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Sixth Generation

the ante bellum years

compiled and copyright by MJP Grundy, 2002



        Although birth dates for members (on this web page) of this generation range from 1781 to 1860, by and large this was the ante bellum generation. Many of them came of age during the Era of Good Feeling when the political emphasis was on local conditions and opportunities. Their adult years of raising families occurred during the proliferation of reform movements that ranged from all sorts of dietary and medical ideas to temperance and abolition. Racism became increasingly pervasive in the culture of the United States, with harsh laws passed in northern, southern, and midwestern states restricting the civil liberties of African Americans. The Quakers continued to live with the results of the 1827-'28 separation, with the Orthodox faction splitting again after 1845, and a few Hicksite individuals leaving to form their own more activist anti-slavery meetings. The nation also tried to split with the resulting Civil War.

installing carpet framing the walls

        This page is nowhere near completion. For one thing, it does not contain all the individuals in this generation, and some entries give nothing more than is already shown for the individual as a child on his (usually) father's entry in the Fifth Generation. More serious, I have included a great deal of information that I have gotten second or third hand and have not yet had an opportunity to research myself. The citations are not yet organized into proper, linked notes. As you read the sources provided in brackets, some in brief form more intelligible to me than to a general reader, you can judge how much weight you want to give to any given factoid.

        Because of missing people in the previous generation I can only assign numbers to the first few people in this generation, although I do list most of their fathers' numbers. I have also identified each person with his (or occasionally her) lineage. They are in the same order as in the previous pages, starting with the oldest son of the oldest son of the oldest son, etc. To make it a little easier to find someone, I have added headings indicating family groupings or branches on this larger family tree. There are two ways of accessing individuals in this generation, in addition to just scrolling down and reading everything or anything that catches your interest. There is a table of contents that gives most of the names of sixth generation males in genealogical order. There is also an alphabetical index of all the names that I have of Paxsons born in the first through the sixth generation, but is not yet complete for the seventh or eighth generations. My apologies for not having everything finished, all spiffy and handy. I construct the html by hand; I am not using commercial genealogy software.

        You can refer to previous generations: the Fifth, or Fourth, or Third, or Second, or First (the Immigrant Generation), or English Ancestors from 1640 to 1682. You may also move to the Seventh Generation, although it is far from complete. For more information about this web site, go to its home page.

        The rabbit principle ("these people multiply like rabbits!") has really taken off by the Sixth Generation. Just to summarize, the first generation had 3 Paxson brothers who reached Pennsylvania. These three men produced 16 Paxson offspring in the second generation. I have not included the offspring of the women who now had different surnames. The males produced a third generation numbering 28 Paxsons. Out of these 28, the men multiplied to 73 Paxsons in the fourth generation, and 208 Paxsons in the fifth. How many in the sixth? I don't know because of gaps in my data.


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Table of Contents for the Sixth Generation

        This "table of contents" lists the Paxson men who have entries on this Sixth Generation page. This is not all there were, just all on whom I have data (and sometimes precious little of that). You may be able to use your browser's finder function to search for the names of wives. You may want to skip directly down to the data.


Descendants of William1 #2, William2 #9, William3 #20, William4 #48:
Sons of William Paxson5 #119:
Isaac6 #326 listed as "idiotic" in the 1870 census
William #329 listed as "idiotic" in the 1870 census
Edward #330 listed as "idiotic" in the 1870 census
Seth #331
Descendants of William1 #2, William2 #9, William3 #20, Joseph4 #49:
Sons of John Paxson #125
Joseph Paxson #332 (1803-1867) m. Elizabeth Hunter Gallaher
Jonathan Paxson #336 (1810-1876) m. Elizabeth Knight
Samuel Harrison Paxson #337 (1812-1868) m. Sarah Richardson
William H. Paxson #341 (1821-1850) m. Sarah P. Rowlett
Sons of William Paxson #126
Samuel Canby Paxson #343 (1804-1860) m. Elizabeth Drinker
Sons of Richard S. Paxson #130
Joseph Shoemaker Paxson #347 (1814- ) m. Deborah J. Iddings
Richard Paxson, Jr. #349 (1818-1872) m. Mary Pickering
Charles Henry Paxson #351 (1824-1884) m. Ada Bowen
William Lashbrooke Paxson #353 (1828-1871) m. Emily Pickering
Descendants of William1 #2, William2 #9, William3 #20, Phineas4 #50:
Sons of Joseph Shaw Paxson #133
Walter Paxson #355 m. -- Kirkbride (?)
Phineas Paxson #356 m. Martha Bird
Mahlon Gregg Paxson #357 m.
Sons of Charles Paxson #135
Merritt Hanson Paxson #364 (1814-1886) m. Hannah Larzalere Knight
John Hayhurst Paxson #365 (1816-1895) m. Eleanor Shearer
Phineas Paxson #369 (1825-1899) m. Rebecca Tomlinson
Descendants of William1 #2, William2 #9, William3 #20, Thomas4 #51:
Sons of Phineas Paxson #136
Thomas Paxson #375 (1824-1849) probably unmarried
Descendants of William1 #2, William2 #9, William3 #20, Mahlon4 #52:
Sons of Joseph W. Paxson #149
Sons of Samuel W. Paxson #150

Descendants of William1 #2, William2 #9, William3 #20, Samuel4 #53:
Sons of Samuel Paxson, Jr. #153

Descendants of William1 #2, William2 #9, William3 #20, Isaac4 #54:
Sons of Edward S. Paxson #154

Descendants of William1 #2, William2 #9, William3 #20, Joshua4 #55:
Son of Willett Paxson #156
John W. Paxson m. Anna Burton
David Paxson m. Ann Evans
Son of Joseph Paxson #158
Joseph Lukens Paxson (1822-1868) m. Anna Maria Stevens
Sons of Charles Paxson #163
Joshua Willett Paxson (1846- ) m. __
Charles Sumner Paxson (1860-1935) m. Tacy Lukens
Son of Joshua Paxson #164 m. Anna W. Ely
Edward Ely Paxson (1849-1864) probably unmarried
Son of William Laurens Paxson #165
Franklin Comly Paxson (1839- )
Descendants of William1 #2, William2 #9, William3 #20, Thomas4 #67:
Sons of Joshua Paxson #174
George W. Paxson m. Lucretia B. Hellings (?)
Thomas Paxson m. __
Descendants of William1 #2, William2 #9, Henry3 #24, Samuel4 #78:
Sons of Stacy At1inson Paxson #184
Henry Clay Paxson (1832-1902) m. Myra C. G. Outlaw
James Olden Paxson (1834-1863)
Stacy Atkinson Paxson (1840-1875) m. Louise E. Lathrop
Franklin VanCleve Paxson (1844-ca. 1868) m. Emma Walker
Descendants of James1 #3, William Jr.2 #16, James3 #30, Thomas4 #84:
Sons of James Paxson #191
Thomas Paxson (1781-1837) m. Elizabeth Green
Ahaz Paxson (1785-1825) m. Peninah Chilcot
Abraham Paxson (1789-1845)
James Paxson (1792- ) m. Sarah Chilcot
Descendants of James1 #3, William Jr.2 #16, James3 #30, Jonas4 #86:
Sons of Joseph Paxton #203
Bright Rupert Paxton (1814-1903) m. Emmeline Barton
Charles Rupert Paxton (1816-1888) m. Rachel A. Charles
Benjamin Franklin Paxton (1823- ) m. Susan M. Lloyd
Joseph Rupert Paxton (1827-1867) m. Sarah C. Whipple
Thomas Lloyd Paxton (1829-1900) unmarried.
Descendants of James1 #3, William Jr.2 #16, James3 #30, James4 #87:
Sons of Amos Clossen Paxson #208
Aaron Paxson (ca. 1797-1884) mar. 3 times: Sasannah Wall, Lucy (__) Swadener, and Hannah (__) Coffelt
Amos Clossen Paxson, Jr (1804-1886) m. Nancy Bowser
Sons of Joseph Paxson #209
Stephen Paxson (1809-1881) m. Sarah Pryor
Descendants of James1 #3, William Jr.2 #16, Thomas3 #31, Joseph4 #91:
Sons of Joseph Paxton #212
Joseph Paxson (1792-1850) m. Rachel Yarnall; Mary Ann Marsh
Timothy Paxson (1800-1863) m. Martha Rakestraw Lippincott
Sons of Benjamin Paxson #213
Isaiah Paxson (1785-1850) m. Lydia Mendenhall
William Paxson (1788-1877) m. Maria Morgan
Benjamin Ely Paxson (1790-1862) m. Sarah Mitchell, and Abigail McNealy
Joseph Jefferson Paxson (1798-1872) m. Jane Irey, and Elizabeth Tidric
George Paxson (1800- )
Heston C. Paxson (1802- ) m. Rachel Ingledue, then Mary Pollock Pierce
Sons of Jacob Paxson #214
William Paxson
Edward Paxson
Jacob Canby Paxson (1817-ca. 1893) m. Sarah Ann Yocum
Sons of Aaron Paxson #220
Job V. Paxson (1822-1881) m. Lydia Ann Hambleton
William Hambleton Paxson m. Christina Hambleton
Sons of Jonathan Paxson #221
John Jefferson Paxson (1805-1873) m. Louise Heston
Joseph Franklin Paxson (1808-1890) m. Susanna Simmons
Jacob Epler Paxson (1811-1880) m. Caroline Mulberry
George Washington Paxson (1813-1894) m. Elizabeth Carnahan
Oliver Hazard Perry Paxson (1816-1889) m. Letitia Hutchinson
Levi B. Paxson (1829-1909) m. Mary Kraft
Descendants of James1 #3, William Jr.2 #16, Thomas3 #31, Benjamin4 #92:
Sons of Timothy Paxson #227
Charles Paxson m. Mary Potts Brooke
Edward Paxson (1791-1864) m. Lucy Ann Long
William Johnson Paxson m. Eliza Johnson (first cousin)
Sons of Thomas Paxson #229
Elias Ely Paxson (1817-1901) m. Margaret Orum Wilson
Oliver Paxson (1820-1876) m. Ruth Anna Ely
Richard R. Paxson (1828-1898) m. Eleanor Ely
Sons of Charles Paxson #234
Louis Paxson (1815- ) m. Louise Spencer
Frederick Paxson (1821-1886) m. Lydia Betts
Charles Paxson, Jr. (1824-1894) m. Sarah Chambers, and Mary J. Williams
Descendants of James1 #3, William Jr.2 #16, Thomas3 #31, Jacob4 #95:
Sons of Isaiah5 Paxson #243
Jacob Longstreth Paxson (1812-1889) m Caroline Shoemaker
William Longstreth Paxson (1817-1884) m Sarah Ann Kirk
Sons of Jonathan5 #244
Philip Price Paxson (1821-1877) m. Phebe SPEAKMAN
Henry Paxson (1823-1894) m. Harriet A. HARLAN
Sons of Thomas Paxson #246
Samuel Johnson Paxson (1818-1864) m. Mary Anna Broadhurst
Albert S. Paxson (1820-1905) m. Mercy P. Beans, and Lavinia Ely
Edward M. Paxson (1824- ) m. Mary Caroline Newlin, and Mary Martha (S_) Bridges
Son of Oliver5 #248
Jacob Canby Paxson (1840-1892) m. Eliza Ayres PAXSON, daughter of William Laurens PAXSON #165
Descendants of James1 #3, William Jr.2 #16, Reuben3 #32, William4 #98:
Sons of Reuben Paxson #261
Samuel Paxson
William Paxson
Sons of John Paxson #263
Ezekiel Paxson
Joseph Paxson
William Paxson
Sons of William Paxson #264
John Paxson (1798- ) m. Nancy Stout
Reuben Paxson (1801-1826) m. Mary Case (?)
William Paxson (1809-1866) m. Elizabeth Lambert
Sons of Jacob Paxson #266
William Paxson
James Steele Paxson (1817-1876) m. Mary Letitia Moore
Joseph F. Paxson (1821-1872)
Descendants of James1 #3, William Jr.2 #16, Reuben3 #32, Jacob4 #100:
Sons of William Paxson #267
Samuel Paxson (1793-1871) m. Martha Ellen Wright
William Paxson ( -1826) m. Diademia Lacey
John Paxson (ca. 1797-before 1841) m. Ann Shawen
Jacob G. Paxson (1805-after 1853) m. Mahala J. Potts
Griffith W. Paxson (1811-1889) m. Duanna Rickard
Sons of Benjamin Paxson #268
William Paxson m. __
John Paxson m. Fanny Feese
Samuel Paxson m. __
Isaac Paxson m. __
Charles Paxson
Aaron Paxson
Benjamin Webster Paxson (1827-1865) m. Beulah Stewart
Sons of John Paxson #269
James A. Paxson, (1805-d. before 1900) m. Elizabeth Oliver
Benjamin Franklin (1818-1902) twin, m. Sarah Elizabeth Carter
Joseph G. Paxson (1818-d. before 1880) twin, m. Martha S. Deane
Son of Arthur Paxson #271
Elijah Paxson m. Elizabeth Norwood
Descendants of James1 #3, William Jr.2 #16, Reuben3 #32, John4 #102:
Son of Reuben Paxson #274
James Paxson m. Ruth Richards
Sons of Jacob Paxson #276
Reuben Paxson (1807-1862) m. Rachel Thomas
John Townsend Paxson (1816-1890) m. Hannah Bell
Joel Cheshire Paxson (1819-1891) m. Nancy Bell, and Leah J. Hinshaw
Roland R. Paxson (1821-1885) m. Phebe Woods
Milton Paxson (1827- ) m. Hannah Richardson
Mahlon Paxson (1830- ) m. Eliza Loudon
Sons of John Paxson #278
James Paxson (1814- )
Reuben Paxson (1824- ) m. Sarah Green
John Paxson (1828-1893) m. Amy Ellen Smith
William Paxson (1830- ) m. Ruth Green
Asaph Paxson (1836-1901) m. Margaret Lundy
Sons of William Paxson #282
Henry Paxson (1827- ) m. Mollie Prince
Descendants of James1 #3, Henry2 #18, Henry, Jr.3 #43, Mahlon4 #103:
Sons of Asher Paxson #284
Howard H. Paxson (1810- ) m. Elizabeth Ely, and Mary Ely
Hugh P. Paxson (1813-1893) unmar.
Descendants of James1 #3, Henry2 #18, Henry, Jr.3 #43, Isaac4 #105:
Sons of Joseph Paxson #289
Henry Paxson (1804- ) m. Rachel Job
Elwood Paxson (1811-1858) m. Elizabeth White
James W. Paxson (1813-1851)
William Paxson (1822-after 1880)
Descendants of James1 #3, Henry2 #18, Thomas3 #45, Abraham4 #115:
Sons of Elias Paxson #306
Abraham Paxson (1802-1852) m. Evelina Walton
Howard Paxson (1808-1886) m. Mary Small
Grandsons of James1 #3, Henry2 #18, Thomas3 #45, Aaron4 #116:
Son of Eliada Paxson #316
Amos C. Paxson (1805-1888) m. Rebekah Smedley
Sons of Aaron Paxson #317
Aaron P. Paxson (1813-1862) m. Sarah Ann Pickering
Ezra Paxson (1820-1855) m. Jane W. Eastburn
Sons of John K. Paxson #318
William Wallace Paxson (1829- ) m. Mary Brittain
John Lambert Paxson (1833- ) m. Jennie Mann
Grandsons of James1 #3, Henry2 #18, Thomas3 #45, Moses4 #117:
Son of Charles #319 m. Ann Smith
Stephen S. Paxson


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Descendants of William3 and Anna (Marriott) Paxson
William2 and Mary (Watson) Paxson
William1 and Mary (__) Paxson




326.      Isaac6 Paxson, the son of William5 #119 (William4, William3, William2, William1) and his wife Mary, was born ca. 1806. In 1835 he was named as one of the executors of his father William's will. He was eventually to receive 1/6 of the estate.

In the 1870 census Isaac and his brothers William and Edward, were living with Paxson and Annie WORTHINGTON in Richboro, Northampton Township, Bucks County. The two brothers were listed as "idiotic", and could not read or write. The Worthington farm was valued at $15,000, with Paxson's personal estate worth $4,500. There were three others in the household, Marcus Worthington, 22, a farm laborer; Amos Worthington, 17; and Isaac Wilkins, 22, another farm laborer. The census was taken on July 4, so it may be that those men were just there for the summer farm season. [1870 Federal US census, 127th District, Bucks County, page 20, lines 5-12.]




332. Joseph6 Paxson, the son of John Paxson5 #125 (Joseph4, William3, William2, William1) and Sarah (Pickering) Paxson, was born 12 February 1803 and died 24 September 1867. He married Elizabeth Hunter GALLAHER, daughter of Dr. James Gallaher and his wife Margaretta (DOBSON). [The Gallahers were married in Christ Church 12 Jan. 1797. Margaretta was the daughter of Thomas Dobson, printer on Second Street, at the Stone House; he printed the first Hebrew Bible in North America. His wife was Jean (PATON), born in Scotland along with her daughter Margaretta, James d. 1822 and mentioned in his will that he had 6 children. Margaret/Margaretta d. 1827 and listed her children's names in her will (William Dobson Gallaher, James Clayton Gallaher, Thomas Dobson Gallaher, Elizabeth Hunter Gallaher, Margaretta Dobson Gallaher and Catharine Francis Gallaher). [My thanks to Denise Hardnack, for sharing this information with me, e mail 5/24/2013,] Joseph and Elizabeth lived at "Brushy Park", near Dunks Ferry, Bensalem Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania.

In 1829 Joseph as a fairly young man served with Charles W. BILES as executors for the estate of Tunis TITUS in Bensalem. [Bucks County Intelligencer, 9/1829.]

In 1843 Joseph was secretary of a Bensalem committee of vigilance calling for a meeting of Whigs in support of Henry CLAY, on a platform of protection of American labor, a sound currency, and equal taxation. [Bucks County Intelligencer, 12/1843.]

In 1850 Joseph was listed on the tax duplicate as owner of 195 acres with a value of $9,555, two horses, five cattle, and a carriage for a total assessed value of $9,710. He owed $29.63 in state tax and $15.53 in county tax.

In the 1850 federal census for Bensalem Joseph was enumerated with his wife and seven children. Also William D. GALLAHER, physician (Elizabeth's brother), and her two unmarried sisters, and another relative? namely 60-year-old Mary Pew Gallaher. There was one additional woman in the household, 16-year-old Irish girl Mary BARBOUR, probably a servant but not labelled as such. [1850 federal census, lines 19-32, etc. ]

Joseph signed his will 30 March 1857. It was filed on 9 October 1867, with final settlement less than two weeks later, on 18 October. Joseph left all his real and personal property to his wife, naming his wife and his friend William S. BOYD of Philadelphia, executors. The inventory was made the day of settlement, by Joseph CANBY and Jonathan PAXSON. They listed $315.00 in cash, $1,157.81 in paper assets, 4 cattle, 3 horses, hogs and pigs, for a total of $3,751.31. [Bucks County Will File 12122.]

Elizabeth was enumerated in the 1880 federal census as a widow, age 65, living in the First Ward, Bristol, Bucks County. Her father had been born in Delaware and her mother in Scotland. With Elizabeth were her three adult, unmarried daughters: Margaret G. (age 35), Isabella G. (age 30), and Alice L. (age 26). None had occupations outside of the home. [ NA Film no. T9-1105, p. 18C, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.]

Elizabeth, as the "widow of Joseph, late of Brushy Park in Bucks County", signed her will 13 June 1881. It was proved 30 June 1882. Elizabeth mentioned all of her surviving children, her granddaughter Elizabeth H. Paxson (daughter of James G.), and her unmarried sister Margaretta. Her son-in-law Charles W. TAYLOR was named executor. The witnesses were Thomas HEADLY and Wm B. BAKER. [Will abstract very kindly sent to me 5 July 2005 by Lynn Tinsley, from Will Book 21, Page 445. See also Thomas G. Myers, Bucks County Pennsylvania Will Abstracts, 1870-1900 (Westminster, Md.: Willow Bend Books, 2002), 182, citing Bucks Will Bk. 21, page 445, file #15578.]

Children of Joseph and Elizabeth Hunter (Gallaher) Paxson:

i.   Margaret G. Paxson7, "Maggie", b. 12 Sept. 1839; living with her mother and two unmarried sisters in Bristol for the 1880 census; unmarried at the time her mother wrote her will June 1881; "Margaretta" remembered in her aunt Elizabeth (Knight) Paxson's will, pr. 4 June 1891;

ii.   Sarah P. Paxson., "Sally", b. 13 Apr. 1841; d. 22 Feb. 1889; m. Charles W. TAYLOR. In the 1880 census Charles is listed as a 60 year-old farmer in Bensalem with his 40 year-old wife Sarah keeping house, and 4 children: William M. Taylor, 18, laborer; Julia B. Taylor, 14, in school; Charles L. Taylor, 6, in school; and Lawrence G. Taylor, 4. [1880 census on www.familysearch.org.]

iii.   James G. Paxson., b. 7 June 1842; m. 3 Apr. 1867 Kate V. ROGERS; had 5 children.

iv.   Mary Anna Paxson, "Dolly", b. 24 Apr. 1844; m. William B. ROGERS, Jr. of Bristol; 3 children: Mary P. Rogers (b. 17 Dec. 1871); William B. Rogers (b. 17 Dec. 1871, twin, d. in infancy); Isabella P. Rogers (b. 16 Apr. 1874).

v.   Isabella G. Paxson, b. 10 Aug. 1845; unmarried at the time her mother wrote her will June 1881; remembered in her aunt Elizabeth (Knight) Paxson's will, pr. 4 June 1891. Isabella G. Paxson in the 1880 census, age 30 (i.e. born ca. 1850), single, living in the home of her mother, Elizabeth H. Paxson, widow, b. ca. 1815, and two unmarried sisters, in the 1st Ward of Bristol. Elizabeth's father was b. in Del., and her mother in S. Carolina. In the 1920 census Isabelle G. Paxson, now claiming to be born ca. 1860, was living in the 2nd Ward of Bristol with a little girl, Alice Paxson, b. ca. 1917.

vi.   Lillias G. Paxson., b. 3 Jan. 1847; d. 6 Mar. 1931; m. Joseph deBenneville KEIM; had 6 children: Joseph P. Keim (b. 2 Feb. 1868); Mary S. Keim (b. 23 Feb. 1874); Helen S. Keim (b. 23 Aug. 1878); Thomas D. Keim (b. 4 July 1879); Lillias G. Keim (b. 14 June 1881); and Elizabeth H. Keim (b. 10 Apr. 1884). The family was listed in the 1880 census in Bristol, where 42 year-old Joseph was a merchant, Lillas [sic] was keeping house, Joseph P. was in school and the next three were at home. They had two servants, Bridget GALLAGHER, 20 years old, and Mary COYLE, 19, both from Ireland. [1880 federal census on www.familysearch.org.]

vii.    Alice L. Paxson, b. 24 Apr. 1848; living with her mother and two unmarried sisters in Bristol for the 1880 census; unmarried at the time her mother wrote her will June 1881; remembered in her aunt Elizabeth (Knight) Paxson's will, pr. 4 June 1891; in 1902 listed as Alice Paxson, lady, living in Bensalem and owning real estate. [Bucks County Directory, 1902: containing the names of all men in the county over 21 years of age . . . all women who pay tax for money on interest. . . (Doylestown: Jospeh B. Steiner, 1902), p. 308.]

viii.   John Franklin Paxson, b. 25 May 1849; d. 23 Apr. 1850.

ix.     Fannie J. Paxson., "Fanny" b. 17 Nov. 1850; d. 4 July 1885; m. Henry C. WHITE; res. in Philadelphia;

x.      Elizabeth G. Paxson, b. 5 May 1853; d. 9 Nov. 1853. [Death notice in Bucks County Intelligencer.]

xi.     Kate G. Paxson., b. 10 Dec. 1854; d. 8 Apr. 1855, age 4 months. [Death notice in Bucks County Intelligencer.]


336. Jonathan6 Paxson, son of John Paxson5 #125 ( Joseph4, William3, William2, William1) and Sarah (Pickering) Paxson, was born 12 August 1810 and died 1 May 1876. He married on 21 October 1835 in Bristol meeting house Elizabeth KNIGHT, daughter of Asa and [Grace or Elizabeth] Knight of Bristol. Elizabeth was born 16 December 1804, the daughter of Asa and Elizabeth Knight. [Joseph C. Martindale, M.D., A History of the Townships of Byberry And Moreland, in Philadelphia, PA (Philadelphia: T. Ellwood Zell, 17 & 19 S. Sixth St., 1867), 326.] She died 15 May 1891.

Jonathan and Elizabeth were both active in Bristol Preparative Meeting and Middletown Monthly Meeting. Jonathan served the latter as assistant clerk, clerk, and Elder. Elizabeth was recorded as a minister in 1838. "She was greatly gifted as a minister of the word, having a beautiful presence and in the early years of her ministry a voice of volume and sweetness of expression. Her matter was almost entirely original and was void of repetition. . . . Being led by the Spirit herself she called the people to this unfailing fountain of excellency within themselves, as the all-sufficient gift . . . ." [Friends Intelligencer, 48:23 (June 6, 1891), 361.] On 9 Seventh Month 1841 she was granted a minute to travel in the ministry to meetings in Abington Quarter. [PMMM 4:929.]

In 1835, the year he got married, the tax duplicate lists Jonathan in Bensalem Township owing .33 county tax and .10 state tax. By 1850 he owned 57 acres, 4 horses, and 4 cows for a total tax valuation of $2,285 on which he was assessed $3.65 county tax and $6.85 state tax. As an indication of the way property was assessed for taxes as opposed to its "real" value, the 1850 census listed his farm as worth $5,500.

Elizabeth was active in the reforms of her day, namely anti-slavery, women's rights, peace, and temperance. "She was a good woman, actuated by the love of right."[Friends Intelligencer, 48:22 (May 30, 1891), 346.] She was "full of brightness, cheerfulness, and geniality so that it was constant pleasure to be in her society". [Friends Intelligencer, 48:23 (June 6, 1891), 361.]

Like many respected men of the time, Jonathan was asked to endorse or recommend various products or institutions. An advertisement for the Clermont Building Academy for Boys, near Frankfort in Philadelphia, carried his recommendation in 1844. [Friends Intelligencer, Mar. 30, 1844 through at least Aug. 10, 1844.]

It is probably this Jonathan "Paxon" who was listed as retired, living on Radcliff, Bristol Borough, in 1871. A check of the 1870 census would help to prove or disprove this. [1872 Bucks Co. Directory, p. 51.]

Jonathan, of Bristol Borough, signed his will 7 April 1869, and it was proved 20 March 1876. His wife Elizabeth was named executrix, and was the sole beneficiary, indicating that they had no children. It was witnessed by J. V. BUCKMAN and Mary Buckman. [Will abstract very kindly sent to me 5 July 2005 by Lynn Tinsley, from Will Book 19, Page 339. His will file in Bucks County's courthouse is #14041.]

In the 1880 federal census, Elizabeth was living with her widowed younger sister, Mary BUCKMAN (age 72) in the 1st Ward, Bristol, Bucks County, Not surprisingly, neither had an occupation outside of the home, although only Elizabeth was marked as "Keeping House". [ NA Film no. T9-1105, p. 19A, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.]

In March 1891 Friends ministers from Chappaqua, New York, on a visit to meetings within Bucks Quarter, stopped in to see Elizabeth. In their account they called her "an aged minister, now unable to get out to meeting". [R. S. Haviland, "Visits and Meetings in Bucks County.--III." Friends Intelligencer 48:13 (Mar. 28, 1891), p. 202.] She died in her home 15 May, at the age of 86.

