Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   


Dunning
Family Descended from Samuel Dunning (1690-1760)
in Maryland, Delaware, and Pennsylvania

Compiled by MJP Grundy with the help of Douglas Dunning, Dorie (Dunning) Heckman, and other descendants

This is still under construction, and obviously a work in progress. The purpose is to enable others to see the data we have accumulated, and our hypotheses of how it fits together. If any reader can help fill in more details, or provide documentation for some of our questions (which are clearly marked), it would be very much appreciated. Just contact me by sending e mail to .


dandelion print by AEG Nydam

Earlier English Generations

Dunnings seem to have flourished in several areas of England, including Devon, Somerset, Oxford, Cambridge, Norfolk, and Yorkshire. I do not know if the various branches are all connected and descended from a single progenitor, or whether the name developed independently in several locations, with no biological connection. The name is said to derive from the Saxon words “dunn” for brown, and “ing” for offspring, thereby signifying “brown offspring”.[1] It is generic enough not to necessarily point to a single individual. In the seventeenth century various individuals emigrated to the American colonies, settling in New York and New England, Virginia and South Carolina, and Maryland and Delaware. I am assuming that these three branches are separate, and this page will only explore the descendants of the Dunnings who emigrated to Maryland and Delaware. New DNA testing is opening up some interesting new connections, and more will be added to this page in time.

The particular branch of the family under study here is probably traceable to an Edward DunningC living in Stepney, two and a half miles east of London. (Click here for an explanation of the numbering system used on this web page.) An Edward Dunning and his wife Anne had a daughter, Martha, christened 26 September 1621. In the records of Saint Dunstan and All Saints in Stepney, an Edward Dunning and his wife Ellen were the parents of nine children, christened between 22 November 1622 and 8 November 1636.[2] These two Edwards may well have been the same man, with Anne dying in or shortly after childbirth. So far we have found no other information about Edward or Anne or Ellen.

Stepney is two and a half miles from London, in the Hundred of Ossulstone, in what used to be the County of Middlesex. It is mentioned in the Doomsday Book as an arable area with meadows, pastures, and woodland. It was spelled Stibenhede. Other old names were Stebunhithe, and Stebenhythe. In 1086 it had a population of 900, which included Hackney. In the middle ages the parish of Stepney included all the area from the city of London east to the River Lea, and from the Thames to Hackney. By the late sixteenth century Stepney had become a desirable residential area. It was divided into four hamlets: Ratcliffe, Limehouse, Poplar, and Mile End. As population increased, new hamlets were added: Bethnal-Green in 1597, Shadwell in 1645, Spitalfields in 1662, St. George’s-in-the-East in 1670, Mile-End New Town in 1691, and Stratford-le-Bow in 1719. Whitechapel and Bromley St. Leonard had already become separate parishes. Eventually all these “hamlets” became urban areas in their own right as part of greater metropolitan London. By the seventeenth century the name Stepney had come to mean only the geographical area around St. Dunstan’s church. In the mid-nineteenth century, well after our Dunnings had emigrated, Stepney became a registration district, consisting of the hamlets of Mile-End New Town, Mile-End Old Town, and Ratcliffe. Its population was largely connected with shipping and seafaring.[3]

There were several Dunning families living in Stepney in the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries whose marriages, christenings, and deaths were recorded at St. Dunstan’s and All Saints church. If they had already been living there for several centuries they would have been very aware of such events as the encampment of the insurgents during the Jack Cade rebellion (1450) during the reign of Henry VI, and the fortifications built to defend the city in 1642 at the outbreak of the Civil War. There were at least two major plagues that ravaged the population. In 1625 2,978 inhabitants died, and in Great Plague of 1665 over 6,583 people died in the parish.[4]

Stepney’s church of St. Dunstan and All Saints is made of flint and stone work, mostly in the later English Style. It has a low, broad tower with buttresses, topped with a small dome and a turret. Near the west entrance is a worn bas-relief of the Virgin and child, with a kneeling supplicant figure. Over the south door is a carved crucifixion.[5]

Stepney had a number of almshouses built from the time of Elizabeth I on into the nineteenth century. A free grammar school was established under Henry VIII, while charity schools were begun in Ratcliffe in 1710 and in Mile-End Old Town in 1714. Its market was established by Charles II in 1664, along with a fair that was later abolished.[7] This would have been the town known by the Dunning family.

Children of Edward and Ellen (__) Dunning, from St. Dunstan’s parish register, Stepney:[8]


    i.      Elizabeth DunningB, christened at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney, on 22 Nov. 1622.

    ii.    Edward Dunning, christened at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney, on 27 Feb. 1623/4; perhaps he m. 16 June 1651 at St. Dunstan’s, Mary COMBERFORD; had an unnamed male child christened at St. Dunstan’s 6 July 1654.

   iii.    Frances Dunning, a daughter christened at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney, in Sept. 1626.

+  iv.  Samuel Dunning, christened at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney, on 28 May 1628; m. Elizabeth __.

    v.    Mary Dunning, christened at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney, on 14 Jan. 1629/30.

    vi.    Elizabeth Dunning, christened at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney, on 13 Oct. 1631.

    vii.   John Dunning, christened at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney, on 5 June 1633.

    viii.  James Dunning, christened at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney, on 31 July 1635.

    ix.   William Dunning, christened at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney, on 8 Nov. 1636; perhaps he m. Elizabeth BUTLER on 4 Dec. 1666.


Here are some unanswered questions about Edward Dunning:

    1.   Who were Edward's parents? When and where was he born? Is he mentioned in his father’s will?
    2.   Is he the same man who also was married to Anne? When did Anne die?
    3.   What was Ellen's family name, and who were her parents? When and where was she born? When and where did she marry Edward?
    4.   When did Edward and Ellen die? Where are they buried? Are there additional death records for St. Dunstan’s?
    5.   Can we learn anything else about Edward and Ellen? tax records? a will? What records exist for Stepney or Middlesex from the time of James I and Charles I?
    6.   What happened to all those children?



Samuel DunningB, presumed to be the son of Edward and his wife Ellen (__) Dunning, was born in 1628 in Stepney, and was christened at the parish church of St. Dunstan’s and All Saints on 28 May of that year. He married Elizabeth __, and had at least four children, all of whom were christened at St. Dunstan’s in Stepney.

It is possible that Samuel and Elizabeth became Friends for a few years between 1657 and 1663, so that any children born in that time period were not christened in the local parish church. They then returned to the established church by 1663/4 at the height of the anti-Quaker persecution. Or the family might have moved away between 1658 and 1662, then returned to Stepney. So far this is all conjecture; it is also possible that they had no live births in those years.

Children of Samuel and Elizabeth (may be incomplete). The first child is only listed as the daughter of Samuel; the last three have both parents named.[9]

    i.    Elizabeth DunningA , christened at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney, on 2 Aug. 1654; perhaps she m. 20 Apr. 1678 William BRADSHAW (or he may have m. the daughter of Henry Dunning).

    ii.    Ellen Dunning, christened at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney, on 11 Nov. 1655.

    iii.   Martha Dunning, christened at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney, on 17 May 1657.

+  iv.    Samuel Dunning, christened at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney, on 22 Jan. 1663; d. 1734?? may have emigrated to the Eastern Shore of Maryland??


Unanswered questions about SamuelB and Elizabeth Dunning:

1. What was Elizabeth's family name? When and where was she born? Who were her parents?
2. Were there additional children born between Martha (May 1657) and Samuel (Jan. 1663)?
3. Did the family become Quakers? If so, when, and as a part of which meeting? Were they persecuted?
4. When did Samuel and Elizabeth die? Where are they buried?
5. Can we learn anything else about Samuel and Elizabeth? tax records? wills?
6. What happened to the three daughters? were they married?



Samuel DunningA, son of Samuel and Elizabeth, was christened 22 January 1663 at St. Dunstan’s church in Stepney, near London. He may have emigrated to the Eastern shore of Maryland, where a Samuel Dunning died in 1734.[10] But no record has yet been found of his passage or arrival. There are two pieces of circumstantial evidence for his emigration. One is the family tradition that states that Samuel, born in 1663, settled in Kent County. The other is a will proved in 1734. But neither of these is sufficient proof. There seems to be no record of his wife in Maryland. Samuel may have been a Friend, but there doesn’t seem to be a mention of him in Friends’ records in Maryland. Records of him in England, other than his christening, have not been found, either.

The family tradition, present in several branches of the family, I think can be traced back to an entry made after the fact in a family Bible. It offers three pieces of uncorroborated information: that Deborah was a sibling of the others, that the Samuel who was born in 1663 settled in Kent Co., Del., and that Thomas as well as Martha and Deborah died without children. Research in primary sources is indicating all three of these traditions are inaccurate to some degree. Here are two nineteenth century versions of the tradition. The first example is recorded in a typed copy of a letter dated 27 March 1912 from Jane T. Adams.

Samuel Dunning was born in England about 1663. Came to this country and settled in Kent County near where the town of Dover now stands with his brother Thomas and sisters Deborah and Martha. They all died without issue except Samuel who was the oldest of them. He had four sons and three daughters, namely: John, Thomas, Samuel, and William; Deborah, Mary and Martha. . . . William the fourth son had ten children, namely: Tamer, Samuel, John, Mary, William, George, David, Deborah, Jane and Rebecca. The above William was born about 1726 or 1727 and died in Oct. 1804, aged 77 years.
William son of the above William was born in Kent County, Aug. 16, 1777. He was my father and had twelve children - namely: Henry, Edward, Emaline, Julia, William, James, Hannah, Isaac, Jane, Mary, Martha and Charles. I am the only living child.
                                                                                    signed, Jane T. Adams, per W. D. Adams.

Another version by Tamar Dunning recorded by her son Samuel Dunning 17 of 6th month 1823 reads as follows:

The generations of the Dunnings that came from England are as follows, Samuel Dunning, Thomas Dunning , Deborah & Martha Dunning. These four came together. Thomas, Deborah & Martha died leaving no issue, Samuel married a Tamar Wilson and had the following children, John, Thomas, Samuel and William, Deborah, Mary & Martha. . . . This I certify to be a correct catalogue of the Dunning family. Tamar Dunning. Recorded by her son Samuel Dunning 17th day of 6th month 1823. Sent by Carrie Satterfield Wicks Grd daught[er] of William brother of Jas. A. & son of David. from Ann Arbor Mich. This note made by Thos. S. Dunning, M.D.

Possible children of Samuel--the first four are definitely siblings; the last probably is, but that is not proved. The order is uncertain.

          i.      John Dunning 1 yeoman; in 1743 was living in Wisbeck, St. Peters, Isle of Ely, in Cambridgeshire, East Anglia. He is not given a number because he did not emigrate. Had a son John, who was a cooper in Philadelphia in 1743.

1       ii.     Thomas Dunning, d. in Philadelphia Dec./Jan. 1737/8, where he was innkeeper of the George Inn on Second Street. Presumably married to a wife who predecesaed him; mentioned a son, Thomas, in his will.

