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Creswick and Clunes Advertiser Inquest Extractions 1863

Name Paper Date Details
Adams, William Gass 23 Jan 1863 An inquest was held on 21st instant at Spring Gully by Mr W.B.Lees, the district coroner, upon the body of an infant, William Gass Adams aged four weeks. Dr Roche conducted the post mortem examination and deposed that death arose from congestion to the intestines. Verdict accordingly. It appears that the child was neglected by its mother, and the coroner commented strongly upon such unnatural conduct.
Ah Fun 28 Apr 1863 On Sunday last an inquest was held at the Talbot Hotel, by Mr W.B.Lees, the District Coroner, on the body of a Chinaman, named Ah Fun, aged thirty-one years, who died on the Portuguese Flat on the Friday previous. - Tong Waugh gave evidence that he and deceased had been working together as mates for the last three months. About three weeks ago deceased took ill and had not been able to do any work since; he died on Friday, at about half-past five. - Dr Daniel was called on Friday to see deceased, he found him suffering from depression and great difficulty of breathing. He called again on Saturday and found that he had been dead for some time. Made a post mortem examination of the body and found that the cause of death was gangrene of the liver and mortification of the lower portions of the liver and bowels. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.
Ah Tack 09 Jan 1863 See "Hoe Man"
Ah Yem 13 Jan 1863 An inquest was held on Sunday last, at Whatman's Prince of Wales Hotel, by Mr W.B.Lees, the district coroner, on the body of Ah Yem, a Chinaman, 30 years of age, who died on Saturday, in consequence of injuries received through the falling in of a drive at Tavistock Gully, covering him in with earth. Dr Daniel, who attended deceased on Friday and Saturday, stated on affirmation that deceased died from dislocation of the thigh, mortification of the bowels, and rupture of the bladder. Two Chinamen, mates of the deceased, gave evidence of the Accident. Deceased, who was married, and had left two sons in China, had no friends and no money in the colony. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.
An Yung 06 Feb, 1863 See " Ang Hui"
Anderson, Isabella 12 May 1863 See "Cullen, Mary Margaret Cox"
Anderson, Mr 12 May 1863 See "Cullen, Mary Margaret Cox"
Anderson, Mr 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Ang Hui 06 Feb, 1863 On the same day an inquest was held at the Talbot Hotel, Melbourne road, by Mr W.B.Lees, the district coroner, on the body of Ang Hui, who died on Monday, the 2nd instant. Several Chinese and other witnesses were examined, and the evidence which we previously published touching the death of An Yung, who was stabbed by Ang Hui, was partly repeated. Dr Steel made the post mortem examination. The following verdict was returned:- "Ang Hui died at Portuguese Flat on the 2nd February, from the effects of a severe wound with a knife in the abdomen, received on the 1st instant. The jury are of the opinion that the wounds were self-inflicted." It thus appears that Ang Hui, after having killed his mate, committed suicide, and that a double murder was indirectly caused through the delay of payment of the small sum of 30s. The two victims of uncontrolled passion were buried on Tuesday afternoon. About 40 Chinamen, mostly in single file, and some of them smoking, followed the deceased.
Barnes, Louisa 24 Mar 1863 An inquest was held on Sunday last, at Mr Fischer's residence, Union Hill, late Hilfling's Union Hotel, by Mr W.B.Lees, the district coroner, on the body of Louisa Barnes, who died suddenly in a dray, whilst being removed from the Bald Hills to her parent's residence.
The following jurymen were sworn in:- James Thompset, Thomas Janneson, Alexander Rowe, John Bunce, William Jones, Thos. Sleep, William Orr, William Cassell, James Pilgrim, John Williams, William Strike, and Daniel Liddell.
The following evidence was taken:-
Jane Walton sworn - I reside at the Bald Hills. Deceased has been in my employ for two months previous to her death. She seemed to enjoy good health up to Thursday last, when she complained of a sick headache. I then saw her to bed at ten o'clock. Gave her some salts and senna which did not act on her bowels. I then gave her the same day eight Holloway's Pills, which did not act on her. Gave her eight more pills on the following morning . Up to Friday at noon none of the medicine had acted. I gave her two antibilous pills, and saw that she was getting worse. I then sent a man in to inform her parents. The mother of deceased came about two o'clock in the afternoon, shortly after the medicine had operated. About one o'clock deceased became quite delirious. She remained in the same state all the afternoon. At half-past five my husband sent for Dr Foster. The mother of deceased said she was too poor to get a doctor. Dr Foster came, and ordered leeches to the throat. Gave her some powders and a mixture, and ordered her hair to be cut. She was delirious from Friday at noon until she was taken away from my house by her parents. The mother of deceased insisted upon her being brought home: I then thought deceased was in a dying state. Deceased was taken away by her parents in a dray at twelve o'clock on Saturday; she had a blister put on her neck on the same day. The mother of deceased said she would rather have deceased die at home than in my house. I heard Dr Foster tell Mrs Barnes that he had hope of deceased. I keep a boarding house at the Bald Hills; my husband is a miner. Deceased had a clean and comfortable room; my children sleep in it. My husband got a dray to take deceased home yesterday; when he came back he told me deceased died in the dray 20 minutes after they left. The father and mother of deceased were with him. Deceased did not request me to send for here parents.
Louisa Barnes sworn - Deceased is my daughter. She is sixteen years old. She has been in the employ of Mrs Walton for nearly three months past. Deceased came to see me on the Sunday before last, and she then complained of a sick headache, and said that the food was very rich. I told her she should not take any pastry, and that she should take salts and senna when she went back. I wanted her to leave, but she did not wish to do so; she said Mr Walton was very kind to her. On Friday, when I went to see deceased, I though her room was close and unwholesome, and I then made up my mind that should be taken away on Saturday forenoon. From the time I first saw deceased on Friday last until her death she seemed to be delirious. She never moved from the time we put her in the dray. She died about half an hour after we left. I was advised to leave deceased at the Bald Hills, but I was anxious to get her home. I did not think she was so ill. She had a fall and injured her head when about four years old. She has always been complaining of her head ever since. Have been in Mrs Walton's house. Have every reason to believe her to be a respectable and clean person.
