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Citations and Notes for Jackson

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1.


2. For one account of the family tradition of a Scots ancestor, see The Clyde Enterprise, Thursday, 18 Feb 1892, as transcribed on http://www.jacksonfamilygenealogy.com/pages/historicalstoriesJosephJackson1795.htm that quotes Joseph Jackson: "My grandfather Jackson was a Scotchman; his wife was a Frenchwoman." Be sure to see also Janie's note at the very bottom of the page. The Joseph of long memory was the son of Daniel, son of Joseph, son of James, son of John, son of Robert. Which wife was from France? "Grandfather" General Joseph Jackson was married to Margaret BURGESS first, and then to Mary Ann ROBINSON, both of whom sound more English than Huguenot, although of course spellings did morph. But Gen. Joseph was still at least three generations removed from the immigrant.


3. See, for example, Charles Henry Pope, The Pioneers of Massachusetts, A Descriptive List . . . (Boston: Published by Charles H. Pope, 1900), 254; Vernon Heaton, The Mayflower (NYC: Mayflower Books, 1980), 37-42; lots of references over the years in New England Historical and Genealogical Register. For the record of Richard Jackson in Southold, Long Island, see Charles B. Moore, Town of Southold, Long Island, Personal Index prior to 1698, and Index of 1698. ... (New York: John Medole, Printer, 1868), 24. The SoutholdIndex.pdf is available on http://longislandgenealogy.com/BooksOnline.html No Jacksons appear in the 1698 census for Southold, Ibid., 95.


4. See, for example, http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/frameset_search.asp FamilySearch recid=7117737 and familyid=5549951; Isabella's AFN: MKM8-ZV.


5. Joseph Hunter, Collections Concerning the Church or Congregation of Protestant Separatists Formed at Scrooby in North Nottinghamshire, in the Time of King James I: The Founders of New-Plymouth, the Parent-Colony of New-England (London: John Russell Smith, 1854; digital facsimile reproduced by Google Book Search, http://books.google.com/books?id=fHir6HSEkEcC&pg=RA1-PA128&lpg=RA1-PA128&dq=scrooby+jackson+nottinghamshire&source=web&ots=O9VGcXlxKc&sig=svuCrErM2EiGmkz0VBuCZZ23Q9g#PRA1-PA130,M1 ) 131. I am greatly indebted to Janie for bringing this to my attention.


6. There is a plethora of books now about the Pilgrims. This account is taken mostly from Vernon Heaton, The Mayflower (NYC: Mayflower books, 1980), 37-38. It corrects some of the earlier account by Hunter, The Founders of New-Plymouth, 72-73, 130-31. The dates may not quite compute. April 1608 is from Hunter, Dec. 1607 from Heaton. A little more research is needed.


7. Heaton, The Mayflower, 38-41, gives a more detailed account than is in Hunter, The Founders of New-Plymouth, 131-5. The latter conflates the two attempts at emigration. For their life in Leyden, see Heaton, The Mayflower, 42ff; and the 56 page pamphlet by Jeremy Bangs, The Pilgrims in the Netherlands--Recent Research (Leiden, 1984).


8. Martha Bockée Flint, Early Long Island: A Colonial Study (NY: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1896), 125.


9. Flint, Early Long Island, 131-32.


10.


10a. This information was "provided by Robert Jackson, a descendant of Robert Jackson and Agnes Wasborne [sic]" on the "Main Index to the Jackson Surname Database", Long Island Genealogy web page at http://longislandgenealogy.com/jackson/ghtindex.htm (seen 4m/6/2007).


