers, two sisters and several children survive her. Funeral services were held at the General Baptist Church Sunday with the Rev. Nealey PEARCY in charge. Interment was in Odd Fellows Cemetery.


George McKinsie DOSS

NOTES: He was killed in a coal mining accident in Saline County, Illinois. A big slap of slate fell from the roof of the mine and crushed him and he lived about 3 or 4 days. His brother-in-law Will Smith was with him and some how Will raised that big old piece of slate off of George and drug him out from under it. Before he died some of his friends came over and sang "In the Sweet By and By" and George sang some with them and everyone wondered how he did it. He never was married.


John Bartley LOFTIS

NOTES: Uncle JB always went by his intials. He never went by John or Bartley.

OBITUARY: Visalia Times-Delta Wednesday, July 28, 2004
J. B. LOFTIS passed away at his home in Woodlake on July 22, 2004 with his wife and children by his side. He was 85 years old. He was born in Marion, Kentucky on Dec 5, 1918 to Jesse and Amy Loftis. He is survived by his wife, Helen, who he was married to for 58 wonderful years. They have five children, Donnie (Sam) CARR of Colorado, Brenda (Charlie) DODD of Exeter, Sheryl Loftis of Tenn., Susie (Dan) QUALLS of Arizona, Billy LOFTIS of Woodlake. Nine grandchildren, Lisa CARR, Jason CARR and wife, Cassie, Darrell DODD and wife, April, Ricky and Ryan SOUZA, Tyson and Kaila QUALLS, Monica and Justin LOFTIS. Two great-grandchildren, Zoe and Zachary DODD; four sisters, Christine, Daisy, Norma Jean and Margaret. Numerous nieces and nephews. A private family graveside service was held on July 27, 2004 in Woodlake. The family welcomes expressions of sympathy. They can be mailed to the LOFTIS Family, 599 W. Mt. View, Woodlake, CA 93286. In an era where hard work was a necessity, Daddy was the epitome of a true hero. When his father became terminally ill, Daddy dropped out of school in the 6th grade and began working to support his family. He rose to this responsibility and created within himself an incredible work ethic, which became very evident as the years passed. For those of us blessed enough to learn from him, the life lessons were abundant and each of us has, through the years, applied these lessons over and over. He was a pillar of strength to so many people and even in his last days, he amazed us with his will power and his ability to hold onto dignity as death approached. God blessed us with a husband, Daddy and Grandpa who left an undeniable mark on our lives, and his legacy will always live on in his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. His devotion to our mom was beautiful to witness, and she is so very grateful for the many years they shared together, loving each other with all their hearts. Daddy served in the US Navy during WWII as a sailor aboard an LST. Upon his return, he and mom were married in Morganfield, Kentucky in 1946. They moved to Woodlake in 1947 where he began his career as a carpenter. He worked for Dick Edminston Construction and then for Bill Andrews Construction where he eventually retired. Daddy's reputation as a skilled craftsman in cabinetry and woodwork soon spread throughout Tulare County. This was a source of great satisfaction for him through the years. We are extremely proud to say that Daddy's life and work touched so many people during his 85 years and those people in turn touched him. In honor of our father, the family is putting together a memory book. Anyone who would like to share a special memory may do so by sending a written message to the above address. Even though Daddy is gone from our lives for a while, we find comfort in knowing the time will come when we will all be together again. We love you Daddy. Arrangements were by Smith Family Chapel, Exeter, CA.