Thomas Foster, residing at Bald Hills, sworn - On Friday evening last, about six o'clock, was called to see deceased. Found her suffering from fever. She was then partially delirious, and had every symptom of malignant scarlatina. The throat of the deceased was swollen externally and internally, and very much ulcerated, which caused great difficulty in swallowing. Examined the body, and found the rash peculiar to scarlatina fever. Ordered the hair to be removed from off the head of deceased. Applied leeches to her throat. Blistered her neck, and gave here two grains of calomel and a fever mixture every two hours, also an injection on Saturday morning, and ordered the same treatment to be continued. Was at the house when deceased was removed. Objected to here being removed at first, but afterwards allowed the parents to take her away. Was in the room deceased slept in, and consider it clean, and quite wholesome. Attended deceased from Friday night last till yesterday at 12 o'clock. Considered deceased received every attention from the time I was called in until her death. I have assisted Dr Roche in making a post mortem examination of the body of deceased, and believe the cause of death was pneumonia.
Dr Roche sworn - Have this day made a post mortem examination of the body of deceased. Found no external marks of violence. The body was well nourished. On opening it, found the lungs inflamed, and adherent to the ribs and diaphragm. Found the windpipe inflamed, also inflammation of the fauces, with purulent matter poured out in the throat. The heart was flabby, and of a fatty character. The abdominal viscera were healthy, with the exception of the small intestines, which were congested. I believe the immediate cause of death was pneumonia. From the appearance of the throat and windpipe, deceased might have suffered from malignant scarlatina previous to her death. I consider the deceased must have suffered for three or four days previous to here death. Have heard the statement of Dr Foster, and consider the treatment good. Consider that putting deceased in a dray yesterday certainly accelerated her death.
The jury returned the following verdict:- "Deceased, Laura Barnes, died of pneumonia in the bush near Bald Hills, on the 21st March. The jury are of the opinion that death was accelerated by deceased being removed yesterday, while in a dangerous state of health.".
Barnes, Louisa (snr) 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
Berryman, Attwell 08 May 1863 See "Pasco, Thomas"
Bingham, John 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Blanchard, Wm 08 May 1863 See "Pasco, Thomas"
Bonds, Thos. 08 May 1863 See "Pasco, Thomas"
Bone, Thomas 08 May 1863 See "Pasco, Thomas"
Borley, Emma (Mrs) 28 Apr 1863 See "Borley, James"
Borley, James 28 Apr 1863 An inquest was held on Sunday last at Borley's store, Cobblers Gully, by Mr W.B.Lees, the District Coroner, on the body of James Borley who died on the 25th inst. Mrs Emma Borley and Mr J.D.Wright gave evidence. Dr Steel, who made the post mortem examination gave the following evidence: - I was called to see deceased yesterday afternoon. I found him in bed in a moribund state. Deceased was pulseless, his extremities cold, his lips livid, his breathing short and labored, but perfectly sensible. Deceased complained of acute pain over the upper part of the abdomen. He informed me that he felt the pain during the previous night, but that the same pain had been relieved by opening medicine. He had taken six Holloway's pills. The wife of deceased stated that no other medicine had been administered. On examining the deceased I found the chest dull over the whole extent. The abdomen was very hard, but not swollen. I gave him some brandy and water. Deceased died about 15 minutes after I arrived. On opening the chest I found both lungs flattened and adhering to the spine. The cavities of both sides of the chest were filled with about two pints of serous fluid which compressed the lungs. The lungs were filled with serous fluid, and not crepitant on pressure. The heart was healthy. The contents of the abdomen were healthy. I found brandy and water in the stomach. I consider the cause of death was the effusion of serum into the chest, the result of pleuritis. I believe the effusion of serum into the chest took place within 24 hours previous to the death of the deceased, he had no smell of liquor when I first saw him. And he was quite sober. The wife of deceased seemed very attentive and kind to him. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.
Buckley, Louisa 12 Jun 1863 See "Newman, Henry"
Bunce, John 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
Calder, Alexander 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Calder, Mary 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Calder, Mr 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Carroll, Timothy 02 Jun 1863 An inquest will be held this day, Tuesday, at Messrs Neill and Moore's Farm, Smeaton, on the body of Timothy Carroll, who died suddenly through a fall.
Carroll, Timothy 05 Jun 1863 In our Tuesday's issue we briefly alluded to the sudden death of Timothy Carroll, on the farm of Mrssers, Nihll and Moore, in the parish of Bullarook, and today we supplement the information as elicited at the inquest, held on Tuesday, by Mr W.B.Lees, the district coroner. One of the employers, Mr Patrick Nihll, deposed that on Sunday evening last deceased had tea, and seemed perfectly well. Subsequently several men, together with deceased, sat down on a form by the fire, and had several drinks of gin, - about three bottles. Deceased then seemed rather tipsy. Saw Maloney pick the deceased up from the floor, but did not see him fall. He placed him before the fire, thinking that he would soon recover. Remained with him until six o'clock the following morning, and , not seeing him revive, went to the doctor. He believed that deceased fell down between then and twelve o'clock on Sunday night. There was no fighting or quarrelling. Deceased generally spent his money as he got it. Had No property, and died indebted to him, as shown in the account produced. Dennis Riardon, Laborer, in the employ of Mr Daniel Moore, deposed that he was in company with deceased on Sunday night last, in the house of Mr P. Nihll. There were seven or eight men present. He was playing cards with deceased and others, at a game called "Forty-five", for a horse. Only six played, and paid 5s each. They commenced playing about nine o'clock on Sunday. Riardon won the horse, and deceased left off playing with others for bottle of grog, left about three o'clock on Monday morning. He did not see the deceased fall down, but assisted in picking him up. Never saw him move afterwards. Deceased was playing cards with Riardon half an hour before he fell. Dr Edmonston, of Kingston, deposed that on Monday morning, about six o'clock, a man requested him to see deceased, the messenger then not knowing whether he was dead or alive. Dr Edmonston went, and found deceased lying on a mattress, and that he had been dead for two or three hours. Made the post mortem examination, and found no external marks of violence. All the organs of the abdomen were highly congested. He considered that deceased, who was about 35 years old, died from hypertrophy of the heart. The jury returned the following verdict; "Died from disease of the heart, accelerated by intemperance."