If there was one impulse of her nature that was stronger than another, it was the impulse to walk in the right path herself, and to urge others to walk therein with a firm and steady step. . . . She believed that the best gift of God to the soul was a sweet natural goodness. Her activity was noble, and it had an ennobling influence. Her perception of the truth was joined with her desire that it should prevail, and this led her to raise her voice for the public ear, a voice that had become familiar to many, familiar through a long course of years. She was closely wedded to her own Friends' Society, and devoted to its high spiritual purposes, yet she evinced a marked toleration towards other religious bodies, and recognized good wherever it was found. Rectitude of life was paramount with her. . . . While she respected the opinions of others without undue contention, she tenaciously held her own, and she felt free to express them on all occasions, whether they conformed with the popular current or ran counter to that variable stream. To float with the tide was not her mission.
      She believed in living in accordance with physical as well as moral laws--in securing health to the body as well as health to the soul. [Friends Intelligencer, 48:22 (May 30, 1891), 346.
]

Elizabeth's will was proved 4 June 1891. She left bequests to her nieces, sisters, sisters-in-law, and friends, so we get a glimpse of the (mostly) female network functioning at that time. Those named in Elizabeth's will were: nieces Elizabeth B. STACKHOUSE (and her daughter Clara B.), Rebecca B. COMLY, Carrie T. DARLINGTON, Clara B. STACKHOUSE, and Margaret TOWNSEND; sisters Mary BUCKMAN, and Sarah S. TOWNSEND; sisters-in-law Sallie R. PAXSON (and her daughter Anna P. PALMER), Mary PAXSON, Margery P. CANBY; friends Ann "Annie" H. STRADLING, Elizabeth P. HAMILTON, Elizabeth FINN, Martha SWAIN, Bertha T. PARR, Edward PICKERING, Bristol Meeting of Friends, Annie's son Jonathan Paxson STRADLING, and Sabra HAMILTON; deceased brother-in-law Joseph Paxson's children: James G., Margaretta, Isabella, and Alice. [Will abstract very kindly sent to me 5 July 2005 by Lynn Tinsley, from Will Book 25, Page 132. See also Thomas G. Myers, Bucks County Pennsylvania Will Abstracts, 1870-1900 (Westminster, Md.: Willow Bend Books, 2002), 369, citing Bucks Will Bk. 25, page 132, file #18237.]




337. Samuel Harrison6 Paxson, son of John Paxson5 #125 (Joseph4 #49, William3 #20, William2 #9, William1 #2) and Sarah (Pickering) Paxson, was born at "Brookfield", in Bensalem Township, on 8 September 1812. On 12 May 1836 he married his second cousin Sarah Richardson, the daughter of Joseph and Mary (Dixon) Richardson. Sarah was born 22 April 1812 and died 19 December 1903. These photographs of Samuel and Sarah do not appear to have been taken at the same time, as Samuel appears much younger than Sarah.

After her husband and children died, Samuel's aunt Anna (Paxson) Richardson, invited him to come and manage her place, "Mineral Spring Farm", in Middletown. Anna's deceased husband was uncle to Samuel's wife, Sarah, so they were nephew and neice of their aunt and uncle.

Although there were two Sarah R. Paxsons in Middletown Meeting at this time, it appears that this Sarah was the active Friend. She was named an Overseer in 1862, and an Elder in 1884. Samuel was moderately active.[Middletown MM records.]

Samuel died 5 November 1868. Sarah renounced the administration of his estate on 24 December. Her sons John and Wm. Rodman, and Isaac Eyre took it on. From the documents filed in the courthouse in Doylestown, it was a bit of a job, indicating the increased complications of life from that of earlier generations. There were fees paid to register the letters of administration, to a lawyer, to qualify the appraisers, to the appraisers for their time, for advertising the estate notice, for the toll to Doylestown, for [title?] searches of the property, and "expenses attending filing of settlement". There is a detailed list of debt, adding up to $2,896.84. There were the usual debts owed to individuals, including the doctor, a blacksmith, for coal, the school tax, and so on. Poster for 1870 Sale of farmThe funeral expenses included $5 for digging the grave, $94.97 for the coffin, and $1 for the funeral notices. Balanced against the debts were the assets, including two $1,000 US bonds, a mortgage on Wm. H. Paxson's mill property worth $2,600, $500 lent to Mary and Elizabeth H. Paxson, $500 to his son John, 32 shares of Farmers' National Bank stock worth $800. The appraisers took note of "corn in the ear", hay, oats, chicken coops, a horse and carriage, harness and buffalo robe. Inside the house were tables, bedsteads, sideboard, 20 chairs, a looking glass, settee, desk, books and bookcase, and 2 maps. They even counted the dough-trough, ironing board and a "lot of flower pots". The executors liquified some assets, including selling a $30 gold coupon for $35.85, as well as farm produce. In the end there was $5,525.13 to divide. The widow's share was $1,841.71. The children's share was $3683.42, taxed at 1%, or $36.83. Each child received $1,215.53.[Bucks Co. Will File 12439.]

Two years after Samuel's death Mineral Spring Farm was put up for sale by his two sons and son-in-law. The illustrations on this poster probably do not accurately portray the farm house. I think that stock cuts were used for decorative purposes. However, the description of the farm and buildings would be accurate. I do not know what happened—if the sale was cancelled, if one son bought out the others' shares, or what. But the farm ended up in the possession of William Rodman Paxson. In 1871 Sallie was simply listed as "Mrs. S. H. Paxson", retired, living in Middletown Township. [1872 Bucks Co. Directory, p. 158.]

In recent years the house has been handsomely renovated. The acreage was sold to a developer and has sprouted a plethora of townhouses.

By the time the 1880 federal census was made, Sallie had moved off of Mineral Spring Farm, and her son Wm. Rodman was running it. Sallie was 68 and had moved in with her widowed daughter, Anna (aged 37), and Anna's daughter Sarah E. Palmer (aged 15, and not listed as at school). They lived in Langhorne, Bucks County. [1880 census, NA Film no. T9-1106, p. 316B, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.]

Sarah seems to have been called "Sallie", and as such she was remembered in her sister-in-law Elizabeth (Knight) Paxson's will, pr. 4 June 1891. [Will abstract very kindly sent to me 5 July 2005 by Lynn Tinsley, from Will Book 25, Page 132.]

After three months of "general debility" Sarah died on 19 December 1903. She and Samuel are both buried in the Middletown Meeting graveyard.

John Paxson

Children of Samuel Harrison and Sarah (Richardson) Paxson:

i. Mary Richardson7 Paxson, b. 18 Mar. 1837; d. 12 Oct. 1867 at the age of 30; unmarried; slightly active in Middletown Meeting.

ii. John Paxson, b. 27 Mar. 1841; d. 3 June 1907 in Newtown; m. Tacie LONG; a physician; res. Newtown. They had no children. A daguerreotype of John is to the right.

iii. Anna Richardson Paxson, b. 27 Apr. 1843; d. 23 Oct. 1898; m. 22 Oct. 1863 Joseph PALMER. He was b. 23 Oct. 1840; d. 23 May 1872. Anna was asked to serve on 5 meeting committees. They had a daughter, Sarah ("Sallie") Palmer who m. Thomas L. ALLEN. He was the son of Marmaduke W. and Sarah Rodman Paxson Allen. "Anna P. Palmer" was remembered in Elizabeth (Knight) Paxson's will, pr. 4 June 1891; no Bucks County will was found for Anna.

      The following four photographs show, from the left, Anna R. (Paxson) Palmer, her daughter; Sallie (Palmer) Allen, and Sallie's husband Thomas L. Allen. Anna R. (Paxson) Palmer's granddaughter, Anna Allen (fourth picture), died before she reached adulthood.

           Anna Paxson Palmer Sallie Palmer Allen Thomas L. Allen Anna Allen William Rodman Paxson


iv. William Rodman Paxson, b. 16 Apr. 1846; d. 15 Aug. 1894; m. 30 Apr. 1874 Catherine Paxson, the daughter of Howard and Mary (Small) Paxson. They had three children. Photograph of William Rodman to the right.

v. Sarah Paxson, b. 17 Aug. 1851; d. 24 Apr. 1864.




341. William H.6 Paxson, son of John Paxson5 #125 (Joseph4 #49, William3 #20, William2 #9, William1 #2) and Sarah (Pickering) Paxson, was born 21 December 1821. He died on the 29th of February 1850. On 14 April 1848 William and Sarah P. ROWLETT, daughter of John of Germantown, were married in Green Street Meeting in Philadelphia.

William was listed as a lumber merchant in Bensalem in the 1850 census. He apparently also had a mill, because his brother Samuel lent him money for it. At Samuel's death in 1868 there was still $156 owned on the mill's mortgage. No Bucks County will could be found for William, presumably because he died suddenly and unexpectedly?

William was slightly active in Middletown Monthly Meeting.

Sarah died on 21 March 1909 in her 83rd year. Her obituary is in the Friends Intelligencer, 66:206.




343. Samuel Canby6 Paxson, son of William Paxson5 #126 (Joseph4 #49, William3 #20, William2 #9, William1 #2) and Ann (Canby), was born 30 September 1804, and died 26 July 1860. He married on 5 July 1827 Elizabeth DRINKER.

It appears that at the time of the Hicksite-Orthodox separation in Philadelphia Yearly Meeting Samuel was a member of Southern District Monthly Meeting. If my somewhat cryptic notes are correct, Samuel was disowned by the Orthodox 21 Feb. 1827, and Elizabeth was disowned 28 Nov. 1827. Then Samuel was disowned by the Hicksites in 1829. In 1854 it was noted that he had a pew in a church in New York City. [from Hinshaw 3:249.]

Samuel was a commission merchant in New York City. He began business in the flour trade in the city in 1832, and became the first president of the Corn Exchange. The firm branched out and dealt in more than flour and grain. For a small example of the wide-ranging business interests of the firm, in the "Marine Intelligence" column of the New York Times in 1852 there was a note that hides for Allen & Paxson was part of the cargo of the schooner Julia E. Ridgeway. ["Marine Intelligence", New York Times, 12 Jan. 1852, p. 4.] When the steamship United States arrived in port it carried $8,928 in specie for the firm. ["Later from California and Australia. Arrival of the United States.", New York Times, 28 Feb. 1853, p. 1.] Two years later Samuel was one of a list of references for George Butler of Galveston, Texas, who was available to collect notes, drafts, and accounts in Texas. ["Financial", New York Times, 2 Sept. 1854, p. 7.] Samuel was one of the signatories to an advertisement for Security Fire Insurance Company, of 31 Pine Street. It advised readers that

"CASH CAPITAL $200,000 ALL PAID IN.--This Company having all its Capital paid in and in process of investment, is now ready to receive applications and to issue policies of insurance, on merchandise, buildings, ships in port, and other property, on favorable terms." [New York Times, 28 June 1856, p. 7.]
In 1858 the original firm of Allen & Paxson was succeeded by Samuel C. Paxson, Son & Co., with his son William taking an active part in the management of the firm. ["Obituary Note", New York Times, 17 May 1853, p. 5.]

Samuel was involved to some extent in local politics. His name appeared in a newspaper notice supporting the Eighteenth Ward City Reform nominations in early November 1853. [New York Times, 7 Nov. 1852, p. 4.]

Apparently Samuel died suddenly. The trustees of the New York Produce Exchange Company met the next day and unanimously passed this resolution:

Whereas. We have just received the painful intelligence of the death of our worthy associate and President, Samuel C. Paxson, Esq: therefore,
Resolved, That in his death we lost an efficient member of our Association, and the community one of its oldest and most respected merchants.
Resolved, That, while deeply lamenting the loss we have sustained, we do not forget the great and irreparable bereavement which has so suddenly fallen upon his afflicted family.
Resolved, That the Board attend his funeral in a body.
Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to his family, and published in the daily papers.
Francis M. French, Vice-President. Edward Cromwell, Secretary. [New York Times, 28 July 1860, p. 5.
]

Children of Samuel Canby and Elizabeth (Drinker) Paxson: [from Hinshaw 3:249.]

i. Henry Drinker Paxson7, b. 1 Oct. 1828; d. 8 Jan. 1830.

ii. Hannah Drinker Paxson, b. 26 Mar. 1831; d. 8 May 1833; bur. Houston Street cemetery.

iii. William Paxson, aka William, Jr., b. 22 Nov. 1832 in New York City; m. 16 May 1871 Elizabeth M. RODMAN, daughter of Dr. Lewis Rodman of Philadelphia.

iv. Anna Paxson, b. 31 July 1834; d. 31 Mar. 1837, age 2 years and 8 months; bur. Houston St.

v. Mary Drinker Paxson, b. 2 June 1836 in NYC; m. 9 May 1855 William H. COOPER. He was not a Friend and Mary was disowned by the Orthodox in Jan. 1856. They had 3 children: Elizabeth D. Cooper (b. 19 Mar. 1856, m. Oscar KEENE); Henry Harris Cooper (b. 18 Jan. 1858); and Mary Paxson Cooper (b. 19 Mar. 1863).

vi. Frances P., b. 19 May 1839; released from membership in New York Monthly Meeting at her request, in Mar. 1860.

vii. Elizabeth Drinker Paxson, b. 24 Nov. 1841 in NYC; m. 22 Oct. 1863 Theodore GILLMAN. She was disowned by New York MM in Mar. 1862. They had 4 children: Samuel Paxson Gillman (b. 23 Nov. 1864 and d. 27 Mar. 1876); Winthrop Sargent Gillman (b. 16 Mar. 1867, and d. 28 Oct. 1870); Frances Paxson Gillman (b. 13 Dec. 1870); and Theodore Gillman (b. 21 Feb. 1873).

viii. Hetty Drinker Paxson., d. 30 Aug. 1844 as an infant.



347. Joseph Shoemaker6 Paxson, son of Richard S. Paxson5 #130 (Joseph4 #49, William3 #20, William2 #9, William1 #2) and Elizabeth (Shoemaker), was born 16 January 1814 in Philadelphia. He was married on 2 May 1836 to Deborah J. IDDINGS by the Rev. SUDDARDS.[Marriage Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer.] Deborah was born 10 August 1815 in Philadelphia, the daughter of Caleb P. Iddings. She died 21 February 1877 in Montgomery County, Maryland.[familysearch (AFN: KZN3-3K)] Joseph had this hollow sillouette taken at the Peale Museum in Philadelphia; he was 9 years old.

Deborah's brother, William Penn Iddings (1822-1906), a wholesale drygoods merchant in Philadelphia, named his son for Joseph. JOSEPH PAXSON IDDINGS (b. 21 January 1857, d. 8 September 1920) was an outstanding leader of petrology widely cited at the turn of the twentieth century, although little known to the present generation of petrologists. He was one of a small group to introduce, about 1880, the microscopic investigation of rocks to the United States and apply the petrographic observations to the then-new inquiry of the origins of rocks called petrology. His fading into the history of science can be attributed no doubt to his gentlemanly, retiring nature and his early withdrawal from the academic and societal scene. Nevertheless, Iddings's record of discovery, both observational and theoretical, initiated many of the ideas that served the more heralded petrologists who followed him. Those ideas, for which he was reluctant to claim originality, were "established or improved by subsequent research."[H. S. Yoder, Jr., on http://stills,nap.edu/html/biomems/jiddings.html]

To return to Joseph S. Paxson, he was in the hardware business with his father, carrying it on after his father took early retirement. Then he made his way west where he served as Treasurer of the City and Council of San Francisco for six years. The history of San Francisco is intertwined with the story of the railroads, and their corruption and monopolistic practices, so I need to learn more of Joseph's own story and practices. See, for example, Doris Muscatine, Old San Francisco: The Biography of a City from Early Days to the Earthquake (G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1975).

Son of Joseph S. and Deborah J. (Iddings) Paxson:

i. Richard C. Paxson, b. 1839; d. 3m/15/1864.




349. Richard Jr.6Paxson, son of Richard S. Paxson5 #130 (Joseph4 #49, William3 #20, William2 #9, William1 #2) and Elizabeth (Shoemaker), was born 9 October 1818, and died 3 February 1872. On 2 January 1844 he and Mary PICKERING were married. Mary was born Seventh Month 16, 1820.

Richard was a member of Philadelphia Monthly Meeting (Orthodox) and therefore his request for a certificate to Northern District Monthly Meeting in order to marry, was granted on 30 November 1843. The following year he transferred his membership to that meeting. [Hinshaw 2:759.]

As a 60-year old widow Mary was enumerated in the 1880 census living with her brother Charles W. PICKERING and his family in Philadelphia. Charles was a 55 year old "Car Spring Manufacturer". In addition to his wife Elizabeth (age 45), daughter Susie (12) and son Charles W. (9), Charles Sr. hosted his three sisters: Alice, Anna, and Mary, plus a nephew Edward Paxson (a 21 year-old clerk), and two others, Jacob (35, engineer) and Mary A. (30, housekeeper) CREAMER. All were born in Pennsylvania of Pennsylvanian parents. [ NA Film no. T9-1172, p. 317A, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.]

grave stones of Mary and Richard Paxson, Friends South-Western Burial Ground, photo taken Apr. 25, 2009

The remains of Richard and Mary were interred in the Friends South-Western Burial Ground in Upper Darby.

Children of Richard and Mary (Pickering) Paxson (may be incomplete):

i. Edward Paxson, b. 4 month 21, 1859; d. 4 mo. 7, 1942; m. Elizabeth S.__; in 1880 census listed as working as a clerk and living with his mother in his uncle's house.





351. Charles Henry6 Paxson, son of Richard S. Paxson5 #130 (Joseph4 #49, William3 #20, William2 #9, William1 #2) and Elizabeth (Shoemaker), was born 26 October 1824 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He died on leap year day, 29 February 1884. Charles married Ada BOWEN.

They lived at "Farley", in Bensalem. Later he was Deputy Treasurer of San Francisco. I need to check the years. Was this under his brother Joseph's term?

Charles died in San Francisco in 1884 at the age of 59. His obituary is in the San Francisco Call [1884D-4048.] Ada died in San Francisco in 1898. Her obituary is also in the San Francisco Call [SF1898-8904.]

Son of Charles Henry and Ada (Bowen) Paxson:

i. William Laurence Paxson, d. in 1872 [obituary in the San Francisco Call, 1872D-2850.]



353. William Lashbrooke6 Paxson, son of Richard S. Paxson5 #130 (Joseph4 #49, William3 #20, William2 #9, William1 #2) and Elizabeth (Shoemaker), was born 30 December 1828 in Philadelphia and died 28 May 1871. He married on 20 May 1858 Emily PICKERING.

They lived at "Oakley Farm" in Bensalem. "W. L. Paxson" was listed as a Farmer in the Township in the 1871 Bucks Co. Directory, p. 35.

It appears that the widowed Emily and two of her children were living with Edward Pickering and his family in Bensalem, Bucks County, at the time of the 1880 federal census. Both the Paxson children were in school. Edward was a 44 year old farmer, not claiming any relation to Emily and her children. His wife Rebecca was 38, and they had five children: John R. (15, laborer), Emily (12, at school), Edward (6, at school), and Anna (4). All of them were born in Pennsylvania, as were all their parents. [1880 census, NA Film no. T9-1105, p. 115A, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.]

Later Emily moved into Philadelphia where she was listed as the widow of William L. in the Gopsill's Philadelphia City Directory. In the 1895 edition she lived at 560 North 16th Street; the next year she lived at 1334 Girard Avenue.

Wm. Lashbrooke and Emily were buried with their first son Richard in Friends South-Western Burial Ground at Powell Lane and Marshall Road. Their stones are worn so the dates can't be read very easily, and I am not sure they are exactly like the dates given above.

grave stone of Wm. Lashbrooke Paxson grave stone of Emily (Pickering) Paxson, taken April 25, 2009 grave stone of Richard Paxson

Children of William Lashbrooke and Emily (Pickering) Paxson:

i. Richard Paxson, b. 12 month 19, 1864; d. as a young child. His grave stone is shown here.

ii. Elizabeth S. Paxson, b. ca. 1868;
iii
iv.


355. Walter6 Paxson, son of #133 Joseph Shaw5 (Phineas4 #50, William3, William1), may have been born ca. 1788. He married 26 Feb. 1818 Hannah KIRKBRIDE, daughter of David and Mary (JONES) Kirkbride, in Buckingham [IGI].

Walter had died by the time the 1850 federal census enumerated Hannah in the Spring Garden Ward of Philadelphia. With her were daughters Ann F. (26) and Ellen M. (22). Also living with them were Huldah S. KIRKBRIDE (37) and Watson Kirkbride, a 7 year old school boy. Robert Child, age 60, no occupation, and John Philips, a 28 year old cabinet maker from New Jersey also lived there. All the rest of them were born in Pennsylvania. [1850 federal census for Spring Garden Ward 1, Philadelphia, roll M432_818, p. 296A, lines 26-32, taken July 29, 1850.

In their grandfather Phineas Paxson's will Walter and and his brother Phineas were to divide $2,000 after the death of their father.[Bucks Co. Will Book 9:350]

Children of Walter and Hannah (Kirkbride) Paxson:

i. Ann F. Paxson7, b. ca. 1824;
ii. Ellen M. Paxson, b. ca. 1828;



356. Phineas6 Paxson, son of #133 Joseph Shaw5 (Phineas4 #50, William3, William2, William1), married Martha BIRD.

In their grandfather Phineas Paxson's will Phineas and and his brother Walter were to divide $2,000 after the death of their father.[Bucks Co. Will Book 9:350]



357. Mahlon Gregg6 Paxson, son of #133 Joseph Shaw5 (Phineas4 #50, William3, William2, William1).

In his grandfather Phineas Paxson's will (1819) Mahlon and his two sisters, Susanna and Caroline, were to divide $150. [Bucks Co. Will Book 9:350.]




364. Merritt Hanson6 Paxson, son of Charles5 #135 (Phineas4 #50, William3, William2, William1 #2) and his wife, Susanna (Michener) Paxson. Merritt was born 23 September 1814 and died on "Twelfth Night", 6 January 1886. On the last day of 1835 he and Hannah Larzalere KNIGHT were married.[Joan Paxson Bodnar, 11m/10/2003, and Davis, Hist. of Bucks Co., 3:693.]

When relatively young Merritt was apparently active in Northampton Township politics.

There must be more to his story that I have not yet uncovered, because by 1860 the census enumerated him in Red Lion, New Castle County, Delaware. He was 43, Emma [sic] was 40, and their children were Mary (2), Sarah (18), Susan (15), Ann [sic] (13), Amanda (11), Merritt [Jr.] (9), Charles (5), and Hannah (3). The household also included Catharine SPARK (35) and her daughter Eva (5), Samuel SIMMONS (16), William PRICE (11), and Catherine WRIGHT (76).[1860 federal census for Pencader Hundred, New Castle Co., Del., roll M653_97, p. 626, as transcribed on www.familysearch.org]

In the 1880 census he was still in Pencader, New Castle County, Delaware as a 64 year old farmer with the middle initial of N (rather than H). His wife was 59-year old Hannah L. Paxson, and they had two children born in Delaware and living at home: 23-year old Charles N. also farming, and 20-year old Hannah E., "at home". In addition there was an African-American family living with them: Isaac WILLIAMS was 33 and a farm laborer; Emma was 23 and a "domestic", and their children were 2-year old Harry and 4 month-old Maggie, both children born in Maryland.[1880 federal census, film # T9-0507, p. 200B, as transcribed on www.familysearch.org, seen 1/15/2008.]

Children of Merritt and Hannah Larzalere (Knight) Paxson:[Joan Paxson Bodnar, 11m/10/2003. Davis, Hist. of Bucks Co., also lists John H. and Phineas as childeren, 3:693.]

i.    Catherine K. Paxson7, b. 22 July 1837, d. as an infant.

ii.    Mary K. Paxson, b. 23 May 1840; m. George Washington HASTINGS;

iii.   Sarah M. Paxson, b. 4 Nov. 1842; m. M. Benjamin B. GROVES, MD;

iv.   Susan A. Paxson, b. 1845; m. James T. VEAZEY;

v.    Aaron Knight Paxson, b. 1848; m. Lydia ELLISON;

vi.   Amanda M. C. K. Paxson, b. 1850; m. James VANSANT; in the 1880 census for Rising Sun, Cecil Co., Md., James was a 36 year old farmer, b. in Penna.; "Amanda C." was 29, keeping house, b. in NJ; living with them was a son, Benjamin M. Vansant, 4, b. in Md., James's aunt Amanda N. C. MURRAY, 49, b. in Pa., and Samuel I. FORD, 20, b. in Pa., no occupation listed, but I would guess he was a farm hand. [1880 census, film # T9-0507, p. 200B, as transcribed on FamilySearch.org, seen 1/15/2008.]

vii.   Merritt C. Paxson, b. 1853; m. Sally M. COCHRAN;

viii.  Charles Paxson, b. 9 Aug. 1855; res. Sylmar, Md.

ix.    Hannah E. Paxson, b. 9 Dec. 1859; res. in Wilmington, Del.



365. John Hayhurst6 Paxson, the second son of Charles5 #135 (Phineas4 #50, William3 #20, William2 #9, William1 #2) and his wife, Susanna (Michener) Paxson, was born 18 July 1816. He died 16 February 1895. On 3 December 1840 he married Eleanor SHEARER, the daughter of William Shearer of Philadelphia. They resided in Salem, New Jersey.[Information about John Hayhurst Paxson is from Joan Paxson Bodnar, 11m/10/2003.]

Eleanor died in Wrightstown on 10 April 1843, aged 21 years and 18 days. She left two small children. [Bucks County Intelligencer.]

In the 1860 census he appeared as Hayhurst Paxson, 42 year old master farmer with $2,500 personal estate, living in Pilesgrove, Salem County, New Jersey. With him were his two sisters, Sarah, age 46, and Ann, 25, a school teacher. There were his two children, Charles, 17, and Eliza Ann, 16 and in school. There were five African American men and boys in the house: Stacy TANLEY (17), Harrison SKINER (30), Franklin JOHNSON (19), John DALEY (14), ad Andrew JOHNSON (12). [1860 federal census for Pilesgrove, Salem County, New Jersey, roll M653_707, p. 147, lines 15-24.]

In the 1880 US census John H. Paxson is a 63-year old widower living in Pilesgrove. Living with him were two single women, 58-year old Sarah Paxson and 53-year old Annie G. Paxson.[1880 census on www.familysearch.org] I assume that Annie G. was his sister, fudging somewhat on her age. She was born 6 June 1821, and died 9 May 1884. Sarah was John's older sister.

Children of John Hayhurst and Eleanor (Shearer) Paxson:

i.    Charles William Paxson7

ii.   Eliza Ann Paxson, b. ca. 1843; d. Aug. 1877, age 34 [The the date of death from the Runner/White family Bible, e mail from Carl Runner White, 3m/6/2013.]


369. Phineas6 Paxson, the third son of Charles5 #135 (Phineas4 #50, William3, William2, William1) and his wife, Susanna (Michener) Paxson, was born 6 May 1825 and died 4 March 1899. On 21 October 1847 he married Rebecca TOMLINSON in Morrisville, NJ. She was born 15 December 1827 and died 31 December 1884 [From Joan Paxson Bodnar, 11m/10/2003], the daughter of Amos (1800-1841) and Caroline (PRAUL) Tomlinson. [Thanks to Lynn Tinsley, e mail 29 June 2005, for bring this to my attention from Watring, Bucks Co, PA Church Records of the 17th & 18th Centuries (Willow Bend Books, Warminster, MD 2000) vol 3.]

At some point during his childhood his parents took in Charles RUNNER, a year younger than Phineas, and the two became very good friends. [Information from Carl Runner White, e mail 3m/5/2013.]

Phineas owned property that he farmed in Southampton, extending into a bit of Northampton Township. It was located to the left and right of Maple Avenue, on the west side of the Neshaminy Creek heading toward Feasterville. The property apparently began about half way up the hill between the Creek and the intersection with Bridgetown Pike. This property and Phineas’ ownership is shown on the 1876 Centennial Atlas map of Southampton. It apparently backed up to the farm of Rebecca's father, Amos Tomlinson, which fronted on Brownsville Road.[From Joan Paxson Bodnar, 11m/10/2003]

Phineas appeared in the 1850 US census as a farmer living in Southampton with his mother-in-law. The 1870 federal census for Middletown listed him as a 45 year old farmer with his wife, Rebecca, age 43, and children Emily (19), Albert (17), John (12), Augustus (9), Ella (5), Carrie (2), and Alice (10 months). The three boys were in school. His real estate was valued at $16,600, and his personal estate at $7,000. In the 1880 census Phineas was back in Southampton. The older three children, and little Alice are gone; John (22) and Augustus (20) work on the farm. Ella (16) is "at home", while Carrie (13) is at school. There are now two servants, E. Lyle ROBERTS (age 14) and Sarah CUMMINGS (15) plus unmarried Franklin TOMLINSON (age 49) for whom no occupation or relationship was transcribed. [ from Lynn Tinsley's web page, http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tinzhaven&id=I18800, as of 6/30/2005, citing FHL Film 1255107 National Archives Film T9-1107 Page 111B.]