2       iii.     Martha Dunning, d. Jan. 1738/9; emigrated to the colonies, and was an innkeeper in Philadelphia at the time of her death. Mentioned her brothers John and Samuel in her will, and her brother John and nephew Thomas were named executors. She was unmarried.

3       iv.    Samuel Dunning, b. 1690; d. 1764; emigrated to the eastern shore of Maryland, then to Delaware.

4       v.     Deborah Dunning, presumed d. by 1737; presumed unmarried; emigrated to the American colonies with her siblings.

Some of the major questions about this "weak link" and mystery man, Samuel Dunning:

1. Is he in fact the father of our family, or is all of this preceeding line not really connected to us? Can we prove paternity?
2. Did he emigrate to the eastern shore of Maryland or did he remain in England?
3. Who was his wife? Who were her parents? When and where did she die?
4. Was he a Quaker? If not, why can we not find a record of his children’s christenings?
5. Was Deborah his daughter? Did he have any additional children?


First Proved Generation in the Colonies


What solid information we have on this first generation is primarily from the documents surrounding the settlement of the estate of Martha Dunning, spinster, of Philadelphia. Primary sources for Samuel Dunning (b. 1690) include Quaker records from Third Haven Meeting and real estate records from Maryland and Delaware. Doug Dunning provided the following:

1)- 185. 9 April 1743. Power of Atty. JOHN DUNNING of Wisbeck Saint Peters in the Isle of Ely and Co of Cambridge yeoman, one of the executors of MARTHA DUNNING late of PA in the West Indies decd. appointed by her will, hath appointed BENJAMIN FRANKLIN postmaster of Phila., my son JOHN DENNING of same place cooper & THOMAS DUNNING of same place cooper my atty. jointly and severally to enter into and upon al such real estate as the said MARTHA DUNNING dyed seized...
Wit: WM. MARSHALL, WM. WEEDON. The afsd Power of Atty. delivered to SAMUEL DUNNING is a true copy from the original. Attest: JNO HOUSEMAN recorder.[11]

2)- 186. 9 April 1743 at Wisbeck Saint Peters. Deposition. JOHN DUNNING of Wisbeck Saint Peters in the Isle of Ely and Co of Cambridge yeoman and WILLIAM WEEDON of same place gent severally make oath, first the said JOHN DUNNING for himself saith that MARTHA DUNNING late of Phila PA in the West Indies spinster was his sister and that he having been lately informed by letter from THOMAS DUNNING of Phila that she is dead and that she hath appointed this depondant one of her executors, he hath thereupon by virtue of the power hereunto annexed, duly authorized and empowered the said THOMAS DUNNING together with the other persons therein named act for him... Sworn before EDWARD SOUTHWELL, Master of the Chancery Extraordinary.[12]

3)- 187.-- Dec 1745. Receipt. Be it known unto all men that I THOMAS DUNNING of Phila as atty for my unkle JOHN DUNNING have received of SAMUEL DUNNING full satisfaction of all demands on & from the estate of MARTHA DUNNING decd, whereby I do discharge him from all demands in relation to the said estate as fully as JOHN DUNNING might do if he were here present. Wit: RICHARD JAMES, ANDREW CALDWELL.[13]

4)- 188. 5 Dec 1745.Bond.THOMAS DUNNING of Phila atty of JOHN DUNNING in Old England to settle affairs of the estate of THOMAS DUNNING and MARTHA DUNNING of Phila decd am held firmly bound to SAMUEL DUNNING if Kent Co in full sum of 80 pounds... condition of the afsd obligation is such that whereas SAMUEL DUNNING has by a settlement with THOMAS DUNNING of the estate of MARTHA DUNNING for the supposed balance, now know ye that if the said THOMAS DUNNING shall and at all times bear SAMUEL DUNNING harmless from any demands that JOHN DUNNING in Old England may have against the said SAMUEL DUNNING as to the estate of MARTHA DUNNING decd then the afsd obligation is void, else to remain in full power & vertue in law. RICHARD JAMES, ANDREW CALDWELL.[14]



John Dunning1, presumed son of Samuel, remained in England while his siblings Martha, Samuel, Thomas, and probably Deborah, went to the new world. By 1743 John was living in Wisbeck, St. Peters, Isle of Ely, in Cambridgeshire, East Anglia. He styled himself a yeoman. Since he never crossed the Atlantic, he doesn't have a number. But he is included because his son immigrated.

John Dunning, of Wisbeck, Saint Peter’s, in the Isle of Ely, Cambridgeshire, was notified by his sister Martha’s nephew (presumably Thomas’s son) Thomas Dunning, of Philadelphia, that John was named one of the executors of Martha’s estate. With only the vaguest sense of geography, John Dunning described his sister as “late of Philadelphia, in the Province of Pennsylvania, in the West Indies, Spinster”. On 9 April 1743 John signed a power of attorney for Thomas Dunning to settle the estate. [“hath appointed Benjamin Franklin postmaster of Phila., my son John Denning of same place cooper & Thomas Dunning of the same place cooper my atty jointly and severally to enter into and upon al such real estate as the said Martha Dunning dyed seized ...”[15] In December 1745 Thomas Dunning reported that he received “full satisfaction of all demands on and from the Estate of Martha Dunning, dec., of Samuel Dunning, for use of John Dunning”. Thomas declared he was “held firmly bound to Samuel Dunning, of Kent County, on Delaware in full sum of Eighty Pounds” as bond to hold Samuel Dunning “harmless from any demands that John Dunning in Old England may have against the said Samuel Dunning as to the estate of Martha Dunning decd . . .”[16]

Child of John (there may be others):

5    i.    John Dunning2, emigrated to the new world; he was a cooper in Philadelphia in 1743. His name was spelled Denning in legal documents.

Questions about John Dunning Sr.:

1. Can we prove who John's parents are? Where and when was he born?
2. Who did John marry? Who were her parents and where and when was she born and died?
3. What were his children's names and birth dates? Did other children (in addition to his son John) also come to America?
4. Does he have a will? When did he die? Where is he buried?



As we turn next to the four (presumed) siblings who emigrated to the colonies, we are faced with the lack of information as to when and where they arrived. Dorie found “The Name and Family of Dunning”, compiled by The Media Research Bureau, Washington DC, that lists Samuel Dunning (b. 1690) as coming to US [sic] in 1734. I do not know what proof they offer. Family tradition, stated above, holds that the siblings came together, but there is no proof of this. Samuel appears in the Third Haven Meeting minutes in 1721, and thereafter left records in Maryland and Delaware. Thomas was an established inn keeper in Philadelphia at least by 1732 when his name appears in that capacity. The fact that no record has yet been found of their arrival suggests they did not come as indentured servants. But did they all come together, first to the eastern shore of Maryland? Or did Samuel come first, then the other three straight to Philadelphia? If any reader has information to help, please e mail me at .




1.    Thomas Dunning1, presumed son of Samuel Dunning, was probably born in England and died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in December or January 1737/8. He probably emigrated to the colonies as a young man with his brother and sister(s). But this is conjecture, as his date of arrival has not yet been documented.

All the family memories, as far as written letters and memoranda go, concluded that Thomas left no issue. But when he died in 1736/7 his will mentioned a minor child named Thomas. My guess is that since the young Thomas may have died without getting married or leaving any heirs, later generations forgot about him. Who the elder Thomas married, and when she was born and died, has not yet been discovered.

Thomas operated the George Inn on Second Street in Philadelphia. William Penn, in spite of his first impulse to bann taverns, decided to permit them but to try to control their excesses. Many of the first taverns in Philadelphia were owned and operated by Friends.[16a] As was common in those days, the local inn was the scene of a fair amount of varied activity. A sampling of such activities is reflected in notices posted in the newspaper. For example, a notice in the Pennsylvania Gazette of 7 May 1730, offered a reward for the recovery of a horse stolen from the stable of the George Inn in Second Street, Philadelphia.[17] Two years later a notice appeared that a runaway servant, a West country wool-comber, was last seen, the night he ran away, at Mr. Dunning’s the George Inn.[18] Thomas had his own share of difficulties with servants, advertizing in October 1734 that Richard Ashton, servant, aged about 25, had run away from Thomas Dunning at the George Inn in Second Street.[19] Owen Ward, an Irish servant aged about 23 who “professes to be a husbandman and miner”, ran away from Thomas Ustick of Second River in Newark, East Jersey; “reward offered if he is brought to his master or to Thomas Dunning at the George Inn”.[20] Another notice might have had a family connection. It advertised that Moses Williams, servant (his father was an Indian and his mother a white woman) runaway from Mary Wilson; John Bennet, West Country servant, butcher, aged ca. 25, runaway from Mary Wilson in Queen Anne’s Co, near Choptank River; reward for capture of Williams or Bennet will be paid by Mary Wilson or Thomas Dunning, innkeeper in Phila.[21]

Thomas was engaged in additional activities (perhaps only because an inn was the logical place to hold an item for sale). A notice appeared in 1733 that Thomas Dunning offers for sale an “engine loomb” at the George Inn. [22] Ralph Assheton advertised leasing 23 lots about a mile from Philadelphia on the highroad to Conestoga, “draughts of said lots may be seen at the houses of Owen Owen, Thomas Dunning and James Bainbridge in Phila.”, or others named in Chester and Bristol.[23] Reward for return of a mare strayed from the stable of George Shoemaker will be paid by James Hammer; “mare is to be taken to said Shoemaker in Phila or to Thomas Dunning in Phila.”[24] Thomas Dunning has “for sale at the George in Second Street, a chariot of London make, to be seen at Thomas Montgomery’s coach –maker in Chestnut St.”[25]

Thomas Dunning, inn holder, signed his will on 12 December 1736, leaving a minor son named Thomas. He named his sister Martha his executor. The will was probated 23 January 1736/7.[26] It would be helpful to see the actual will, not just the abstract.

There are three deeds in the Philadelphia Grantor Index Book G (1739-1751) which presumably were made after Thomas died and his estate was being settled. Perhaps the Thomas named as Grantor is the son, young Thomas who was a minor in 1736.

Son of Thomas and (__) Dunning:

6    i.    Thomas 2 Dunning, presumably b. before 1722, and had come of age by 1743, when he was a cooper in Philadelphia. Probably died unmarried, without issue.



2. Martha1 Dunning, presumably the daughter of Samuel Dunning, was probably born in England and emigrated as a young woman to the colonies with her siblings. Her date of arrival has not yet been documented, although Dorie’s grandmother’s note suggests they all came ca. 1734. This seems very late to me, since Samuel is recorded in Maryland in 1721 and Thomas in Philadelphia in 1732. Martha died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in January 1738/9. She was unmarried.

Martha presumably had assisted her brother in the George Inn, especially as it appears his wife had died some time before. At the time of Martha’s death in Jan. 1738/9 she is listed as innkeeper (i.e. she had taken over for her deceased brother).