Cassell, William 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
Clark, Andrew 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Coates, C.W. 24 Apr 1863 See "Eyres, Mary"
Coundon, Newrick 08 May 1863 See "Pasco, Thomas"
Cox, Edward 12 May 1863 See "Cullen, Mary Margaret Cox"
Creati, John Francis 19 May 1863 See "Stewart, Duncan"
Cullen, Margaret 12 May 1863 See "Cullen, Mary Margaret Cox"
Cullen, Mary Margaret Cox 15 May 1863 An inquest was held at Anthony's American Hotel, on Wednesday, by Mr W B Lees, the District Coroner, on the body of a child which died on the 12th instant.
Margaret Cullen sworn - The deceased is my daughter. She is twelve months and two days old, and was born on Creswick. Am unmarried. The father of deceased is Edward Cox. Have not seen him for the last year. Never received any money from him on account of deceased. Do not know here he is now. Deceased was a healthy child; when born she always appeared to be in pain. She took ill about six weeks ago, and from that time has been gradually sinking. Dr Roche saw deceased when she was attacked with vomiting; he prescribed for her and has seen her since frequently. I took deceased from my breast when she was between seven and eight months old. Mr Anderson told me I should get Dr Steel to see deceased; he saw her with Dr Roche last week. She had some medicine about six weeks ago, but none since. She died last night at 11 o'clock. She gradually sank. I used to give arrowroot, chicken broth, and some spirits. I was ordered to give the spirits by the doctor. Am a dressmaker. Have always carefully attended the deceased. Dr Roche brought down Dr Steel to see deceased last week. Dr Roche told me last week to continue giving deceased a little brandy, and that he would not give her medicine. He told me about a week ago that there were no hopes of recovery of deceased.
Isabella Anderson, a neighbour, and Dr Roche, who made the post mortem examination, gave evidence.
The jury returned the following verdict:- "The deceased, Mary Margaret Cox Cullin, died at Creswick on the 12th day of May from debility."
Curtin, Mr 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Curtin, Patrick 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Daniel, Dr 09 Jan 1863 See "Hoe Man"
Daniel, Dr 13 Jan 1863 See "Ah Yem"
Daniel, Dr 28 Apr 1863 See "Ah Fun"
Daniel, Dr 29 May 1863 See "Gurr, Rosina"
Dans, Emily 17 Mar 1863 See "Dans, James Eli"
Dans, James Eli 17 Mar 1863 An inquest was held on Sunday last, at Dean, by Mr W.B.Lees, the district coroner, on the body of James Eli Dans, a little boy fourteen months old, who died on Friday morning. Emily Dans, the mother of deceased, deposed that Mr Walpole had ordered some powders, but did not make any charge. Henry N. Walpole, a farmer residing in Bungaree, stated that when the parents brought the deceased to him, he requested them to take the child to Dr Trotter. They told him that they had no means. He then gave some powders. Witness added that he was a surgeon, qualified in London in the year 1835, that he had his qualification but objected to show it. He believed deceased died from suffocation brought on by irritation of the ulcerated throat. Dr Roche, who made the post mortem examination, found no external marks of violence, but on opening the body found the lungs had advanced into the second stage of pneumonia. The coroner, summing up the evidence, expressed some doubt as to Mr Walpole's having a diploma, and stated that fortunately the medicine had been harmless, although Mr Walpole seemed not to have known the nature of the disease. The jury returned a verdict that deceased had died of pneumonia. The coroner warned Mr Walpole not to practice in the future.
Dickson, Thomas 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Dixon, Rev 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Dougall, Mr 12 May 1863 See "Smith, William"
Dougall, Mrs 12 May 1863 See "Smith, William"
Dunn, Archibald 26 May 1863 An inquest was held on Sunday, the 24th May at the Farmers' Arms Hotel, Smeaton, by Mr W.B.Lees, the District Coroner, on the body of Archibald Dunn, who died on the 23rd inst.
[The inquest was held on Sunday at the request of the deceased's friends.]
The following jurymen were sworn, viz.:- Mr Patrick Curtin, (Foreman); Messrs Geo. Pegler, John Lewis, Alexander Calder, Peter Mann, William Reed, Robert Myers, John Holst, Andrew Clark, Thomas Dickson, John Reid and Henry Jacobs.
The following witnesses were examined:- Sarah Hepworth sworn: Am wife of John Hepworth, Smeaton. Have known the deceased for the last three years. On Thursday last, about 4 p.m., deceased called at our wheelwright and blacksmith's shop, when my husband bought a bag of potatoes of him. Deceased then asked my husband to go up to Dockery's Hotel and shout for him; my husband refused to go as he was busy. My husband then gave deceased a small glassful of brandy. I saw deceased spill nearly the half of it. He stopped at our place about three quarters of an hour, part of the time he was half asleep. My son went with deceased and saw him off on his dray. I saw Mr Bingham close to the dray at the time. The bullocks went on. I never saw deceased so tipsy as he was on Thursday last. He would not leave our place without getting a little brandy. We do not sell spirits. I thought deceased could go home without any danger to himself.
John Bingham sworn: Am a farmer residing at Smeaton. Have known deceased for the last five years. On Thursday last between 4 and 5 o'clock, when I came down to get my horse shod, I saw deceased at Mr Hepworth's door. I was then about 30 yards from him. Saw him get on the pole in front of the dray, and then he drove on towards Mr Calder's. Hr Hepworth's son, a boy about 14 years of age, told me he was afraid that the deceased would fall off his dray as he was very tipsy. Subsequently I followed the deceased. I was about a quarter of a mile from him and the dray, which was near Caller's gate, when I thought I saw deceased fall off. I then ran towards him. Jus as I was approaching the deceased, Mr Anderson and Mr Calder came up to deceased. Mr Anderson pronounced him dead, but I said No! as I saw him breathing. Deceased did not speak at that time. We then carried him to Mr Caller's house, and laid him on the sofa. Mr Anderson sent for the doctor. Dr Edmonston came shortly after. I remained with the deceased until his death. Deceased was my partner for the last five years. Was present when deceased made his will on Friday night last; he was then quite sensible. Deceased has a half brother in the colony, but has not seen him for a long time. Deceased was unmarried; he is 32 years of age, a native of Ireland. Believe deceased has been about six and a half years in Victoria. Have heard deceased say his father was a land steward in Ireland. During the time deceased has been partner with me he was in the habit of taking fits of drinking. I saw deceased on Thursday morning last about 8 o'clock. He then left to go about two miles off for a load of potatoes. He was then quite sober. I did not see him until the afternoon. I am not aware that deceased had any property of his own. We rented a farm from Mr Curtin. Have heard the will of deceased read, and believe that the had no more property than what is therein stated. I have no money belonging to deceased. He told me that he was dragged along the ground by the wheel of the dray. The interest deceased had in the land with me is willed over to me. For the last five years it has not paid more than expenses. The lease expires at the end of the present year.