After Rebecca’s death in 1884, Phineas had a “companion” named Jennetta FARIS. She was also his housekeeper.[From Joan Paxson Bodnar, 11m/10/2003]

Phineas sold the farm, and on 8 April 1892 purchased a house at 344 South Bellevue (on the West side of Bellevue Avenue) in Langhorne Borough. The previous owner, Harry C. GILLINGHAM, had purchased it from Edward NEELD in 1887. Phineas was living on Bellevue Avenue, identified as a "gent.", in 1894. [Bucks County Directory, 1894: containing the names of citizens . . . address, together with a general business directory, and appendix giving banks, churches, societies, etc. (Doylestown: James D. Scott, 1894), p. 123.] He resided in this house until his death on 4 March 1899. He had been ill for only one week and died of “paralysis respiration”. He was 73 years of age and had been a widower for more than 15 years. Phineas was buried at William Penn Cemetery in Somerton beside his wife. [From Joan Paxson Bodnar, 11m/10/2003, and Register of Deaths, Bucks County Courthouse, Doylestown (seen 8/1987).]

Children of Phineas and Rebecca (Tomlinson) Paxson:[From Joan Paxson Bodnar, 11m/10/2003, and Davis, Hist. of Bucks Co., 3:693.]

i. Amos Paxson7, b. 12 Mar. 1849; d. 18 Sept. 1855.

ii. Charles Runner Paxson, presumably named for Phineas's good friend, who for some years was raised with him;

iii. Emily A. Paxson, b. 12 Apr. 1851; m. 8 Oct. 1873 Amos Taylor PRAUL (b. 4 Sept. 1849); they had a son, Clarence T. Praul, b. 31 Dec. 1876. In the 1880 census for Bensalem, Bucks Co., Amos was a 29 year old farmer, b. in Penna.,; Emily A. was 28, "keeping house". Son Clarence Praul was 3. There were 6 other people in the household: Clara HYDE, a 13 year old servant, and 5 single male laborers from Penna. and Ireland. [1880 census, film # T9-1105, p. 106D, as transcribed on FamilySearch.org, seen 1/15/2008.]

iv. Albert S. Paxson, b. 5 Mar. 1854 in Salem Co., N.J.; d. 26 July 1935; m. 30 Dec. 1875 Josephine LaRue BITTING; they had 6 children.[Davis, Hist. of Bucks Co., 3:693-4.]

v. John Charles Paxson, b. 17 Oct. 1857; m. 22 Feb. 1883 Sarah WHITE; had a son Russell.

vi. Augustus Paxson, b. 21 Oct. 1859; d. 27 Sept. 1927; m(1) 22 Feb. 1882 Emma E. WORTHINGTON; m(2) Clara SCHARD; 4 children.

vii. Ella R. Paxson, b. 24 Sept. 1863; d. 10 Nov. 1915; m. 13 June 1883 Thornton TOMLINSON; had three children:
a) Margaret Tomlinson, b. 1886;.
b) Phineas Paxson Tomlinson, called "Pax", b. 1888; d. 1947; m. 1921 Regina (MACKELL) Barton, widow of John Barton (she was b. 1892; d. 1966). A descendant informed me that "Phineas had a triple strike against him. First, he was an atheist. Second, he joined the Army during World War I (and was injured in basic training badly enough that he didn't stay in). Third, he married a good, Irish Catholic girl. . . . he also hated the name Phineas and went by 'Pax'." Pax and Regina had 2 children. [E mail from Heather Tomlinson, 9m/1/2007.]
c) Herman Tomlinson,

viii. Caroline M. "Carrie" Paxson, b. 15 Jan. 1867; m. 8 Sept. 1887 T. Hart ROSS. He was warden of the Bucks County Prison. They had 6 children: Dora Ross, Alvin Ross, Finney Ross, Harry Ross, Eddie Ross, and Russell Ross.



Thomas6 Paxson, son of #136 Phineas5 (Thomas4, William3, William2, William1) and his wife Rachel (WOOLSTON), was born 11 March 1824, and died 10 March 1849 in Sandy Spring, Maryland. At the age of 15 he had moved with his parents from Falls Meeting to Baltimore in October 1839. I do not know if Thomas was married and had any children, or not. He was 25 years old when he died.







John W. Paxson, the son of #156 Willett (Joshua4 William3, William2, William1) and his first wife Sarah (Wilson) Paxson, was born ca. 1825. John married Anna BURTON. She was the daughter of Anthony and Mary (HEADLEY) Burton of Tullytown, born 17 March 1834 and died 27 January 1890. Her step-mother was Anna (PAXSON), daughter of Joshua (#55) and Mary (Willett) Paxson.

As a teenager John tried his hand at the pharmacy business. There are letters from March 1841 and February 1842 written by John from St. Louis to Robert Shumaker, Esq., Druggist, of the S.W. Corner of Second and Green Streets in Philadelphia. In the latter he details the bank failures resulting from the panic of 1841. He also adds somewhat cryptic details about the drug business:

Neither of our house intend going East this spring and the ones that buys or orders the least is the best off. You know in the drug business we can order almost as well as to go on specially when ordering from persons who you can depend on. Yarnells for instance we have bought all our drugs from them their bill alone has been about six thousand dollars although our fancy articles we buy of Glenn Bouschle. I expect Glenn charges more for his things than any other person there. We can buy drugs almost as cheap here, as East and pay the expenses getting them here. [Letter transcribed from the original in his possession by David W. Paxson, and sent to me 11m/15/2006.]

A small personal insight into John is that he enjoyed smoking cigars. In his letter to Robert Shumaker John complained about the low quality and high price of "segars" in St. Louis. A "bit" refers to 12.5 cents, from the colonial period when a Spanish dollar could be cut into eight bits. I do not know what "pickoun" means.

Am very sorry I had not room in trunk for my segars, for they only had Kentucky segars on the latter boat and only two of them for a bit however they were about eight inches long and I could smoke at two all the afternoon. I can't get any good ones here for less than a pickoun apiece.[Letter transcribed from the original in his possession by David W. Paxson, and sent to me 11m/15/2006.]

John had returned to Pennsylvania by 1846. At the time his father was trying to sell his mill on Crum Creek, Marple Township, the newspaper ad listed Willett and "J.W. & D. Paxson, near the nine mile stone, on the West Chester road" for fielding enquiries about the sale. [Delaware County Republican, December 11, 1846. My thanks to David Paxson, who sent this to me 3/14/2006.]

Apparently next John ran a store in Tullytown. He hired his brother-in-law, Elwood BURTON (b. 28 February 1836) as a clerk. When he became of age, Elwood and his brother John Burton bought out the Paxson store. Two years later Elwood bought out his brother, and successfully ran the store until he died in 1896.[Davis., Hist. of Bucks Co., 3:229-30.]

During the Civil War John was a sutler, in partnership with __ Stockton, purchasing things to sell to the men in camp. He was attached to Col. James Miller's 81st Regiment of Penna. Volunteers. Anna wrote to him 1 Dec. 1861:

Elly [her brother Elwood Burton, who had bought out John's store in Tullytown] thinks you all have it very hard. He is sure he could not stand it day after day as you do, am very anxious and want to hear very much how you are making out. It must make it very inconvenient for you to buy your goods, Patterson was about sending segars to you, very glad that I stopped, he had not heard of you moving he said he saw you in Washington. [copy of letter kindly sent to me by David Paxson, 6m/2006.

Anthony Burton, John's father-in-law, wrote to him 9 Twelfth Month 1861 with details of the foundry business, as well as the following bit of gossip about sutlers:

I see by the papers that there will be an effort made in Congress to do away with the sutlers. If so your stay will be short down there but I think the army cannot get along without something of the sort. Congress may pass a law having for its object the stopping of the great amount of extortioning that is practiced by some of the sutlers but to do it entirely away, I don't think it will be done. [copy of letter kindly sent to me by David Paxson, 6m/2006.

Anna wrote to John again on 11 December 1861, reflecting some of the animosity felt against sutlers. The high prices they charged were actually set by a committee of military unit officers. Sutlers received a special appointment from the government, a governor, or the brigade commander on the recommendation of the brigade's commissioned officers. Most made a handsome profit.

. . . glad to hear of thy arrival safe in Washington, hope thee found them all well at camp, do not expect to get paid off before next week, try and have everything to pass satisfactorily. I see in the dispatches and also in the transcript, two letters from your regiment, it seems as if there is great dissatisfaction between the Philadelphia and Maun Chunk companies. They do not speak very favorably of their colonel J. Miller, and the lieutenant colonel that wears spectacles, speaking of the chaplain being a Philadelphian was the reason for displacing him, the Col. took the place of the chaplain at the burial of a soldier, and was saying the lord's prayer, before he got through broke down, there was not a word about the poor Sutlers, wait till after payday and it is likely we shall hear something about them. I think those letters are calculated to prejudice the people against you, the other letters from the other regiments do not speak in such disrespectful language of their officers, it is not worthwhile for me to write about the matter, you receive the papers down there, . . . [copy of letter kindly sent to me by David Paxson, 6m/2006.

On New Year's Day, 1862, Anna wrote to John:

Received thy letter this morning, think thee cannot get home till after the tenth, not be till week after next will make it nearly four weeks, we all looking anxiously for the time to come can have our dear papa with us again, must say to thee happy New Year's, we are going to have a turkey today for dinner, Mary [John's sister] and Henry [Brooks, Mary's husband], Annie and Aunt Nancy, will take dinner with us. [copy of letter kindly sent to me by David Paxson, 6m/2006.

John wrote to his wife from "Camp California" on 12 March 1862:

10 o'clock Evening. Stockton has just returned, he left the regiment about four miles beyond Fairfax and thinks they will move on tomorrow to Manassas. There is already over one hundred thousand men in that neighborhood and all have to bunk out at night -- the tents having been left behind. Said he saw quantities of blankets, crates, haversacks, boots etc. strewed along the road, could have gathered up wagon loads, they have plenty of provisions such as it is. Calves, bullocks, Poultry etc but have had to cook without any salt. We expect to load up the wagon Tomorrow with such articles as are most wanted such as Tobacco, Segars, cakes, cheese, etc. and follow them. Stockton and John Burton [Anna's brother] will go and the rest of us remain for the present, he said he could have sold half dozen loads today for cash to other regiments as there was only one sutler in the neighborhood there today. [copy of letter kindly sent to me by David Paxson, 6m/2006.

Civil War buffs remember that the first battle of Manassas (Bull Run) was 21 July 1861, while the second one was not until 28-30 August 1862.

After the War the family moved. John, his wife Anna B., and their minor children Sarah W. and Anthony B. were received at Race Street Meeting on 25 December 1867 from Green Street Meeting. [Hinshaw 2:907.] Eldest daughter Mary had died of typhus the year before. I am unclear why two-year-old Willett was not included on the certificate of removal, it seems likely it was an oversight that was corrected in a few months; Willett was received at Race Street Meeting on 17 June 1868. [Hinshaw 2:907.]

In February 1868 John was on the road again, writing from Jacksonville, Florida, to his son Burt, who was away at school. He reflected the then common attitude towards wildlife, shooting away at alligators and birds. I assume the birds he killed were two Carolina Parakeets (Conuropsis carolinensis) and a Passenger Pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius), which were shot excessively and became extinct in about 1918 and 1914 respectively.

I started from Philad' on Steamer Torrananda for Savanna Georgia on the 25th of January, and arrived there, on the 29th, then took the boat for this place and arrived next day. We had a stormy passage most of the way, and a number of the passengers were Sea Sick the whole voyage. I felt sick for a few hours only, and have been well ever since. Since I arrived here, I took a trip up the St. Johns River about 210 miles above Jacksonville, to a place called Enterprise and the passage up the river was one of the pleasantest trips I ever made, the river is very crooked and some places not over fifty yards wide, there was a number of lakes on it, some being 10 or 15 miles wide and about as long. We saw hundreds of alligators on the banks, and shot a number of them. Some I should think was 12 feet long. Most of the country on both sides of the river is thick woods, the principle kind being live oak, Palmetto, Cyprus and Magnolia. The woods abound with Deer, Bear, Panthers, Wild Cats, etc. I did not see any of them myself in a wild state, but I saw the wild Turkey and a great many different kinds of birds. I shot at Enterprise two Parakeets and cut the wings off for Sally. They are a species of the Parrot, green with a red and white head and one of the handsomest birds I ever saw. I did not like to go out of sight of the ton with my gun for fear of getting lost, besides the danger of snakes which are very poisonous. I thought of thee, hoe thee would enjoy the fine oranges in this country. I went in the grove and picked as many as I could carry. The weather here is like summer. We have green peas and many other vegetables growing in the gardens—plenty of shad and other fine fish in the market and the trees all being in bloom reminds one of June instead of winter. I expect to start for home in a week or two and want to go by Rail Road by way of Charlestown, Wilmington, Richmond and Washington and may stop a short time in each place. My calculations when I left home was to be gone about one month or six weeks, but I think now I will be at home before March. [Letter of Feb. 8th, 1868, transcribed from the original in his possession by David W. Paxson, and sent to me 11m/15/2006.]
Quaker City Facing mills, 1883 letter head

In June 1868 John was in New England and upstate New York.

I wrote to thee when in Boston and give thee a short account of our trip up to that time. From Boston we visited a number of New England towns and returned by way of New York, then went up the Hudson River about 100 miles. The scenery up that river is very grand and we enjoyed it very much. [Letter of June 11th, 1868, transcribed from the original in his possession by David W. Paxson, and sent to me 11m/15/2006.]

Later John ran the John W. Paxson Co., affiliated with the Quaker City Facing Mills, a foundry supply company on Pier 45 on the Delaware River in Philadelphia. (I am told that a recent trip on Delaware Avenue revealed that the building is no longer standing.) This excellent letterhead shows not only the building, but lists the various products the company handled. My thanks to David Paxson for sharing it.

John appeared in the 1880 US census in Philadelphia. He was 55, and employed in "foundry supplies"; Anna was 42, "keeping house". Three of their children were living with them, Sallie W. (25), "at home", Anthony B. (22) clerk in store, and Willette [sic: Willett] (16) at school. There were two servants in the house, Bridget HURLEY (40) and Mary McGURKE (30), both born in Ireland.[1880 US census on familysearch] In the 1895, 1896, and 1897 Gopsill's Philadelphia City Directory he is listed working for J. W. Paxson & Co., with his home at 2216 Green Street. Other men listed with the company were Josiah K. Bougher, Howard Evans, and Howard M. Bougher.[page 1564 of the 1897 edition]

advertisement for J. W. Paxson and Company, ca. 1884, Library Company image 'LibCo  11-14-053'

J. W. Paxson and Company's pier with its waterfront warehouses was one of more than one hundred wharves on Philadelphia's waterfront in the last decades of the nineteenth century. The chromolithographic advertisement to the right "illustrates the use of overlapping printed colors to achieve shading in the water and on the surface of the pier." [Jennifer Ambrose, "Nineteenth-century Philadelphia advertising prints" in Magazine Antiques, August, 2006, Fig. 10.] The barge on the right of the picture is the Estelle, 182 tons, delivered in 1884 to J. W. Paxson Company by Pusey & Jones, Wilmington, Delaware Shipbuilders. [My thanks to David Paxson for finding this information and sending me the print which is in the Library Company, e mails 5/23 and 24/2007.] Unfortunately, I do not know if the inset portrait is of John W. Paxson himself, or not. He would be in his late 50s by then, but a portrait need not show the sitter as he currently looks.

John was a Friend who used plain language in his correspondence (and presumably in his speech, but that is not documented; some of his letters remain). His wife's family were active Friends, too. This did not prevent John from attending a Baptist revival meeting and a Universalist service while in St. Louis. [See his letter of Feb 24th 1842 to Robert Shumaker, transcribed from the original in his possession by David W. Paxson, and sent to me 11m/15/2006.]

Anna died 27 January 1890 and was buried 30 January in Fair Hill cemetery in Philadelphia. [Hinshaw 2:907.] Her remains are in section 56, row G, lot #7, at a depth of eight feet. [Fair Hill interment records, sent by the generosity of Richard Biddle, 6m/2006.]

John W. was cremated and his ashes buried 8 January 1906 in section 86, row G, lot #7, Fair Hill cemetery. [Fair Hill interment records.]

Children of John W. and Anna (Burton) Paxson:

i. Mary B. Paxson, b. ca. 1853; died of typhus at the age of 13; bur. Fairhill Cemetery. On May 13th 1868 John wrote to his son Burt, at school, "Yesterday I took little brother out to Fair Hill Cemetery to see little sister's grave. Does thee ever think of her." [May 13th 1868]

ii. Sarah W. Paxson, b. ca. 1855 according to the 1880 census; called Sallie;

iii. Anthony Burton Paxson, b. 26 July 1855 (or ca. 1858 according to the 1880 census); d. 31 July 1894; called Burt; took over his father's business, but d. at the age of 39. Fair Hill Cemetery records him as 38 at the time of his death. Buried in the Friends cemetery in Philadelphia.

iv. Willett Paxson, b. 17 Apr. 1865; d. Saturday, 15 May 1886, aged 22 years and 28 days; bur. 19 May Fair Hill cemetery, section 22, row G, lot #7. As a minor he transferred from Green St. Mtg. to the Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia (aka Race St. Mtg.), received 17 June 1868. He was the youngest son. [Friends Intelligencer, 43:21 (May 22, 1886), 328; Hinshaw 2:907; Fair Hill interment records.]



David Paxson, the son of #156 Willett (Joshua4 William3, William2, William1) and his first wife Sarah (Wilson) Paxson, was born ca. 1818. He married Ann EVANS. They had no children.

I need to check the 1850 census to see if David and Ann were still living in Marple Township, where David grew up. If so, then he is probably the man who posted the following notice in the local newspaper:

Advertisement $100 REWARD. - Some evil disposed person killed a horse belonging to the subscriber, in Marple township, Delaware County, on the night of the 26th of June last, by cutting his throat. The above reward will be paid for such information as will lead to the detection and conviction of the person guilty of so great an outrage. DAVID PAXSON. Marple, July 5.[Delaware County Republican, July 5, 1850. My thanks to David Paxson, who sent this to me 3/14/2006.]

David apparently owned part of his father's farm, because in 1855 a notice of a Marple farm for sale mentioned that it was bounded by land of David Paxson. [Delaware County Republican, January 12, 1855.]

In the 1860 US federal census David, age 42, was listed with his wife Ann, age 30, living in Radnor Township. Both were born in Pennsylvania.[ p. 52, 1860 US census from US Genweb (seen 2/27/2006)] They lived on the residence of the late John Evans, and in 1863, in the midst of the Civil War, David sold off a number of plants collected by Evans. The newspaper noted:

SALE OF RARE PLANTS AND SHRUBBERY. - We call the attention of that portion of our readers who desire to beautify their residences by the introduction of rare plants and shrubbery to the advertisement of Mr. David Paxson, who will offer at public sale, on Monday next, at the late residence of John Evans, deceased in this county, a portion of the extensive collection of plants, &c., of that scientific gentleman. Mr. Evans was well known as one of the first among American botanists, and those who purchase at this sale, will not be disappointed in what they buy, being exactly as represented. The sale is the most important one of kind, perhaps ever made in our county. [Delaware County Republican, April 10, 1863. My thanks to David Paxson, who sent this to me 3/14/2006.]

Two years later David was ready to move on.

PUBLIC SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY. - Being about to decline my present business, I will sell at public sale, on WEDNESDAY, the 29th of MARCH, 1865, in Radnor township, Delaware county, Pa., a first rate TEAM of 5 HORSES, including an excellent leader, shafter and driving mare, with hears complete for the same. Also, a very superior yoke of large, young working cattle, 2 log carriages, in good order, lot of log chains, set of French burs in complete order, bolting chest with a lot of mill machinery. Also, about 40,000 feet of seasoned and partly seasoned lumber, consisting of white oak, hickory, walnut and poplar plank and boards, lot of hickory axles of assorted sizes. Also, a miscellaneous lot of lumber, consisting of lath, posts, rails, &c. Sale to commence at 1 o, when conditions will be made known by DAVID PAXSON. [Delaware County Republican, March 24, 1865. My thanks to David Paxson, who sent this to me 3/14/2006.]





Joseph Lukens6 Paxson, the son of #158 Joseph (Joshua4 William3, William2, William1) and his first wife Harriet (Lukens) Paxson, was born 20 January 1822 and died on 16 February 1868. In December 1847 Joseph and Anna Maria STEVENS were married.

In 1850 Lukens [mistranscribed as "Lukers"] and Anna M. were listed in the 1850 census in Upper Dublin, Montgomery County. He was a 28 year old farmer, Anna M. was 22. With them were Charles SCOTT (age 12), Charles Phipps (30), and Elizabeth NOONEY (19). [1850 federal census for Twp. of Upper Dublin, Montgomery Co., Pa., roll M432_800, page 69B, lines 29-33.]

Joseph (and perhaps Anna Maria?) was/were buried in the Presbyterian lot, Moorestown, N.J.. They are said to have had 7 children, but had none by August 24, 1850, in the census. Can a descendant fill me in?




Joshua Willett
6 Paxson, son of #163 Charles5 (Joshua4, William3, William2, William1) and Agnes (Tyson) Paxson, was born 29 July 1846.

In the 1880 US census Joshua was a single man of 34, farming his widowed mother's farm in Upper Dublin, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. With them lived three unmarried siblings, Sallie (36), Josephine (30), and Charles (19) as well as Lizzie MURRAY, a 19-year old white servant and Spencer HOFFMAN, a 14-year old white farm laborer, both born in Pennsylvania of Pennsylvania-born parents. [1880 census as found on www.familysearch.org]

Joshua was married later to ___ and had a son:

i. Walter R. Paxson7 married Ruth Chandlee; res. Islip, Long Island; 3 children.


Charles Sumner6 Paxson, son of #163 Charles5 (Joshua4, William3, William2, William1) and Agnes (TYSON) Paxson, was born 16 August 1860 at "SpringFarm". He died 4 February 1935 from pneumonia which developed from a cold caught during his son's wedding. Charles Sumner married Tacy LUKENS on 15 October 1884. She was born 17 July 1860 and died 28 September 1928.

In the 1880 US census Charles was a single man of 19, helping farm his widowed mother's place in Upper Dublin, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. With them lived three unmarried older siblings, Sallie (36), Joshua (34), and Josephine (30), as well as Lizzie Murray, a 19-year old white servant and Spencer Hoffman, a 14-year old white farm laborer, both born in Pennsylvania of Pennsylvania-born parents. [1880 census as found on www.familysearch.org]

Five years after they were married, Charles and Tacy raised the roof of their 1760 farm house so that one could stand erect in the attic. At the same time (1896) the roof was redone in slate, replacing the earlier wood shingles. It is still in place. [letter from William L. Paxson II, 4/23/2005.]

In 1900 the federal census was taken again and Charles was enumerated as a 39 year old farmer. His wife Tacy L. was reported as also being 39, born in July 1863, which does not quite compute. She had given birth to two children, both of whom were still living. Joshua T. was 14, at school, born in July 1885, while his younger brother William L. was 10, born in July 1889. There were three other people in the household. Louisa E. Miles was a 33 year old servant a "house maid", born in Germany and brought to this country as an infant. She was a widow with a four year old daughter, Iriene I. Miles, born in Pennsylvania with an English-born father. Finally, there was James Wood, a boarder. He was a 32 year old farm laborer, born in Pennsylvania of German parents. [Federal census, 1900 for Upper Dublin Township, Montgomery County, Penna., lines 19-25, p. 15-A, Enum. Dist. 254, schedule image seen 11/28/2007 on Ancestry.com.]

Charles ran a dairy farm until 1912. In October that year the barn burned, destroying his dairy herd of 18 cows. The cause of the fire was never determined: spontaneous combustion? lightning? Charles turned then to truck farming. He raised wheat, and sweet and field corn, which he took by wagon load into Philadelphia to sell. On his return trip the wagon was loaded with manure from stables in the city. Charles was treasurer of Horsham Monthly Meeting. [Letters from William L. Paxson II, 6/15/2003.]

In 1920 the federal census again enumerated Charles, this time as a 59 year old farmer engaged in general farming. His wife Tacy L. was also 59. Their unmarried 30 year old son William lived with them, along with Tacy's unmarried younger sister, 55 year old "Sielorea" [?] H. Lukens and a 54 year old unmarried "hired man" named John Williams, who was a farm laborer. [Federal census, 1920 for Upper Dublin Township, Montgomery County, Penna., lines 19-25, p. 15-A, Enum. Dist. 180, schedule image seen 11/28/2007 on Ancestry.com.]

A decade later the 1930 census enumerator listed Charles S. Paxson with William L. Paxson, Sidnea P. LUKENS, and James KETT (born ca. 1885) in Upper Dublin Township. [Federal census, 1930 for Upper Dublin Township, Montgomery County, Penna., Sheet 8a abstracted, and seen 5/28/2009 on www.footnote.com.]

Children of Charles Sumner and Tacy (Lukens) Paxson:

i. Joshua Tyson Paxson7, b. 4 July 1885; d. 2 Sept. 1949; m. 19 March 1918 Helen B. SEARIGHT. Helen was the second wife of John C. Searight (b. 12/1869; drowned in the Niagara River sometime prior to January 1920. [date of death from Marty Searight, e mail 5/28/2005; other information from Steve Searight, e mail 3m/9/2005.]

ii.  William Lukens Paxson, b. 15 July 1889; d. 21 June 1955; m. 23 Jan. 1935 Augusta HELMSTETTER; 1 son




Edward Ely6 Paxson, son of #164 Joshua5 (Joshua4, William3, William2, William1) and his wife Anna W. Ely, was born 6 May 1849 and died 2 January 1864, during the Civil War (not that he was involved in the war). His body was buried in Fair Hill cemetery in Philadelphia. He was only 15. Although his date of death was entered in the records of Race Street Meeting, it was noted that Edward was not a member of that meeting. [Hinshaw2:813; his death was noted in Friends Intelligencer20:728 (1864)] He was not married and left no children.





Franklin Comly6 Paxson, son of #165 William Laurens5 (Joshua4, William3, William2, William1) and his wife Sarah Willett Comly, was born 16 November 1839. I need more information. Is there a vewer who can help?

In 1877 Franklin's parents moved out to Oxford, Chester County.

It is possible that this was the Frank Paxson who was living near the Sadsbury meeting house when a great tornado roared through Chester County in 1877. "He was lying down that afternoon and had his attention suddenly called to a great roaring sound without. He had scarcely time to go to his front door and examine the situation, when his large stone structure encountered a tremendous blast of wind, and all was over in a moment. He then looked out upon the scene: his barn was entirely demolished, and also all his outbuildings. The trap door of his house was carried off, and all his carriages and farming utensils were gone. The trees near his dwelling, strange to say, were saved, while his orchard was uprooted from one end to the other. I observed one of his large apple trees, not only blown over, but carried about fifty feet from its proper place." [Friends Intelligencer 51:11 (Oct. 27, 1877), 82.]

In 1887 Franklin's widowed mother moved to Germantown to live with him and his widowed sister. So if Frank was in the 1877 tornado in Chester County, he had moved to Germantown in Philadelphia County by 1887. In August 1888 the funeral of his aunt Anna Paxson BURTON was held at his home on Ross Street, Germantown.

Franklin C. was living at 5344 Ross Street, in Germantown when he was listed as a "treasurer" in the 1895 Gopsill's Philadelphia City Directory. The following year's edition (it was published annually in March) lists him living on Clarkson Avenue, Germantown, and in 1897 on Wissahickon Avenue.