Martha added a codicil to her will dated 20 Jan. 1738. The will was proved 27 January 1738. In it she listed brothers Thomas, John, Samuel, and a nephew Thomas. She named Samuel as executor. However, the estate was not settled promptly, perhaps because John was in England and Samuel in Delaware. Thus there was more activity in 1743 when her nephew Thomas, who was a cooper in Philadelphia, came of age and could actually settle the estate. Thus the documents quoted above.[27] It looks like in 1737 Martha had two nephews named Thomas, sons of her brothers Samuel (in Delaware) and Thomas (in Philadelphia). My guess is that the Thomas in her will is the one mentioned as in Philadelphia, who was also slightly older than the one in Delaware.



3. Samuel1 Dunning, was born in 1690 and died in 1760. He emigrated to the eastern shore of Maryland, then to Delaware. Samuel married in 1721 Tamar (Willson) Berry, a widow. She was the daughter of John and Tamer Willson. [28] She had married first, (minuted on 28 3rd month 1719 that the marriage had occurred in good order) John Berry of Talbot County.[29] They had no children. John had earlier been married to Ann PRATT, a sister of Thomas Pratt (minute of 26 7month 1711 reported that the marriage had been accomplished in an orderly manner). Ann and John had a daughter, Elizabeth BERRY. At the time of her father’s death, Third Haven Friends Meeting minuted, “This meeting understanding that Elizabeth, the dau. of John Berry is willing to go to live with her Unckle Thos. Pratt & this meeting assents to it.”[30] As was not uncommon when remarriages were made quickly and court proceedings were slow, Samuel Dunning helped his wife settle the estate of her late husband, John Berry.[31]

The Third Haven Meeting minutes read as follows regarding the marriage of Tamar and Samuel:

“At a monthly Meeting held att Our Meeting House att Tred haven the 29 & 30th of the 9 moth 1721. Samll Dunin & Tamar Berrey appeared in this meeting and declared their intention of marriage this being the first time. This meeting appts Danll Richardson & Thos. Ball to inquier into the mans clearness and report to next monthly meeting.”[32]

Presumably the women’s meeting appointed two women to look into Tamar’s clearness. The couple made their second declaration of intention 27 Tenth Month (October), and “Nothing appered to obstruct they are left to their liberty In truth to efect their sd marriage they appointing time and place and making the same publick.” On the first of Twelfth Month 1721 (1 February 1721/2) the marriage was reported as having been “accomplished in good order according to Accts. given to this meeting.”[33]

Friends were concerned for the care of any orphaned members of the meeting, and part of the normal oversight of a marriage was being sure that any children of a former marriage were properly cared for. On 26/6m/1725 Third Haven Men’s Monthly Meeting minuted, “This meeting being informed that Eliza Berrey an Orphant and dau, of Jno. Berrey Deceased is not brought up among friends. Therefore this meeting appoints James Berrey and James Willson Jun. To endever to have her brought among friends and report to next monthly meeting.”[34] The meeting of 29 7m 1725 minuted, “The ffriends appointed to take care of the orphant Elizth Berrey reports that she is with her mother in law (stepmother) who is now wife of Samll Dunnin and the meeting is so far satisfied, but Desires that sd. Orphant be under ffriends further care and thatt Samll Dunnin and his w. be advised by ffriends in Relation to sd. Orphant and that they cum to next monthly meeting.” [35] At the next meeting, “Samll Dunning being before this meeting the meeting advice is to Him and his wife to take care of the Orphant Eliza Berry as her father and mother and that they bring her to meeting as offen as they can conveniently until further consideration.”[36]

Samuel Dunning had possession of two tracts of land in Talbot County, Maryland. One was “Broad Lane”, of 50 acres, the other was “Beaver Neck” which was 100 acres. In 1757 these two tracts were listed for Saml Dunning in “A List of Lands charged on the aforesaid Debt Book delivered to Jacob Hindman to Colect, Which cannot be found and the persons Living out of the Province or beyond Seas No. Rent Paid.”[37]

Samuel and Tamar decided to remove from Talbot County, Maryland, to Delaware. So according to the good order among Friends, they went to the men’s (and probably to the women’s) meetings to request a certificate of removal to carry to their new meeting, that would indicate that they were in good standing, had left no unpaid debts or other unfinished business, and were clear to move. The Third Haven men’s meeting minuted 28 8m 1742, “Samuel Dunning requested a few lines by way of Certificate from this meeting, directed to the monthly meeting in Kent Co., on Delaware, this meeting appoints James Wilson & James Berrey to make necessary inquirey and prepare a certificate accordingly and bring to our next meeting.”[38] The following month it was minuted that “According to the appointment of the Last mo. Meeting James Wilson & James Berrey, brought to this Meeting a certificate for Samuel Dunning which was read and signed in this meeting.” [39] The same procedure would have been followed in the women’s meeting, but I have not checked their minutes, although often the entire family would be included in the single certificate signed by the men’s meeting.

On 18 5m (July) 1743 Samuel produced the certificate of removal from Third Haven Monthly Meeting to Duck Creek Meeting for himself and his family.[40] The latter minuted, “Samuel Dunning appeared here and produced a Certificate from the Monthly Meeting of Third-haven in Maryland, recommending him and his Family to the care & notice of this, which was read & received.”[41]

As noted above, Martha Dunning, Samuel’s sister who died in Philadelphia, named their brother John as one of the executors of her estate. In December 1745 Thomas Dunning, presumably the son of their brother Thomas who was deceased, reported that he received “full satisfaction of all demands on and from the Estate of Martha Dunning, dec., of Samuel Dunning, for use of John Dunning”. Thomas declared he was “held firmly bound to Samuel Dunning, of Kent County, on Delaware in full sum of Eighty Pounds” as bond to hold Samuel Dunning “harmless from any demands that John Dunning in Old England may have against the said Samuel Dunning as to the estate of Martha Dunning decd . . .”[42]

Samuel purchased for £63 a 200 acre tract, "Great Geneva" in 1749 in Murderkill Hundred,[43] which he sold for £35 to his son John in 1753. In the deed of sale Samuel is identified as a "taylor", and John as a carpenter.[44]

On 14 August 1754 Samuel Dunning

aged sixty four years or thereabout being summoned [by?] George Wilson Esqr one of ye King’s Justices of this county to apear before {/} to give Evidence to wh a certain Negroe Girl named Nay? who being solemanly attested according to Law saith yt one ye -- day of this ---Augt he said ---saith yt - Robert told him yt it was his desire [desine?] & yt he left to his & brother in Law David Barrett & to his wife a Negroe Girl he & Robert called Rach whose proper name is Rachel & yt he desired yt she should not --- accounted but --- out of the Estate for ye use of-- word to that purpose.” signed, “Samuel Dunning” “Affirmed this 14th Day of August 1754 before me,” and the signature I can’t read.

Elizabeth Taylor aged about Forty years or thereabouts being sworn on ye Evangelist of Almighty God saith yt she was present at ye same time when Samuel Dunning heard ye -- declaration of Robert Fleming [?] --- to her leaving to his brother in law David Barnhill & to his wife a certain Negroe Girl named Rach or Rachel as before --- yt she heard & --- say he left & Negroe Girl to his brother in Law David Barnhill & his wife & desired she should not be accounted part of his Estate but . . . . [45]

Samuel made his will 31 August 1754, naming his wife Tamar and son Thomas as executors. It was probated in Kent County, Delaware, on 2 October 1760.[46] He bequeathed one third part of his Dwelling Plantation and one third of the Wood land to his wife Tamar, and the other two thirds of each and the adjoining swamp to his son Thomas. After his mother’s death Thomas was to have the entire dwelling plantation, on condition that Thomas pay £25 to Samuel’s son Samuel a year after Samuel Sr’s death, £25 to Samuel’s son William two years after Samuel’s death, and £5 to Samuel’s son John, who had already received the 200 acre “Great Geneva” for half its market rate. One third of the moveable estate was bequeathed to Tamar, the residue to be divided equally among Samuel’s children Thomas, Samuel, William, Mary, and Martha. Tamar and son Thomas were named executors.[47]  It appears that Samuel actually died soon after making his will, because in September 1757 he was called “late”. It is unclear to me why there was a three-year delay in probating his will, except that the legacies would not have to be paid until it was probated.

On 19 Ninth Month (September) 1757 a complaint was brought before Third Haven Friends Meeting against three sons of the late Samuel, all of whom had "gone out" in marriage: Thomas, John, and Samuel, Jr. This means that they had not followed proper Quaker process for their marriages. A complaint was also raised against Samuel and John for enlisting in the military service, this being the time of the so-called French and Indian, or Seven Years War. Later they both brought papers to the Meeting acknowledging and condemning their disorderly proceeding. [48] Complaints were brought 26 November 1763 against John Dunning for marrying a non-Quaker, and against William Dunning for going out in marriage.[49] I need to check the minutes to see if these were second marriages or old complaints brought up again. The first go-round, in 1757, was at a time when Friends were being urged to “treat” with those Friends who had not lived up to the Discipline expected of Friends.

The children of Samuel and Tamar (Willson) Berry Dunning, as listed in Samuel’s will. This may be incomplete; order is uncertain:

7    i.    John Dunning2, b. in Maryland ca. 1722?; d. 1767; m. Mary __. John was a carpenter in Murderkill Hundred. After John’s death, his widow, Mary, married 2 May 1767 Daniel MORRIS.

8    ii.    Thomas Dunning, b. __ ; d. Apr. 1771; m. Mary (CHIPMAN), the widow of __ SHIELDS; planter in Murderkill Hundred, Del.

9    iii.    Samuel Dunning, Jr., d. spring 1771; m. Mary (___). He was a farmer in Murderkill Hundred.

10  iv.   William Dunning, b. 1727? 1730?; d. 4 Dec. 1804; m. 1763 Mary JOHNSON.

11  v.    Mary Dunning, b.    ; bequeathed all the household furniture, cattle & wearing apparel (except for 5 caps & hankerchiefs & aprons) by her sister Martha.

12   vi.   Martha Dunning, b.  ; unmar. Illiterate, she signed her will with her mark on 23 March 1773. It was probated 21 Apr. 1773. Her sister Mary was made co-heir with cousin Deborah Gaskins (who was to receive 5 caps & hankerchiefs & aprons); Mary was also named executrix.[50]


Second Generation in America



5.   John Dunning2 (John1 Dunning) was (as far as we know) born in England and emigrated to the new world. Just when this happened, and where he first landed are not yet discovered. In 1743 John was a cooper in Philadelphia. His name was spelled Denning in legal documents. He may be the progenitor of the Denning family that flourished in Delaware in the 1770s, but we have not yet found proof for this possibility.

There is a Philadelphia real estate deed in which John Denning was Grantor, and John MOOR the Grantee. It was recorded in Book E, Vol. 5, page 8; this volume includes deeds recorded between 1683 and 1718 which would place John in Philadelphia fairly early.

Lots of questions remain about John Dunning/Denning, such as:

1. When and where was he born? What was his mother's name?
2. When and where did he arrive in the new world?
3. Did he marry? If so, where, when, and to whom?
4. Did he have children?  If so what are their names and dates?
5. Did he move to Delaware and leave a plenitude of descendants who spelled their name Denning?
6. When did he die, and where?