11. Anderson, Sanborn, Jr., and Sanborn, The Great Migration: 1634-1635, 4:13-18.


12. Anderson, Sanborn, Jr., and Sanborn, The Great Migration: 1634-1635, 4:19-22.


13. Anderson, Sanborn, Jr., and Sanborn, The Great Migration: 1634-1635, 4:22.


14. Anderson, Sanborn, Jr., and Sanborn, The Great Migration: 1634-1635, 4:22.


15. Anderson, Sanborn, Jr., and Sanborn, The Great Migration: 1634-1635, 4:23-25.


16. Anderson, Sanborn, Jr., and Sanborn, The Great Migration: 1634-1635, 4:25-28.


17. Frank R. Holmes, Directory of the Ancestral Heads of New England Families, 1620-1700 (Balt.: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1980), cxxxi.


18. William T. Davis Genealogical Register of Plymouth Families (2nd ed. originally published in Boston, 1899; reprinted Balt: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1977), 159-162.


19. The origin of our Robert with Rev. Denton coming from "Watertown Mass. thence to Wethersfield Conn., thence to Stamford, and from thence to Hempstead", from http://longislandgenealogy.com/jackson/ghtindex.htm


20. http://www.stamfordhistory.org/dav_colonial.htm


21. http://longislandgenealogy.com/jackson/ghtindex.htm


22. An 1883 pamphlet cited by Robbins, History of the Jackson Family of Hempstead, Long Island, N.Y., 24, and referenced on jacksonfamilygenealogy.com.


23. Daniel Denton, "A Brief Description of New York.", as quoted on http://www.newsday.com/community/guide/lihistory/ny-history-hs312a,0,5846972.story


24. Many Jackson genealogies and web sites repeat each other to this effect.


25. For more on three generations of the Washburne family in Massachusetts, see Eugene Aubrey Stratton, Plymouth Colony: Its History & People, 1620-1691 (Salt Lake City: Ancestry Publishing, 1986), 368-370.


26. Harry Macy, Jr., "Robert Jackson's Wives and Children", The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 131 Number 1 (January 2000), 6-7, as quoted on http://www.jacksonfamilygenealogy.com/pages/conflictingdatarobertjackson.htm


27. Harry Macy, Jr., "Robert Jackson's Wives and Children", The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 131 Number 1 (January 2000), 6-7, as quoted on http://www.jacksonfamilygenealogy.com/pages/conflictingdatarobertjackson.htm


28. Flint, Early Long Island, 131-32.


29. Flint, Early Long Island, 133.


30. Flint, Early Long Island, 135.


31. Town Records of Newtown, Book I, p. 452 as cited by Wharton Dickinson, Genealogy of the Fowlers in England and America as on Jackson web site, notes for Robert Jackson.


32. Flint, Early Long Island, 134; John Fiske, The Dutch and Quaker Colonies in America, 2 vols. (New York: Houghton, Miflin & Co., 1903), 1:154-163. For a synopsis of the war on the web, see http://www.newsday.com/community/guide/lihistory/ny-history-hs305a,0,6043582.story and http://www.newsday.com/community/guide/lihistory/ny-history-hs306a,0,6174655.story. It is not a pretty story.


32a. Fiske, The Dutch and Quaker Colonies in America, 1:200.


33. Hugh Barbour, Christopher Densmore, Elizabeth H. Moger, Nancy C. Sorel, Alson D. Van Wagner, and Arthur J. Worrall, eds., Quaker Crosscurrents: three hundred years of Friends in the New York Yearly Meetings (Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press, 1995), 7-8; Fiske, The Dutch and Quaker Colonies in America, 1:234-36. The English towns were Flushing, Middlebury/Middleburg, Hempstead/Heemstede, and Gravesend.


34. From http://www.newsday.com/community/guide/lihistory/ny-history-hs304a,0,5912509.story?coll=ny-lihistory-navigation seen 3/20, 2007. My thanks to Janie Jackson Kimble for bringing this to my attention. Deborah Dunch was born in London in 1586, married Henry Moody who was later given a knighthood, and widowed in 1629 when Deborah was about 33 years old. She emigrated to Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1639, and left in 1643. The fledgling settlement at Gravesend was attacked by Indians from up the Hudson, and the settlers removed to Amersfoort (Flatlands) until they got their patent and returned. Dame Deborah died ca. 1659, aged about 73. See also "Lady Deborah Moody", on http://longislandgenealogy.com/moodygrave/LadyMoody.htm This article includes the names of those who held the first 40 plots, and also those of the first division of land.