George W.6 Paxson, son of #174 Joshua5 (Thomas4, William3, William2, William1) and his wife Elizabeth Walker. George was b. ca. 1817. He married 12 March 1835 Lucretia B. HELLINGS, the daughter of John Hellings of Bristol, at the house of her father, by Elder Frederick PLUMMER. [Bucks County Intelligencer]

In the 1850 census George was enumerated as a 33 year old carpenter with $600 worth of property, living in Bristol Borough with his 31 year old wife Lucretia and three school children: Mary C. (14), Catharine (8), and Hannah M. (5). They were all born in Pennsylvania. [1850 federal census for Borough of Bristol., Bucks Co., Pa., roll M432_759, p. 20B, lines 2-6.]

He was listed as George "Paxon", a carpenter living on Cedar in Bristol Borough in 1871. [1872 Bucks Co. Directory, p. 51.]

George W.'s will is file #20119 on the list of the Register of Wills. [ Bucks County Courthouse, Doylestown (seen 8/1987).]

Children of George W. and Lucretia B. (Hellings) as given on worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=hellingsfamily&id=I1048

i. Mary C. Paxson7, b. ca. 1836, a school girl in the 1850 census.

ii. Catharine H. Paxson, called Kate, b. ca. 1842, attending school in the 1850 census

iii. Hannah Maria Paxson, b. ca. 1845; attendd schol in 1850 census;




Thomas6 Paxson, son of #174 Joshua5 (Thomas4 #67, Thomas3 #22, William2, William1) and his wife Elizabeth Walker. Thomas married twice. First he and Ann BUNTING were married 2 February 1843, and had four children. Ann died 3 march 1859 at the age of 36. He married secondly Mary ETTINGER and had six more children. [My thanks to Donna Goodwin, e mail Oct. 8, 2009, for informing me about these two wives.]

Thomas was named co-executor for his uncle John Paxson's will, signed 29 June 1846. John left half of his estate, after other bequests and debts were paid, to Thomas, and $100 to John, the "infant son" of Thomas. The estate inventory totalled to $17,498.18, including various debts such as $184.27 owed to Thomas. [Bucks Co. will file #10079.]

In the 1850 census Thomas was 28 year old laborer living with his wife Ann of the same age and their children John (6), Susannah (4) and infant James in Middletown Twp with Ann's parents, James (55) and Elizabeth (54) BUNTING. The older man was a huckster. All were born in Pennsylvania. [1850 federal census for Middletown Twp., Bucks Co., Pa., roll M432_758, p. 316B, lines 7-14. Taken Aug. 14, 1850, poor quality photo image.]

It seems quite likely that Thomas is the 58 year old Thomas Paxson appearing in the 1880 census for Middletown Township. He was a farmer, with a 43 year old wife, Mary, keeping house. There were four minor children living with them. [1880 census for Middletown Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, Family History Library Film 1255106, Page Number 369A]

Children of Thomas and his first wife Ann (Bunting) Paxson: [My thanks to Donna Goodwin, e mail Oct. 8, 2009, for the names and dates of all ten children. Additional information from Donna she got from William A. Collins, used by permission.]

i.       John Paxson7, b. 1844; d. 5 Mar. 1879; m. 10 Sept. 1872 Mary JENKS; 1 child.

ii.     Susanna K. Paxson, b. 28 Aug. 1846; d. 7 June 1869 at the age of 22; m. 1866 Israel ALLEN; 1 child: Anna Mary Allen, b. 8 Jan. 1867; m. Frank DALY and resided in Asbury Park, Monmouth Co., NJ. In the 1880 census for Bristol Township, Bucks Co., Israel Allen, age 40, was living with Levi and Laura FORCE and their two young children. [1880 census as transcribed on FamilySearch, NA film no. T9-1105, page 7B.] I could not locate Anna in either Penna. or NJ in the 1880 census.

iii.   James B. Paxson, b. 2 or 7 Feb. 1850; d. 17 May 1891; m. 27 Jan. 1875 Phebe R. DARRAH; 2 children.

iv.   Joshua S. Paxson, b. 23 Oct. 1853; d. 8 Dec. 1863 at the age of ten.

Children of Thomas and his second wife Mary (Ettinger) Paxson:

Elizabeth Walker Paxson Wilmot, ca. 1926 Elizabeth Walker Paxson Wilmot, ca. 1922 v.     William E. Paxson, b. 10 Feb. 1863; age 17 and farming in the 1880 census;

vi.   Elizabeth Walker Paxson, b. 22 Jan. 1865; d. ca. 1926; m. Edward Pidcock WILMOT. Edward was b. Aug. 1862, son of John Wilmot and Mary (PIDCOCK) Wilmot; they had 8 children. At age 15, in the 1880 census, Elizabeth was at home. My thanks to Donna Goodwin for the two photos of Elizabeth, in 1922 and 1926.
a) William Wilmot, b. Jan. 1886;
b) Augustus Wildman Wilmot b. 20 Sept. 1887;
c) Laura H. Wilmot, b. July 1890;
d) Mary P. Wilmot, b. Sept. 1891;
e) Gladys V. Wilmot, b. Dec. 1896;
f) Francis S. Wilmot, b. Mar. 1898;
g) Edward P. Wilmot, b. 1900;
h) Charles Reed Wilmot, b. 7 Dec. 1901; d. 26 Sept. 1981;
vii.    Melissa Paxson, b. 1866; d. 1866.

viii.  Charles W. Paxson, b. 1867; must have died young, is not in 1870 Census.

v.       Sarah E. Paxson, b. 14 Apr 1869; age 11 and attending school in the 1880 census;

vi.     Viola Paxson, b. ca. 1877; age 3 in the 1880 census;




Descendants of Henry3 and Martha (Shinn) Paxson
Grandsons of Samuel and his wife Beulah (Atkinson) Paxson


Henry Clay6Paxson, son of #184 Stacy Atkinson5 Paxson, (Samuel4, Henry3, William2, William1) and his wife Mary (VanCleve) Paxson, was born 19 December 1832, and died on 25 July 1902. He married Myra C. G. OUTLAW.




James Olden6 Paxson, son of #184 Stacy Atkinson5 Paxson, (Samuel4, Henry3, William2, William1) and his wife Mary (VanCleve) Paxson, was born 14 August 1834. He died 21 July 1863.

James O. fought in the Civil War as a Captain, 48th Infantry Volunteers from New York. On July 2, 1862, he was ordered to take a flag of truce to deliver letters and two prisoners to the Confederates on the Savannah River. Here is his official order:

        You will proceed to-morrow morning by water with a flag of truce to the enemy's lines taking in charge two prisoners of war, Antonio Ponce, jr., and Ashley M. Shaw, who were captured at the surrender of Fort Pulaski on the 11th day of April last and who are released by order of Major-General Hunter, commanding the Department of the South. You will be provided with a letter to the commanding officer at Fort Jackson and you will deliver it and the prisoners to the officer by whom you shall be received. You will also take charge of a number of letters addressed to persons residing in the States of Georgia, South Carolina, &c., a portion of which are from the prisoners captured at Pulaski; the remainder are from other persons. You will deliver none of these letters unless all are received and received with the understanding that subject to ordinary military inspection they are to be forwarded to the persons to whom they are addressed whether they come from prisoners or others. Should it be required you will pay the postage on those letters which are not from the prisoners.

        You will proceed in an open and public manner in strict conformity with the laws and usages governing flags of truce. Your party will consist of eight men, over whom you will exercise a careful supervision in order that they may give no information to the enemy. Should you be obliged to leave them you will caution them to hold no conversation with any person relative to military matters. Having accomplished the object of your mission you will return with all possible dispatch to this post.

        I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
        ALFRED H. TERRY,
        Brigadier- General. [United States. War Dept., United States. Record and Pension Office., United States. War Records Office., et al., The war of the rebellion: a compilation of the official records of the Union and Confederate armies. Series 2 - Volume 4 (Washington, D.C.: Govt. Print. Office, 1899), 115-116.
]

        The official letter that he carried was as follows:

                HDQRs. U. S. FORCES, HILTON HEAD, COCKSPUR, &C.,
                Port Pulaski, July 2, 18G2.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Port Jackson, Savannah River:

        The bearer of this, Lieut. James 0. Paxson, of the Forty-eighth Regiment New York State Volunteers, is instructed to proceed to your lines under a flag of truce and there deliver to you two prisoners of war, Antonio Ponce, jr., and A. M. Shaw, who were captured at Fort Pulaski on the 11th of April last and who are now released by order of Major-General Hunter, commanding Department of the South.

        Lieutenant Paxson has also in charge a number of letters addressed to persons residing in the States of Georgia, South Carolina, Florida, &c.

        As far the larger portion of these letters are from prisoners of war captured at Pulaski—the others are from other persons—Lieutenant Paxson is instructed to deliver none of them unless all shall be received with the understanding that, subject to ordinary military inspection, they are to be forwarded to the persons to whom they are addressed.

        I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
        ALFRED H. TERRY,
        Brigadier- General, Commanding. [United States. War Dept., United States. Record and Pension Office., United States. War Records Office., et al., The war of the rebellion: a compilation of the official records of the Union and Confederate armies. Series 2 - Volume 4 (Washington, D.C.: Govt. Print. Office, 1899), 116.
]

        James carried out his mission successfully, and the report sent in on July 5, 1862, from Brig.-Gen. Terry, said:

        I have the honor to report that in obedience to instructions received from the major-general commanding the Department of the South I this morning sent Lieut. James 0. Paxson, of the Forty-eighth Regiment New York Volunteers, with a flag of truce to the enemy's lines on the Savannah River. Lieutenant Paxson had in charge the two prisoners of war, Antonio Ponce, jr., and Ashley M. Shaw, captured at this place on the 11th of April, whom I was directed to send to Savannah, the letters which I received from you and a large number of letters, most of them written by persons taken at Pulaski and which have been in my possession since the fall of the fort. Lieutenant Paxson was instructed to deliver all of these letters or none. He proceeded up the river until halted by the rebel outpost on the west bank of Saint Augustine Creek he was there detained until the arrival of a commissioned officer to whom he delivered the persons and the letters. No objection was made to the reception of these letters. Having accomplished the object of the flag he returned to this post. [United States. War Dept., United States. Record and Pension Office., United States. War Records Office., et al., The war of the rebellion: a compilation of the official records of the Union and Confederate armies. Series 2 - Volume 4 (Washington, D.C.: Govt. Print. Office, 1899), 116.]

        The following year Capt. James took part in the siege of Battery Wagner, July 18 to September 7, 1863. But he was mortally wounded on the first day of the battle. [United States. War Dept., United States. Record and Pension Office., United States. War Records Office., et al., The war of the rebellion: a compilation of the official records of the Union and Confederate armies. Series 1, Volume 28, Part II (Washington, D.C.: Govt. Print. Office, 1890), .]





Stacy Atkinson
6 Paxson, son of #184 Stacy Atkinson5 Paxson, (Samuel4, Henry3, William2, William1) and his wife Mary (VanCleve) Paxson, was born 9 January 1840, and died 1 February 1875. He married Louise E. LATHROP.





Franklin VanCleve6 Paxson, son of #184 Stacy Atkinson5 Paxson, (Samuel4, Henry3, William2, William1) and his wife Mary (VanCleve) Paxson, was born 28 February 1844. He died ca. 1868. Franklin was married to Emma WALKER.

Frank, from New Jersey, was granted an M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in the spring of 1864. [Medical and Surgical Reporter, 11:12 (Mar. 19, 1864), p. 183.]

children??




Descendants of James3 and his two wives, Mary (Horseman) and Margaret (Hodges) Paxson
Grandsons of Thomas and his wife Mary (Hambleton) Paxson



Thomas Paxson, the son of #191 James5 Paxson, (Thomas4, James3, William Jr.2, James1) and Amy (Coate), was born 19 November 1781 and died 5 July 1837. Thomas married Elizabeth GREEN, daughter of James and Martha (Foulke) Green. Elizabeth was born 1 November 1781. [Suzanne P. Lamborn, The Paxson Family, 11, lists Thomas's wife as Elizabeth MILLER.]

Thomas was not quite 15 years old in the summer of 1796 when he moved with his parents from Buckingham Meeting in Bucks County to what was then the frontier at Catawissa Meeting in Columbia County. His parents were living at Muncy Creek in Lycoming County at the time of Thomas's marriage on 30 Ninth Month 1807 to Elizabeth Green. Their marriage certificate was signed by James and Amy Paxson, among others. ["Genealogical Records of members of the Society of Friends Composing Catawissa Monthly Meeting, Columbia County, Pa.", compiled by John E. Eshelman, Jan. 1947, pp. 7, 104, included in the Collections of the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania at the HSP.]

Children of Thomas and Elizabeth (Green) Paxson: [Barbara Feeser Gill, "The Paxson Family from England to Edenbower, Schuylkill County Pennsylvania: The Ancestors of Iona Paxson Freeser" (unpublished mms kindly sent to me by the author, 6/2002, pp. 89-90.]

i. James Paxson, b. 1 July 1814;

ii. Margaret Paxson, b. 22 Sept. 1817;

iii. Mary Paxson, b. 23 Sept. 1819;

iv. Amy Paxson, b. 19 Jan. 1821; d. 23 Mar. 1856; m. Stephen KISTER [KESTER?]

v. Matilda Paxson, b. 30 Sept. 1823;

vi. John M. Paxson, b. 5 Mar. 1825;

vii. Lewis Paxson, b. 20 Sept. 1828; it may be this Lewis Paxson who mar Louisa S. She d. 7 Feb. 1877 in Manchester, Iowa, in her 67th year, retaining her membership in Wilmington (Del.) Meeting. Her death notice was in The Friend, Vol. L, no. 34 (7/4m/1877), p. 272. I would be glad to hear from a descendant to corroborate or correct this assumption.

viii. Thomas Paxson, Jr., b. 29 Jan. 1831;

ix. Henry Paxson, b. 16 June 1835



Ahaz Paxson, the son of #191 James5 Paxson, (Thomas4, James3, William Jr.2, James1) and Amy (Coate), was born 30 October 1785. He died on 20 August 1825 in New York. Ahaz married Peninah CHILCOT, daughter of Amos and Ann.

Ahaz removed with his parents from Buckingham Meeting in Bucks County to what was then the frontier at Catawissa Meeting in Columbia County. Ahaz signed the marriage certificate of Job McCARTY and Jane WALTON on 26 Tenth Month 1808. The following year Ahaz's own marriage certificate was signed 25 Tenth Month 1809 by his parents James and Amy Paxson, and his siblings Thomas, Abraham, John, Stacy, and Elizabeth Paxson. ["Genealogical Records of members of the Society of Friends Composing Catawissa Monthly Meeting, Columbia County, Pa.", compiled by John E. Eshelman, Jan. 1947, pp. 8, 9, 104, included in the Collections of the Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania at the HSP.]

Children of Ahaz and Peninah (Chilcot) Paxson: [Barbara Feeser Gill, "The Paxson Family from England to Edenbower, Schuylkill County Pennsylvania: The Ancestors of Iona Paxson Freeser" (unpublished mms kindly sent to me by the author, 6/2002, pp. 89-90.]
i. Amos Paxson7,

ii. Seth Paxson,

iii. Thomas Paxson,



Abraham Paxson, the son of #191 James5 Paxson, (Thomas4, James3, William Jr.2, James1) and Amy (Coate), was born 2 November 1789 and died 18 September 1845 in New York.




James Paxson, Jr.6, the son of #191 James5 Paxson, (Thomas4, James3, William Jr.2, James1) and Amy (Coate), was born 12 Feb. 1792. He married 26 Second Month 1817 Sarah CHILCOTT, daughter of Amos and Ann of Muncy. [Extracts from Catawissa and Muncy Meeting records, Genealogical Records of Members of the Society of Friends Comprising Catawissa Monthly Meeting, Columbia County, Pennsylvania, comp. by John E. Eastburn, Jan. 1947, 19.] I do not know if they had any children. Is there a reader out there who can help on this?



John Paxson6, the son of #191 James5 Paxson, (Thomas4, James3, William Jr.2, James1) and Amy (Coate), was born 25 May 1794. He married Abigail CHILCOTT. [The marriage from Lamborn, The Paxson Family, 11.]

John Paxson enumerated in the 1850 census as a 55 year old farmer in Aurora, Erie County, New York, on land valued at $2,500. His wife Abigail was 52. Three children lived with them, Daughter Amazilla, age 23, and two school children Theodore, 13, and Myron, 10. All five were born in Pennsylvania. [1850 federal census for Town of Auroral, Erie Co., N.Y., roll M432_498, p. 86B, lines 10-14.]

Children of John and Abigail (Chilcott) Paxson (may be incomplete):

i. Amazilla Paxson7, b. ca. 1827; she was unmarried and living with her parents in the 1850 census;

ii. Theodore Paxson, b. ca. 1837;

iii. Myron Paxson, b. ca. 1840;



Descendants of James3 and his two wives, Mary (Horseman) and Margaret (Hodges) Paxson
Grandsons of Jonas and his wives Mary (Kester) and Mary (Broadhurst) Paxson

Bright Rupert Paxton, son of #203 Joseph5 (Jonas4 #86, James3 #30, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Catherine RUPERT Paxton, was born in Catawissa, Columbia County, on 3 February 1814 and died 28 March 1903. He married 27 July 1837 in Bloomsburg Emmeline BARTON, the daughter of John and Mary Catherine (KREIDER) Barton. Emmeline was born 6 August 1818 inBloomsburg, and died in San Francisco at the age of ninety-one on 17 March 1909.

Bright received a local education and followed his father into the tanning business. The 1850 census lists him as a tanner with real estate valued at $700. He was living in Catawissa Township with his wife and five children, one unrelated woman (servant?) and two apprentice tanners, both 24 years old.

Blair's Rhetoric title page This copy of Blair's Rhetoric belonged to Bright R. Paxton, and has his signature on the title page.

On 10 September 1860 the federal census enumerator recorded the family of nine living in the Lairdsville P.O. area, Franklin Township, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. Bright was listed as a 46 year old tanner with his 42 year old wife "Emaline". Living at home were their children: Henry, 22; J. Barton, 19, a student; Joseph, 12; Mary B., 10; Edward, 9; Leonard, 5; and George, 1. All but Henry and George were listed as in school. [1860 census Lycoming Co., Penna., roll M653_1136, p. 211, lines 6-14, image of the census schedule seen on Ancestry.com, 1/25/2007.]

Later he became a merchant, and operated a general store in Lairdsville for a number of years. The 1880 census enumerator found Bright and "Emaline" [sic] with three of their children (Edward, George, and Katherine) living in Franklin Township, Lycoming County. Bright was listed as a farmer, Edward as a laborer, and George as a printer. [1880 census as given on www.familysearch.org, 3/2005] There was a family reunion in Lairdsville in 1887 to celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary.

On 1 May 1880 Bright purchased at sheriff's sale the residence of William SMEDLEY at 822 North 40th St. in Philadelphia. Bright was very ill in 1888-'89, and his daughter Katherine came home to help her mother nurse him. After his recovery, Katherine went to San Francisco to teach.

souvenir spoon from Los Angeles, and embroidered 'P' on a linen table napkin

Bright also owned an orange grove on the Indian River in Florida, adjoining that of his eldest son Henry. He spent his winters there until he removed to Los Angeles in 1894 or 1895. However, he is listed in the 1895 Gopsill's Philadelphia City Directory living at 822 North 40th Street, Philadelphia. He was enumerated in Los Angeles on 6 June 1900 for the federal census. Bright, an 86 year old farmer, lived at 229 30th Street, in Los Angeles' 6th Ward. Emeline B., his wife of 63 years, was 82. She had had ten children, of whom 8 survived. With them lived Isabel WHITE, housekeeper. She listed her birthday as 13 November 1832 in Indiana, of Indiana-born parents. She was a widow who had borne seven children, of whom three survived. [1900 census for Los Angeles, Calif., roll T623_89, Enumeration District 51, page 7B, sheet 7B, lines 66-68, image seen on Ancestry.com, 1/25/2007.]

Souvenir spoons became a craze in 1890, that peaked in 1896, but continued on as quite a fad into the 1920s. To the right is a souvenir teaspoon of Los Angeles, California. It is lying on a white dinner napkin embroidered with the initial "P".

Bright died in Los Angeles 28 March 1903 at the age of eighty nine. Emmeline died in San Francisco 17 March 1909.

Children of Bright Rupert and Emmeline (Barton) Paxton:

i.    Henry Bright Paxton7, b. 14 Aug. 1838 in Catawissa; d. 26 Dec. 1926 in Rockledge, Florida; m. 26 Dec. 1867 in Schuylkill Haven, Pa., Frances Heilman KOONS, the daughter of Philip and Mary Ann. She was b. 6 Aug. 1839; d. 17 Sept. 1928 in Rockledge, Fla. Henry was a fruit grower. 3 children.

ii.    Charles Rupert Paxton, b. 5 May 1840 in Catawissa; d. 14 June 1914 in Sawtelle, Calif.; m. 30 May 1866 Josephine Frances WOOD; no children.

iii.   John Barton Paxton, b. 3 Mar. 1842 in Catawissa; d. 14 Mar. 1913 in Philadelphia; m(1) 5 Sept. 1867 in West Chester Sue Jones PRICE; m(2) 15 Nov. 1877, Anne Jones PRICE.

iv.   Joseph Paxton, b. 17 Mar. 1846 in Catawissa; d. 14 Jan. 1919 in Rockledge, Fla.; m. 14 Dec. 1879 Anne Leland HATCH, daughter of Andrew Leland and Mary Virginia (Hogsett). She was b. 4 Feb. 1862; d. 24 Dec. 1940 in Rockledge; 3 children.

v.    Mary Barton Paxton, called May, b. 17 July 1848 in Catawissa; d. 5 Mar. 1899 in Los Angeles; unmarried; moved to New Mexico ca. 1880s with her brothers Charlie and Leonard.

vi.    Edward Paxton, b. 12 Apr. 1851 in Catawissa; d. 20 Dec. 1928 in Kennett, Calif.; unmarried.

vii.    Hervey Barton Paxton, b. 29 Apr. 1853 in Catawissa or Lairdsville; d. 11 June 1855 in Lairdsville, Pa.

viii.    Leonard Rupert Paxton, b. 3 Aug. 1855 in Lairdsville; d. 19 Apr. 1935 in Rivera, Calif.; m. 17 Nov. 1885 in Flagstaff, Ariz., Stella RAWSON, the daughter of Richard and Laura (Bruce). Stella was b. 11 Apr. 1858 in Hiram, Ohio; d. 16 Aug. 1936 in Rivera, Calif.; 4 children.
Katharine R. Paxton autograph quilt block
ix.    George Scott Paxton, b. 1 Mar. 1859 in Lairdsville; d. 4 Apr. 1912 in Los Angeles; unmarried.

x.    Katharine Rupert Paxton, b. 14 Aug. 1861 in either Lairdsville or Franklin Township, Lycoming County, Penna.; d. 26 June 1945 in Merion, Montgomery Co., and bur. Drexel Hill, Delaware Co., Penna. She taught in San Francisco from ca. 1889, lived through the earthquake and fire, and was there for the 1910 census. She was "head" of her household that had a lodger, 45-year old Herbert Gilchrist, a marine engineer. [1910 Census, Assembly District 34, page 1B, enumeration district 96, microfilm roll T624_97.] She went to Paris to study at the Sorbonne, coming home when World War I began. Since she loved Paris she joined the Red Cross and returned to France in November 1916. In the summer of 1920 she signed an autograph quilt for her niece, Sue Paxton EDMUNDS. She returned to France at least twice more, in October 1920 to study language in France and also to visit England and Italy; and in July 1924 she applied for a US passport for "temporary residence" in France and travel around much of the rest of Europe. In the 1930 census at the age of 68 she was living in an apartment building at 4742 Pine Street in Philadelphia. She gave no occupation. Her great niece, Adeline W. Edmunds, remembered Katharine's exquisite taste and grande dame airs. She learned to drive an automobile quite late in life, to the terror of her passengers.





from

Charles Rupert6 Paxton, son of #203 Joseph5 (Jonas4, James3, William Jr.2, James1) and his wife Catherine RUPERT Paxton, was born 2 March 1816 and died in 1888 in Leesburg, Va. He married on 27 November 1843 Rachel A. CHARLES. She was born 11 February 1827 in N.Y., and died 30 December 1921 in Leesburg. This image of Rachel hangs in the hall of Carlheim. If any reader has a photograph of Charles I would be delighted to hear from you at .

In the 1870 US census Charles R. and Rachael [sic] were living in the East Ward of the town of Bloomsburg. Charles was listed as 54, Rachel as 44, and their daughter Maggie as 20 years old. [p. 50B, 1870 US census from US Genweb (seen 2/27/2006).]

Irondale Inn, former home of Charles R. Paxton

Charles was president of the Bloomsburg Railroad and Iron Co. and lived in a mansion near the furnaces. Charles moved to Virginia ca. 1874. He left at a propitious time, as the iron ore gave out soon after. By 1914 his mansion had become a tenement house. However, times change, and by 2007 it had been restored as the Irondale Inn, a lovely B&B on Irondale Road off of Iron Street near the water treatment plant. The house is seen here as it looked in January 2010.

In the 1880 census Charles was enumerated as a 64 year old farmer in Leesburg, Loudon County, Virginia. He called his estate "Carlheim". Living in the same household were his 54 year old wife, who was keeping house, and his 30 year old daughter, the widow Margaret Christian, and her son Charles P., age 4, born in Virginia. Befitting an upper class household, there were more servants than served. Forty year old Caucasian Sarah MITCHEL and 45 year old African American Mariah COLSTON were "servants in the house" while Mariah's son (?) 20 year old Robert Colston was a "Servant on The Place". Then there was John LEVELL, 30 year old Englishman, the gardener, his wife 28 year old Mariah J. Levell, also born in England, and their two children Emily (5) and Ida (3), both born in Virginia. [1880 federal census as transcribed on FamilySearch, NA Film # T9-1375, p. 363C, seen 12/13/2007. The house was an elegant mansion northeast of town, designed by Henry DUDLEY of New York. It was described in some detail in the local Leesburg newspaper, The Washingtonian, of Saturday, April 27, 1872. The mansion, with wings, was 130 by 132 feet, two storeys, with a Mansard roof and a tower 75 feet high. tower

     The building fronts to the South, and is entered through a large door-way of cut stone, with double doors of solid oak, three inches thick. The vestibule is ten by ten, paved with encaustic tile, and finished with oak to correspond with the door-way and hall.
     Passing the vestibule through large double doors of oak, with plate-glass pannels, we enter the hall, twelve by forty-five, which is finished with heavy pannelled wainscoating of oak. On the left is the parlor, eighteen by thirty, with splendid bay windows, finished in pine and to be painted in tints, with a beautiful and elegantly wrought mantle of Italian statuary marble. Connected with the parlor, is the library, sixteen by twenty, elegantly finished with black walnut, with mantle of handsomely wrought Lisbon marble.
     On the right is the stairway hall, containing a solid oak Staircase, a rare piece of workmanship, with heavy oak rail and balusters, splendidly lighted with a large triple window. In front is the door leading to the dining room—a large and handsome Room, lighted with three large plate glass windows, running to the floor, and is finished in ash, with pannelled wainscoating, and a beautiful mantle of Tennessee marble. Adjoining the dining room, is the butler's pantry and china closet, finished with cases and shelving of chestnut. From the dining room a corridor with closets on each side leads to the office, back staircase and wing building. The office contains a fire and burglar proof vault, and is one of a suit, consisting of bed, dressing, bath rooms and office, which are all finished in black walnut and chestnut.
     The wing contains the kitchen, servants' hall, laundry, ice-house, dairy, wood-house, &c., all finished in chestnut and pine.
     The second story of the main building, contains a splendid hall, finished with oak wainscoting, with arched glass ceiling, and lighted with two sky-lights. There is on this floor a large and elegant billiard room, handsomely finished with oak, with a beautiful mantle of Lisbon marble. The remainder of this floor is taken up with bed and dressing rooms, bath and work rooms, closets, &c., which are finished with black walnut, oak, ash, chestnut and pine—each bed room with mantles of white, or dove colored marble.
     The attic story contains a water-tank with a capacity of 4,000 gallons, supplied with rain water from the roof of the building and communicating with all the rooms by galvanized iron pipes. The building will be lighted with gas. An ingenious arrangement of electric burglar alarms is attached to all the outer doors, put up by the American electric clock company, of Washington, D.C. [My thanks to Lori Kimball, who transcribed it in August 2007, and sent me a copy 12/12/2007.]