Mary Calder sworn: Am the wife of Alexander Calder. On Thursday last about 5 o'clock, saw deceased quite close to my place; he was then being dragged by a bullock dray. He was on the ground and entangled with the first wheel of the dray on the sided towards our house. I called the attention of Mr Anderson, who was in my house, to it, and he went to stop the bullocks. Deceased then was disentangled. I saw John Bingham at the dray just as Mr Anderson got to it. Both brought deceased into our house. Deceased was quite sensible when brought in. Deceased died at 8 a.m. yesterday morning in my presence. He was quite sensible during his illness, and carefully attended to. I was present when deceased made his will. My husband, the Rev Mr Dixon, and others were then present. On Friday last, at that time he was quite sensible. I believe he was dragged about 30 yards on the ground before he became disentangled.
Dr Edmonston sworn: Am a legally qualified medical practitioner, residing at Kingston. On Thursday afternoon last, Mr Anderson called on me and wished me to see deceased. I left immediately and found deceased in Mr Caller's house. Found that he was under the influence of drink. Found a superficial contused wound over the fifth and eighth ribs on the left side. There was a slight abrasion from the wound, extending to the right shoulder. The fifth and seventh ribs were fractured in the neighborhood of the wound. I found emphysema on the neck and chest. There was no other injury on the person of deceased. Applied the usual treatment, and attended deceased until his death. I last saw deceased alive on Friday night last. I have this day made a post mortem examination of the body of deceased. On making incisions into the skin a quantity of air escaped. On my opening the thorax found the left cavity filled with air and the lung perfectly collapsed; it was wounded in two places. There was a large quantity of blood in the cavity of the thoradx. I then examined the chest and found the 5th and 7th ribs broken on the left side, corresponding with the wound outside. I found no injury to the head or the abdomen. I believe the cause of death was emphysema with internal hemorrhage from the lungs. Have heard the evidence of the other witnesses and believe deceased received the injury described, by being dragged on the ground and the wheel pressing on him. Deceased was quite sensible during his illness with the exception of about half an hour when I first saw him on Thursday night. Deceased told me that he was so tipsy previous to the accident that he remembered very little of what occurred previous to his falling off the dray.
The will alluded to in the evidence testified by the Rev Mr Dixon and other gentlemen was produced at the inquest.
The Coroner censured Mr Hepworth for having supplied the deceased with drink, and Mr Bingham for having allowed the deceased remaining on the pole of the dray whilst in a state of intoxication.
The Jury returned the following verdict:- The deceased Archibald Dunn, died at Smeaton on the 23rd May from severe injuries received by his falling from a bullock dray on the 21st May whilst in a state of intoxication.
Edmonston, Dr 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Edmonston, Dr 05 Jun 1863 See "Carroll, Timothy"
Elliott, Simon 08 May 1863 See "Pasco, Thomas"
Eyres, Charles 24 Apr 1863 See "Eyres, Mary"
Eyres, Mary 24 Apr 1863 Yesterday at the Kingston Hotel, Kingston, an inquest was held by Mr W.B.Lees, the District Coroner, on the body of Mary Eyres, aged 35 years, who died on Wednesday. Mr C.W.Coates, Mr Charles Eyres, and Mrs Mary Miles gave evidence. Dr Roche, who made the post mortem examination, deposed that he found no external marks of violence; he had heard the statement made by Mr Coates, and was of opinion that what he (Mr Coates) gave the deceased could not have hurt her. Dr Roche believed that Mary Eyres died from peritonitis. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.
Fischer, Mr 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
Foster, Thomas (Dr) 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
Gubbins, John 08 May 1863 See "Pasco, Thomas"
Gurr, Hester (Mrs) 29 May 1863 See "Gurr, Rosina"
Gurr, Rosina 29 May 1863 An inquest was held last night at the Talbot Hotel, by Mr W.B.Lees, the District Coroner, on the body of Rosina Gurr, a girl five years eight months old, who whilst playing with other children was accidentally drowned by falling into a waterhole, four feet wide, nine yards long, and six feet deep, close to the creek, Melbourne-road. Mrs Hester Gurr, the mother of the deceased, Mrs Sally Hodge, Mr Elijah May baker, who, with the assistance of Mr Mann and Mr Jacob, got the deceased out of the hole, gave evidence. Dr Daniel deposed, that he, in conjunction with Drs. Roche and Steel, did all they could to resuscitate the deceased, but without avail. The jury returned the following verdict:- "Deceased, Rosina Gurr, died from asphyxia, caused by her falling into a water-hole on the 27th Mary." The coroner cautioned the parents and others against allowing their children playing near the creek.
Hedge, James 27 November 1863 An inquest was held on Wednesday at the District Hospital by Mr W.B.Lees, the district coroner, on the body of James Hedge, aged 15 years. Deceased, who was in the employ of Mr Norman, dairyman, near the Hospital, on Tuesday night in driving into the bush his own horse, which he purchased a week ago at the Creswick Pound for seven shillings, received a slight kick on the thigh, not sufficent even to disable him, as he walked to his hut, about 100 yards distant. Every attention was paid to deceased by Mr and Mrs Norman, who visited him about ten o'clock and found him comfortably asleep. Mr Norman visited him again about two o'clock on Wednesday morning, when he complained of a slight sickness, for relief of which some ginger, essence of pepperment, sugar, and water were given by his master, and he felt relieved. Mr Norman went to his door about five o'clock, when he seemed to be snoring. Mrs Norman at seven o'clock found deceased apparently in a fit, and put hot water to his feet, whilst her husband ran for Dr Steel, who on examin ing deceased found that life was extinct, and had probably been so for two hours. The doctor made the post mortem examination, and found the blood vessels of the head highly congested, the liver very much enlarged and all the other organs healthy; believed the cause of death was the shock to the nervous system. Verdict - Accidental death. Deceased, who was described as of a delicate constitution, was a quiet steady lad; he was born in Tasmania and was the son of Roger and Eliza Hedge, who now reside at Creswick.