6.   Thomas Dunning2 (Thomas1 Dunning) was born before 1722 so that he was a minor in 1736/7, but had come of age by 1743. He was a cooper in Philadelphia in 1743 when his uncle John, in England, named his nephew Thomas to be John’s attorney in settling Martha’s estate. Presumably Thomas died unmarried, without issue, or he totally lost contact with his nieces and nephews which is why later descendants of his uncle Samuel "remembered" that his father must have died childless.




7.      John Dunning2 (Samuel1 Dunning #3) died in 1767. He married Mary ___, for which a complaint was brought against him in Duck Creek Friends Meeting on 19/9/1757 for going out in marriage against Friends' testimony, and for enlisting in the Militia. It was the time of the so-called French and Indian War, and passions were running high. John later produced a paper acknowledging and condemning the latter behavior. [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties,16.]

John was a carpenter, but typical of the times, was also a farmer. He purchased from his father on 12 February 1753 the 200 acre "Great Geneva" in Murderkill Hundred for half its market value, this then constituted his major inheritance.

John left a paper trail in the legal system of the time when he witnessed the will of Benjamin WARREN of Murtherkill Hundred on 3 July 1762, and administered the estate of Mary Dunning, widow, on 22 May 1767. She might have been the widow of John's brother Thomas?[Del. Archives A15, pp. 202, 228.]

[Whoa. Something screwy here, with John administering a will and his widow remarrying, all in May 1767? Need to check the documents.]

After John's death, his widow Mary married in May 1767 Daniel MORRIS, who was named by the Orphan's Court guardian for John's three minor daughters, Tamar, Rachel, and Elizabeth Dunning. [Turner, "Dunning", 14.]

Children of John and his wife Mary (__) Dunning (may be incomplete):

13.    i.   Tamar Dunning

14.   ii.   Rachel Dunning

15.   iii.  Elizabeth Dunning, b. 1764; m(1) John PENNAL; m(2) Thomas JENKINS;




8.      Thomas Dunning2 (Samuel1 Dunning) died in April 1771. He married Mary CHIPMAN, the widow of __ SHIELDS. [My thanks to Donald Matson, e mails 12m/3/2007, and 1m/2/2008, for clarifying Mary's name. Don cites the following sources: Kent Co., Del. Probate Records 1680-1800 for the Will of Thomas Dunning in 1771; Letter dated 1974 with information from G.D. Helzer, Houston, Tx. 77001; e mail dated 1999 from Barb Petty ; and "Genealogical Notes On The Dunning Family in America" by M.B. Dunning, Bedford, Iowa 1915. Another communication, from Donald Larson in 7/2012 suggests there is information about the Chipman-Shields-Dunning families in Elizabeth Pearson White and Edwin Wagner Coles, "Who Were the Chipmans of Delaware and Maryland?", Mayflower Descendants Vol. 52, no. 1 (Winter 2003), p. 19. I have not been able to find a copy thus far.]

Thomas was a planter in Murderkill Hundred, Delaware. There was a complaint brought against him by Duck Creek Meeting 19 Ninth Month 1757 for going out in marriage. [Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 16.]

Thomas made his will 15 April 1771, naming his wife Mary executrix. It was witnessed by William Dunning, among others. Thomas gave his wife the “land I live on. The same for the raising of the chdn. till 1786, & then to have 1/3. To son James 1/3 of the land. To son Thomas Dunning 1/3. At their mother’s death entire est. to be div. between them. They to pay their sister Jerusha Dunning £10 each yearly. To Elizabeth Shields, furniture to the same such as she the said Elizabeth shall make out of my flax and wool. . . . I will that if Abel Shields asest in going after that Land in the Jarseys that he should have one hundred and fifty acres of the same to him his ares and assines forever.” [Kent Co. Del., Will Records. Liber L, fol. 95, as quoted by Turner, “Dunning”. Turner did considerable research in New Jersey and Isle of Jersey records and found nothing, p. 15-16.] Mary later married Francis EDMONDSON. [Del. Arch. A15:140-41, 145-46 (Reg. of Wills, Liber L, folios 95-96, p. 258.)] Abel Shields was a sailor who owned several vessels; he was named guardian of Thomas’s son James. [Turner, “Dunning”, 16.] Abel and Elizabeth were apparently Mary's children by her previous marriage. [Donald Larson, e mail 7/24/2012.]

Children of Thomas and Mary (Chipman) Shields Dunning:

16.   i.     James Dunning3, b. 1750; d. before 1821 (alternatively, d. 7/6/1826 in Guilford Co., N.C. - per e mail from Don Matson, 12m/3/2007]; m. 1/1/1821 in Kent Co., Del. Rachel NORTH; 7 or 8 children.

17.   ii.   Jerusha Dunning, m. Abel SHIELDS;

18.   iii.  Thomas Dunning, b. 1761; married? children?


9.      Samuel Dunning, Jr.2 (Samuel1 Dunning) died 1771; m. Mary ___; had 4 sons and 5 daughters. He was a farmer in Murderkill Hundred. He was dealt with by Duck Creek Meeting 19/9m/1757 for going out in marriage and enlisting in the militia. Turner doesn’t quote the minutes of 12m/1757, but reports that on 16/1m/1758 that the paper “given in by” him "hath sent them by a Friend who reports they were read according to order.” [Minutes of Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, 1705-1800, Vol. 1, p. 201, 202, 203, as quoted by Turner, “Dunning”.]

Illiterate, he signed his will with his mark on 11 April 1771. It was probated 13 May 1771. His heirs were Tamar (d. 1803), Martha, John (d. 1806), Thomas, and Samuel Dunning. [Del. Arch. A15:136-39 (Reg of Wills, Liber L, folio 96, p. 258).] He specified that his wife Mary “should have the land where I now live & the youse of it till my youngest child should come of age or the youse of it should go to the raisen of my children and then to be Ekueley div. between all my chdn. that should remain living at that time ondly William and Tamer shall have no part in the said Land at that time and the rest of my estate to be Ekeley Divided between them all.” [Kent Co. Del., Will Records. Liber L, fol. 96, as quoted by Turner, “Dunning”.]

Children of Samuel and Mary (__) Dunning:

i.     Sarah Dunning,

ii.    Susan[na] Dunning

iii.   Catherine Dunning

iv.   William Dunning, d. 1786; m. Rachel __; no issue; William was a saddler in Dover, Del.

v.    Tamar Dunning, minor in 1772; d. 1833.

vi.   John Dunning, b. 1740; d. 1795 or 1806? mar. Mary __; had 2 sons.



10.   William Dunning2 (Samuel1 Dunning) was born ca. 1727? or 1730? He died on 4 December 1804. William married in about 1763 Mary Johnson. She had been born in ca. 1740 and died 18 August 1800.

A deed is listed in the Philadelphia Grantor Index, Book G (1739-1751) from William Denning (Dunning), Grantor, to Samuel POWELL (Deed of Post), Grantee, and on the same page one from Mary Denning (Dunning), Grantor, to Samuel POWELL, Grantee. It may be that these two entries are a single deed signed by husband and wife, but we shall have to see the actual deed to learn more. [Book G, Vil. 8, page 5.]

Children of William and Mary (Johnson) Dunning:

i.      Tamar Dunning

ii.     George Dunning, d. 1818; m. __ MILEMAN; children?

iii.    Debora Dunning, m. 1802 John? MILEMAN

iv.    Jane [or Jean?] Dunning, unmarried.

v.     John Dunning, d. 1806, m. Mary __; children?

vi.    William Dunning, b. 1777; d. 1852; m. Martha TUNNEL; rem. to Sussex Co., Del.; 12 children.

vii.   Mary Dunning, b. 1781; d. 1849; m. Philemon SKINNER

viii.  Samuel Dunning, m. 1818 Margaret HAMILTON; rem. to Knox Co., Tenn. in 1808;

ix.    Rebecca Dunning, m. 1818 William D. MILEHAM;

x.     David Dunning, b. 1786; d. 1831; m. 1810 Mary Mariah ANDERSON; 6 children.

xi.    Elizabeth Dunning,



Third Generation in America


Lots more still to post here.



16.        James Dunning3, son of Thomas (Samuel1) and his wife Mary (Chipman Shields) Dunning, was born in 1750. He either died before 1821 or on 7/6/1826 in Guilford County, North Carolina. [E mail from Don Mattson, 12m/3/2007.] James married Rachel NORTH, probably ca. 1782 or shortly after. She probably came from Kent County, Del., but this is not yet documented.

Abel SHIELDS was named guardian for the orphaned James according to the terms of his father's will. An orphan was considered someone without a father, even though his mother was still alive, and eventually remarried. Abel was a mariner.

James served as sheriff in North Carolina. [My thanks to Jim Borsari, e mail 1m/26/2012 for this and other information about James and Rachel.]

Known children of James and Rachel (North) Dunning. There were supposedly 6 sons, but only 5 are known. [My thanks to Don Matson, e mail 12m/3/2007, for the information on the children, and of 1m/2/2008 for information on the grandchildren. Don cites these sources: a letter dated 1974 with information from G.D. Helzer, Houston, Tx. 77001; e mail dated 1999 from Barb Petty; and "Genealogical Notes On The Dunning Family in America" by M.B. Dunning, Bedford, Iowa 1915. This data raises a lot of little questions, with which perhaps a reader can help. Wherever the data has either been ambiguous or two sources have given conflicting information, Don has inserted a question mark.]

i.   Betsey Dunning4, m. 9/12/1813 at Guilford Co., N.C. Jonathan ARMFIELD;

ii.  Polly Dunning, m. 8/4/1812 at Guilford Co., N.C. John A. TRULL;

iii.
James Dunning, b. ca. 1788 in Del.; d. after 1850 in Monroe/Owen Cos., Ind.; m. in N. Car. Phebe J. (CHARLES?). She was b. in N. Car. and d. 15/4m/1863 at the age of 2 mo., 26 days, and 74 years. They had four children:[I am grateful to Don Matson for information on this family, e mail 1m/2/2008. He cites a letter dated 1974 with information from G.D. Helzer, Houston, Tx. 77001; e mail dated 1999 from Barb Petty; and "Genealogical Notes On The Dunning Family in America" by M.B. Dunning, Bedford, Iowa 1915.]
a) Elijah Charles or G. Dunning, b. 11m/19/1817; d. 3m/11/1867; buried Maple Grove Cem., Monroe Co., Ind.; m. 12m/22/1841 in Monroe Co., Ind. Mary Elizabeth WHITESELL.

b) James Quenton Dunning, b. 3m/10/1818 N. Car.; d. 5m/30/1887; buried Gosport, Ind. Cemetery; m. 1m/25/1841 in Owen Co., Ind. Isabel HARDEN.