Charles kept a Commonplace book in which he recorded all kinds of things that struck his interest about iron ore, railroads, geometry, arches, and farming (including a recipe for preventing sows from eating their piglets). There is also an account book that lists purchases and sales for his various farms, but unfortunately someone started to paste recipes (from newspaper clippings) on top of the account lists. He owned over 7,800 acres in Loudoun County.[The commonplace and account books are part of the Rachel Paxton Papers at the Thomas Balch Library in Leesburg. My thanks to Lori Kimball for this information, e mail, June 27, 2007.]

Rachel

Charles predeceased his wife. Rachel continued to be an active part of the social and cultural life of Leesburg. When she died, her will specified that the Paxton mansion be left to care for needy or sick children. ["The Carlheim Mansion", episode 125 of a local Leesburg TV show, On This Ground. My great thanks to Lori Kimball for sending me a DVD of the show.]

Charles, Rachel, and their grandson Charles Paxton Christian were buried in Union Cemetery in Leesburg. However, Lori Kimball, who is researching the family as part of a project to restore their Leesburg mansion, found that "an old cemetery book says Charles and Rachel each have a stone on the ground, however neither stone is present today (or they are completely covered by grass). There is a small stone with hard-to-read engraving that I'm fairly certain is their grandson. He is definitely buried in the cemetery, and the small stone is likely his. In the middle of the plot is a huge Celtic cross with the name Paxton on it, however there is no mention of the cross in the old cemetery book!" [E mail from Lori, 12/12/2007.

Rachel's obituary in a Bloomsburg paper mentioned that she was 97 years old, died on a Friday and was buried Monday. Mostly it mentioned Charles. Margaret,

    Mrs. Paxton's husband was at one time president of the First National Bank of Bloomsburg and also president of the Bloomsburg Iron Company.
    Her husband was the son of Colonel Joseph Paxton, builder of the Catawissa Railroad. Her husband's brothers were Lloyd Paxton, who for many years resided at the Paxton home in Rupert; Frank and Bright Paxton. A sister of her husband was Mrs. Scott, the mother of Mrs. K. P. Willits, of Market street. For many years her husband and she resided in Catawissa, and later, for a number of years, they lived at Irondale in the house now occupied by George J. Vanderslice. [My thanks to Lori Kimball for sending me a facsimile of the newspaper obituary, Aug. 4, 2007.
Rachel left some of her property to her nephew Alexis Paxton, son of Joseph, including a landscape painting. [My thanks to Lori Kimball for this information, e mail, July 10, 2007.]

Child of Charles Rupert and Rachel A. (Charles) Paxton:

i.   Margaret Paxton7, called "Maggie", b. 19 May 1850 in New York; m. 22 May 1875 Bolivar CHRISTIAN. He was b. 26 Apr. 1825 or 1826 in Augusta, Va., son of John Brownlee and Jane Tate (FINLEY) Christian. They had separated or divorced by the 1880 census when Margaret was listed as a widow. Margaret had a son, Charles Paxton Christian, who died young. She later remarried and moved to New York, but had no more issue. This photograph of Maggie hangs in the hall of Carlheim. My thanks to Lori Kimball for a copy of it, e mail 5/21/2010.




Benjamin Franklin6 Paxton, son of #203 Joseph5 (Jonas4,James3, William Jr.2, James1) and his wife Catherine RUPERT Paxton, was born 4 Ocober 1823. He died in Philadelphia. He married 15 January 1858 Susan M. LLOYD.

Child of Benjamin Franklin and Susan M. (Lloyd) Paxton:

i. Fannie Paxton7.





Joseph Rupert
6 Paxton, son of #203 Joseph5 (Jonas4, James3, William Jr.2, James1) and his wife Catherine RUPERT Paxton, was born 2 July 1827 in Columbia Co., Penna., and died 20 August 1867 in Galveston or Houston, Texas. He married on 1 or 21 January 1849 Sarah C. WHIPPLE.[Most of the information for this entry is from The Cyclopaedia of American Biography (NY: 1915), 4:n.p. It says he died in Houston, and was admitted to the Phila. bar in 1849.]

Joseph graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1845 and was admitted to the Penna. bar in 1848. In 1854-55 he edited Bizarre magazine in Philadelphia. When the Civil War began he declined a diplomatic post and was appointed Captain in the 15th U.S. Infantry. His only son, Alexis R. accompanied him at the battle of Nashville where Joseph was on the staff of Gen. George H. Thomas. Joseph resigned 1 July 1865.

In 1866 he travelled in Europe to gather material for further literary work. He translated works from French to English and vice versa, and dramatized many of Charles Dickens's stories. He wrote "Jewelry and the Precious Stones, by Hipponax Roset", an anagram (Phila. 1856). He was well known in Philadelphia social circles for his genial nature.

Children of Joseph Rupert and Sarah C. (Whipple) Paxton:

i. Alexis R. Paxton, became a career army officer.

ii. Marie B. Paxton

iii. Cecil Paxton

iv. Rosabel Paxton




Thomas Lloyd6 Paxton, called Lloyd, son of #203 Joseph5 (Jonas4 #86, James3, William Jr.2, James1) and his wife Catherine RUPERT Paxton, was born 22 September 1829. He died 13 February 1900 in Rupert, Pennsylvania.

In the 1850 census he lived with his brother Charles, as a "clerk". Lloyd was unmarried. In the 1880 US census he was a 50 year-old unmarried wholesale dealer in general merchandise living in Mifflin, Columbia County, Pennsyslvania, with his 84-year old widowed mother and 40-year old unmarried niece Sarah VASTINE. Living with them were a servant keeping house, Catherine DUKE (26) who was born in Pennsylvania of German parents, and 13 year old servant Emma SNYDER who was not in school. [1880 census as on www.familysearch.org]

Lloyd was a member of St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Bloomsburg. He was a witness there to a marriage in

His obituary in the Democratic Sentinel says:

    Thomas Lloyd Paxton died at "Bright Side," Rupert, Tuesday night at about eleven o'clock, aged seventy years, four months and twenty-one days. Mr. Paxton was born September 22nd, 1829, and was the youngest son of the late Col. Joseph Paxton, of Catawissa. For several years he was head man in the Bloomsburg Iron Company's Store at Irondale and made that store the most celebrated store in Columbia county. Afterward he went into the coal and general merchandise business at Rupert with J. H. Harman. For the past several years he has led a retired life and his home at Rupert "Bright Side" has ever been under his gracious hand, open and most pleasant to his many friends--its bright rooms were always full of the choicest literary treats, costliest curios and his table ever groaned with luxuries. He was most generous to the church, to his friends and to the public . . . .
    Funeral srvices will be conducted at the house this afternoon at one o'clock by Rev. D. N. Kirkby, pastor of St. Paul's Episcopal church. Interment in Greenwood Cemetery Catawissa. [Democratic Sentinel, Friday, February 16, 1900. My thanks to Lori Kimball for sending me a facsimile copy of the obituary, Aug. 4, 2007.]



Descendants of James3 and his two wives, Mary (Horseman) and Margaret (Hodges) Paxson
Grandson of James and Sarah (Letch) Paxson

Aaron6 Paxson, Jr., son of #208 Amos5 (James4, James3, William Jr.2, James1) and his wife Cynthia (Beall), was born in about 1797, and died 11 December 1884 in Greene County, Ohio. He married three times. His first wife, Susannah WALL, was wed in June 1820. She was born in 1800, and died in 1836. Two years later Aaron married, on 12 April 1838, the widow Lucy (__) SWADENER. She died in 1848. Very soon thereafter, on 13 July 1848 he married for the third time, Hannah (__) COFFELT. [My thanks to Vanessa M. Stephan who sent me this information 7m/3/2006, that she had received from Kay Walton. It appears that it is based on information sent to Kay by "Phil Paxson of NJ". I have not yet had time to check primary sources.]

Aaron is listed as a 53 year old farmer in the 1850 census for Beaver Creek Township, Greene County, Ohio. With him was his 53-year old (third) wife, Hannah, who had been born in Virginia. The household also had William H. CAFFIELD (23), Elizabeth S. Caffield (17) , and Harriet J. Caffield (15), all born in Ohio. I am guessing that they are the children of Hannah from a previous marriage. [From the 1850 census FHC film #444,676 p. 449, District 206 Beaver Creek, taken 13 Sept. 1850. I am grateful to Dianna Privette for sending this to me, 1m/7/2005.]

Ten years later, on 11 July 1860 the census enumerator listed Aaron "Paxton" as a 63 year old farmer with real easte valued at $13,200 and personal property worth $3,000. His wife Hannah was now 64. The household also included her daughter (?) Harriett J. Coffelt, age 25, and Jane (?) Ceunley or Camley (?), age 45, born in Ohio, perhaps a live-in servant? Aaron's son Aaron lived on the next farm. [My thanks to Vanessa Stephan for sending me the federal census schedule, p. 99, photoduplicate, 7m/10/2006.]

In the 1870 census Aaron (farmer, age 73), Hannah (keeping house, age 73) have living with them a Charles Paxson (farm laborer, 19, born on Ohio, attending school) and Taylor Hess (farm laborer, age 23, white, born in Virginia). The farm was now valued at $25,00, and Aaron's personal property at $2,000. [My thanks to Vanessa Stephan for sending me the federal census schedule, p. 24, enumerated on 13 July 1870, photoduplicate, 7m/10/2006.]

The last census in which Aaron and Hannah appear was enumerated in Beaver Creek on 16 and 17 June 1880. Aaron was still a farmer at 83, and Hannah was still keeping house at 83. They enjoyed a four-generation household, with Aaron's son Isaac, age 61, engaged in farm labor. Grandson and daughter Abraham (30 years old and farm laborer) and Nancy GARST (25 years old house keeper), and their daughter, 8-year old Rettie completed the household. [I'm indebted to Vanessa Stephan for sending me the 1880 federal census schedule, p. 27/207, photoduplicate, 7m/10/2006.]

Children of Aaron and his first wife, Susannah (Wall) Paxson: Three of them are from Kay Walton, via Vanessa (with my thanks)

i.       Aaron Paxson, b. 1820; m. Elizabeth MASON (b. ca. 1821); [My thanks to Dianna Privette for Elizabeth's surname.] his farm was valued at $3,380.00 in the 1850 census. Had 9 children.

ii.     Isaac Paxson, b. ca. 1821; m. Margaret __, b. ca. 1818; had children: Mary E. (age 6) and James A. (age 2) in the 1850 census, but not included in Kay Walton's list. However he is identified as "son" living with Aaron and Hannah in the 1880 census.

iii.   Ezeriah Paxson, b. 1 Jan. 1823; m. Susannah DELLINGER; often called Ezra in public documents; 12 children.

iv.   John Paxson, b. 22 Feb, 1829, in Jamestown, Greene, OH; m. Louisa A. __, also b. ca. 1830; they lived on the farm next door to John's parents, valued at $1,000.




Amos Clossen6 Paxson, Jr., son of #208 Amos5 (James4, James3, William Jr.2, James1) and his wife Cynthia (Beall), was born 1 December 1804 in Loudon County, Virginia. He died 15 January 1886, and was buried in Montour Cemetery in Iowa. Amos married 13 March 1828 Nancy BOWSER. She was born in 1805 in Pennsylvania, and died in 1858, and was buried in Montour Cemetery. The family had moved to Tama County, Iowa. Amos married for a second time on 16 September 1865 Sarah Deyarmond CROWLEY. Amos was a tailor. [Information on Amos and his descendants has been kindly sent to me by Mary Louise Giles.]

In the 1860 census for Indian Village Township, Butlerville P. O., there are three Paxton families in a row. I do not know if they intentionally changed the spelling to Paxton, or if it was an error that gradually became accepted. In any event, the individuals are only identified by their initials. So "A Paxton" was a 55 year old farmer, born in Virginia, with real estate valued at $970. and personal property worth $230. His wife Nancy had died. Living with him were W[illiam] age 26 who also had land valued at $970, M[ary] E. age 22, E[lizabeth] F. age 18, and J[ohn] N[elson] age 15. The other two farms belonged to sons Thomas and Francis.[Census schedule image, page 81 or 887, lines 28-32, seen on Iowa GenWeb page, http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/ia/tama/census/1860/0888.gif and 0887.gif, 11/19/2007.]

In the 1880 federal census, Amos Paxton is enumerated as a 75 year old farmer in Indian Village, Tama County, Iowa. His wife Sarah was 69 and keeping house. Sarah had been born in Pennsylvania as had her mother, but her father was born in Ireland. Living with them were Amos's daughter Eliza Paxton, age 36 "at home", granddaughter Gertie Paxton, age ten, and Sarah's son Simion CROWLEY, age 22, working as a farmer. [1880 census as transcribed on FamilySearch, NA film # T9-0365, page 500C, seen 11/18/2007.]

Children of Amos Clossen and his first wife Nancy (Bowser) Paxson:

i.       William Thomas Paxson, apparently called Thomas, b. 28 Sept. 1828; d. 29 Mar. 1899; m. 2 Jan. 1855 Frances "Fannie" Elizabeth WISK; 13 children.

ii.     John Samuel Paxson, m. 1854 Keziah ST. JOHN, the daughter of Joseph and Margaretta (SCHRACK) St. John.

iii.   Francis "Frank" Marion Paxson, b. 25 July 1831 in Warren Co., Ohio; d. 26 June 1904; m. 1854 Clarissa ST. JOHN, the daughter of Joseph and Margaretta (SCHRACK) St. John; 11 children.

iv.   William Paxson

v.     Arminda Paxson, b. 1837; d. 1901; m. Samuel J. WALKER (1834-1929); had a son, John Monroe Walker (1875-1954, who m. Mabel HUTCHINGS or HUTCHINSON (b. 1876, d. 1919). [e mail 4m/11/2005 from Donna Bieg.]

vi.     Mary E. Paxson

vii.   Elizabeth Paxson

viii. John Nelson Paxson



Joseph6 Paxson, son of #209 Joseph5 (James4, James3 #30, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Mary (Lester) Paxson, was born 3 August 1804 in Loudon Co., Va., and died 1888 in Elkrun, Ohio. At least it seems like a good possibility that these were his parents. Joseph married Rebecca CROW on 1 December 1825 or 1828. Rebecca was born in April 1806 in Burgettstown, Penna., the daughter of Jesse Crow (b. 1777, Fay CO, PA)and Hannah McCarter(b.1777 in PA). Jesse Crow's father was Abraham Crow (born 1747 in Penna.) and his mother was Rachel Craven (born 1754 in Penna.) Rebecca died 16 February 1878 in Elkton, Columbia County, Ohio. [My thanks to Jo Ann Williams, e mail Aug. 30, 2010; "mamaw" May 27, 2011 reply on boards.ancestry.com/surnames.paxson; and Jerry Hobson, e mails May 28 & 29, 2011.]

When he was three and a half his father moved to Columbiana County, Ohio, presumably taking the family with him. "On the 16th day of May, 1812, my mother took me by the hand and led me to Nathan Heald's and bound me out for eight years and three months" when he was seven and ¾ years old. At the end of this indenture, when Joseph was sixteen, "My father at that time bound me out to Thomas Morgan to learn the blacksmith trade, in the town of East Fairfield, Ohio . . . . On the first day of April, 1825, I became free from Morgan, and then I started for the town of Erie, Pa., with the determination of setting up permanently in business, with the determination of not coming to Columbiana county only for the purpose of seeing my friends."[Biographical sketch of the late Rev. Joseph Paxson, furnished by himself to his son Josiah. My thanks to Gerald Hobson, e mail 5/29/2011 for sending me a transcription.]

In his autobiography, as narrated by his son Josiah, Joseph was strongly influenced by religion.

Early impressions were made upon my mind at the age of six years by the following circumstances: First, mother instituted family prayer and ordered me to kneel; I did not do so at the first and second bidding, then she placed her hand on my shoulder and forced me upon my knees and then prayed for the family. She then went to the cornfield to pray in secret; she prayed aloud and I heard her; I then cried aloud from the effect of her prayer, and when she came to the house she asked me what was the matter, but I did not tell her the reason of my crying. In order to quiet me she gave me an article and told me to go to William Freits. These two circumstances made an early impression on the subject of religion. . . . all of which time [during his indenture] I was under the religious training of the Friends. At the age of 14 years the first impressions were made on my mind with reference to the ministry. My mind then became concentrated on conversion. At the age of sixteen my mind was so impressed by the subject of a change of heart, that one Sabbath in passing through Samuel Wood's sugar camp (near the present site of Middleton, O.) I fell to the earth and prayed for the answer to a good conscience, that I might receive the evidence of forgiven sins; but my prayer seemed to ascend no higher than my head; the earth seemed to be as iron and the heavens as brass. . . . [While learning blacksmithing] my mind was engaged in reference to a change of heart and a call to the ministry. I would leave the shop and pray in secret - three or four times a day, frequently. At the age of eighteen I joined the Bible Christian church there, but took no active part in the services. At the age of nineteen Sister Bradfield said to me, "Why don't you sing and pray in meeting?" I told her I was not converted and had not received the pardon of my sins. She said if I had not religion, there was no other in the class had. I told her I knew my own feelings, but did not know the feelings of others. My mind was still impressed not only with reference to conversion but to a call to the ministry. . . . After one month's work [in Erie] I did not like the religious aspect of things so I concluded to go to the city of Buffalo. One morning I heard of a schooner going to Buffalo, and that evening I went to speak for my passage. I enquired for the captain and was told that he had gone to the schooner; so I sat down and waited for about an hour for his return, but still he did not come. While thus waiting this question struck my mind: "Is this of the Lord?" The language of David came to my mind - "I have set the Lord before me that I shall not be moved." At that time something seemed to say, "Do not go to Buffalo; go back to Columbiana and set up in business." I then immediately returned to the city, settled up, and returned to Columbiana county, Ohio. On the first day of December, 1825, I was married to Rebecca Crow, and we immediately went to keeping house. We lived together pleasantly for fifty-two years, during which time six children were born to us.

In 1826 I took up preaching in my own house. At that time my mind was deeply fixed on a change of heart and preaching. In 1827 I took up what was called church meeting, and in October 1827 I made a solemn covenant with the Almighty that if he would pardon my sins I would take my cross in public. During the month Father Teegarden was preaching in my house. When he concluded his sermon he called upon me to pray, I submitted and prayed for the first time in my life in public. I then arose from my knees and took my seat. While sitting the enemy wanted me to promise that I would not take up the cross again in prayer; but I remembered the covenant which I had made and asked the Lord for the evidence of the pardon of my sins. The Lord heard my prayer and granted me the evidence of the pardon of sins. I then jumped to my feet, one of the congregation came to me and said let us have prayer meeting here to-night. I answered agreed. I asked brother Teegarden to meet with us; but he said he could not but he gave out the prayer meeting and the people came and filled my house at that meeting. When the time came to commence, the question was who should lead it; for there was no other one in the congregation that ever prayed in public so the lot fell on me. I did the best I could and from that day to this I have tried to preach to the best of my ability. Under the influence of the teachings of friends I had concluded not to take any salary for preaching and when I traveled the first circuit I told the Conference I would not throw my family upon the circuit as a charge. I told the people of my charge if they had anything to give well and good, if not, well and good. The first circuit I traveled was called the Warren circuit, in 1828, containing twenty-one appointments. Received $65 for that year, traveling about 1800 miles on horse back; 2nd was Connotin, received $100, traveled 1680 miles on horseback; 3rd circuit I traveled 3500 received a present of $70. thirty in money and the rest in produce and lost in horses $125, out of pocket $55; 4th circuit Nimashilling, presents $55, traveled 1000 miles; 5th circuit traveled 2600 miles received $80 as presents; 6th Berlin circuit, received $100, traveled 1320 miles; 7th Chambersburgh, presents $80, traveled 1700 miles. I have traveled in all 17 circuits in 17 years. Balance of my traveling was without circuits, being at this date 73 years old in good health and sound mind. [My thanks to Jo Ann Williams, e mail Aug. 30, 2010; "mamaw" May 27, 2011 reply on boards.ancestry.com/surnames.paxson; and Jerry Hobson, e mails May 28 & 29, 2011.]

"He received but few months schooling; but he was a man of strong will, and while pursuing his trade, as blacksmith, he was often found reading the Bible. Thus by constant application, he soon became well acquainted with the Holy Scriptures. He was ordained a minister in the United Brethren Church, and served in that capacity for fifty-five years, when he was superannuated." Joseph and Rebecca had children: Jessie, Hannah, John N., , and Mary Jane Paxson. [ History of Tama County, Iowa (Springfield, Ill: Union Publishing Co., 1883), 796, as posted by Gerald Hobson on the Paxson surname message board of ancestry.com, 20 April 2005.]

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=paxson&GSiman=1&GScid=2143229&GRid=58500075

Children of Joseph and Rebecca (Crow) Paxson, all born in Columbiana County, Ohio:

i.     Jesse Paxson7, b. 23 Oct. 1826; m. Julia KELLY [Gerald Hobson, reply 28 May 2011 on boards.ancestry.com/surnames.paxson]
ii.    Hannah Paxson, b. 27 Oct. 1828;
iii.   John N. Paxson, b. 1 Sept. 1831;
iv.   Mary Jane Paxson, b. 1835;
v.    Josiah Paxson, b. 1837; d. 1919 in Marshall Co., Iowa, bur. Pleasant Hills, LaGrange; m. 1864 Rebecca Hayes; in obits of both John and Jesse mentin that brother Josiah is a minister in LaGrange, Iowa;6 children.
vi.   Milton Paxson, b. 1839;




portrait of Stephen Paxson from frontispiece of his biography.

Stephen6 Paxson, son of #209 Joseph5 (James4, James3 #30, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Mary (Lester) Paxson, was born on 3 November 1808 in New Lisbon, Ohio, the sixth of seven children. He died 22 April 1881 in St. Louis, Missouri. Stephen married 18 October 1830 Sarah PRYOR. Sarah was born in 1809, and died on 1 November 1889, eight years after Stephen.

Stephen was a pioneer missionary in the Mississippi Valley, organizing 1,314 Sunday schools with 83,405 teachers and pupils. He originated a system of county and state conventions. [Drury, A fruitful life, 185-6.

After his father's death while Stephen was quite young, the family's financial circumstances were so precarious that his mother was forced to send her orphaned children to live with others. Stephen, a sensitive boy with a speech impediment, was indentured to a farmer, Harman FAGAN. He was to work for Fagan, but have three months a year of schooling. He eagerly anticipated school and worked cheerfully at his tasks until winter. On the first day of school, however, he was in
such a state of nervous trepidation that, when called upon, he could not give his name, or age, or any intelligible account of his mental acquirements. The children all laughed . . . while the teacher stamped his foot impatiently, and harshly ordered the boy to go home, and sent by his hand a note requesting the people who had him in charge to teach him to talk before they sent him to school. [Drury, A fruitful life, 18-9.]
This was sufficient excuse for Fagan to keep the boy home and at work for the remainder of his indenture. This was cut short, mercifully, when Stephen fell ill with "a painful disease known as white swelling, which made him a helpless cripple for a long time, and partially lamed him for life." His mistress, Euphemia Fagan, was a Quaker, and she took pity on him and once offered to read to him. The only suitable book she had was a doggerel account of Oelar, a Quaker preacher who "went about doing good". Stephen was able to memorize most of it from that single reading, and it fed his mind as he lay for months in his garret bed. "He resolved that if he ever became able to walk he would travel all over the world; though as he was ignorant and now lame besides, and unable to talk well, he did hope to be helpful to others like the good man in the story." [Drury, A fruitful life, 20-1.]

Since he was no longer fit for farm work, Stephen was apprenticed to Jacob Clapsaddle (1784-1847) to learn the trade of hatter. The other apprentices teased him unmercifully for stammering. Gradually he taught himself to read by studying signs and occasional old newspapers, asking "What do you call this letter?" Although he could not speak clearly, he could sing very well. [Drury, A fruitful life, 21-3. My thanks to Diane Clapsaddle for Jacob Clapsaddle's first name and dates, e mail 7/22/2009.]

At the conclusion of his apprenticeship Stephen got a "stout cane" to help overcome his lameness, and walked to the Ohio River. "He was tall, well-proportioned, and had remarkably fine black eyes, raven-black hair, and complexion dark as that of an Italian." He made his way, making friends, singing, and working at his trade when he needed more cash. [Drury, A fruitful life, 23-5.]

At the age of 21 he entered Tennessee. At one point he came to the Holston River, and the ferryman was absent. Stephen saw a "comely girl" in a skiff on the other side. He beckoned to her to come over, and asked her to row him across. Being gentlemanly he took the oars, but was totally unfamiliar with how to row, and the boat soon spun around then headed downstream in the current. The girl calmly resumed the oars and got them safely ashore. It was love at first sight. It took Stephen several months to convince "Squire Pryor, an English gentleman, and a man of importance in that community" to allow this unknown nobody to marry his beloved daughter. Stephen's "stammering question with its tinge of Quaker accent: 'Sa-a-rah, dost thou love me?' had its own quaint charm." They were married 18 October 1830, and went to live in Virginia. After the birth of a daughter, they moved to Alabama. [Drury, A fruitful life, 25-7, 171.]

In 1838 the Paxson family moved to Winchester, Illinois, where Stephen pursued hat making with some success. The American Sunday-School Union (founded in 1824) set up a few "union" (meaning non-denominational Protestant) Sunday schools in Illinois, one of them in Winchester. Young Mary Paxson attended and when each child was asked to bring an additional person the following week, she brought her somewhat skeptical father. Stephen was immediately pressed to teach the class of boys, aged 10 to 15, and got "hooked". He taught with growing enthusiasm for four years, converted, and joined his wife's church (Methodist). [Drury, A fruitful life, 33ff, 39.]

Stephen began to visit other schools on Sunday afternoons, then started to organize ones where none existed. His "great executive ability and much practical sense" facilitated the work. But his own ignorance bothered him deeply. He began to hold mass meetings of schools near each other where speeches and songs helped teachers learn from one another. Finally, after careful planning and preparation, on 20 April 1846 he held a convention for all the teachers in the county to meet in Winchester. From this eventually grew a whole system of county, state, and district conventions. [Drury, A fruitful life, 40-43.]

Stephen's stammering speech now became "almost unendurable" to him. Taking courage from the example of Demosthenes, he studied his impediment, experimented, and discovered

that, whenever he filled his lungs with air and expelled it slowly, accompanying his speech with certain gestures, the nerves seemed to relax, and the words came with greater fluency and ease. He acted at once upon this hint, and practiced every day. . . . He felt himself a new man, . . . A heart aglow with zeal and a loosened tongue . . . [Drury, A fruitful life, 45.]
sketch of cabin at hickory Hill, from  his biography, opp. p. 61. In 1848 Stephen Paxson was hired by the American Sunday-School Union, at $1 for each day worked, to establish Sunday schools in the Mississippi Valley. This was not sufficient to support his family in the manner in which they lived in Winchester. When one of Sarah's relatives offered them a piece of unimproved land in Pike County, to be paid for when they were able, they moved to the then wilderness. A crude log cabin was built for them at Hickory Hill, and they hired men to do some rudimentary clearing and fencing. Then Stephen was off on his missionary travels, leaving Sarah, the daughter of an Englishman used to a more comfortable life, to raise her children in the forest. Sarah bore eleven children, and buried six of them as infants or young children. [Drury, A fruitful life, 48-51, 63, 74-5.]
It was his business as a missionary to visit all the people in a neighborhood where there was no Sunday school; to invite them to hold a meeting for purposes of organization; to address them at this meeting; to instruct them as to the best methods of conducting a school, and to provide them with necessary books and papers. [Drury, A fruitful life, 53.]

Stephen had a discerning eye for the right man to select to be superintendent of a newly organized Sunday school. He could be very persuasive, knowing just which arguments would tip the balance for an individual candidate. On the rare occcasions when no man could be found, he would appoint a woman. [Drury, A fruitful life, 66-68, 157.]