35. Robert Fowler's own account of the remarkable voyage is reprinted in James Bowden, The History of the Society of Friends in America (London: Charles Gilpin, 1850), 1:63-67. A shorter, perhaps more readable version, is in Elfrida Vipont, George Fox and the Valiant Sixty (Philadelphia: Friends General Conference, 1997), 107-8. See also Bowden, The History of the Society of Friends in America, 309-320.


36. Bowden, The History of the Society of Friends in America, 311, 316. My guess is that this was Capt. Thomas Willett, New England merchant and first mayor of New York City in 1665. The irony is that by 1714 there were Quaker Willetts in New York. That year John Willett, the grandson of the other Thomas Willett, married Mary Rodman of Flushing. Their descendants were the Quaker Willetts, many of whom removed to New Jersey and Pennsylvania. For more on the Willett family, see Genealogies of Long Island Families, From The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record Vol. ii: Praa-Youngs (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1987), 700-742. My thanks to David Paxson for sending me a copy of this carefully researched article by Rosalie Fellows Bailey.


37. Jaap Jacobs, New Netherland: A Dutch Colony in Seventeenth-Century America (Leiden: Brill, 2005), 142. My thanks to David Paxson for showing me this source, 3/2007.


38. For more on Friends' testimony against "hat honor", see


39. Bowden, The History of the Society of Friends in America, 311-16; Hugh Barbour et al., eds., Quaker Crosscurrents: three hundred years of Friends in the New York Yearly Meetings, 8-9. For Friends being invited to meet at the home of Dame Dorothy Moody, see http://www.newsday.com/community/guide/lihistory/ny-history-hs304a,0,5912509.story?coll=ny-lihistory-navigation (seen 3/20, 2007).


40. Fiske, The Dutch and Quaker Colonies in America, 1:202-5. For more on the story of the Flushing Remonstrance, see http://www.newsday.com/community/guide/lihistory/ny-history-hs316a,0,6371264.story .


41. Hugh Barbour et al., eds., Quaker Crosscurrents: three hundred years of Friends in the New York Yearly Meetings, 9-11. For much more detail on the Flushing Remonstrance, see Bowden, The History of the Society of Friends in America, 317-320. The text of the Remonstrance is printed on http://www.newsday.com/community/guide/lihistory/ny-history-hs301a1v,0,7673847.story (seen 3/20/2007).


41a. The above material is taken from "Papers Relating to Quakers and Moravians". chapter XV of E. B. O'Callaghan, Documentary History of New York 4 (Albany, NY: Weeds, Parsons & Co., 1849), digital images on http://www.quakerrecords.com/databases/quakers_and_moravians/ as seen 5m/16/2007. Some of the linked images run onto additional pages that can be accessed by clicking on the next page.


42. From Don Norman's file, as cited in Robert Jackson notes on the Jackson family genealogy web site.


43.Thomas Jefferson Wertenbaker, The Founding of American Civilization: The Middle Colonies (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1938), 85.


44. My thanks to Janie Jackson Kimble's e mail of 2/20/2007 for this information. She cites John Henry Jones, The Jones Family of Long Island, Descendants of Major Thomas Jones and Allied Families (New York: Tobias A. Wright, 1907), 352, referencing Vol. 7, p. 32 of Deeds, Secy. of State Office, Albany, N.Y.


45. The will was transcribed from the first book of Records, Queens County, Long Island, New York, by Robbins, included in his book, and posted on the web at www.jacksonfamilygenealogy.com/pages/willrobertjackson.htm (seen 9/16/2005).