Hepworth, John 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Hepworth, Sarah 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Hodge, Sally (Mrs) 29 May 1863 See "Gurr, Rosina"
Hoe Man 09 Jan 1863 On Wednesday last an inquest was held at the Talbot Hotel, Melbourne Road, by Mr W.B.Lees, the District Coroner, on the body of Hoe Man (a Chinaman), thirty-six years of age, married in China, who was found dead the same day on the floor of his tent, near Hammon's Bridge. Ah Tack and To Kit (two Chinamen), and Constable Martin, gave evidence. Dr Daniel, who made a post mortem examination, affirmed that he found two incised wounds on the side of the head, and acute disease of the heart. The brain was inflamed and softened. Deceased could not have lived much longer; death was accelerated by the shock to the nervous system caused by his falling out of bed while sick and feeble. About four months ago he operated on the mouth of the deceased. His lips were then nearly closed, and he (the doctor) had to cut open the mouth. The jury returned the following verdict - "Deceased died on the 7th from disease of the brain, and death was accelerated by a fall."
Holst, John 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Jacobs, Henry 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Jacobs, Mr 29 May 1863 See "Gurr, Rosina"
Janneson, Thomas 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
Jones, William 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
King Sing 24 Feb, 1863 An inquest was held on Sunday afternoon at Mr Luttitt's Store, Bloody Gully, on the body of a Chinaman, named King Sing, aged 50, who died the same day. Two of his countrymen, who called at his tent early on Sunday morning, found deceased in a dying state, and took him some tea. The post mortem examination was conducted by Dr Roche, who deposed that death was caused by tubercular disease, accelerated by want of nourishment and of medical treatment. Verdict accordingly.
King, Thos. 08 May 1863 See "Pasco, Thomas"
Kneebone, John 08 May 1863 See "Pasco, Thomas"
Lathlain, F.J. 08 May 1863 See "Pasco, Thomas"
Lean, John 08 May 1863 See "Pasco, Thomas"
Lees, W.B. 09 Jan 1863 See "Hoe Man"
Lees, W.B. 13 Jan 1863 See "Ah Yem"
Lees, W.B. 23 Jan 1863 see "Adams, William Gass"
Lees, W.B. 06 Feb, 1863 See " Ang Hui"
Lees, W.B. 10 Mar 1863 See "Waterman, Laura"
Lees, W.B. 17 Mar 1863 See "Dans, James Eli"
Lees, W.B. 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
Lees, W.B. 24 Apr 1863 See "Eyres, Mary"
Lees, W.B. 28 Apr 1863 See "Ah Fun"
Lees, W.B. 28 Apr 1863 See "Borley, James"
Lees, W.B. 08 May 1863 See "Pasco, Thomas"
Lees, W.B. 12 May 1863 See "Cullen, Mary Margaret Cox"
Lees, W.B. 12 May 1863 See "Smith, William"
Lees, W.B. 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Lees, W.B. 29 May 1863 See "Gurr, Rosina"
Lees, W.B. 02 Jun 1863 See "Ranton, John"
Lees, W.B. 02 Jun 1863 See "Purser, Maria"
Lees, W.B. 05 Jun 1863 See "Carroll, Timothy"
Lees, W.B. 12 Jun 1863 See "Newman, Henry"
Lewis, John 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Liddell, Daniel 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
Luttitt, Mr 24 Feb, 1863 See "King Sing"
Mackay, Dr 24 Apr 1863 See "Wallace, Mary Hamilton"
Malony, Mr 05 Jun 1863 See "Carroll, Timothy"
Mann, Mr 29 May 1863 See "Gurr, Rosina"
Mann, Peter 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Martin, Constable 09 Jan 1863 See "Hoe Man"
May Elijah 29 May 1863 See "Gurr, Rosina"
McKay, Flora (Mrs) 02 Jun 1863 See "Ranton, John"
McRae, Donald 19 May 1863 See "Stewart, Duncan"
Miles, Mary (Mrs) 24 Apr 1863 See "Eyres, Mary"
Moore, Daniel 05 Jun 1863 See "Carroll, Timothy"
Moore, Mr 02 Jun 1863 See "Carroll, Timothy"
Moore, Mr 05 Jun 1863 See "Carroll, Timothy"
Myers, Robert 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Neill, Mr 02 Jun 1863 See "Carroll, Timothy"
Newman, Henry 12 Jun 1863 An inquest was held yesterday at the Talbot Hotel, by Mr W.B.Lees, the district coroner, on the body of Henry Newman, 86 years of age, who died suddenly on the 10th instant, at Cheese Flat, after only half an hour's illness. Sarah Newman, his daughter, and Louisa Buckley, who had been assisting the family occasionally in their work, gave evidence. Dr Steel deposed that, on being called, he went to see deceased, who had been dead a few minutes. He examined the body, and found it stiff and well nourished. There were no external marks of violence. He believed deceased probably died from disease of the heart and lungs, accelerated by old age. He believed the family of deceased to be highly respectable, and of temperate habits. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.
Newman, Sarah 12 Jun 1863 See "Newman, Henry"
Nihll, Mr 05 Jun 1863 See "Carroll, Timothy"
Nihll, Patick 05 Jun 1863 See "Carroll, Timothy"
Oakes, Mr 19 May 1863 See "Stewart, Duncan"
Orr, William 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
Parker, George A 10 Mar 1863 See "Waterman, Laura"
Pasco, Thomas 08 May 1863 An inquest was held on Thursday, the 7th inst., at Gubbin's Hotel by Mr W.B.Lees, the District Coroner, on the body of Thomas Pasco, who died in consequence of an accident on the 6th inst.
The following jurymen were sworn:- Messrs F.J.Lathlain (foreman); Thos. King, Wm. Blanchard, Thos. Bonds, John Lean, John Kneebone, Conrad Schroeder, Thomas Bone, Paul Winning, John Gubbins, Newrick Coundon, and Simon Elliott.