Stephen was a born story teller, and the "ignorance and the eagerness, the opposition and encouragement" with which he was met furnished incidents to weave into his speeches and conversations. His singing, with a large repertoire of hymns and folk songs, helped him win attentive audiences. [Drury, A fruitful life, 53-54.]
Robert Raikes, the faithful horse, with Stephen handing out literature, Drury, 'A fruitful life', opp. p. 81
Eventually money was donated to enable Stephen to acquire a horse. "Robert Raikes", a small bay horse, became a familiar and beloved partner in his travels. The horse knew to stop whenever children approached, so that Stephen could talk with them, give them pamphlets, and encourage them to invite their parents to organize a Sunday school. [Drury, A fruitful life, 82-90, 218-9, 222-3.]

In 1854 the American Sunday-School Union raised his salary. Stephen was able to move his family to the little village of Summer Hill, in Pike County. It had been settled by easterners, and had a decent school. Although he never had any formal education, Stephen was very interested in his children's studies. [Drury, A fruitful life, 91-92.]

His active mind never tired of trying to assimilate new ideas. He would say, "I don't know much; but it is a characteristic of my family, as far back as I can trace them, that they never became too old to learn." [Drury, A fruitful life, 93.]
Part of Stephen's work involved writing missionary letters and monthly reports, which he filled with interesting details and anecdotes. In 1856 the Sunday-School Union invited him to lecture and raise funds in eastern cities. He was a great success at both, and continued for many years to spend his winters on an east coast lecture tour. He did not write out his speeches ahead of time, but spoke in the moment "as the spirit within giveth utterance". At one point an eastern financier offered Stephen $50,000 to invest in land on the frontier, and split the profits 50-50. Stephen refused. Years later they compared notes. The $50,000 had doubled. Stephen drew out his notebook and pointed to his record: 50,000 scholars gathered into Sunday schools. As he once wrote, "The essential elements of a good Sabbath-school are Grace, Grit, and Greenbacks." [Drury, A fruitful life, 105-7ff, 130, 200.]

After the repeal of the Missouri Compromise in 1854 pro- and anti-slavery sentiment and violence escalated in Missouri and Kansas. Once while Stephen was holding a Sunday-school meeting in Missouri 25 armed "bush-whackers" approached. Stephen told the group to remain calm, and he began to sing hymns. The bush-whackers gathered at the door, hesitated, then entered and sat down to listen. Stephen continued to sing until he grew weary; as he stopped the bush-whackers quietly filed out. When the Civil War began, many of Stephen's Sunday school scholars enlisted in the Union army. [Drury, A fruitful life, 131-3.] The tide of Union sentiment submerged whatever unspoken message of the Prince of Peace might have led to a pacifist stand. Although most folks in Illinois and Missouri were more interested in free land than in freeing slaves, at Stephen's funeral African-American children timidly sought admission, explaining, "You know he was our friend, too! He visited our school and cared for us." [Drury, A fruitful life, 188.]

Stephen took his oldest son to join him in missionary work when William was fifteen. As the two older boys finished the school available in Summer Hill, the family moved again in 1861 so they could attend college in Jacksonville, Illinois. Stephen opened a depository of books for the Sunday-School Union in town, so that during the disruptions of war orders could be filled more expeditiously. [Drury, A fruitful life, 133.]

In 1868 the Sunday-School Union gave the aging missionary an easier job, in charge of the Book Depository in St. Louis. His "promptness and fine executive ability" earned a high reputation for the house. He was encouraged to travel whenever he felt moved, to conventions, mass-meetings, etc. Stephen greatly enjoyed these Sunday school conventions, he said, "if for no other reason than that it rubs off the rough edges of sectarian prejudice . . . . Here we know no differences. We ask not to what [Protestant] church you belong, but, are you laboring in this grand work?" He loved children, and they responded. At a Sunday school Jubilee held 20 June 1872 in St. Louis some 2,500 children attended. [Drury, A fruitful life, 140, 146-47, 158-59.]

In the First Enumeration of the 1880 census Stephen appears as a 72-year old Book Seller with his 70 year old wife Sarah, daughter Anna L (27, at home), son "Cory E." (26, in the bookstore), Katie Paxson (25 at home), and a 22-year old German servant, Lizzie LEREX. [1880 federal census, as transcribed on familysearch.org, from NA Film No. T9-0724, p. 270A.] In the Second Enumeration he is listed as as a 71-year-old Sunday School Missionary living in the 19th Ward, Precinct 203 of St. Louis, Missouri. His wife is named Jonah [sic: mistranscribed for Sarah on familysearch.org, transcribed from NA Film No. T9-0734, p. 494C.], and she was 70, born in Tennessee, her father born in England and her mother in Virginia. Their daughter Anna L., an unmarried 30-year old, was living with them, employed in the book business. [1880 census on www.familysearch.org] In October Stephen and Sarah celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. There was a flurry of congratulatory letters and newspaper accounts. [Drury, A fruitful life, 171-73.]

Family of Stephen and Sarah Paxson, 1860

Always willing to learn, in his old age Stephen studied the methods of the Swiss educator Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi. [Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi (1746 - 1827), born in Zurich, an educator who took up J. J. Rousseau's ideas and explored how they might be developed and implemented. His early experiments in education (at Neuhof) ran into difficulties but he persisted and what became known as the "Pestalozzi Method"came to fruition in his school at Yverdon (established in 1805). Instead of dealing with words, he argued, children should learn through activity and through things. They should be free to pursue their own interests and draw their own conclusions (Darling 1994: 18). http://www.infed.org/thinkers/et-pest.htm] He carefully assembled scrapbooks containing the gleanings of his experience with Sunday school teaching and organizing.

His last three months were bed-ridden. In that time he resolved to learn "to be patient, and not to rebuke my friends for their blunders." Perhaps his greatest flaw had been "a habit of great impatience", keen sarcasm, and terrible invective. [Drury, A fruitful life, 178-79.] He demanded the best of himself and could not abide it when others did not live up to his expectations. Stephen died 22 April 1881 in St. Louis. A subscription was raised to erect a monument to his memory in Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis. This large city cemetery was established in 1849 on West Florissant Avenue, about .3 mile north of I-70. Sarah died on 1 November 1889.

This photo, taken ca. 1860, shows Stephen and Sarah surrounded by their adult children. From the left: Belle Paxson Drury (writer), Alfred A Paxson (Judge), Sarah Pryor Paxson, Stephen Paxson, Anna Lester Paxson (Missionary to Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma), Corey E. Paxson (Minister), William Patterson Paxson (Minister, Sunday school missionary), and Mary Paxson Hornback (daughter who led her father's church). [My thanks to Kathy Kleiva for this image and identifications.]

Children of Stephen and his wife, Sarah (Pryor) Paxson (order uncertain):

i. Mary Jane or Jayne Paxson, b. 8 Aug. 1831 in Gate City, Scott County, Va.; bur. in Broken Bow, Custer Co., Neb.; m. 18 Oct. 1852 in Eldara, Pike Co., Ill. James Hopeful HORNBECK, eldest son of Joseph A. and Nancy (Pierce) Hornback; had 5 children: Stephen Paxson Hornback (b. in Pike Co.; d. Audrain Co., Mo.); Ross N. Hornback (b. in Pike Co.; d. Walenburgh, Col.); Florence Hornback (b. in Pike Co.; d. near Broken Bow, Neb.); Jennie B. Hornback (b. in Pike Co.); Joseph Alfred Hornback (b. 19 Oct. 1853 at El Dora, Pike Co.; d. 28 Apr. 1943 in Norfolk, Madison Co., Neb.). [http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~glendasubyak/ch112.html; and, familysearch.org, as seen 7m/12/2005.] cover of the book written by Belle Drury, 'A fruitful life'

ii. William Patterson Paxson, b. 1837, d. 1896; m. 1 May 1864 Harriet M. SWING in Mason, Ill.; ordained minister; 4 children.

iii. Frederick Paxson - a lawyer in St. Louis; not in familysearch's transcription of the 1880 census.

iv. Belle Paxson, m. 21 May 1867 Charles J. DRURY, son of Lawson and Ann (SMITH) Drury. Belle attended the Monticello Seminary in Godfrey, Ill., then went on to the Methodist Female College at Jacksonville, where she graduated in 1863. She taught there for 4 years. She wrote a biography of her father, A fruitful life: a narrative of the experiences and missionary labors of Stephen Paxson by his daughter, B. Paxson Drury; with an introduction by Rev. C. L. Goodell (Philadelphia: The American Sunday-School Union, 1882). Belle and Charles res. in Morgan Co., Ill.; had 2 children: Frank E. Drury (b. 11 June 1869), and Edith Drury (b. 16 July 1873). [Portrait & Biographical Album of Morgan and Scott Counties, Illinois (Chicago: Chapman Bros., Publishers, 1889), 341.]

v. Corey Paxson, b. ca. 1853 in Illinois; m. Kate __; an evangelist, worked as assistant to Dr. Pentecost, in Brooklyn, NY. Presumably named for A. W. Corey, then Superintendent of Missions in the Valley of the Mississippi who was instructed to hire Stephen Paxson "if, upon inquiry, he should be found to be suitable." [Drury, A fruitful life, 48.] In the 1880 federal census Second Enumeration for St. Louis, Corey was 27, employed in a book store, living with his wife Kate. She was 28, born in Kentucky or Kentucky-born parents, "keeping house". They don't seem to have had any children at that time. [1880 census on familysearch.org, transcribed from NA Film No. T9-0732, p. 382A (seen 7m/12/2005).]

vi. Alfred Allen Paxson, b. 10 Dec. 1844 in Winchester, Scott Co., Ill.; m. 8 Oct. 1873 Julia L. HART, daughter of H. E. Hart; children: Nellie, Harry, Pryor, and Ruth. [http://genealogyinstlouis.accessgenealogy.com/fc/pafg69.htm as seen 7/12m/2005).]

vii. Anna Lester Paxson, b. ca. 1850; unmarried and living with her parents in 1880 and working in the family book store. Sometime between 1889 and 1904 following the death of her parents she went to Indian territory (Oklahoma) and became a school teacher perhaps because of her nephew, William D. Paxton, who was living in Oklahoma. Records indicate she was a teacher 1904-1907 at the Chishoktak Boarding School near Bennington, Okla. [My thanks to Grey Brogdon, e mail 1m/9/2008 for this information, citing 1904 school records.]

viii-xii. five children died young



Descendants of Thomas3 and Jane (Canby) Paxson
Grandsons of Joseph and his wife Mary (Heston) Paxson

Joseph6 Paxson, son of #212 Joseph5 (Joseph4 #91, Thomas3 #31, William Jr.2, James1) and Phebe (COOPER) Paxson, was born 3 June 1792 and died in March 1850. He married twice, first to Rachel YARNALL on 7 August 1839 at Willistown Meeting in Chester County, Pennsylvania. Rachel had been born 24 March 1796, the daughter of Benjamin and Susanna (TRUMAN) Yarnall. Rachel died 24 August 1843 and her body buried at Willistown. Joseph married secondly on 11 July 1844 under the care of Sadsbury Meeting Mary Ann MARSH. She was born 29 January 1803, the daughter of James and Lydia Marsh of Philadelphia. Mary Ann died 5 March 1850. [Suzanne P. Lamborn, The Paxson Family (Morgantown, Pa.: Masthof Press, 2008), 31.]

Joseph was a farmer in Sadsbury Township. [Lamborn, The Paxson Family, 31.]

Child of Joseph and his first wife Rachel (Yarnall) Paxson: [Barbara Feeser Gill, "The Paxson Family from England to Edenbower, Schuylkill County Pennsylvania: The Ancestors of Iona Paxson Freeser" (unpublished mms kindly sent to me by the author, 6/2002, p. 90.]

i. Rachel Yarnall Paxson, b. 25 May 1840;; d. 1 Apr. 1864; m. 12 Mar. 1863 William H. GARRETT. ["Houstons of Pequea and Allied Families" on worldconnect.rootsweb.com, seen 7m/27/2005.]




Timothy6 Paxson, son of #212 Joseph5 (Joseph4 #91, Thomas3 #31, William Jr.2, James1) and Phebe (COOPER) Paxson, was born 20 December 1800, and died 28 March 1863. He married Martha Rakestraw LIPPINCOTT on 22 May 1834. She was born in 1801, the daughter of William and Ann (ROGERS) Lippincott of Westfield, Burlington County, New Jersey. [Initial information on Timothy and Martha and their children was kindly given to me by Cindy Grossholz, who found it in the sources that will be given at the end of each paragraph. This has since been augmented by information from Nancy H. Plumley. I remain in the debt of both these women. Lippincott, TheSixth Generation of the Descendants of Richard and Abigail Lippincott, by Judith M. Olsen (published by the GLHS, 1999); Kay Walton, via internet correspondence; Chester and Delaware Counties, 429. Confirmation and additional data from Jim Houston, "Houstons of Pequea and Allied Families" on worldconnect.rootsweb.com, seen 7m/27/2005. See http://www.pa-roots.com/~lancaster/church/bart/bartmarriages.html for their wedding date, seen 4/4/2006.] Martha died 20 May 1884. [Suzanne P. Lamborn, The Paxson Family (Morgantown, Pa.: Masthof Press, 2008), 32.]

Paxson house on rt. 30, Sadsbury Township

Timothy was a birthright member of Sadsbury Meeting, of the so-called Hicksite branch of Friends. [Chester and Delaware Counties, 429.] Timothy lived all his life in Sadsbury. He built the house on the family farm in 1835, pictured to the right. [Pennsylvania Births, Chester County, 1682-1800, compiled by John J. Humphrey (Humphrey Publications, 1994); Newspaper Clipping File at Chester County Historical Society, obituary from the Daily Local News 16 March 1927. The photograph is used by permission of Nancy H. Plumley, 3/2006.] He lived in the house and kept a "country store" in it. He also farmed. For many years Joseph was post master of the Black Horse post office. [Chester and Delaware Counties, 429.]

Visits among friends and family members was a major part of social and family life of the nineteenth century. A small vignette of this is illuminated in the diary entry of William Lippincott Rakestraw, Martha's cousin. On Friday, 13 August 1847, he noted, "had a visit from Clayton Lippincott & Rachel, & Ann Lippincott from Jersey & Timothy & Martha Paxson". [My thanks to Nancy H. Plumley, who owns W. L. Rakestraw's diaries, for sharing this entry with me. E mail 3m/29/2006. She also sent me a xerox copy of the diary page.] It appears that Clayton and his wife Rachel (Collins) Lippincott and his unmarried sister Ann R. Lippincott, were siblings of Martha, and therefore all cousins of William Lippincott Rakestraw. [freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~baconfamily/, seen 4/4/2006.]

In the 1860 federal census for Sadsbury Township Timothy Paxson, age 60 was listed as a farmer. His real estate was valued at $7,000 and his personal estate at $1,000. His wife Martha was 55. Their children were listed as Mary J. 17, Elizabeth 15, and Joseph 14. Their two oldest children lived next door: Willam 23, also a farmer with real estate valued at $7,000 and his personal estate at $1,000. Living with him was Phebe A. 24, an unmarried teacher. [My thanks for this information to Nancy Plumley, e mail, 4m/3/2006. Also, Ancestry.com 1860 census schedule, Black Horse P.O., Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co., Pa., p. 764, dwelling no. 123, family no. 129, as seen 9/18/2006.]

Timothy was a Whig in politics. [Chester and Delaware Counties, 429.]

His obituary in the Village Record of 7 April 1863 bluntly states: "Timothy Paxon, a very estimable citizen of Sadsbury township, Chester county, committed suicide on the morning of the 28th ult. under the influence of a nervous disease which had affected his mind. His age was about 63 years." [Newspaper Clipping File at Chester County Historical Society, the obituary from the Village Record 7 April 1863.] Martha's cousin, William L. Rakestraw, recorded in his diary on Monday, March 30, 1863: "went to the funeral of Timothy Paxson who committed suicide on 7th day morning last by hanging himself - was buried at East Sadsbury". [My thanks to Nancy Plumley, who owns Rakestraw's diaries, for sharing this entry with me. E mail 3m/28/2006.]

Martha died 20 May 1884, aged 82. She is buried in the Sadsbury Meeting cemetery. [fn: listing of cemetery found at <www.pa-roots.com/~chester/cemetery/sadsbury.html> on 17 Dec. 2002]

Children of Timothy and Martha (Lippincott) Paxson:

 i.    Phebe Ann Paxson7, born 29 3m 1835; d. 13 Jan. 1914; married 20 June 1867 Isaac P. JACKSON. He was the son of John C. and Rebecca (PRESTON) Jackson. They had 4 children:
a) Jane R. Jackson8, b. 23 June 1868;
b) William Jackson, b. 14 Oct. 1869;
c) Joseph P. Jackson, b. 25 June 1871;
d) Martha P. Jackson (b. 23 Aug. 1875). [Chester and Delaware Counties; newspaper article found at the Chester County Historical Society, West Chester, PA.; "Houstons of Pequea and Allied Families" on worldconnect.rootsweb.com, seen 7m/27/2005. Phebe's date of death from Lamborn, The Paxson Family, 32.]
 ii.    William Lippincott Paxson, born 18 November 1836 in West Sadsbury Township, Chester County, Pennsyvania, and died 15 March 1927 in at his home, West Sadsbury Township, Chester County; m(1) 19 Jan. 1869 Rebecca KLING; m(2) 21 Feb. 1878 Hannah WILSON.

 iii.   Mary Jane Paxson, born 5 April 1838; died 11 June 1863; obituary appeared in the Village Record on 18 August 1863. [fn: Chester and Delaware Counties; newspaper article filed at the Chester County Historical Society.] Her mother's cousin, William L. Rakestraw, recorded in his diary on Saturday, June 13, 1863: "Sarah, Mary and John [his wife, and 2 of their children] went to funeral of Mary Jane Paxson". [My thanks to Nancy Plumley, who owns Rakestraw's diaries, for sharing this entry with me. E mail 3m/28/2006.]

iv.    Elizabeth Lippincott Paxson, born 8 Aug. 1842 in Sadsbury Twp., Chester County, Pa.; died 16 Jan. 1927 of pneumonia after a week's illness at the home of her son, William P. Moore, near Chatham, Chester Co. She married Levi Pownel [or Pownall?] MOORE on 12 March 1868 under the care of Sadsbury Meeting. Levi was born 27 October 1840, the son of Jeremiah and Elizabeth (ELY) Moore. He d. 25 December 1897. They are both buried at the Doe Run Friends Cemetery, Londonderry Township. Elizabeth was president of the Londonderry Women's Christian Temperance Union (W. C. T.U.) for more than thirty years and active in temperance and other reforms. At the time of her death she was honorary president of Londonderry W. C. T. U. They had three sons:
a) Howard Moore, b. 21/11m/1868; d. 5m/1869;
b) Elwood Lippincott Moore, b. 14/10m/1870; d. 15/11m/1946; m. Annie Wilgris HOGG (1872-1959); 3 children;
c) William Paxson Moore of London Grove, b. 13/10m/1876 [or 12 Dec. 1877]; d. 28/11m/1955 of a stroke; m. Sara Mary PUSEY (1878-1945). [fn: Levi's middle name is spelled Pownel in the family Bible, but other sources spell it Pownall. Jeremiah Moore (1803-1887) Family Bible. This Bible is in the possession of Dorothy H. Montgomery; Ancestors and Descendants of Andrew Moore 1612-1897, by John Andrew Moore Passmore, Philadelphia, 1897; Record of the Jackson Family, compiled by a Family Committee and presented 25th 8 month 1875 (located at <genealogylibrary.com>); obituary from the West GroveIndependent, dated January 1927, in the newspaper clipping file at the Chester County Historical Society. See also http://www.pa-roots.com/~chester/daily_local_news.htm. William Paxson Moore's descendants listed in Suzanne P. Lamborn, The Paxson Family (Morgantown, Pa.: Masthof Press, 2008), 33-34.]
v.    Joseph C. Paxson, born 14 February 1844; died 31 August 1922; m. Mary Ann KLING in 1875, who died Sunday morning before 1 Dec. 1938. They had 5 children.



Isaiah6 Paxson, eldest child of # 213 Benjamin5 (Joseph4 #91, Thomas3 #31, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and Jane (ELY) Paxson, was born in Solebury Township, Bucks County, on 24 May 1785. He died 3 May 1850. Isaiah married Lydia MENDENHALL. She was born 27 August 1780 and died 24 April 1863, and her body was buried in Hillside Cemetery, Pennville, Indiana.

Children of Isaiah and Lydia (Mendenhall) Paxson: [From "The Paxsons", compiled by Helen Dinius Paxson (Mrs. Frank Paxson), typescript, 11-14, generously sent to me 3/2005 by Tom Irey.]
i. Martha M.7 Paxson, b. 19 July 1807; d. 19 Feb. 1875; m. 30 Sept. 1830 Samuel WATTS (b. 23 Oct. 1800; d. 3 Mar. 1859). Samuel was a prosperous merchant until ill health and financial reverses led him in 1847 to move to Wells Co., Ind. where he located on a farm between Bluffton and Camden. [My thanks to Bruce Sonner for bringing to my attention a biography of Watts.] They had children:
a) Isaiah P. Watts, b. 15 June 1840 in Richland Co., Oh.; d. 17 Oct. 1925; m. 1 Aug. 1861 Ann Eliza DIGGS who d. 26 June 1917. Isaiah attended local schools and Liber College in Jay Co., Ind. Enlisted in Company H, 84th Indiana Volunteer Infantry in 1862He engaged in teaching, law, and the ministry in the Christian Church of Winchester and then in Alexandria; president of the Mendenhall Gold Mining Co and of the Phillips Land & Gas Company. He served as clerk of courts for Randolph circuit 1881-1885; Republican representative in 1903; door-keeper of the U.S. Senate 1906-1910. There is a biography of him in Past and Present of Randolph County, Indiana (1914)
b) Lydia Catherine Watts, b. 11 Sept. 1833; d. 29 Jan. 1908; m. 16 Sept. 1852 William HARPER, Jr. who was b. 15/3/1834, d. 27/6/1910;


ii. Mary Vickers Paxson, m. 5 Aug. 1848 Robert ROMANS (b. 1810); 3 children: Joseph Romans (m. Rachel FISHER; 7 children): Jesse Romans (b. 1853; m. 1884 Sarah BOUSE who was b. 1854 and d. 1929; 3 children); Lydia Romans (m. 18 May 1878 King L. DAVIS).

iii. Heston Paxson, had 7 children: Thomas, John, Charles, Henry, Frank, Lydia (m. Ed ANDERSON), and Hellon [Helen?] (m. __ SUMMERS).

iv. Benjamin Paxson, it is possible, but by no means yet proved, that this man is the Benjamin Paxson listed in the 1895 Gopsill's Philadelphia City Directory as a "manager" living at 2700 Ridge Avenue. He was not listed in the following year. Is there a descendant who could give me more information?



William Paxson
, son of #213 Benjamin5 (Joseph4 #91, Thomas3 #31, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and Jane (ELY) Paxson, was born 23 August 1788 and died 3 March 1877 in Pennsville, Iowa. He married Maria MORGAN. She was born 4 July 1796, and died 24 February 1852, and was buried in Woodsdale Cemetery, Ohio.

But something is confused in my mind, because I have also been given data that the William Paxson who married Maria Morgan was the son of Jacob #214.

Child(ren?) of William and Maria (Morgan) Paxson (may be incomplete):

i. Anna Emily7 Paxson, b. 1831 in Ohio; d. 1901; m. Thomas Armstrong BEREMAN (1833-1904); 3 children. [http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1254163&id100446]



Benjamin Ely6 Paxson
, fourth child of #213 Benjamin5 (Joseph4 #91, Thomas3 #31, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and Jane (ELY) Paxson, was born 11 November 1790 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. He died 6 September 1862 near Camden (now Pennville) in Jay County, Indiana. Benjamin married first Sarah MITCHELL, on 22 December 1814. She was the daughter of William and Mary (BROWNE) Mitchell, born 27 May 1795 in Muncie, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. Sarah died 6 July 1835 in Newgarden [New Garden Meeting?], Columbiana County, Ohio, and was buried in Wiggsdale Cemetery, Butler, Ohio.

Benjamin and Sarah were not married under the care of the meeting, and Benjamin was disowned. Later he joined the Disciples. In Ohio Benjamin farmed and ran a peddling wagon. After Sarah's death following the birth of their eighth child, Benjamin married 10 May 1838 in Columbiana County, Ohio, Abigail McNEALY; she was the daughter of George and Jane (Regester) McNeely (I am unclear what is the correct spelling; her son spelled it McNely). Abigail was born 25 April 1802 in Chester County. Both Benjamin and Abigail were buried in Pennsville Cemetery, Jay Co., Indiana. [Gilbert Cope, comp., Genealogy of the Smedley Family... (Lancaster, Pa.: Wickersham Printing Company, 1901), 214, 650.] Abigail's father came with his parent from Ireland to Pennsylvania before the Revolutionary War. The father died at sea, and upon arrival the children were "put out amongst strangers". George McNely was was raised in Anthony Wayne's family, he and "Mad Anthony" were boys together. George married a Quaker girl, Jane Register, and they moved to Columbiana County, Ohio. Benjamin later said he could remember standing at the fence with his father watching the carriages as the Friends went by to yearly meeting at Damascus. [memoir of J. M. Paxson, in Martha C. M. Lynch, comp., Reminiscences Of Adams, Jay And Randolph Counties (Ft. Wayne, Ind.: Lipes, Nelson & Singmaster, ca. 1896) transcribed on the web at http://files.usgwarchives.org/in/jay/history/1896/reminisc/chapterv544gms.txt, seen 6/28/2009.] Later Damascus became the center of the most evangelical branch of Quakers.

Benjamin and Abigail moved to Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana with their three youngest children. Their youngest son Joseph dated it in 1837 when he was three; Gilbert Cope dated it in October 1847, nine years after his second marriage. Joseph remembered:

We were accompanied on our trip to Jay County by Aaron Register and wife, and they had a carriage, we a big wagon. Thomas Register and Enoch Hunter (young men) came along. All I can remember on the road out was some men killing our dog. He had treed a squirrel, but never came back to the wagon. The men, I think, were drunk. I remember the men and the boys with us having a racket. We were nine days on the road, making the quickest trip that had been made. My oldest brother, William, and brother-in-law, Abraham Smith, had moved out some two or three years before we came. Brother William had a house up and an acre or two of ground cleared. Though my father was not one of the early pioneers, yet we had some of the experience of pioneer life. In my mind's eye I can see the old log cabin with its small windows, its puncheon floor, the stake ridden roof, stick chimney and clapboard door with the latch' string always out. I can see the small patch of ground around the house, and remember how year by year it widened, and the neighbors seemed to get closer together as the woods disappeared. My brother, older than myself, was quite a hunter in a small way, though he never killed a deer or turkey. He was death on mink and opossum. The worst small varment dreaded by the hunter was the porcupine, for the dog was almost sure to get his mouth full of quills, then they had to be pulled out with the bullet molds or pinchers. Never saw but one wolf and that after it was killed. Remember hearing them howl after night; never killed but one wild turkey. The deer used to come in our meadow to pasture, three or four at a time. [memoir of J. M. Paxson, in Lynch, Reminiscences of Adams, Jay And Randolph Counties. ]

They settled in the woods. "Abigail used to say that she cleared acres of land with her needle, by sewing for men who cut the trees." [Cope, Genealogy of the Smedley Family, 650-51.] Her son remembered, "Mother was a great nurse in sickness and used to go far and near when the diphtheria broke out first. She was a faithful hand, never fearing for herself. She was something of a tailor, having worked at the trade in her younger days, and long hours after we were in bed she often plied her needle making garments for the neighbors. Can see her yet at the old spinning wheel . . . ." [memoir by J. M. Paxson, in Lynch, Reminiscences of Adams, Jay and Randolph Counties. ]

Benjamin died in 1862. For several years before his death "he was troubled with palpitation of the heart." The family never let him go anywhere alone. [J. M. Paxson, in Reminiscences of Adams, Jay and Randolph Counties.] Abigail married for a second time in 1866, Simon COX, the son of John and Patience. He had been born in North Carolina in 1798. His parents moved to Ohio when Simon was two. It was said of him that he "rocked his first child in a sugar trough; was a farmer, cabinet-maker and undertaker". [Cope, Genealogy of the Smedley Family, 651.]

