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William CLARK/CLARKE was a convict - sailed 28 January 1806 from London, England - Ship's Master Hy MOORE - arrived on the ship "Fortune" (1) 12 July 1806.

On a winter's night in February 1805 in an upstairs room at a lodging in Rotton Row, Old Street , near Hatton Garden, London, sitting beside a fireplace there sat a sturdy native of Lincolnshire one William CLARK (then CLARKE) age 35 years 5' 9 1/2" tall with dark or black hair & hazel eyes. Before William, a hawker of earthern ware, stood a constable & an aggrieved householder, fresh from an examination downstairs of certain pieces of earthernware & glassware. Escorted by a constable & aggrieved householder, William CLARK left his fireplace & appeared at the office of a Hatton Garden Magistrate, where he heard the charge: that he, William CLARK, had knowingly received a quantity of earthernware & glassware, feloniously stolen from the aggrieved householder (valued at the trial at the Old Bailey at 2/14/6).

At Windsor in 1810, long before he had completed his servitude, William then age 40 years, married Ann Maria SINGLETON age 17 years, the daughter of William SINGLETON (Ann Maria SINGLETON was the first of the SINGLETON family born in Australia).

On the Hawksbury they raised a family of 6 children, including sons who became founders of their own large branches of the CLARK family, and daughters who became wives of founders of other large families in the Hunter Valley, North Western NSW and elseware.

While raising this family of 6 children, William worked as a labourer and farmed the 100 acre portion he acquired on the north bank of Freeman's Reach near Wilberforce. He also rented a piece of land from G. T. PALMER, brother of the original occupier of Richmond Vale on Wallis Creek, and son of the former Commissary General of NSW, John (Little Jack) PALMER. To enable Governor MACQUARIE and party to undertake the journey across the Blue Mountains, the convict, William CLARK, supplied maize & other stores. In 1815 William received a conditional pardon. He received his certificate of freedom in 1823.

In 1825 William found himself deserted by Ann Maria, who absconded with the children. Reunited in 1827, they moved to Patrick's Plains where Ann Maria's brother Benjamin, had established himself at the site of the town which later bore his name SINGLETON.

 
John LYONS & Mary PAGE
 
William CLARK/E
 
William SINGLETON
 
Catherine KIRWAN
 
Daniel CLARKE & Hannah STANLEY
 
Peter McALPIN
 
William TREHARNE
 
Anthony CARLTON
 
Albert CAVILL
 
James McGRATH
 
Edward CRITCHLEY
 
George WELDON
 
George QUINLAN
 
William CAVANAGH
 
Neils Berg BASSTIAN
 
John Anderson MORRIS
 
Gustave Mitchell BURNARD
 
Martin NICKEL
 
Edward George HAYES
 
William Stanley MOORE