Attwell Berryman sworn: Am a miner, residing at Clunes. Have known deceased for the last four years: he was my father-in-law. Yesterday morning, at 7 o'clock I went to work with him in the Victoria Claim. He and myself went down the shaft, which is about 260 feet deep. We then proceeded to work in the drive, 300 feet from the bottom of the shaft The drive throughout is well timbered, with the exception of ten feet where we were working. The drive is 18 feet wide. Deceased and myself were engaged in removing the quartz from the new cutting in the drive to the back. At about one o'clock we were both in a line with each other. While deceased and myself were thus at work, about 15 cwt. of earth gave way and fell on deceased, and nearly covered him. I was only about two feet from deceased at the time of the accident and barely escaped. There were five men working in the same drive, about 30 feet from us. I at once called out for assistance. We got the deceased from under the earth in a few minutes, and took him up the shaft and then home. Dr Schmidt was at the shaft when deceased was brought up, and attended until death. I was with deceased when he died, about half-past four o'clock yesterday afternoon. Deceased was sensible from the time of the accident until he was brought home and put to bed. He never spoke after. Previous to the accident I considered the drive perfectly safe. Deceased and myself were two of the contractors for the Victoria Company. We are allowed any quantity of timber we think requisite. Deceased is 46 years of age, born in Cornwall, and has been in Victoria seven years. The manager of the Company was down the shaft, and in the drive where we were working and did not find fault with our work. The last blast went off yesterday. It was about an hour and a half before the accident took place. We had to drive about four feet before we could put in another set of timber. When the accident took place, deceased told me that his legs were broken. I have been working in the same drive for the last four months. Where we were working it was quite dry. The house of deceased is about a mile from where the accident took place.
John Reynolds sworn: Am a miner, residing on Clunes. Have known deceased for the last five months. Deceased and Attwell Berryman were in the same drive with me and others in the Victoria Company's claim. About half-past one o'clock, I was engaged in tamping a hole about four feet from deceased and Berryman, when the accident took place. My back was towards Berryman and deceased. I heard the noise of the earth falling. I looked round and found deceased lying on the ground, face downwards. Berryman was then trying remove deceased. I heard deceased cry out, after the accident took place, "Lord, have mercy upon me." Am one of the contractors with deceased and Berryman. Did not consider the drive dangerous where the accident took place. Deceased and his mate, Berryman, were of perfectly sober habits and quite sober yesterday.
Dr R.W.Schmidt sworn - Am a legally qualified medical practitioner. Yesterday, about half-past one, was called to attend deceased. Had just got to the shaft when he was brought up, and put in the workshop. I examined the deceased, and found both bones of the left leg broken, and the thigh bone of the right leg. Deceased was very much bruised from the shoulder down to the hip on the left side. A large fleshy wound on the left arm, below the elbow. A wound on the left hand. The nose split, about an inch in length. Deep sharp cut over the right eye. When I first saw deceased yesterday he was quite sensible, and complained of great pain at his heart. I set the broken limbs on the spot, likewise dressed the wounds. Deceased began to sink rapidly. I then ordered him to be taken to his house, as there was no place for him to lie where he was. I attended deceased until his death. He died about four o'clock yesterday afternoon. He was quite sensible until about three minutes before his death. I gave him stimulants. He died about fifteen minutes after getting into his own house. Consider he died from the shock to the nervous system. He lost very little blood. The fourth and fifth ribs were bent in, and the sixth rib was broken.
The Coroner here asked the last witness whether he thought it proper to remove a sinking man a distance of a about a mile.
Dr Schmidt replied that, having set the broken limbs, he considered it quite safe. It was a practice he had always pursued.
The Coroner, in summing up the evidence, touched on the removal of deceased, ordered by Dr Schmidt, and the jury returned the following verdict:- "Deceased, Thomas Pasco, died on the 6th of May from a severe shock to the nervous system, caused by receiving severe injuries on the same day, while at work in a drive in the Victoria Company's claim, Clunes."
Pegler, Geo 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Pilgrim, James 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
Porter, Henry William 19 May 1863 See "Stewart, Duncan"
Preshaw, Dr 24 Apr 1863 See "Wallace, Mary Hamilton"
Purser, Benjamin 02 Jun 1863 See "Purser, Maria"
Purser, Maria 02 Jun 1863 An inquest was held yesterday afternoon, at Mopoke, by Mr W.B.Lees, the district coroner, on the body of Maria Purser, who was found dead in her bed yesterday morning. Mrs Ann Usher, Mrs Clara Ware, the daughter of the deceased, Mr Benjamin Purser, and Dr Roche, who made the post mortem examination, gave evidence, from which it appeared that deceased was 70 years of age, 45 years married, and addicted to intemperance, having sometimes had drinking fits. There were no external marks of violence. Dr Roche considered the cause of death was inflammation of the lungs, accelerated by old age and intemperate habits. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.
Ranton, Hugh (Mrs) 02 Jun 1863 See "Ranton, John"
Ranton, John 02 Jun 1863 On Sunday last, at Glendonald, an inquest was held by Mr W.B.Lees, the District Coroner, on the body of John Ranton, a little boy, three years and two months old, who died on the 30th May from acute inflammation of the lungs. Mrs Hugh Ranton, the mother of the deceased: Mrs Flora McKay, and Dr Roche who made the post mortem examination, gave evidence. It appeared that the child died before Dr Roche reached the spot. There were no external marks of violence, and the medicine administered by the relatives was harmless.
Reed, William 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Reid, John 26 May 1863 See "Dunn, Archibald"
Reynolds, John 08 May 1863 See "Pasco, Thomas"
Riardon, Dennis 05 Jun 1863 See "Carroll, Timothy"
Robinson, Dr 13 Feb, 1863 See "Sandilant, Henry"
Roche, Dr 23 Jan 1863 See "Adams, William Gass"
Roche, Dr 24 Feb, 1863 See "King Sing"
Roche, Dr 10 Mar 1863 See "Waterman, Laura"
Roche, Dr 17 Mar 1863 See "Dans, James Eli"
Roche, Dr 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
Roche, Dr 24 Apr 1863 See "Eyres, Mary"
Roche, Dr 12 May 1863 See "Cullen, Mary Margaret Cox"
Roche, Dr 29 May 1863 See "Gurr, Rosina"
Roche, Dr 02 Jun 1863 See "Ranton, John"
Roche, Dr 02 Jun 1863 See "Purser, Maria"
Rowe, Alexander 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
Rowell, Mr 19 May 1863 See "Stewart, Duncan"
Sandilant, Catherine 13 Feb, 1863 See "Sandilant, Henry"
Sandilant, Henry 13 Feb, 1863 CORONER'S INQUEST - An inquest was held at Hood's (late Nicholson's) Hotel on Tuesday morning on the body of Henry Sandilant, aged 3 years and 10 months, who died suddenly on the previous day. The jury having been sworn, proceeded to view the body. On their return, Catherine Sandilant, mother of the child said, deceased was poorly on Sunday, but went out for a walk on that day. Called in Dr Schmidt on Monday about half-past 12 in the afternoon. Deceased was then hot and feverish, and I was afraid that my son was suffering from scarlatina. Dr Schmidt did not express an opinion to me as to the nature of the complaint. Gave deceased two powders by the doctor's directions - one at two o'clock and other at a quarter-past four. Deceased vomited about half-an-hour after taking the first powder. Dr Schmidt told me that the powders might produce sickness. The child appeared quite insensible after taking the first powder. Took him up in my arms at half-past five o'clock, and give him a drink of tea, a small quantity of which he drank freely. He then began to struggle, and I then placed in the servant's arms, whilst I ran for Dr Schmidt, but he was not a t home. I then came back and sent for Drs Robinson and Warren. Dr Warren came first, and by his directions the child was placed in a hot bath and wrapped up in blankets. They said the death of the child was strange. The child had been healthy up to Sunday last. The child was flushed in the morning and a rash broke out. (One powder Properly directed was then handed in: being the third which Dr Schmidt had prescribed.)