c) Elizabeth Dunning, b. 8m/18/1824 in Ind.; d. 1m/6/1875; buried Maple Grove Cem., Monroe Co., Ind.; m. 3m/12/1844 in Monroe Co., Ind. to Levi RIDGE;

d) ? Cynthia A. Dunning, b. 6m/3/1811 in N.Car.; d. 2m/9/1883 Owen Co., Ind.; buried Heddings Chapel Cem., Clay Twp., Owen Co., Ind.; m. 11m/8/1836 Monroe Co., Ind. Abraham HENRY;
iv. William Dunning, b. 11m/25/1794 Guilford Co., N.C.; d. 12m/25/1879 Buchanan Co., Mo., m. 8m/7/1818 in Grainger Co., Tn. Anna HAMILTON; 5 children:
a) Alexander Hamilton Dunning, b. 4m/28/1819 Grainger Co., Tenn.; m. 8m/2/1840 Sara Ann RECTOR;

b) Rachel N. Dunning, b. 23 Oct. 1820?? less than 6 months after her brother? she m. 9m/17/1843 John GRACE;

c) James Madison Dunning, b. 2m/4/1833 in Gosport, Ind.; d. 10m/24/1902 in Santa Cruz, Calif.; m. Anne Campbell RICHARDSON;

d) Paris C. Dunning, b. 8m/19/1836; d. 3m/20/1869 in St. Joseph, Mo.; m. 5m/23/1868 Annie WITHERS in Buchanan Co., Mo.

e) Minerva Dunning
v.   John M. Dunning, b. 10m/4/1801 in N.Car.; d. 9m/16/1867 in McLean Co., Ill.; bur. Dawson Cem. near Ellsworth, McLean Co.; m. 9m/11/1823 in Monroe Co., Ind. Sarah WAMPLER. She was b. 2m/29/1798, and d. 8m/14/1876. They had 6 children: [My thanks to Don Matson, e mail 1m/2/2008, for the data on the children in this family, taken from Wampler genealogy, researched by Harry Smith of Bloomington, In.]
a) Elizabeth Dunning, b. 12m/5/1825 Ind.; d. aft. 1929 in McLean Co., Ill.; m. 12m/24/1850 in McLean Co. to Alfred FRANKEBERGER;

b) James H. Dunning, b. 12m/2/1831 in Ind. ; d. 10m/11/1877; bur. Dawson Cem.

c) Austin Seward Dunning, b. 11m/28/1833 in Ind.; d. 3m/6/1916; bur. Dawson Cem.; m(1) 12m/25/1864 in McLean Co., Ill. to Eliza B. SHAW. They had 3 children. James m(2) ? 12m/3/1885 in Monroe Co., Ind. Laura Caroline (WHISENAND) PARKS. He moved to Illinois in 1886.

d) Sarah Jane Dunning, b. 6m/12/1836 Ind.; d. 9m/21/1916 Bloomington, Il.,; buried Evergreen Cem.; m. 10m/27/1855 in McLean Co., Ill. to Jefferson D. VANDERVOORT. They had 7 children.

e) Matilda H. Dunning, b. 5m/27/1841 Ind.; d. 12m/26/1927 McLean Co., Ill.; m. 2m/3/1863 McLean Co., to Zachariah ARNOLD.

f) William Clark ? Dunning, b. 1848 in Duquoin, Perry Co., Ill.
vi.  Thomas Dunning, b. 5/5/1790?; d. 5/15/1843; bur. Old Union Cem. north of Gosport, Owen Co., Ind.; m. 12/20/1815 in Guilford Co., N.C. Polly ADAMS. They had 6 children:
a) William Adam? Dunning, b. 10m/16/1814 N.Car.; d. 10m/17/1858 in Texas; m. 9m/21/1837 in Owen Co., Ind. to Mary Jane HUDSON;

b) James Quenton? Dunning, b. 3/10/1818 N.C. d. 5/30/1887; buried Gosport, Ind. Cemetery; m. 1m/25/1841 Owen Co., Ind. to Isabel HARDEN (not sure if James Quenton is son of Thomas or his above brother James Dunning)

c) Elizabeth? Dunning, b. 1810/20 d. 2/12/1854 age 34y 18days; bur. Old Union Cem., north of Gosport, Ind.

d) Samuel? Dunning, b. 1820-25 Ind.; m. 6m/12/1846 Owen Co., Ind. Leafy Emeline McHENRY;

e) Jerusha, b. 1827 Ind., m. 11m/29/1846 in Owen Co., Ind. Milton LACY; [e mail 1m/7/2008]

f) female b. 1825-30
vii. Paris Chipman Dunning, b. 3m/15/1806 in N.Car.; d. 5m/9/1884; buried Rose Hill Cem. in Bloomington, Ind.; m(1) 7m/6/1827 in Monroe Co., Ind. Sarah M. ALEXANDER; she was b. 6/1/1810 Ky., d. 5m/19/1863 Bloomington, Ind. They had 6 known children:
a) Martha Elizabeth Dunning b. ca. 1834 In. marr. 1/27/1852 (where?) Lewis C. Stimson. They lived in Terre Haute, Ind. at one time.

b) Mary C. Dunning b. ca. 1840 In.

c) Rachel Dunning b. ca. 1842 In.

d) Paris C. Dunning b. ca. 1844 In. think he marr. 1875 Knox Co.,In. to Mary Hewitt ?

e) James A. Dunning b. ca. 1846 in Ind.; m. 2/5/1877 in Monroe Co., Ind. Minerva A. WOOD

f) Alice J. Dunning b. ca. 1850 In.
Paris m(2) 9m/27/1865 in Vanderburgh Co., Ind. Mrs. Ellen D. (Lane) ASHFORD. They had one child:
g) Smith Lane Dunning, b. ca. 1870 in Ind.
Paris was Governor of Indiana. His portrait and a brief biography are on the web. You can also see his house at 608 W. Third St. in Bloomington (Site #1 on the 2007 Tour of Homes).



David Dunning (William2 #10, Samuel1 #3), was born in 1786 and died in 1831. In 1810 he married Mary Mariah ANDERSON.

Children of David and Mary Mariah (Anderson) Dunning:

i.     James Anderson Dunning, b. 1811; d. 1865; m(1) 1837 Louisa TURNER, 3 children; m(2) 1847 Margaret Ann STEVENSON, 3 children.

ii.    J[ohn] William Dunning, b. ca. 1815; d. after 1860; m(1) 2m/21/1833 Mary BENNY, 6 children; m(2) 3m/22/1851 Mary Ellen SHORT, 5 children.

iii.   Barrett Clothier Dunning, b. 1822; d. 1822.

iv.   Thomas Barratt Dunning, b. 1824; d. 1825.

v.    Mary Ann Letitia Dunning, b. 1826; m. George Fox Dunning, son of Samuel and Mary (BERRY) Dunning; had a daughter.

vi.    Emaline Eliza Dunnng, b. 1829; m. 5m/17/1847 Simon SPEARMAN.


Fourth Generation in America



James Dunning (James3, Thomas2 #8, Samuel1 #3), was born ca. 1788 in Delaware, and died after 1850 in Monroe/Owen Counties, Indiana. He was married in North Carolina to Phebe J. CHARLES?. She was born in North Carolina and died 15 April 1863 at the age of 74 years, 2 months, and 26 days.

Children of James and his wife Phebe J. (Charles?) Dunning: [I am grateful to Don Matson for information on this family, e mails 1m/2 and 3/2008. He cites a letter dated 1974 with information from G.D. Helzer, Houston, Tx. 77001; e mail dated 1999 from Barb Petty; and "Genealogical Notes On The Dunning Family in America" by M.B. Dunning, Bedford, Iowa 1915.]

i.       Elijah Charles or G. Dunning4, b. 11m/19/1817; d. 3m/11/1867; buried Maple Grove Cem., northwest of Bloomington, Monroe Co., Ind.; m. 12m/22/1841 in Monroe Co., Ind. Mary Elizabeth WHITESELL. She was b. in 1821 in Ind., and d. 6/26/1876 age 54y 1m 7d They had 7 children:
a) Risdon E. Dunning5, b. 6m/20/1843 in Ind.; d. 5m/1/1870; bur. Maple Grove Cem., Monroe Co., Ind.
b) Willis Gorman Dunning, b. 2m/1/1845 in Ind.; d. 7m/17/1922; fought in Civil War; m. 5m/6/1869 Greene Co., Ind. to Hannah P. DEVORE. He is buried in Maple Grove Cem., Monroe Co., Ind.
c) John F. Dunning, b. 1m/19/1847 in Ind.; d. 1m/23/1873; bur. Maple Grove Cem., m. 2m/8/1870 Monroe Co., Ind. Mary E. WAMPLER. She later remarr. 2m/15/1878 Robert F. DELAP.
d) Phoebe J. Dunning, b. 1850;
e) James B. (Barton?) Dunning, b. 1852 d. ? ; m. 1886 Monroe Co., Ind. to Elizabeth BROUGH;
f) William Ezra Dunning, b. 1854; d. 2m/9/1919; buried Maple Grove Cem., Monroe Co., Ind. ; m. 3m/29/1877in Monroe Co. to Elizabeth J. WAMPLER. He was a Sheriff of Stinesville, Ind.
g) Nancy Catherine Dunning, b. 9m/ ?/ 1857; d. 1925; bur. Maple Grove Cem.; m. 9m/11/1884 Monroe Co. to Robert A. BROUGH;
ii.     James Quenton Dunning, called "Quince", b. 3m/10/1818 in N. Car.; d. 5m/30/1887; buried Gosport, Ind. Cemetery; m. 1m/25/1841 in Owen Co., Ind. Isabel HARDEN. Not sure if "Quince" belongs in this family, or as a son of Thomas, below. They had 6 known children:
a) Mary M. Dunning, b. 1844 in Ind.; d. 6m/?/1926; m(1) 4m/7/1863 in Owen Co., Ind. James S. JOHNS; m(2) 3m/10/1870 Owen Co.. to Charles P. MARION;
b) Martha F. Dunning, b. 1847;
c) P.? R. Dunning, (male) b. 1849;
d) Jeremiah F. Dunning, b. 1852; d. 7m/? /1920 in Cloverdale, Putnam Co. Ind.
e) Arisa/Erissa E. Dunning, b. 1855;
f) William C. Dunning, b. 1857;
iii.   Elizabeth Dunning, b. 8m/18/1824 in Ind.; d. 1m/6/1875; buried Maple Grove Cem., Monroe Co., Ind.; m. 3m/12/1844 in Monroe Co., Ind. to Levi RIDGE; had 7 children: [e mail from Don Matson, 1m/7/2007]
a) Harriet J. Ridge, b. 1m/28/1845; d. 8m/19/1924 bur. Maple Grove Cem., marr. 4/7/1864 Monroe Co., Ind., George W. FYFFE;
2. Amanda H. Ridge, b. 11m/19/1846; d. 11m/29/1914 bur. Maple Grove Cem., marr. 11/14/1867 Monroe Co., to Squire ELLETT;
3. Susan A. Ridge, b. 8m/12/1848; d. 4m/5/1899 bur. Maple Grove Cem., marr. 11/3/1871 Monroe Co., William J. DUTTON;
4. James B. Ridge, b. 1850; d. 1916 buried Rose Hill Cem., in Bloomington, In., marr. 4/10/1873 Monroe Co., to Nancy S. WHISENAND;
5. Thomas Franklin Ridge, b. 1852; d. 1937 bur. Rose Hill Cem., in Bloomington, In., marr. 4/26/1878 Monroe Co., to Iceson Anne (Gooldy) STIMPSON;
6. William E. Ridge, b. 1m/10/1863; d. 8m/26/1863 bur. Maple Grove Cem.
7. America B. Ridge, b. 6m/4/1867; d. 3m/9/1922 bur. Maple Grove Cem., marr. 2/20/1898 Monroe Co., Thomas B. WAMPLER;
iv.   ? Cynthia A. Dunning, b. 6m/3/1811 in N.Car.; d. 2m/9/1883 Owen Co., Ind.; buried Heddings Chapel Cem., Clay Twp., Owen Co., Ind.; m. 11m/8/1836 Monroe Co., Ind. Abraham HENRY;



William Dunning, photo from Jim Borsari, 1m/25/2012

William Dunning (James3, Thomas2 #8, Samuel1 #3), was born 25 November 1794 in Guilford County, N.C., and died Christmas Day, 25 December 1879 in Buchanan County, Mo. William married 7 August 1818 in Grainger County, Tn. Anna HAMILTON, the daughter of Alexander Hamilton and his wife Susanna (ADAMSON). Anna was born 3 August 1804 in Rutledge Township, Grainger County and died 15 August 1884 in St. Joseph, Missouri. [My thanks to Jim Borsari for sending me a copy of his "Descendants of William Dunning" from which the information on William and his descendants is taken. E mail 1/25/2012. Jim also sent this photograph of Judge William Dunning.]