Simon was a life-long Friend, and for years "sat at the head of the meeting." Abigail was named an Elder in Jerico Particular Meeting. She was known as "a very kind neighbor and fearless nurse in times of sickness." [Cope, Genealogy of the Smedley Family, 651.] Abigail and Simon moved to Randolph County, Indiana, where, after his marriage, her youngest son Joseph lived for seven years till Abigail's death, on November 23rd, 1869.

Children of Benjamin Ely and his first wife, Sarah (Mitchell), as listed by Helen Dinius Paxson. [From "The Paxsons", compiled by Helen Dinius Paxson (Mrs. Frank Paxson), typescript, 15-18, generously sent to me 3/2005 by Tom Irey. Wayne Paxson's web page seems to mix up the two groups of children, http://www.gencircles.com/users/paxlincoln/1/data/382; Cope's genealogy has only the three children of Abigail. Cope, Genealogy of the Smedley Family, 651.]

i. William Maud Paxson, b. 1815; d. 1848; m. Mary KINT in Columbiana Co., Ohio; both bur. in West Grove Cemetery, Jay Co., Ind.; 5 children.

ii. Charles Ely Paxson, b. 1817; m. Isobel TAYLOR;

iii. Phoebe "Sarah" Paxson, b. ca. 1820; m. James SAFFELL;

iv. Rachel Ann Paxson, b. 2 Dec. 1821 in Columbiana Co., Oh.; d. 12 July 1895 of paralysis near Pennville (at the Harry Wall Farm) aged 73 yrs., 7 mo. and 10 days; m. 6 Mar. 1838 Abraham SMITH (b. 3 Nov. 1817 in Va.; d. 31 Oct. 1875, aged 58 yrs., 11 mo., 28 days). They were charter members of the United Brethren Church at Gilead. It was built in 1864. Both are bur. in the Gilead Cemetery. Abraham was a blacksmith and had a shop in Balbec. They had children: Sarah E. Smith (m. Oliver IREY); Deborah Yates Smith (b. 30/9/1842, d. 29/8/1899; m. 31/10/1858 Mahlon HUNT); Phoebe Ann Smith (b. 3/2m/1846; d. 14/1/1880; m. 2/6m/1862 Sylvester HUNT)

v. Oliver Paxson, b. 1824; m. Rebecca DAYHOFF;

vi. Martha P. Paxson, b. 1828; m. Jeyhu SAFFELL;

vii. Mary P. Paxson, m. Jason BLACKLEDGE and had 9 children: Frank Blackledge, Oliver Blackledge, Eugene Blackledge, Rolf Blackledge, Lindley Blackledge, Charley Blackledge, Owen Blackledge, Gertrude Blackledge, Malty Blackledge.

viii. George Paxson7, b. 3 June 1835 in Butler Twp., Columbiana Co., Ohio; d. 25 May 1903 in Penn Twp., Jay Co., Ind.; m. 13 Nov. 1856 in Penn Twp, Jay Co., Ind., Lydia E. MENDENHALL (she was b. 26 Dec. 1832 in Columbiana Co., Oh., daughter of William) They had 6 children. [Cope, Genealogy of the Smedley Family, 876-77.]

Children of Benjamin Ely and his second wife, Abigail (McNeely): ["The Paxsons", compiled by Helen Dinius Paxson (Mrs. Frank Paxson), typescript, 31-34.]

ix. Albert R. Paxson, b. 30 May 1840 in Columbiana Co.; d. there 26 Dec. 1842.

x. Lydia Jane Paxson, b. 22 Nov. 1842; in Columbiana Co.; d. 20 Oct. 1889 near Pennsville, Jay Co., Ind.; m. Hiram B. GRISSELL on 3 Feb. 1862. He was b. 30 Aug. 1836 in Ohio, the son of Milo and Mary (JOHNSON) Grissel, and d. near Pennsville 25 June 1889. Lydia joined the Gilead United Brethern Church at Balbec in 1864 and served as seretary, teacher, and superintendent of the Sabbath School. They lived on a farm 2 miles northeast of Pennville. They had 10 children:
a) Lowell Paxson Grisell, b. 3/4m/1862, d. 18/6/1930. m. 1/1/1884 Mary C. "Katie" DAVENPORT, 3 children;
b) Atlantic Ocean Grisell, b. 3/6m/1863, d. 12/2m/1888, m. 19/3/1883 James Hamilton "Ham" CASH; 2 children;
c) Mary Josephine Grisell, b. 21/2/1865, d. 1/2m/1895, m. 1883 John Edward STRAIT, 5 children;
d) Albert Thurston Grisell, b. 26/7/1866, d. 22/2/1896; unmar.;
e) Joseph Arthur Grisell, b. 23/11/1868, d. 9/6m/1900;
f) Charles Elmer Grisell, b. 7/5m/1870, d. 20/11/1932, m. 24/1m/1895 Eliza Elizabeth "Lizzie" HOPKINS, daughter of Jerome B. and Mary Adeline (Lewis) Hopkins; 4 children; he was engaged in rig building, teaming, pulling oil wells, farming, and stock raising; she taught school before marriage;
g) Ethel D. Grisell, triplet b. 29/8/1872, d. 30/4/1891;
h) Elva E. Grisell, triplet b. 29/8/1872, d. 15/1/1873;
i) Elpha B. Grisell, triplet b. 29/8/1872, d. 28/10/1941, m. May COLE, 3 children;
j) Abigail "Abbie" M. Grisell, b.26/11/1873, d. 27/12/1891.["The Paxsons", comp. by Helen Dinius Paxson (Mrs. Frank), typescript, 31-34; Cope, Genealogy of the Smedley Family, 651, 879-80; Haines, comp., Richard Haines and his Descendants, 2:312.]
xi. Joseph M. Paxson, b. 23 Nov. 1844 in Columbiana Co.; m. 23 Nov. 1869 Delilah B. MANLEY in West Liberty, Jay Co., Ind. She was the daughter of Jeremiah L. and Mary Ann (BECKLER) Manley. Three children, of whom one d. as an infant.[Cope, Genealogy of the Smedley Family, 880.]: Christina Leona Paxson (b. 20 Nov. 1870 in Randolph Co., Ind.); and George Rutherford Paxson (b. 3 June 1876 in the same Co.).




Joseph Jefferson6 Paxson, ninth child of #213 Benjamin 5 (Joseph4, Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and Jane (ELY) Paxson, was born 4 or 14 January 1798 in Sadsbury Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania, and died 16 April 1872 in Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana, where he was buried in the Hillside/Quaker Cemetery. ["The Rumple-Haworth Family History" posted by Shannon Colleen O'Hara-Haworth, updated 26 July 2003 on worldconnect.rootsweb.com.] Joseph was married to Jane IREY 26 October 1820 by Joshua CHANDLER, Justice of the Peace in Sadsbury Township. Jane was born in 1802, the daughter of Philip Irey, Jr., and died ca. 1837 in Penn Township. Tracking tax records, the Irey family was in Loudoun Co. Va. in the 1790s, then moved to Harrison Co. Va. (now Barbour Co.West Va.), and was in Columbiana Co. Ohio by 1803. [My thanks to Tom Irey for this information, e mail 4/25/2010.]

Joseph removed from Sadsbury Meeting to New Garden Monthly Meeting in Columbiana County, Ohio, by certificate dated 7 Ninth Month 1819, received 25 Eleventh Month that year. He was disowned by New Garden Meeting on 21 Third Month 1822 for marrying contrary to Friends' discipline. Not only were they not married under the care of the meeting, but Jane was not a Friend and she was already four months pregnant. [Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:837.]

Perhaps in 1833 the family moved to Cincinnati. [from data by Robert Shannon, Malo, WI, cited by "Rumple-Haworth".]

In the fall of 1836 Joseph and Jane and their children moved to Penn Township, Jay County, Indiana. Jane died there the following year, perhaps at or soon after the birth of her last (ninth) child. Joseph married for a second time, on 13 June 1838 in Jay County, Elizabeth TETERICK, or TEDRIC, who had been born in 1807. [Marriage Records: Indiana (pre 1850), as cited by "Rumple-Haworth".]

Paxson mail carriers from Huntington, Ind. to Greenville, Oh, 1842-1856

Joseph was a mailman, and Helen Dinius Paxson gives the following account:

In 1846 Joseph J. took the contract for carrying the mail from Greenville, OH, to Huntington, IN, a distance of 84 miles one way, the round trip to be made weekly. They carried mail on horseback, leaving Huntington every Tuesday at 6:00 A,M, and arriving in Greenville the next Friday at 6:00 P.M., leaving Greenville every Saturday morning at 6:00 and arriving in Huntington the next Monday evening at 6:00. Mail was to be carried by way of Huntington, Murray, Bluffton, Penn (afterwards changed to Pennville), New Mt. Pleasant, Deerfield, Mount Holly, Millgrove to Greenville. For this they were paid $340. per year. The sons who helped their father carry the mail were Joshua, Cyrus, Phillip, Eli, Joseph Watson, Benjamin, and perhaps Edward . . . . [From "The Paxsons", compiled by Helen Dinius Paxson (Mrs. Frank Paxson), typescript, copied for me 3/2005 by Tom Irey.]

Fifty years later this photograph was taken of five of Joseph's sons who had helped carry the mail. The label reads, "mail carriers from Huntington, Ind. to Greenville, Oh, 1842-1856, 162 miles round trip". Back row from the left: Eli (age 76), Bennie (age 70), and Joseph (72); front row: Cyrus (age 80) and Phillip (78). [The actual photo is in Wayne Paxson's album, this image sent to me by Bruce Sonner, Sept. 8, 2009. My thanks to both these men for sharing it.]

It has been said that Joseph's sons were also involved in the underground railroad. [From "The Paxsons", compiled by Helen Dinius Paxson (Mrs. Frank Paxson), typescript, generously sent to me 3/2005 by Tom Irey.]

Children of Joseph Jefferson and Jane (Irey) Paxson: [From "The Paxsons", compiled by Helen Dinius Paxson (Mrs. Frank Paxson), typescript, kindly sent to me 3/2005 by Tom Irey.]

i.     Joshua M. Paxson, b. 4 Apr. 1821; m. Mary J. IREY;

ii.    Cyrus C. Paxson, b. 24 Jan. 1823 in Columbiana Co., Oh; d. 3 Jan. 1903 in Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas; m(1) Axie PEACOCK; they had 3 children. Cyrus m(2) in 1853 or 1855 Sarah Ellen JONES; they had 2 daughters. Cyrus m(3) 28 Feb. 1858 Abigail JONES; they had 7 children.

iii.   Philip I. Paxson, b. 11 Mar. 1825 in Columbiana Co., Oh.; d. 18 Jan. 1904 in Jay Co., Ind.; m. 17 Dec. 1846 in Pennville, Anna J. PEACOCK. They had 8 children.

iv.    Eli Warner Paxson, b. 4 Feb. 1827; d. 19 Apr. 1905 in Redkey, Jay Co., Ind. [date and place of death from "Rumple-Haworth"]

v.     Edward H. Paxson, b. 27 Dec. 1828 in Columbiana Co., Ohio; killed by a horse when an "oldish young man".

vi.    Joseph Watson Paxson, b. 28 Feb. 1831 in Columbiana Co., Ohio; d. 14 Nov. 1903; m. Eveline DUGDALE; 6 children.

vii.   Benjamin Franklin Paxson, b. 5 Apr. 1833 in Columbiana Co., Ohio; d. 23 Sept. 1910 in Marion, Grant Co., Ind.; m. 23 Dec. 1854 Sarah Ellen WOOD. They had 6 children.

viii.  Elosan V. Paxson, b. 29 Apr. 1835; m. William PEACOCK; 2 children.

ix.    Oliver C. Paxson, b. 17 Oct. 1837 in Jay Co., Ind.; d. 17 Oct. 1837. [date of death from "Rumple-Haworth"]
Children of Joseph Jefferson and Elizabeth (Teterick) Paxson: [from "Rumple-Haworth".]
x.     George Washington Paxson, b. ca. 1839? or ca. 1834?; perhaps he is the laborer enumerated in the 1880 census in Lower Saucon Twp., Northampton Co., Pa., age 46, with his wife Catharine (49), and children John (16), William (13), and Mary (9), the two boys in school, all born in Penna. [Family History Library Film 1255162; NA Film Number T9-1162; p. 119D.] If the census age of 46 is correct, then either he belongs in another family or his mother was the first wife.

xi.    Ira Heston Paxson

xii.   William Paxson

xiii.  Michael Teterick Paxson

xiv.   Sarah Jane Paxson

xv.    Margaret Ann Paxson

xvi.   John Q. Paxson, d. 27 April 1865, killed in the Sultana Disaster. John served in the Union Army, Indiana 7th Cavalry, Company E, 119th Regiment. He was captured and imprisoned in the notorious Andersonville Prison. Finally, hoping to get home and be reunited with their loved ones, the sick, starving prisoners, clothed only in rags, were released and crowded onto an overloaded Mississippi River paddle wheel steamer, the Sultana. She had a capacity of 396 passengers, but somewhere between 1,700 and over 2,000 men were crowded aboard. The Sultana blew up and most of the men were killed. Most of the dead were identified, but not all were found, lost in the cold flooded river; some were buried in unmarked shallow graves on the River banks. Bruce Sonner is trying to find where John was buried, and if his grave is suitably marked.

xvii.  Jesse K. Paxson

xviii. James S. Paxson





George Paxson6, son of #213 Benjamin 5 (Joseph4, Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and Jane ELY, was born 20 Feb. 1800;





Heston C.6 Paxson, son of #213 Benjamin 5 (Joseph4, Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and Jane ELY, was born 17 February 1802 in Sadsbury, Chester County, Pennsylvania. He died 19 June 1881 near Tipton, Iowa. Heston was married twice. His first wife was Rachel INGLEDUE, by whom he had four children. After Rachel's death Heston married on 11 November 1860 in Cedar County, Iowa, Mary Pollock PEARCE, a widow with nine children. Mary's husband Dennis had died in 1846 one year after arriving in Iowa from Ohio. [Information from Rachel Keller-McGuire, e mail 15 June 2005; she is the great great grand daughter of Mary Pearce.]

Heston's request to move west was approved by Sadsbury Monthly Meeting which signed a certificate of removal for him on 3 Sixth Month 1823. It was accepted at New Garden Meeting in Columbiana County, Ohio on the 26th of Sixth Month.[Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, 4:837.] But apparently Friends' manner of worship no longer satisfied them, and they began attending a different church. New Garden Meeting disowned Martha M. Paxson on 22 First Month and Heston C. Paxson on 25 Third Month 1824 for joining "another society". [Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, 4:837.] Martha might be a daughter? Apparently they joined the "old Bible Christians".

The 1860 US census for Cedar Township, Iowa, lists Heston living with a William Matheson and family. [Census information from Rachel Keller-McGuire, e mail 15 June 2005; she believes this may be one of his daughters.]

In 1880 the federal census enumerator listed Heston C. Paxson as a 79-year old farmer in Center, Cedar County, Iowa, with his [second] wife Mary, 69 and "Keeping House". [1880 census, NA Film no. T9-0331, p. 111B, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.]

The following obituary was sent to me by Rachel Keller-McGuire, for which I am grateful.

Heston C. Paxson at his residence, near Tipton, Iowa on the 19th of June, at the ripe age of 79yrs, 4mths, 2days.

Bro. Paxson was born in Chester, Pa but moved to Ohio in the early part of his life where he married his first wife, Rachel Englewdow, (Ingledue), by whom he had four children, all of whom survive him. After her death he came to Iowa and married Sister Mary Pearce, who also survives him.

Bro. Paxson was raised a Quaker, but when about twenty years old became acquainted with the old Bible Christians, and was united with them, and that gave him more advanced ideas of the Bible truth: but he soon met with our brethren, and followed up the Bible teaching in a more perfect way, of which he was a great admirer until the close of his earthly work.

For many years he filled the office of elder in the Rock Creek Congregation, where he last lived, and died beloved by all his neighbors. Surely a good man is lost to the community. By request, the undersigned preached at his funeral, from Isaiah 53. So has passed away one we all loved and respected much.

Three of his children are associated with the church in Ohio, and one is connected with the Friends, in Iowa, and the only one that was permitted to be at his bedside when he died. May God keep them all, and unite them in that better land, where there is no death or separation.

(signed) Jas. Jennings

The funeral occur ed at the German Reformed Church on the 20Th, Elder Jennings. The attendance was very large and the manifestation of grief unusually touching.

Mary Pollock Pearce Paxson died 21 September 1901 in Carson, Iowa and is buried at Buckner Cemetery, Montgomery County, Iowa. [Information from Rachel Keller-McGuire, e mail 15 June 2005.]

Children of Heston C. and his first wife, Rachel (Ingledue) Paxson [Information on the children kindly sent to me by Jan Paxson, 5m/8/2006.]:
i. Ezra Wheat Paxson7, b. 23 Dec. 1827; m. Mary Jane BAKER (1829-1909); 11 children.

ii. Lucinda Paxson, b. 27 May 1833; m(1) 20 May 1854 Joseph A. MACY (b. 10 Sept. 1829 in Ohio); 3 children b. in Iowa: Edward T. MACY (b. 28 Feb. 1857), Clarence P. MACY (b. 20 Mar. 1859), Lillian R. MACY (b. 29 Nov. 1861). Lucinda m(2) Royal STRANG.

iii. Malinda Paxson, b. 14 June 1836; d. Jan. 1884; m. 15 Apr. 1856 Joseph C. SHEETS (b. 28 Nov. 1829 in Ohio, son of Abraham and Margaret (__) Sheets); two children: Edward A. SHEETS (b. 17 Sept. 1859, m. 6 Nov. 1883 Helen ROOT; 1 daughter: Emma Lora SHEETS, b. 30 June 1884), and Hillery H. SHEETS (b. 19 Aug. 1870, m. 2 Jan. 1905 Annie M. LOGGIE).

iv. Sarah Ann Paxson, b. 1840; m. 13 Mar. 1862 Zena CHAMBERLAIN.




William Paxson is the son of Jacob5 #214 (Joseph4, Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and Elizabeth (PETITT) Paxson was born in 1798. [from http://www.pennock.ws/surnames/fam/fam06928.html 5/27/2005.] He moved from Sadsbury Meeting to New Garden, (Ohio) handing in his certificate 13 Eighth Month 1818. Two months later he was reported married to Maria MORGAN. They were Hicksites, so both were disowned by the Orthodox 26 Third Month 1829. [Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:837.]

But something is confused in my mind, because I have also been given data that the William Paxson who married Maria Morgan was the son of Benjamin #213.




Edward Paxson is the son of #214 Jacob5 (Joseph4, Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and Elizabeth (PETITT) Paxson. I do not know anything more about him than this. Did he have any children?



Jacob Canby Paxson, the son of Jacob5 # 214 (Joseph4, Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and Elizabeth (PETTIT) Paxson, was born 4 August 1817 and died in 24 November 189, aged 75. He married Sarah Ann YOCUM. She was born 31 July 1818 and died 30 July 1894 age 76. [Birth and death dates listed in Section C, Pioneer Cemetery, Van Buren Co., Hartford Township, Hartford Michigan (no date; typed transcription), kindly sent to me by Eileen Talamantez, e mail 4/28/2007.]

The 1860 Federal Census for Butler Township, Columbiana County, Ohio, lists Jacob C. Paxson, age 41, his wife Sarah A., same age, and their children Letitia W. 12, "Artwell" (sic) 10, Mary 8, and Sarah A., one month old. [usgenweb/oh/columbiana/census/1860]

I am assuming that this is the couple appearing in the 1880 census in Hartford Township, Van Buren County, Michigan. There Jacob is listed as a 62 year-old farmer born in Ohio, whose parents were born in Pennsylvania. Sarah is 61, born in Pennsyslvania, of Pennsylvania-born parents. Their daughter Annette is a single woman of 20, born in Ohio, and currently teaching school. [1880 census, www.familysearch.org]

The bodies of Jacob and Sarah were buried in the Pioneer Cemetery in Hartford, Michigan. When Eileen Talamantez stopped there in May 2007, she reported that it is a beautiful cemetery, with "lots of trees and very old tombstones. Jacob and Sarah are in the back row under a huge tree with spreading branches...a lovely site." [E mail 5/14/2007.]

Children of Jacob Canby and Sarah Ann (Yokum) Paxson: ["The Paxsons", comp. by Helen Dinius Paxson (Mrs. Frank), typescript, 19-30 (copy sent to me by Tom Irey, 3/2005).]

i. Juliet Paxson7
,
ii. Letitia "Tish" Paxson, b. ca. 1848

iii. Hartwell Littleton Paxson. b. 3 Feb. 1850; d. 27 Dec. 1918; m. 24 Nov. 1878 Ina Emmeroi LEACH; 4 children.

iv. Mary Matilda Paxson, b. ca. 1852; m. __ GALBRITH; res. in Hartford, Mich., a few miles from her brother Hartwell. They had a son, and a daughter named Ethel Galbrith.[Letter written by Blanche GLASS FROST to Thomas W. Jones, 31 March 1979, a copy kindly sent to me 2/22/2009 by Elaine Bennett-Sharp.]

v. Sarah Annette "Nettie" Paxson, b. 1860; She was a school teacher, living at home at the time of the 1880 census.




Job V. Paxson6, son of #220 Aaron (Joseph4, Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and Susanna (Hambleton) Paxson, was born 8 February 1822, and died on 27 September 1881. He married Lydia Ann HAMBLETON on 29 September 1847 in Hamburg, Erie County, New York. [date and place of marriage from IGI, familysearch, 7m/8/2006.] She was the daughter of Samuel A. and Edith (WILLITS) Hambleton. [Suzanne P. Lamborn, The Paxson Family, 39.]

Job was a farmer in Orchard Park, Erie Co., New York. The couple had no children. [Roberts, comp., Genealogy of the Descendants of John Kirk, 191.] He was listed as postmaster for Reserve, in Erie County in 1870, and perhaps served much longer. ["Post-Masters' Names; Telegraph Stations, etc., in N. Y. State", The New York state business directory and gazetteer (Syracuse, 1870), 194.]




William Hambleton Paxson and Christiana (Hambleton) Paxson, ca. 1850, from ESPaxson: Frontier Artist

William Hambleton Paxson6, son of #220 Aaron5 (Joseph4, Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and Susanna (Hambleton) Paxson, was born 15 April 1825. Susanna's father (William H. Paxson's grandfather) was Jonas Hambleton. [according to The Genealogical Record of The Hambleton Family by Chalkley J. Hambleton (1887), p. 89. William married Christiana HAMBLETON. She was born in 1832 in Orchard Park, New York, the daughter of Samuel A. and Edith (WILLITS) Hambleton. ["Christina [child 8], b. 1832; living at Orchard Park; m., in 1850, William Hambleton Paxson, b. in 1825, son of Aaron Paxson and Susan Hambleton, dau. of 10 Jonas Hambleton." My thanks to Bea Bard for bringing this to my attention, e mail 13 June 2005. Another source gives her parents as John and Hannah (Stoffel) Hambleton. There is said to be a Pennsylvania "Dutch" fractur as the source for this.]

The pictures to the right of William and Christiana were painted by their son, Edgar, from an old tintype, ca. 1850, the year of their marriage. [From William Edgar Paxson, Jr., E.S. Paxson: Frontier Artist (Boulder, Colo.: Pruett Co, c 1984) kindly sent to me by Eileen Talamantez, e mail 4/27/2007.]

A neighbor, "Aunt" Triphene, was with Christiana when her son Edgar was born. Triphene was the first white person born on the nearby Seneca Indian Reservation. She would thrill the children with stories of her youth on the New York frontier when the Senecas, one of the powerful Five Nations of Iroquois, ranged the woodlands led by the famous chief Red Jacket. [Excerpt from Chapter 1, William Edgar Paxson, Jr., E.S. Paxson: Frontier Artist (Boulder, Colo.: Pruett Co, c 1984) kindly sent to me by Eileen Talamantez, e mail 4/28/2007.]

Although William and his family were Hicksite Friends, in 1862 William served in the 76th New York Regiment at Harrisburg during the Civil War. [The Cyclopaedia of American Biography (NY: 1918), 8:285.] His ten-year-old son Edgar served as drummer boy for new recruits. Friends were divided in their response to the dilemma of having to choose which was a worse evil: slavery or war. Earlier, Christiana's father, Samuel A. HAMBLETON had gone to jail for refusing to participate in military activities. Samuel's uncle Moses and Moses's son Aaron refused conscription into the British forces near Toronto during the War of 1812. Aaron died in a Canadian jail, and Moses fled to the United States, losing his farm as the price of upholding Friends testimony against war and outward violence. [Excerpt from Chapter 1, William Edgar Paxson, Jr., E.S. Paxson: Frontier Artist (Boulder, Colo.: Pruett Co, c 1984) kindly sent to me by Eileen Talamantez, e mail 4/28/2007.]

William Hambleton Paxson sketched by his son, Edgar Samuel Paxson, 1874

William was listed in the 1870 New York State Directory as dealing in wagons, in East Hamburg. [The New York state business directory and gazetteer (Syracuse, 1870), 945.]

The sketch to the left of William Hambleton Paxson was done by his son, the artist Edgar Samuel Paxson. Edgar also painted the two portraits of his parents (above).

The following obituary was found among family papers; the newspaper was not dated or identified, but probably was from Butte, Montana. My thanks to Bea Bard for sending it to me.

VENERABLE CHRISTIAN LADY. Death Yesterday of Mrs. William H. Paxson, Mother of a Large Family. Mrs. William H. Paxson died yesterday morning of paralysis, the fatal stroke manifesting itself Wednesday. When the end came she was surrounded by her husband and children. She was conscious until just before the last. She came to Butte with her husband about 20 years ago and had resided here since. The couple celebrated their golden wedding two years ago, and at this were congregated their children and grandchildren.
    Mrs. Paxson was born in Boston, Erie county, N.Y., June 22, 1832, the youngest daughter of Samuel A. and Edith Hambleton. The family was of early pioneer stock of Bucks county, Pa., who settled there in 1632 [sic]. She was ever a good and Christian lady, devoted wholly to her family. She leaves to mourn her loss a widower, three sons and a daughter--- Ed. S. Paxson, Everett E., Robert H. Paxson and Mrs. William J. Crittenden; also five grandchildren, the children of E. S. Paxson: Loren C., Harry M., Robert C. and Lelia E., and Ruth, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Paxson. [Note from Bea Bard, e mail 13 June 2005: Ruth was the daughter of Robert Paxson and his first wife.]
Children of William Hambleton and Christiana (Hambleton) Paxson: [Information on the children is from Bea Bard, e mails 8 June, and 13 June 2005; I have not yet had an opportunity to check this myself, but Bea has copies of the marriage certificates. See also Roberts, comp., Genealogy of the Descendants of John Kirk, 192.]
i.   Edgar Samuel Paxson7, b. 25 Apr. 1852 in Orchard Park, East Hamburg, NY; m. 1852 Laura M. JOHNSON. She and her sister Lelia (the wife of Edgar's two brothers) were the daughters of Lorenzo D. "Loren" and Polly (Hall) Johnson. They are named in Lorenzo's will, file #11341, Erie County, New York. [My thanks to Bea Bard, e mail 13 June 2005, for this information. I have not yet had time to check it for myself, but Bea seems like a careful researcher.]

ii.  Everett Erastus Paxson, b. 8 Oct. 1853 in Orchard park, NY; d. 21 Nov. 1903 in Butte, bur. Mt. Moriah Cemetery in Butte, Mont.; m. 23 July 1901 in Duluth, St. Louis Co., Minn., Lelia JOHNSON, the sister of Edgar's wife Laura.

iii. Robert Hambleton Paxson , b. 4 June [or May 1858] 1855 at Orchard Park, NY; d. in Central Point, Ore.; m(1) __ and had a daughter Ruth; m(2) 18 Sept. 1906 in Butte the widow of his brother Everett, Lelia JOHNSON.

iv.   Florence Paxson, m. William J. CRITTENDEN;





John Jefferson Paxson6, son of #221 Jonathan (Joseph4, Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and Catherine (Beecher) Paxson, was born 21 June 1805 on the family farm near Atglen, Pennsylvania. Alternatively, he was born on his grandparents' homestead in Sadsbury. [Suzanne P. Lamborn, The Paxson Family, 39.] John died 26 March 1873 [1893, per Lamborn] on Sweetbriar Farm in South Manheim Township, Schuylkill County, Penna. On 3 March 1831 he was married to Louisa HESTON, "of Hesion Ville" [sic], Philadelphia County, by Alderman P. CHRISTIAN. [Atkinson's Saturday Evening Post 10:502 (Mar. 12, 1831), p. 3.] Her name is sometimes incorrectly written as Laura or Louise. Louisa was the daughter of Edward and and his second wife Sarah (HALL) Heston. She had been born 6 [or 25 according to Roberts, comp., Genealogy of the Descendants of John Kirk, 95.] November 1801 in Hestonville, Pennsylvania. She died 26 April 1899 in South Mannheim Township, and was buried in the Union Cemetery, Schuylkill Haven. [Roberts, comp., Genealogy of the Descendants of John Kirk, 95.]