Jane Taylor sworn - Am servant to the last witness. (The witness then corroborated the chief portion of the previous statement.) After the child drank the tea it was seized with convulsions. Dr Warren came and put it in a warm bath, and Dr Robinson came in afterwards. The child was then dead. The child died just a few minutes before its mother came back from going to fetch Dr Schmidt. Dr Schmidt came in about three-quarters of an hour afterwards.
Dr Schmidt sworn, said - I am legally qualified practitioner. I was called into Sandilant's house between twelve and one o'clock on Monday afternoon to see the child in question. The mother said the child was loose in the bowels. Examined the child, and found various symptoms apparent, but could not give a direct opinion as to what the complaint was. The child was not feverish; it was sleepy and heavy in the head, and the pupils were greatly dilated. Could not say at the time whether it was suffering from sunstroke, congestion of the brain, or from some other complaint. Asked the mother if it had been any length of time ill, and the reply was "No." Gave necessary directions as to the powders being given, viz., every three hours, and said I would call again about seven o'clock. On returning from seeing a patient about five o'clock, met Dr Robinson, went to the house and Mrs Sandilant said, "You have killed my child." Went immediately to the camp, to make arrangements to have an inquest held.
Dr Warren, who made the post mortem examination, stated that the contents of the stomach were healthy, with the exception of a slight enlargement of the liver. The brain was highly congested, which was the cause of death. In answer to a question the Dr stated that the congestion of the brain was so acute that it ought to have been remarked by a medical man on examination./ The Coroner, in summing up, said that the jury should go by the medical evidence, and remarked that the cause of death was natural; that no doctor would have been able to have saved the child; and that no blame attached to the medical man.
The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the evidence, adding, as a rider, that Dr Schmidt should have taken more energetic steps to have ascertained the nature of the disease.
Schmidt, Dr 13 Feb, 1863 See "Sandilant, Henry"
Schmidt, R.W. (Dr) 08 May 1863 See "Pasco, Thomas"
Schroeder, Conrad 08 May 1863 See "Pasco, Thomas"
Sleep, Thos. 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
Smith, Marion 12 May 1863 See "Smith, William"
Smith, William 12 May 1863 An inquest was held on Sunday last, by Mr W.B.Lees, the district coroner, at Mr Dougall's Kerse Farm, Ascot, on the body of William Smith, farm laborer, aged 40 years, who died suddenly on Saturday. From the evidence, it appeared that deceased was born in Cambridgeshire, England. He has resided 21 years in Victoria, married seven years ago, and leaves a wife and two children. Last month deceased frequently complained of pain in the chest. On Wednesday last he left off work at four o'clock. On Friday afternoon he came to see Dr Steel, Creswick, who gave him twelve powders, one of which deceased took, and went to bed. He was restless all night. On Saturday morning, at about three o'clock, he left the bed to answer a call of nature, and came back in a few minutes. His wife Marion Smith, got up at about seven o'clock, and although warm, he was not moving then, and did not answer to a question she put to him. She felt his pulse, and thought it was beating. She subsequently went for Mrs Dougall, a distance of about 150 yards, who came and saw the deceased, whom she considered to be in a trance. Shortly after, Mrs Dougall thought he was dead, and left and sent her husband down to see him. Mr Dougall and deceased's brother-in-law sent for Dr Steel. The latter arrived between eight and nine in the morning, and pronounced deceased to have been dead about three hours. Dr Steel made the post mortem examination on Sunday, and deposed that deceased died from fatty degeneration of the heart - he found the heart twice the usual size, the liver much enlarged, and was of opinion that death had been accelerated by intemperance and the excessive use of tobacco. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.
Steel, Dr 06 Feb, 1863 See " Ang Hui"
Steel, Dr 28 Apr 1863 See "Borley, James"
Steel, Dr 12 May 1863 See "Smith, William"
Steel, Dr 12 May 1863 See "Cullen, Mary Margaret Cox"
Steel, Dr 29 May 1863 See "Gurr, Rosina"
Steel, Dr 12 Jun 1863 See "Newman, Henry"
Steel, J.B. Rev 19 May 1863 See "Stewart, Duncan"
Steel, T.H., Dr 19 May 1863 See "Stewart, Duncan"
Stewart, Duncan 19 May 1863 An inquest was held at Oakes's store, Spring Hill Road, on Monday morning, before the District Coroner, on the body of Duncan Stewart, aged about 32, unmarried.
Mr Donald McRae, sheep dealer, Creswick, deposed that deceased was in his employ from November last. Left on Friday morning, about nine o'clock to deliver sheep at Kinston and Rocky Lead, intending to return same night. Next morning was informed that the deceased had met with an accident, and was lying at Slade's store; immediately procured medical assistance, and was with deceased until his death, on Saturday night about eleven o'clock. The parents of Stewart reside in the Warrnambool district.
John Francis Creati, of the Flying Buck Hotel, Spring Hill, deposed that deceased called at his house on Friday, about ten o'clock. The house was closed. Opened the door, and supplied Stewart with one small glass of ale. Deceased seemed 'half and Half," but quite capable of taking care of himself. Had frequently seen him much worse for liquor than on Friday night. Stewart remarked that the horse had tried to kick him as he was mounting. He then started for Creswick.