William fought in the War of 1812 and again in the Civil War.

After their marriage, William and Anna moved to Bloomington, Indiana. He served as Associate justice there for eight years.

The Dunnings then moved to Wayne Township in Buchanan County, ten miles south of St. Joseph, Missouri. He was appointed Judge of the Buchanan County Court in 1842, and was then repeatedly elected to continue in office from 1843 to 1852, and from 1860 to 1861. He resigned in 1862, and died in 1879, at the age of 84.

William and Anna were both buried in Bethel Cemetery, which is 2.4 miles east of Hwy 59 on SW Bethel Rd & corner of Highway JJ (near Dekalb, Missouri).

Children of William and Anna (Hamilton) Dunning:

i.     Alexander Hamilton Dunning5, b. 4m/28/1819 in Grainger Co., Tenn.; d. 4m/19/1866 in Doniphan, Kansas; m. 8m/2/1840 Sarah Ann RECTOR (1821-1899), daughter of Alfred Moore Rector and Martha Patsy (Robertson). They had 7 children.

ii.     Rachel N. Dunning, b. Oct 23, 1820 in Grainger Co., Tenn., although this is less than 6 months after Alexander was born; m. John GRACE on Sep 17, 1843 in Buchanan County, Missouri. He was born on Oct 27, 1821 in Fayette, Ind.; had 6 children.

iii.    James Madison Dunning, b. 2m/4/1833 in Gosport, Ind.; d. 10m/24/1902 in Santa Cruz, Calif.; m. 7m/8/1856 in Bethpage, Wellsburg Co., W.Va. Anne Campbell RICHARDSON (b. 5m/13/1835 in Carthage, Ohio; d. 7m/16/1883 in Bethpage. James was a pastor in the church of Christ Disciples. Had children:
a) Julia Logan Dunning was born on Nov 18, 1858 in Richmond, Missouri. She died on Apr 05, 1906 in St. Joseph, Missouri of Pneumonia. She married WILLIAM A. THOMAS on Jul 01, 1880 in Buchanan County, Missouri. He died after 1930 in Kansas. Had 1 daughter.
b) William Dunning, b. Oct 19, 1860 in Mercer County, Ky.; d. in 1899.
c) Robert RICHARDSON Dunning was born on Nov 07, 1866 in Bethphage, Bethany College, W. VA. He died on Jun 05, 1899 in Kansas City, Missouri.
d) Rebecca Wildey Dunning was born on Apr 26, 1869 in St. Joseph, Missouri. She died in 1946. She married Uuk BERGAN; had 1 daughter.
e) Mary Grace Dunning was born on Dec 01, 1871.
f) Anne Hamilton Dunning was born on Jan 28, 1877 in Buchanan County, Missouri. She died on Oct 14, 1967 in Los Angeles, CA. He father conducted the ceremony when she married Charles F. ENCELL in 1902 in Santa Cruz, CA. He was born in 1878 in Ill. Charles was listed as a printer in LA in 1898, in Maxwell's Los Angeles City Directory and Gazetteer of Southern California 1898; worked for Times-Mirror Co according to Los Angeles City Directory 1899. Had 2 children.

iv.   Paris C. Dunning, b. 19 Aug. 1836; d. 20 Mar. 1869 in St. Joseph, MO.; m. Annie WITHERS on 23 May 1868 in Buchanan County, MO.;

v.    Minerva Dunning,

Thomas Dunning (James3, Thomas2 #8, Samuel1 #3), was born 5 May 1790? and died 15 May 1843. His mortal remains were buried in the Old Union Cemetery north of Gosport, in Owen County, Indiana. Thomas was married on 20 December 1815 in Guilford County North Carolina to Polly ADAMS.

Children of Thomas and Polly (Adams) Dunning: [My thanks to Don Matson for information on this family, e mail 1m/3/2008. He cites as sources a letter dated 1974 with information from G.D. Helzer, Houston, Tx. 77001; e mail dated 1999 from Barb Petty; and "Genealogical Notes On The Dunning Family in America" by M.B. Dunning, Bedford, Iowa 1915.]

i.     William Adam? Dunning, b. 10m/16/1814 N. Car. (before his parents were married?); d. 10m/17/1858 in Texas; m. 9m/21/1837 in Owen Co., Ind. to Mary Jane HUDSON; three known children:
a) female, b. between 1837 and 1840;
b) Isaac W. Dunning, b. 1837-40; d. 4m/ ?/1860 Ellis Co.,Tex. m. 3m/21/1860 Ellis Co.,Tx. Nancy SMITH;
c) James Ezra Dunning, b. 5m/20/1840 Owen Co., In. or Terre Haute, In.; d. 12m/25/1922 in Wheeling, Tx.; m(1) 8m/7/1860 Ellis Co., Tx. to Frances SMITH, no children known; m(2) 4m/15/1868 in Hillsborough, Tx. to Elizabeth J. BURTON; they had 3 children James m(3) 11m/ ?/1881 to S. W. PARRISH; had 2 children:
1. Cecil G. Dunning, lived Memphis, Tn.; d. after 1965; had 1 daughter.
2. John Roy Dunning, d. 1949 in Lawton, Ok.; had 2 daughters.
ii.    James Quenton? Dunning, b. 3/10/1818; N.C. d. 5/30/1887; buried Gosport, Ind. Cemetery; m. 1m/25/1841 Owen Co., Ind. to Isabel HARDEN (not sure if James Quenton is son of Thomas or his above brother James Dunning)

iii.   Elizabeth? Dunning, b. 1810/20; d. 2/12/1854 age 34y 18days; bur. Old Union Cem., north of Gosport, Ind.

iv.   Samuel? Dunning, b. 1820-25 Ind.; m. 6m/12/1846 Owen Co., Ind. Leafy Emeline McHENRY;

v.     female, b. 1825-30

vi.   female b. 1825-30




Paris Chipman Dunning (James3, Thomas2 #8, Samuel1 #3), was born 15 March 1806 in N.Car.; d. 5m/9/1884; buried Rose Hill Cem. in Bloomington, Ind.; m(1) 7m/6/1827 in Monroe Co., Ind. Sarah M. ALEXANDER. She was born 1 June 1810 in Kentucky, and died 19 May 1863 in Bloomington, Indiana. Paris married a second time on 27 September 1865 in Vanderburgh County, Indiana, the much younger Ellen D. (LANE) Ashford.

In the 1880 federal census for Evansville, Vanderburgh County, Indiana, Paris was enumerated as a lawyer, the 74 year old son-in-law living in 65-year old widow Sarah Lane's house. Sarah's daughter, Ellen, was the 46 year old wife of Paris. Living with them were Sarah's three grandchildren from Ellen's previous marriage: Fannie ASHFORD (26 "at home"), Henry S. Ashford (24 year old physician), William L. Ashford (22 year old advertizing writier), and , and Smith L. Dunning, ten year old son of Paris and Ellen, currently attending school. They were all living at 220 Walnut Street. Sarah was born in England, Paris in North Carolina, Ellen in Indiana, and Ellen's children in Tennessee, Indiana, Missouri, and finally Indiana. [Enumeration District 7, Page 8D, Microfilm roll T9_317, image 257.]

Paris was Governor of Indiana. His portrait and a brief biography are on the web. You can also see his house at 608 W. Third St. in Bloomington (Site #1 on the 2007 Tour of Homes).

Children of Paris Chipman and his first wife Sarah M. (Alexander) Dunning:

a) Martha Elizabeth Dunning b. ca. 1834 In. marr. 1/27/1852 (where?) Lewis C. STIMSON. They lived in Terre Haute, In. at one time.
b) Mary C. Dunning b. ca. 1840 In.
c) Rachel Dunning b. ca. 1842 In.
d) Paris C. Dunning b. ca. 1844 In. think he marr. 1875 Knox Co.,In. to Mary Hewitt ?
e) James A. Dunning b.ca. 1846 In. marr. 2/5/1877 Monroe Co.,In. to Minerva A. Wood
f) Alice J. Dunning b. ca. 1850 In.

Child of Paris Chipman and his second wife Ellen D. (Lane Ashford) Dunning:

g) Smith Lane Dunning, b. ca. 1870 in Ind.



James Anderson Dunning, 1847

James Anderson Dunning4 (David3, William2 #10, Samuel1 #3), son of David and Mary Mariah (ANDERSON) was born 25 August 1811. He was married first on Thursday, 2_ April, 1837, to Louisa TURNER by the Rev. Charles PITMAN. She was born 16 January 1820, the daughter of Jacob D. and Rachel. Louisa died 15 January 1846. Her mother Rachel married a second time, someone named KING. Rachel died peacefully on 4 March 1866 aged 71. [Note in David Dunning family Bible, donated by Lucy Shoe Meritt to the Delaware Historical Society; photoduplicated pages in the Texas DAR Genealogical Records Committee Report, Series 2.]

Margaret Ann Stevenson Dunning, 1847

James was married secondly on Wednesday, 1 September 1847 to Margaret Ann STEVENSON by the Rev. Henry SUTTEN. Margaret was born 26 October 1818, the daughter of Thomas and Sarah (QUINALLY) Stevenson.

Turner sez James spent his early years in Philadelphia. While there he was a member of Union Methodist Episcopal Church at Diamond above 20th Street. In 1837 he sold his moity in his father's estate to his brother John W. Then he later returned and took up residence in Dover. There he purchased 1 February 1844 from John R. Bostick, a mansion dwelling house and lot on the north side of the Public Square. He also purchased a tract on the east side of the main road from Dover to Smyrna. His name figures fairly frequently in real estate transactions over the next 30 years. [Turner, "Dunning", 27. The deed is in the collection of documents inherited by Lucy (Shoe) Meritt.]