46. Descendants now spell the name SEAMAN. There has been confusion over the number of wives that John had. This has been straightened out by Janie Kimble on her web page, http://www.jacksonfamilygenealogy.com. For an example of the confusion, see Oscar Burton Robbins, History of the Jackson Family of Hempstead, Long Island, N.Y., Ohio and Indiana: Descendants of Robert and Agnes Washburne Jackson (©1951). The correct wife is in Norman Davis, Westchester Patriarchs: a genealogical dictionary of Westchester County, New York, families prior to 1755 (Bowie, Md. : Heritage Books, 1988), 133. I have not yet had an opportunity to check primary sources, but am very appreciative of the work done by Janie Kimble.


47. My thanks to Janie Jackson Kimble's e mail of 2/20/2007, and her web site, http://www.jacksonfamilygenealogy.com/pages/conflictingstoryoftwowives.htm for sorting out the often repeated misunderstanding that John-the-father had two wives, instead of one of the wives (namely Elizabeth Hallett) being married to his son.


48. Flint, Early Long Island, 147.


49. Davis, Westchester Patriarchs, 133; Mary is not mentioned in Robbins, History of the Jackson Family.


50. Davis, Westchester Patriarchs, 133; name of her husband and that she was in her father's will, from Robbins, History of the Jackson Family.


51. Year of birth from "Jackson Family Genealogy" at http://www.jacksonfamilygenealogy.com/pafc01.htm#557C4 seen 3m/8/2009; it cites R. G. Clarke, Early New Netherlands Settlers, http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~rclarke/. Death from Davis, Westchester Patriarchs, 133; his lack of heirs and that he was in his father's will, from Robbins, History of the Jackson Family.


52. Robbins, History of the Jackson Family. Sarah is not mentioned in Davis, Westchester Patriarchs.


53. Robert Bolton, History of Several Towns, Manors, and Patents of the County of Westchester, from its First Settlement to the Present Time (NY: Charles F. Roper, 1881), 2:416, chart opp. p. 422; Blanch H. Semans, "The First Ferris in America", in Floyd I. Ferris, Jeffrey Ferris Family Genealogy (Ithaca, NY: published by the author in cooperation with the DeWitt Historical Society of Tompkins County, Inc., 1963), 11; Harriet Scofield, "The Ferris Family", in Ferris, Jeffrey Ferris Family Genealogy, 7.


54. Flint, Early Long Island, 159.


55. www.jacksonfamilygenealogy.com


56. John L. Nickalls, ed., The Journal of George Fox (Cambridge: at the University Press, 1952), 619-20.


57. Barbour et al., eds., Quaker Crosscurrents, 20.


58. William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopaedia of American Quaker Genealogy 6 vols. (Ann Arbor, Mich.: Edwards Brothers, Inc., 1936-1970), 3:117.


59. Barbour et al., eds., Quaker Crosscurrents, 21-22.


60. Scofield, "The Ferris Family", 7.


61. The couple made their first intentions to New York Meeting on 27 Twelfth Month (February) 1685/6. William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, 6 vols. (Ann Arbor, Mich.: Edwards Brothers, Inc., 1936-1970) 3:117, 330.


62. Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, 3:117.


63. Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, 3:54; 117. Also in Flushing Meeting records, Friends Historical Library, Swarthmore College, FHL microfilm MR NY47, pp. 140, 145. There is some confusion because Edward had a middle name, unusual for those days, and one reading of the record in Hinshaw has been taken to imply his last name (rather than his middle name) was Carpenter.


64. Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, 3:410, 430.




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Please let me know if you have corrections or additions to these sources:
kwg "at" cwru.edu, substituting the familiar @ for the "at" (I'm trying to avoid spam, but it seems a hopeless struggle).

Updated 3m/8/2009.






detail from 'The Mayflower arriving in Provincetown Harbour, Nov. 11th 1620', a commemorative plate