Henry William Porter, sworn: Was in bed reading on Friday night, about ten o'clock, when he heard a noise as if a horse had stumbled against a stump about 20 yards off. Heard a voice talking loudly to a horse. All then became quiet. Afterwards went to sleep. In the morning with others saw deceased.
Frederick James Telfer, a miner, was proceeding to work in company with his mate. On the road saw a horse with two dogs. Upon a closer inspection discovered that one stirrup iron was missing. Thinking that some accident might have happened, searched the abandoned holes in the neighborhood, but without success. Then took the horse to Oakes's store, thinking that he might be identified. In going towards the store, and at about 400 yards from where the hors was found, saw Stewart lying by the roadside. Was then breathing heavily, like a man in liquor. Spake to him, but obtained no answer. On closer inspection found that he was bruised about the side of the head. A dog was sleeping with him and refused to allow them to touch him. Went to the store and informed Mr Oakes, who came down and endeavored to give the deceased some brandy, but without success. Then assisted to carry the body to Slade's store.
Dr T.H.Steel deposed that he saw deceased on Saturday morning about eight o'clock. Was quite cold and stiff, but alive and insensible. Applied the usual remedies. Visited him three times during the day. Saw deceased last about 10 p.m., when he was rapidly sinking. Next morning heard of his death. Made a post mortem examination, and found that deceased died from concussion of the brain. Other organs in body were in a healthy state.
Several other witnesses were examined corroborating the evidence given above./ The Coroner in summing up complimented Mr McRae, Messrs Tilfer, Oakes, and others, for their energetic and kind treatment of deceased. The death appeared to be purely accidental.
Verdict accordingly.
Deceased was buried yesterday afternoon in the Creswick cemetery. Mr Rowell conducted the funeral which was well and respectably attended. The Rev J.B.Steel officiated at the grave.
Strike, William 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
Taylor, Jane 13 Feb, 1863 See "Sandilant, Henry"
Telfer, Frederick James 19 May 1863 See "Stewart, Duncan"
Thompset, James 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
To Kit 09 Jan 1863 See "Hoe Man"
Tong Waugh 28 Apr 1863 See "Ah Fun"
Trotter, Dr 17 Mar 1863 See "Dans, James Eli"
Usher, Ann (Mrs) 02 Jun 1863 See "Purser, Maria"
Wallace, D 24 Apr 1863 See "Wallace, Mary Hamilton"
Wallace, Mary Hamilton 24 Apr 1863 A child Scalded to Death. - Dr Preshaw, the Coroner, held an inquest on Monday at the Queen's Hotel, touching the death of Mary Hamilton Wallace, aged two and a half years, the daughter of Mr D. Wallace, the well-known auctioneer of this town. It appeared from the evidence of the servants that, on Sunday, the dinner was being prepared in the kitchen, the deceased was playing in that room, a large boiler of boiling water stood on the ground partly under a table, the child's foot caught in something, and before she could be laid hold of, fell backwards into the boiler of scalding water. She was immediately pulled out, and Dr Mackay sent for but the scalding was so severe, and the shock to the nervous system so great, that the poor child survived but a few hours. Dr Mackay having given his evidence, the jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death. This is the second case of the kind which has occurred in this district within the last few days. - M.A. Mail
Walpole, Henry N. 17 Mar 1863 See "Dans, James Eli"
Walton, Jane 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
Ware, Clara (Mrs) 02 Jun 1863 See "Purser, Maria"
Warren, Dr 13 Feb, 1863 See "Sandilant, Henry"
Waterman, Ann 10 Mar 1863 See "Waterman, Laura"
Waterman, Laura 10 Mar 1863 An inquest was held yesterday, at Shicer Hill, near Sulky Gully, by Mr W.B.Lees, District Coroner, on the body of Laura Waterman, a girl seven years old, who died in the afternoon. The following witnesses were examined:- G.A.Parker, a miner residing on Tucker Hill, who, as a friend, had given the father two Dover's powders, about two and a half grains, for the deceased. He also gave deceased a gargle, and lineament. He had studied medicine by reading medical books. Does not practice - gives the best advice he can, and never charges for it nor medicine. He never informed anyone that he was a surgeon. Ann Waterman, the mother of the deceased, deposed that her daughter complained of soreness in the throat on Monday last. She gave her some Holloway's Pills, and castor oil. Deceased came out of her room on Sunday night, and had tea with the family. She seemed quite strong then. Her husband subsequently gave deceased a powder he got from Mr Parker; and about one o'clock on Monday morning deceased rolled about the bed, and died in the afternoon. Dr Roche, a legally qualified medical practitioner, deposed as follows - I have this day made a post mortem examination. Deceased was delicately formed. I found no external marks of violence. On examining the throat, I found congestion of the fauces. The upper portion of the windpipe was slightly congested. The lungs were healthy. The right side of the heart was filled with blood. The abdominal viscera were healthy. On opening the skull I found about three ounces of blood effused at the base of the brains. The brain and its membranes were highly congested. I believe the cause of death was effusion of blood on the brain, and that congestion took place yesterday. I have seen the powders now produced, and consider if deceased was suffering from a slight cold, that a powder similar to the one produced given, would accelerate death. I consider the powder which deceased got, contained about three grains of Dover's powders. Deceased could not have had a highly congested brain, otherwise she could not have been able to go about yesterday as stated. If deceased had been in good health, the powder might not have produced any bad effect. From information received I tied up both ends of the stomach, in case it might be required. There was no disease in the throat of deceased to cause death. Three grains of Dover's powders is not an overdose for a child seven years old, if there is no congestion of the brain. The coroner in summing up stated that the conduct of George Parker was reprehensible, as he had given the Dover's powders without knowing their contents. The dose administered would not have been injurious had not the child suffered from congestion of the brain. Th jury, to whom the Coroner explained the law referring to manslaughter, deliberated for a short time and then returned the following verdict:- Laura Waterman died on the 9th of March from congestion of the brain, accelerated by an injudicious dose of Dover's powders. The jury are of the opinion that George A. Parker gave the powder to deceased, believing her to be laboring under no symptoms of congestion of the brain. After the delivery of the verdict, the Coroner cautioned Mr Parker, who felt deeply affected, and who had to be accommodated with a chair.
Whatman 13 Jan 1863 See "Ah Yem"
Williams, John 24 Mar 1863 See "Barnes, Louisa"
Winning, Paul 08 May 1863 See "Pasco, Thomas"
Wright, J.D. 28 Apr 1863 See "Borley, James"

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