James was a clerk in the drygoods store of Erasmus Wolfe. Later he had his own store in Dover, Delaware. In addition to the store James also owned a lumberyard behind the cabinet shop of his father-in-law, Thomas Stevenson. After 1850 when the land was being developed by the Rev. Thomas Bradford, James bought Stevenson's shop and moved it to what is now 55 King Street, where it was still in existence in 1910. [mimeographed, typed copy of "By-Gone Days, Memories from the pen of T.J. Stevenson of Dover When a Small Town," ca. 1909 or 1910, from an old newspaper clipping in the possession of William Bradford of Dover, Del.]

James was involved in several real estate transactions which have left a paper trail. On 15 November "James A Dunning, of Kent Co De", purchased "from Wm. Parron Cooper both of Dover" a tract. He bought 13 acres from Thomas Stewart and wife for $260.00 in Tuckahoe Neck adjacent to Pratt and Chrebonnier. Then James and Margaret sold to Jacob Ardie of Philadelphia the east end of "Taylor's Chance", amounting to 140 acres. [As cited by Doug Dunning, e mail 23 June 1999, from Caroline County Land Records - Tuckahoe Neck (in the Caroline County Library in Denton Md.).]

On 2 June 1860 the federal census enumerator stopped at the Dunning household, numbering their place the 83rd entered into the schedule. Jas. A. Dunning was listed as being 48, a merchant with real estate valued at $23,000 and "personal estate" worth $15, 000. His wife was 43 year old Margaret. Living with them were their children Erasmus, 17, Thomas 12, James, 10, and Charles 7. Actually Erasmus was James's son by his first wife. There was also 10 year old Anne Stevenson, whose relationship to Margaret I have not yet deciphered. All the children were in school. The household also conatined two African-American women, 35 year old Phebe RICHARDS who was illiterate, and 14 year old Martha SOUTMAN [?], who was not attending school, but as she was under 20 the census didn't want to know if she could read or write. [US Federal Census for 1860, Dover, Kent, Delaware; Roll: M653_95; Page: 14; Image: 15. June 2, 1860 lines 9-17, town of Dover, Dover Hundred, Kent County.]

James was "a most ardent and devoted steward and class leader" of Wesley Methodist Church in Dover. Margaret Ann's family was also strongly Methodist. [Central Penna. Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 1933 sessions, 185.]

James died 6 February 1865. "He died," it is penned into the family Bible record, "in hope of a glorious Immortality."

After James's death his widow ran the store for a year with her brother John Stevenson, who had been a partner with James. Then in the fall the store was closed by auction. Thomas Gilbreth rented it for $400 a year for several years. Then he built the store house opposite. Margaret then rented the third floor to Masons. She rented one room on the second floor to a photographer—the same one who had it while James was still living.

The 1880 federal census enumerator found Margaret A. Dunning living in Philadelphia with her son, "T.S. Dunning", a 31-year old medical doctor. In the house were his wife, Lydia B., 30-years old and keeping house, and their four children: Maggie (6), Martha (5), Thomas S. (3), and Mary (1). There was also a boarder, Hannah JAMES (36) and Margaret DOWNEY, a 20-year old servant born in Pennsylvania of Irish parents. [ 1880 census as transcribed on FamilySearch.org, NA Film T9-1188, page 30C, seen 7/31/2007.]

There is a great deal of additional information about James and all six of his children, three of whom ended their lives in son Thomas's house in Philadelphia. The book describes many of their objects as well as events in their lives, with sufficient social history to give context and meaning. It's a hard cover book, entitled 1328 North Fifteenth Street: the Dunning Family and Its Things. Some photographs of James and his family have been posted.

Children of James A. Dunning and his first wife, Louisa Turner:

i. Caroline Dunning5, b. 3 Oct. 1838; bapt. by Rev. E. Reed; m. C. W. JONES in a double wedding with her sister, Anna, on 26 Jan. 1860; he was a physician in the Civil War. Caroline married a second time [date?], Cyrus Forbes WOODS and resided in Enfield, Mass.; d. at the home of her brother Thomas in Phila., 20 June 1926, and was buried in the Jones lot in Wilmington & Brandywine cemetery, Wilmington, Del.; no children.

ii. Anna Eliza Dunning, b. Sunday, 27 Sept. 1840, about 3:00 p.m.; bapt. by Rev. I. Humphries; m. Albert COWGILL on 26 Jan. 1860 in the Methodist Episcopal Church in Delaware by the Rev. Dr. Charles Cook; d. at the home of her brother Thomas in Phila., 1914, and was buried with the Cowgill family in the Presbyterian cemetery, Dover, Del.; all four children died young.

iii. Erasmus Clark Dunning, MD, b. Sunday, 18 June 1843; bapt. by Rev. T.? Coopers 1843; m. Harriette Shallcross MORRIS (of Morriseianna, Chatham Co., Penna.) in St. Andrews Church, Phila., on 17 Jan. 1872 by Right Rev. Alfred Lee, Bishop of the Diocese of Delaware. Resided at 704 Market St., Wilmington. He was named for Erasmus ("Raz") Turner, the half-brother of Louisa Turner Dunning. He d. 7 June 1880, aged 37.
Children of James A. Dunning and his second wife, Margaret Ann (Stevenson):

iv. Thomas Stevenson Dunning, b. 1 Aug. 1848; bapt. by Rev. I. Thompson; d. at his home 1328 N. 15th St., 12 Jan. 1948; buried at Mt. Vernon cemetery, Philadelphia; m. Lydia BALDERSTON; 8 children.

v. James Henry Dunning, b. Tuesday, 5 Feb. 1850; bapt. by Rev. I. Thompson; d. 8 Sept. 1870 in Dover. "His life-work was short. 'I have been trying for some to say "Thy will be done". I think I can say it now.'" Samuel F. Balderston wrote a letter to his daughter Lydia about the death of "our valued young friend", remarking that Thomas Chalkley Balderston attended the funeral.

vi. Charles Thompson Dunning, b. on Sunday, 21 Nov. 1852 about 7 p.m.; bapt. by Rev. I. Thompson; m. 23 June 1875 Mary Hamilton CREVER (of Worthington, Minn.); d. 22 Oct. 1932; bur. Paxtang Cemetary, Harrisburg, Penna. Graduated from Dickinson in 1872. After teaching several years, he became a Methodist Minister and lived in a number of different places, mostly in the Central Penna. Conference. Had 4 children: Lona Williams, unm. (d. 1906); Charles Crever m. Deborah __ and had 2 children (Sterling, Kathrine); James Edwin m. Daisy FISHER, and had 2 children (Charles, and Edwin); William Follansbee, unm (d. 1909 of TB).


John William Dunning4 (David3, William2 #10, Samuel1 #3), son of David and Mary Mariah (Anderson) was born 11 February 1815 and died some time after 1860. His first wife's name is thought to be Mary BENNY. He married secondly on 22 March 1851 Mary Ellen SHORT.

John William inherited real estate from his mother. He seems to have lived on the farm listed in the 1865 inventory of real estate in his father's estate.

Children of John William and his first wife:

i.     David H. Dunning5, b. Feb. 1835; d. after 1900; m(1) 23 Dec. 1858 Mary E. Warren; m(2) 19 June 1882 Rhoda Harrington. David was a farmer in Delaware.
ii.    Sarah Dunning
iii.   James Dunning
iv.   John William Dunning, d. 1937, bur. Odd Fellows, Dover, Del.
v.    Mary Dunning
vi.   Emeline Dunning

Children of John William and his second wife, Mary Ellen (Short) Dunning:

vii.   Samuel Dunning
viii.  James Dunning
ix.    Margaret Dunning
x.     Kate Dunning
xi.    Virginia Dunning


Fifth Generation in America



Alexander Hamilton Dunning5, son of William (James3, Thomas2 #8, Samuel1 #3) and his wife Anna HAMILTON Dunning, was born April 28, 1819 in Grainger Co., Tenn. He died April 19, 1866 in Doniphan, Kansas. Alexander married on August 2, 1840 Sarah Ann RECTOR, daughter of Alfred Moore Rector and Martha Patsy (Robertson). Sarah Ann was born January 12, 1821 in Terre Haute, Vigo Co., Indiana, and died November 14, 1899 in Doniphan, KS. [My thanks to Jim Borsari for all the data on this family, e mails 1m/2012.]

Alexander was one of many young men who responded to the lure of gold when it was found in 1849 in California. In the 1850 census he was enumerated in El Dorado, California.

Alexander was a Sergeant in the Union Army during the Civil War. He was not in the 1865 Kansas census, but Sarah was.

Undocumented family lore holds that Alexander was a gambler, and that he was killed in a gunfight that erupted over a card game. In any event, he died April 19, 1866 and was buried in section M of Doniphan Cemetery. His will was probated April 2, 1868.

tintype? of Thomas Jefferson Dunning, 1870, from Jim Borsari, 1m/25/2012

Children of Alexander H. and Sarah Ann (Rector) Dunning:

i.       Thomas Jefferson Dunning5 was b. July 16, 1849 in Buchanan County, Missouri; d. Sep 15, 1932 in Platte County, Weston, MO. He married Katherine Janet QUINN on Jan 02, 1872 in Doniphan, Doniphan Co., Kansas, daughter of Daniel Michael Quinn and Ellianor (Ellen) (BOWMAN). She was born on Jul 02, 1851 in Weston, Platte Co., Missouri; d. Mar 23, 1921 in Boise, Ada Co., Idaho. This tintype? of Thomas, dated 1870, is from Jim Borsari. Had 4 children.

ii.     James Alfred (Jim) Dunning was born on Feb 17, 1847 in Buchanan County, MO. He died on Jul 29, 1925 in St Joseph, MOo. of Carcinoma of Bile Ducts. He married SARAH E. She was born in Apr 1852 in Milwaukee, Wisc. Jim was a justice of the peace and a grocer. Had 6 children.

iii.    Louisa Dunning was born in 1841. She m(1) __ HENDLEY and had 2 children. She m(2) George Washington BROCK on Nov. 25, 1875 in Doniphan, at her brother Jim's house. George was born in Mar. 1839 in Illinois; d. Oct. 1, 1926. Had 4 more children.

iv.    Annie Abigail Dunning was born in 1854 in Doniphan, KS. She married Lewis STEPHENS, b. ca. 1850.

v.    Paris Chipman (Bud) Dunning was born on Apr. 19, 1856 in Doniphan, KS. He died on Mar. 27, 1928. He married ANNA ASHTON SPENCER on Dec. 20, 1883. She was born on Sept. 9, 1864 in Doniphan, KS. She died on Apr. 8, 1900 in Doniphan, Kansas. Had 7 children.

vi.     William T. Dunning, b. in 1843; d. in 1852.

vii.   Martha Ann Dunning, b. Mar. 4, 1845 in St. Joseph, Buchanan, Missouri. She died on Mar. 13, 1866 in Bendena, Doniphan Co., Kansas. She married Patrick Henry KIRWAN on Nov 18, 1863 in White Cloud, Doniphan Co., Kansas. He was born on Oct. 8, 1837 in Gorey, County Wexford, Ireland. He died on Apr. 26, 1920 in Bendena, Doniphan Co., Kansas. Had 3 children.


Lots more to add here. I intend eventually to post entries for Thomas S. and Charles T. (sons of James A. Dunning) and David H. (son of John William Dunning). For those who would like a lot more detail on the extended family of Dr. Thomas S. Dunning (1848-1945) there is a hard cover book, 1328 North Fifteenth Street: the Dunning Family and Its Things.



Sixth Generation in America


Thomas Jefferson Dunning6 (William4, James3, Thomas2 #8, Samuel1 #3) was born July 16, 1849 in Buchanan County, Missouri, and died September 15, 1932 in Platte County, Weston Thomas Jefferson Dunning and mirror, from Jim Borsari, 1m/25/2012 County, Mo. He married Katherine Janet QUINN on January 2, 187, in Doniphan, Kansas, daughter of Daniel Michael Quinn and Ellianor (Ellen) (BOWMAN). Katherine was born on July 2, 1851, in Weston, Platte County, Missouri, and died March 23, 1921 in Boise, Ada County, Idaho.

This photo of Thomas is from Jim Borsari. The mirror in the ornate frame partially visible behind Thomas is still in the family. [My thanks to Jim for the photo, and data about Thomas and his family, e mails 1m/25 and 26/2012.]

Thomas's death certificate says he was found in the river after 4 days, with head and bowel injuries. An hypothesis suggests he may have been killed by a train. [Death Cert. #033253.]

Thomas Jefferson Dunning and family, from Jim Borsari, 1m/25/2012

Children of Thomas J. and Katherine J. (Quinn) Dunning are shown in this photograph. From the left, standing: Archie, Alexander, Daniel; seated: Thomas and Katherine, with Lillian between them.

i. Alexander Hamilton Dunning, b. on Dec 25, 1872 in Atchison, KS. He died on May 22, 1947 in Atchison, Kansas (Burial Oak Hill Cemetery, Atchison, KS). He married MARY A. KOHLER on Jul 14, 1897 in Doniphan, KS. She was born on Feb 15, 1878 in Doniphan, KS. Had a son, Thomas Jefferson Dunning (1898-1976) who m. Bertha Rosalie SMITH (b. 1897).

ii. Daniel Alfred Dunning, b. Sep 25, 1874 in Doniphan, Doniphan Co., Kansas. He died on Nov 26, 1944 in Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, D.C. He married Alice Hall TOTTEN on Sep 26, 1903 in Washington, D.C., daughter of Cornelius Arthur Totten and Sarah Gilbert Hall. She was born on Jun 16, 1879 in Washington, D.C.. She died on Dec 24, 1960 in Vienna, Va. Had 3 children.

iii. Archie M. Dunning, b. Jul 1878 in Doniphan, KS.

iv. Lillian Janet Dunning, b. May 31, 1886 in Kansas. She died on Nov 12, 1966 in Los Angeles, California. She married Theodore W. PRIMROSE. He was born in Apr 1873 in Pennsylvania. Had 1 son: Theodore Wolfe Primrose, b. 3m/1/1911 in Nevada, d. 5m/2/1942 in Los Angeles, Calif.; m. Dorothy WAITS.







Notes and Citations

Obviously this is still under construction. Later citations are in brackets embedded in the narrative text.



1. William Arthur, Derivation of Saxon Names (NY: 1857) as cited by Van Arsdale B. Turner, “Dunning: An Outline of the Ancestry of Thomas Stevenson Dunning, M.D. of Philadelphia, Pa., With the Necessary Abstracts and References In Verification Thereof” (typed mms., 1913), 9.

2. There are church records of the marriages of Edward Dunning in 1616 to Agnes Chapman, in 1620 to Alice Taylor. These may be two men or the same person, but don’t seem to be our man. These and “our” Edward’s children’s dates are from IGI, Batch #CO55766, Stepney, Saint Dunstan, London, as sent me by Doug Dunning, e mail, 6/1999.

3. Samuel Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (1842), 4:187-88; http://eolfts.rootsweb.com/parish/stepnet.html. See also http://www.parishregister.com/areamaps.html, scrolling down to Stepney.

4. Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (1842), 4:187-88.

5. Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (1842), 4:189.

6. Dorie located this copy of an etching by S. Lacey on http://www.londonancestor.com/ It looks like an entirely different church, not in Stepney.

7. Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England (1842), 4:188-89.

8. Information from Doug Dunning, e mail 1 June 1999, from IGI, Batch #CO55766, Stepney, Saint Dunstan, London. The two suggested marriages are from Batch #MO55762.

9. Information from Doug Dunning, e mail 1 June 1999, from IGI, Batch #CO55768, Stepney, Saint Dunstan, London.

10. Info from Dorie, 1734 will??

11. Kent County Del. Deed Book N, p. 83, as given to me by Doug Dunning, e mail 3 June 1999.

12. Kent County Del. Deed Book N, p. 84, as given to me by Doug Dunning, e mail 3 June 1999.

13. Kent County Del. Deed Book N, p. 84, as given to me by Doug Dunning, e mail 3 June 1999.

14. Kent County Del. Deed Book N, p. 84, as given to me by Doug Dunning, e mail 3 June 1999.

15. Deed Book N, p. 83, as quoted by Doug Dunning, in an e mail 3 June 1999.

16. Deed Book N, page 84, Kent County Del., as quoted by Doug Dunning, in an e mail 3 June 1999. This is also reported, but not quite as completely, by Charles W. Lord, Jr., in a letter to TSD, 23/1/1920. Lord gives the date of the initial power of attorney as 1649. Also quoted by Doug Dunning, in an e mail 3 June 1999, with the year 1643.

16a. Peter John Thompson, "A Social History of Philadelphia's Taverns, 1683-1800", PhD. dissertation, University of Pennsylvania, 1989.

17. 7 May 1730, in Kenneth Scott, Abstracts from Ben Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette, 1728-1748 (Balt: Gen Pub Co, Inc., 1975), p. 21.

18. 27 Apr. 1732, in Scott, Abstracts from Ben Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette, p. 57.

19. 10 Oct. 1734, in Scott, Abstracts from Ben Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette, p. 103.

20. 26 June 1735, in Scott, Abstracts from Ben Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette, p. 113.

21. 21 Apr. 1737, in Scott, Abstracts from Ben Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette, p. 154.

22. 9 Aug 1733, in Scott, Abstracts from Ben Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette, p. 79.

23. 29 Jan. 1736, in Scott, Abstracts from Ben Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette, p. 123-24.

24. 2 Sept. 1736, in Scott, Abstracts from Ben Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette, p. 137.

25. 4 Aug. 1737, in Scott, Abstracts from Ben Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette, p. 162.

26. Phila. Will (in the HSP abstracts) citing Book F, p. 60, #56.

27. Phila. Will Bk F, p. 86, #84 and #85.

Turner, “Dunning”; however a pencilled note adds “Duning” to Tamer's name, which makes the whole note somewhat suspect, suggesting a confusion between the mother Tamer (__) Willson with the daughter Tamer (Willson) Dunning.

29. Records of the Third Haven Friends Meeting, Talbot Co., Md., copy in the Md. Hist. Soc., vol. 2, pp. 170 (25-26/1m/1719), 172 (29-30/2m/1719), 174 27-28/3m/1719), as cited by Turner, “Dunning”.

30. Records of the Third Haven Friends Meeting, Talbot Co., Md., copy in the Md. Hist. Soc., vol. 2, p. 216 (28/12m and 17/1m/1721), as cited by Turner, “Dunning”.

31. Provincial Court of Maryland, Testamentary Proceedings, Vol. 27, fols. 212 (20 Sept. 1725), 236 (1 Jan. 1725), as cited by Turner, “Dunning”.

32. Records of the Third Haven Friends Meeting, Talbot Co., Md., copy in the Md. Hist. Soc., vol. 2, p. 212, as quoted by Turner, “Dunning”.

33. Third Haven minutes, copy in the Md. Hist. Soc., vol. 2, p. 215, as quoted in Turner, “Dunning”.

34. Records of the Third Haven Friends Meeting, Talbot Co., Md., copy in the Md. Hist. Soc., vol. 2, p. 267, as quoted by Turner, “Dunning”.

35. Records of the Third Haven Friends Meeting, Talbot Co., Md., copy in the Md. Hist. Soc., vol. 2, p. 212, as quoted by Turner, “Dunning”.

36. Records of the Third Haven Friends Meeting, Talbot Co., Md., copy in the Md. Hist. Soc., vol. 2, p. 212, as quoted by Turner, “Dunning”.

37. Scharf Papers, Box 86, Md. Hist. Soc., as quoted by Turner, “Dunning”.

38. Records of the Third Haven Friends Meeting, Talbot Co., Md., copy in the Md. Hist. Soc., vol. 3, p. 31, as quoted by Turner, “Dunning”.

39. Records of the Third Haven Friends Meeting, Talbot Co., Md., copy in the Md. Hist. Soc., vol. 3, p. 32, as quoted by Turner, “Dunning”.

40. F. Edward Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, Delaware, 1686-1800 (Silver Spring, Md.: Family Line Publications, 1986), 10.

41. Minutes of Duck Creek Monthly Meeting, 1706-1800, copy in Penna. Hist. Soc. Vol 1, p. 126, as cited by Turner, “Dunning”.

42. Mary Marshall Brewer,  Kent County Delaware Land Records, Vol. 5: 1742-1749, citing Deed Book N, page 84, as quoted by Doug Dunning, in an e mail 3 June 1999. This is also reported, but not quite as completely, by Charles W. Lord, Jr., in a letter to TSD, 23/1/1920. Lord gives the date of the initial power of attorney as 1749. Also quoted by Doug Dunning, in an e mail 3 June 1999, with the year 1743.

43. Turner, “Dunning”, citing Kent Co. Deed Records, Liber N, no. 1, fol. 271.

44. Turner, “Dunning”, citing Kent Co. Deed Records, Liber O, no. 1, fol. 172.

45. photostatic copy made by Charles W. Lord, Jr., in 1920. It is difficult to read, and the original should be checked.

46. Reg. of Wills Liber K, folio 240, p. 189, as printed in Delaware Public Archives Commission, Calendar of Kent County Delaware Probate Records, 1680-1800 (Dover: Delaware Archives Commission, 1944), Del. Arch. ser. A, vol. 15, pp.134-35.


47. Kent Co. Del. Will Records, Liber K, fo. 240, as quoted by Turner, “Dunning”. Pencilled notes in material from TSD/LTSM have the preamble of the will, and some of the provisions.


48. Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 16.


49. Wright, Vital Records of Kent and Sussex Counties, 21.


50. Del. Arch. A15:128-29. (Reg. of Wills, Liber L, folio 131, p. 276).


5.

Return to the top of the page.





    updated 8m/1/2012