John J. was a truck farmer on a 30-acre farm in Hestonville (a village founded by his father-in-law, Col. Edward W. Heston, an officer in the Revolutionary War). Col. Heston had settled on a large farm ca. 1766 at the foot of "George" Hill in Fairmount Park. There they raised 14 children, the youngest of whom, Louisa, was born in 1801. She and her husband, John J. Paxson, farmed a small portion of the original tract. At the time it was three miles from the city of Philadelphia, but it has since been absorbed by the city, with the only reminder being Paxson Street, and a hundred years ago the old farmhouse was still on Master Street near 52nd Street. I doubt it is still standing. John loved truck farming, and hoped his sons would follow in his footsteps. But the farm was too small, and the price of land too steep to make this possible. So on 1 April 1849, John, Louise, and their six sons moved to Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, where they could engage in truck farming for the Pottstown market. [Isaac Paxson, "Recollections of My Early Farm Life in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania" (Paper Read Before the Historical Society, April 24, 1907) transcribed on http://www.searchforancestors.com/bios/pennsylvania/biographical_notes_of_pine_grove/paxson-isaac.php. Note that there are a few typographical errors, including in the first sentence "Laura" instead of "Louisa", and later "Conrad" instead of "Conard". My thanks to Elaine Paxson, e mails 12/31/2007 and 1m/2/2008 for bringing this article to my attention, and pointing out the typos.]

The new farm was 160 acres on the top of the Schuylkill mountain south of Schuylkill Haven, purchased from James B. Levan, who was one of the active merchants and wood dealers in the early history of Schuylkill Haven. The original owner was Adam EILER, who acquired it by a patent deed from the State of Pennsylvania dated at Harrisburg, September 10, 1810, wherein it is named "Edenbower Farm". By 1849 it had been used mostly to house teams for hauling stone from a quarry for the use by the Schuylkill Canal Company, so the farm itself had been neglected and was pretty delapidated. John and his sons and a nearby stone mason soon had the place in good order. John became one of the noted farmers of the county, and was one of the originators of the Schuylkill County Agricultural Society, serving as its first President. John hired John MEEK, an English gardener, and together they cultivated 8 or 10 acres of truck. John "introduced many new innovations such as deep ploughing, liming the land heavily, cleaning out old fence rows, so that the fields would present a neater appearance, as well as preventing the spread of briars and noxious weeds." [Isaac Paxson, "Recollections of My Early Farm Life in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania"] John also introduced tomato growing, soon picked up by other English-background neighbors. The ethnic German settlers, who were probably a majority at the time, at first refused to have anything to do with tomatoes. [Paxson family entry in a book that Schuylkill Haven published in 1975, highlighting the 225 anniversary of the town; my thanks to Elaine Paxson for e mailing me images of two pages, 1m/4/2008.]

Among the activities of the Schuylkill County Agricultural Society was an annual fair. The first was held at Lessig's Hotel on Centre Turnpike about half way between Schuylkill Haven and Orwigsburg, probably in the fall of 1852. The fairs usually included horse racing and a great deal of socializing. On a more serious note, they enabled the farmers to "get together and discuss matters relative to their occupation, and by comparing notes could help each other. They also enabled them to become acquainted with the new farming implements and machinery that were introduced to facilitate and lighten their labor." [Isaac Paxson, "Recollections of My Early Farm Life in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania"]

After the fairs were moved from Lessig's to Orwigsburg, many of the farmers in the west end of the county became dissatisfied because of the distance. They organized a new fair at Schuylkill Haven, and elected John J. Paxson President, and Henry BOWMAN, of Schuylkill Haven, Secretary. Land was acquired from the P. & R. Railroad Co., and fairs were held for ten years (1857-1867) that were financially "and otherwise" successful. [Isaac Paxson, "Recollections of My Early Farm Life in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania"]

John J. was also President of the Farmer's Fire Insurance Company of Schuylkill County for a number of years. Although he never sought public office, once his name was placed on the ticket of the Republican party for Associate Judge, but was defeated by his opponent, Judge KLINE. [Isaac Paxson, "Recollections of My Early Farm Life in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania"]

Before moving to Schuylkill County the family had attended Friends meeting in Merion. But there was no meeting within a convenient distance to their new home. So the family joined a group organizing a new English-speaking Lutheran church in Schuylkill Haven. The Paxson males helped dig the foundation and built seats for the new church. The family have been active members of St. Matthews ever since. [Paxson family entry in a book that Schuylkill Haven published in 1975, highlighting the 225 anniversary of the town; my thanks to Elaine Paxson for e mailing me images of two pages, 1m/4/2008.]

"John J. Paxson, after living on the farm the remainder of his life, died on March 26th, 1873, in the 68th year of his age, well satisfied in his having been permitted to live and work so long on the farm he loved so well. A short time before his death he made the remark, that the old farm had seemed to him like an earthly paradise." [Isaac Paxson, "Recollections of My Early Farm Life in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania"]

Louisa died exactly 26 years later. It was written of her:

Louisa (Heston) Paxson, who passed away 4 Mo. 26, 1899, aged 97 years, was a historically picturesque figure. She was a real daughter of the Revolution, and a daughter of a Revolutionary soldier, Col. Edward Warner Heston, the founder of Hestonville, where she was born 11 Mo. 25, 1901. The old Heston mansion was erected in 1776, on the old Lancaster Road near what is now 52nd Street, Philadelphia. . . . Edward Warner Heston was a man of much note in the Revolutionary Army: from captain he was promoted to lieutenant-colonel. After the war he filled the office of Judge of the court of common pleas of Philadelphia, and was also State senator. Louisa Heston Paxson was widely known and honored. Several years ago the Daughters of the Revolution presented her with a gold souvenir spoon. [Roberts, comp., Genealogy of the Descendants of John Kirk, 95, quoting from the Doylestown Democrat, 1901. Note, however, that her son's reminiscence said she died on March 26, not April 26.]

John and Louisa lived in Hestonville. [The Kirk Family, 192.]

Children of John J. and Louisa (Heston) Paxson: [Gill, "The Paxson Family from England to Edenbower, Schuylkill County Pennsylvania", p. 90; Roberts, comp., The Kirk Family, 391-92.]

i. Isaac Paxson7, b. 23 Dec. 1831 in Hestonville; d. 11 Sept. 1920 in Schuylkill Haven; m. 23 Dec. 1856 Miriam P. CONARD; 6 children.

ii. Edward Heston Paxson, b. 22 Apr. 1833; d. 2 July 1916 in Philadelphia; m(1) 20 Nov. 1862 Sarah Wood GILLINGHAM; m(2) 1889 Catharine Ann ARMSTRONG; 4 children.

iii. Jonathan Paxson, b. 24 Sept. 1834; d. 12 Dec. 1900 in Oaklette, Va.; m(1) Martha WYNKOOP; m(2) Louisa WYNKOOP; 5 children.

iv. George Paxson, b. 5 May 1836; d. 4 May 1918 in Orwigsburg, Penna.; m. Mary A. DEAN; 4 children.

v. William J. Paxson, b. 25 Oct. 1838; d. 8 June 1857 in South Mannheim Twp., Schuylkill Co.; unmarried. He died of "injuries received by the market wagon breaking and the horses running away whilst going down one of the steep hills of Pottsville." [Isaac Paxson, "Recollections of My Early Farm Life in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania".]

vi. Joseph Paschall Paxson, b. 4 May 1840; d. 5 Feb. 1929 in Norfolk, Va.; m. 12 Feb. 1867 Frances Jane WYNKOOP.



Joseph Franklin Paxson6, son of #221 Jonathan (Joseph4, Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and Catherine (Beecher) Paxson, was born 26 May 1808 at Cedar Park Farm, near Atglen, in Sadsbury Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. He died 21 September 1890 in the same place where he was born. On 10 September 1828 he married Jennie Susanna SIMMONS. She was born 25 February 1805 in Cross Keys, Sadsbury Township, the daughter of Samuel Simmons and Hannah (Williams) Simmons, and died 28 March 1892 in Cedar Park Farm.[My thanks to Jim Houston for data on this family, e mail 10/16/2009. The Kirk Family, 192, sez Susan was his wife's name.]

Joseph served as a Chester County Commissioner in 1838 and 1840. He was a member of the Pennsylvania Legislature in 1844.

He may be the Joseph F. Paxson whose application for a license to operate the "Cross Keys" tavern in Sadsbury was denied in 1839, 1849, and 1841. He tried again and was granted a license for the "Penningtonville Hotel" in 1847 and 1748. [Chester Co. Tavern Petitions Index, 1700-1923]

In the 1860 federal census for Sadsbury Township J.F. Paxson was 52, married to Susanna, 55, and their children are listed as Charlotte 28; Susan 26; Balinda [sic] 20; Rachel 18 and Malinda [sic] 14. [I'm grateful for this information from Nancy Plumley, e mail, 4m/3/2006.]

Joseph F. appeared in the 1880 census for West Sadsbury, Chester County, Pennsylvania, with his wife "Susann", age 75 who was keeping house. Two unmarried daughters were living at home: Lottie, age 47, and Sarah, age 45. Joseph was a farmer and also in the household was a 15-year old "farm boy", Enos JORDAY, a 15-year old white boy born in Pennsyslvania of Pennsylvania-born parents.[www.familysearch.org]

Joseph died Sep 21 1890, and Susanna died 28 March 1892. They are both interred in the Friends Burial Ground in Sadsbury.[My thanks to Jim Houston for data on this family, e mail 10/16/2009.]

Children of Joseph F. and Susanna (Simmons) Paxson: [Jim Houston, e mail 10/16/2009; Roberts, comp., The Kirk Family, 392-93.]

i. Timothy Paxson7, b. 24 July 1829; d. Mar. 1902; m(1) 1852 Elizabeth MANSFIELD, who d. 1853; m(2) Caroline A. LIPPINCOTT; 1 son.

ii. Sarah Paxson, b. 24 Dec. 1830; d. died 2 Mar. 1888 at Mt. Welcome, Cecil Co., Md.; m. Apr. 1851 William E. PORTER. He was b. 31 Oct. 1828, son of John Hart Porter and Mary Ann (Toy), and d. 23 June 1909 in Mt. Pleasant, Cecil Co., Md. During the Civil War William was Asst. Master of Roads and Supt. of Construction of the B & O Railroad. After the War, he was asst. supt of the B&O rail dept., Baltimore, and was supt. of the construction of the Parkersburg bridge (1869-71). In 1890 he was president of the West Virginia Central Railway Co., Elkins, Randolph Co., WV. His work during the Civil War is mentioned in History of the B & O Railroad by John F. Stover, p. 107, and Story of the B & O Railroad by Edward Hungerford, Vol. 2, p. 20. In June 1907 William wrote an article for the Book of the Royal Blue entitled, "Keeping the B & O in repair in war time was a task for Hercules." They had 10 children.
a) William Franklin Porter, b. Dec 26 1852; m. Mary Eugenia FITZSIMMONS, Jan 16 1895, b. 6 Sept. 1850, d. 17 Oct. 1934 in Baltimore, Md., buried in W. Nottingham Pres. Cem., Colora, Md. William was a member of the Maryland Historical Society. Admitted to practice before the U.S. Court of Appeals, 4/13/1892.
b) Martha Elizabeth Porter, b. 8 Mar. 1854; d. 29 Apr. 1913 in Cecil Co., Md.; m. 4 Mar. 1873 Perry Sylvannus SHAFFER (b. Mar 25 1850, son of George Henry Shaffer and Harriett (Startzman), d. Apr 1 1906. In 1883 Perry accidently killed his uncle, husband of Rachel Paxson Houston, while duck hunting. Martha and Perry were buried at W. Nottingham Presby. Cem., Colora, Md.; 7 children.
c) Edmund J. Porter, b. July 29 1855, d. Oct. 25 1857.
d) George H. Porter, b. May 10 1857; d. Jan. 3 1945; m. 1882 Kate Elizabeth WILDE (b. Dec 28 1857, daughter of Issac T. Wilde and Matilda Louisa (Paxson); 4 children.
e) Henry Tegmire Porter, b. Oct. 10 1859; m. Annie HALL;
f) Mary M. Porter, b. Oct. 1860; d. Apr. 1862.
g) Augustus H. Porter, b. Sept. 11 1862 in WV; d. before 1911; m. Cora LOGAN;
h) Charles Porter, b. Feb 25 1864,2 d. Mar 9 1964.
i) Alpheus Lee Porter, b. Apr. 25 1866; d. after 1911; m. Margaret HOFFMAN;
j) Mary Ann Porter, b. Mar. 31 1869; m. Lewis TWADELL;
iii. Charlotte Paxson, b. 16 Oct. 1832 in Penningtonville, Chester Co.; d. 11 Mar. 1911, buried in Sadsbury FBG, Sadsbury Twp., Lancaster Co.

iv. Susanna Paxson, twin, b. 20 June 1834 in Penningtonville, Chester Co.; d. 20 Nov. 1914, buried in Sadsbury FBG;

v. Phebe Anna Paxson, or Phoebe Ann, twin, b. b. 20 June 1834; d. 8 July 1834 in Penningtonville.

vi. Simmons Paxson, b. 6 July 1836; m(1) 1859 Hannah J. CHAPMAN; m(2) 1863 the widow Mary A. LANCASTER; Simmons was a lawyer; 2 children died young.

vii. Ruth A. Paxson, b. 11 Mar. 1838; d. 29 Apr. 1848.

viii. Belinda Paxson, b. 11 Dec. 1839; d. 6 Sept. 1894 in W. Sadsbury Twp.; unmarried.

ix. Rachel R. Paxson, b. 4 Dec. 1841; m. 21 Nov. 1866 James Hervey HOUSTON, Jr.; he was b. 5 Dec. 1839 in Gap, Lanc. Co., Penna., the son of James Hervey Houston, Sr. and Sarah Jacobs (Downing), and d. 30 Nov. 1883 on Patapsco R., Baltimore, Md. James served in the 15th Penna. Cavalry during the Civil War. Then he worked in railroad construction, first for the Penna. RR on the Harrisburg-Altoona line (1868), then for the B&O at Parkersburg, W. Va. were he was a supervisor of construction of the Ohio River railroad bridge (1869-71). He then moved to Baltimore and continued to work for the B&O. At the time of his death he was chief marshall of the B&O fire department and superintendent of the yard at Locust Point. He was a member of the Col. John W. Wilson Post #1, GAR, Baltimore, MD. James was accidentally shot and killed by Perry SHAFFER, the husband of his wife's niece, while on a duck hunting outing on the Patapsco River, near Baltimore, on November 30, 1883. (See Baltimore Sun 12/1/1883) They had 3 children.
a) James Homer Houston, b. July 28 1867 in Coatesville, Chester Co.; d. 18 Dec. 1893 in Elkins, Randolph Co., W. Va.; m. Jessie May Wilson, Jul 21 1891 in Elkins, Randolph Co., W. Va. Jessie was b. May 28 1868 in Beverly, Randolph Co., WV, daughter of James Duncan Wilson and Delia (Crawford), and d. after 1920. James was a contractor with the West Virginia Central Railway Co., killed by dynamite explosion during railroad construction, buried in Beverly Cemetery, Beverly, Randolph Co., WV. One son d. at ca. 2 months old.
b) Grace Downing Houston, b. Nov. 30 1870 in Parkersburg, Wood Co., W. Va., d. May 18 1883 in Baltimore.
c) Franklin Paxson Houston, b. 11 Sept. 1879 in Cedar Park Farm, Sadsbury Twp., Chester Co.; d. May 21 1934 in West Grove; m. Jane Egenton EWING, May 3 1906 in W. Grove Presby. Church, West Grove, Chester Co., by the Rev. Henry G. MARTIN. Jane was b. Apr. 23 1880 in West Grove, daughter of Robert Black Ewing and Mary Ann (Ross), and d. Mar 18 1964 in West Grove, Ches. Co., PA, both are buried in Oxford, Chester Co., Franklin bought out the pharmacy business of Ms. Nellie BAKER at the corner of Exchange Place and Evergreen St., West Grove, Penna. in 1907 and operated it as Houston's Pharmacy until his death. He was a member of New London Lodge No. 545 F&AM. They had 3 children.
x. Mary Melvina Paxson, b. 22 Nov. 1845; m. 22 Nov. 1865 John HAMILTON (b. 1835); res in Washington, D.C.; had 3 or 4 children.



Jacob Epler Paxson6, son of #221 Jonathan (Joseph4, Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and Catherine (Beecher) Paxson, was born 22 August 1811 in Atglen. He died 2 May 1880. Jacob married Caroline MULBERRY. [The Kirk Family, 192, offers 20 Aug. as his b. date.]

In the 1880 census 69-year old Jacob still considered himself a carpenter. He and Caroline were living with their son David M. Paxson in South Bend, Indiana, and David's wife Maggie and their two young daughters, Capitolas age 4 and Clenny, age 1 year. [www.familysearch.org]

Children of Jacob E. and Caroline (Mulberry) Paxson [Roberts, comp., The Kirk Family, 393-4; and, worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jhouston&id=I308]:

i. Sarah E. Paxson7, b. 15 May 1832; d. 1915; m. David U. VanNORDSTRAND; 7 children listed on worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jhouston&id=I539 (seen 2/28/2006) [The Kirk Family, 393, gives her husband's name as Vanordstrand; the resided in Buchanan, Mich.; also lists 7 children.]

ii. Catherine M. Paxson, b. 17 Feb. 1834; m. Jonathan ESKRDGE; 3 children.

iii. William P. Paxson, b. 9 Apr. 1836 in Columbia, lancaster Co., Penna.; d. 5 Feb. 1889; m. Mary F. MURRAY and had 3 children: Caroline, Mary, and Sarah; William was a railroad engineer. [worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jhouston&id=I540 as seen 2/28/2006.]

iv. Eliza Jane Paxson, b. 13 May 1840; m. Nathan S. MARSH; res in South Bend, Ind.; had 5 children.

v. John Miller Paxson, b. 14 Sept. 1842; m(1) 15 Apr. 1866 Amyra ROGERS; m(2) 23 Dec. 1890 Emma Oliver MILLER.

vi. Mary Amanda Paxson, b. 2 Feb. 1845; m(1) George ESKRIDGE; m(2) Samuel RIVERS.

vii. Daniel D. Paxson, b. 19 Feb. 1847; d. 21 Mar. 1851.

viii. Jonathan V. Paxson, b. 20 Apr. 1848; m. Mintie READING.

ix. Caroline E. Paxson, b. 10 Nov. 1849; d. 1890; m.(1) Levi PADDOCK; m(2) Melotus HESTON.

x. David M. Paxson, b. 23 Apr. 1852; m. "Maggie" Margaret Neidhart GILBERT; at least 2 children.




George Washington Paxson6, son of #221 Jonathan (Joseph4, Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and Catherine (Beecher) Paxson, was born 18 January 1813 on the family farm near Atglen. He died 20 December 1894. He married Elizabeth CARNAHAN.

In 1877 a great tornado swept a path of destruction through Chester County. It went "through the southern part of the borough of Parkesburg; only the extreme south-western portion of the village, however, was destroyed. First came the new residence of Geo. Paxson, Superintendent of the Pennsylvania and Delaware Railroad. This was a building of rather modest pretensions, long and narrow, and constructed of frame. It had been finished, and his family were preparing to move in on the following day. The dwelling was said to have been erected by contract, the cost to be about fifteen hundred dollars. The cloud on encountering the building, entirely demolished it; a pump stood on the north or kitchen end, solitary and alone, and it was evident that the structure had been near the centre of the storm track." [Friends Intelligencer 51:11 (Oct. 27, 1877), 83.]

In the 1880 census the family lived in Parkesburg, Chester County, Pennsyslvania. George was 67 and a train master on the Pennsylvania Rail Road. Elizabeth was 58, keeping house. Living with them were their children, 21 year old Annie B. and 13 year old George W. a school boy. Also living there was a 5-year old grandson, Charles C. HALLOWD [sic].[1880 census as given on www.familysearch.org]

George died at the age of 71 on 21 December 1894 of "la grippe" after an illness of two months. [West Chester County Death Register, 1893-1907, Vol. 1, p. 201 as transcribed on http://courses.wcupa.edu/jones/his480/ seen 5/22/2009.]

Children of George and Elizabeth (Carnahan) Paxson: [The Kirk Family, 394.]

i. James W. Paxson7, b. 10 Jan. 1842; d. 19 Sept. 1860.

ii. Elizabeth C. Paxson, b. 22 Sept. 1843; d. by 1880; m. William HALLOWELL; had several sons.

iii. Levi B. Paxson, b. 6 Sept. 1846; d. 17 June 1872.

iv. Clarkson Paxson, b. 17 June 1851; m. Lettie C. GARDNER;

v. Sallie C. Paxson, b. 25 Oct. 1851; m. Rouse C. JONES; had a son, George P. Jones.

vi. Mary F. Paxson, b. 3 Aug. 1853; d. 6 Dec. 1864.

vii. Agnes S. Paxson, b. 26 July 1856; d. 26 Oct. 1856.

viii. Anna B. Paxson, b. 13 Feb. 1859; m. __ MURPHY;

ix. George S. Paxson, b. 24 July 1866;



Oliver Hazard Perry Paxson6, son of #221 Jonathan (Joseph4, Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and Catherine (Beecher) Paxson, was born 5 December 1816 on the family farm near Atglen. He died 29 September 1889 at his farm in Honey Brook, Chester County, Penna. On 14 January 1841 he married Letitia HUTCHINSON in Columbia, Penna. She was the daughter of James and Hannah (Jefferies) Hutchenson [sic], and was born on 4 November 1822 and died 23 April 1910 in Philadelphia. [The Kirk Family, 192, offers 1849 as the year of his death, but this doesn't seem to compute with his children's births.]

In the 1860 federal census for Sadsbury Township Oliver Paxson, age 44, is listed as an engineer. His wife is Letitia, 36 and their children are Clara 16, Josephene 14, Adda 12, George W.B. 7, Catharine M. 4 and Hannah E. 3. [My thanks for this information to Nancy Plumley, e mail, 4m/3/2006.]

Suzanne Lamborn refers to an August 13, 1868 article that said Oliver had been "an efficient engineer" for the Waynesburg Branch of the Penna. Railroad, working for the line for 43 and a half years. He started with a pick and shovel, then was promoted to laying track for five years. During this time he lost an eye in an accident. In 1842 he became a fireman, and in 1848 an engineer on the Downingtown-Lancaster Branch of the Penna. RR. During his career as engineer he ran over an ax at Radnor and it is thought one man was killed on the tracks. [Suzanne P. Lamborn, The Paxson Family (Morgantown, Pa.: Masthof Press, 2008), 40.]

On November 13, 1867 a mechanics' lien was placed on Oliver's "two story stone frame building" in Honeybrook Township. I have not discovered what became of it, but presumably he managed to pay it off. [Chester County Mechanics' Liens Index 1826-1869.]

A descendant described Oliver as "a large man, some three hundred pounds. He comes from a Quaker family and was a farmer. He left the farm and later became an engineer on the railroad running from Columbia, Lancaster Co. PA to Philadelphia. He resided in Columbia, which at that time was a busy rail center. All of his children were born there, with the possible exception of the last two. In 1880 he resided in New Holland, Earl Township, Lancaster County, PA. He also resided at Honeybrook [sic], PA." [http://user.mc.net/~cherokee/paxpage/paxson.htm]

In the 1880 census Oliver was listed as a 62-year-old engineer with his wife Lettie M., age 56. They had four unmarried children and two grandchildren living with them in New Holland Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. [1880 census, NA Film no. T9-1140, p. 202D, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.]

Children of Oliver Hazzard Perry and Letitia (Hutchinson) Paxson:

i. Cecelia Paxson7, b. 22 Dec. 1841 in New Holland; d. 19 Apr. 1885;m. 14 Nov. 1859 Walter DESINO. [The Kirk Family, 192, offers 25 Dec. as her b., and Walter D. SINO as her husband's name.]

ii. Clara Paxson, b. 24 June 1844 in New Holland; d. 1924; m. James SKYLER. In 1880 she was a 34-year old unmarried seamstress living with her parents. In 1911 she lived in Philadelphia. [The Kirk Family, 192, offers 24 Jan. 1843 as her b. date and James S. KYLE as her husband.]

iii. Josephine Paxson, b. 17 Mar. 1846 in New Holland; d. 23 Dec. 1911; m. Daniel SCHUTT on 19 Aug. 1869. They had two sons, Frederick O. P. Shutt, b. in Ohio ca. 1870, and George W. Shutt, b. in Penna. ca. 1872. Her obituary, as the widow of Robert ANDERSON, appeared on 28 Dec. 1911. She was described as "a faithful worker in the Presbyterian Church" who "greeted everyone with a pleasing smile always." She lived with her son Frederick; son George lived in Philadelphia. She was survived by them and siblings Clara Paxson, Elizabeth Townsley, Ada Whitman, George W. and James E. E. Paxson. [usgenweb/pa/philadelphia/obits/anderson-j8.txt]

iv. Ada Paxson, b. 9 July 1848 in New Holland; d. 21 Feb. 1924; m. 22 Oct. 1867 Edger WHITMAN; living in Little Britain in 1911. [The Kirk Family, 192, spells it WHITEMAN.]

v. George W. Paxson, b. 21 Sept. 1850; d. 1852.

vi. George Washington Paxson, b. 15 May 1853 in Columbia; d. 4 Apr. 1925 in Philadelphia; m. in Honey Brook on 25 Dec. 1873 Mary Jane CHALFANT; she d. 17 June 1891 in Norristown, Pa.; George m(2) Cora DEVIESE in Norristown in 1892; [http://user.mc.net/~cherokee/paxpage/paxson.htm]; living in Philadelphia in 1911. [The Kirk Family, 192, the 6th child is George B., b.15 May 1853, m(10 Mary Jane CHALFANT and (2) Cora Elizabeth DAVIES.]

vii. Katherine Paxson, b. 4 Oct. 1855 in Columbia; living at home with her parents in 1880. [The Kirk Family, 192, says her name was Mary C. Paxson, and she d. in 1900.]

viii. Elizabeth H. Paxson, b. 5 Mar. 1858 in Columbia; m. Robert TOWNSLEY; living at home with her parents as a 22-year old in 1880; living in Philadelphia in 1911. [The Kirk Family, 192, offers Hannah C. as the youngest child, b. 5 Mar. 1858.]

ix. James E. E. Paxson, b. 28 Aug. 1860 in Columbia; m. Cora BRUBAKER; living at home with his parents in 1880 at the age of 19, employed as a railroad fireman; living in Lancaster in 1911.




Levi B. Paxson6, son of #221 Jonathan (Joseph4, Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and Catherine (Beecher) Paxson, was born 22 March 1829 [The Kirk Family, 192, says he was born in 1827.] and died 11 April 1909. He married Mary KRAFT in 1851.

In the 1880 census for Reading, Berks County, Pennsylvania, Levi was given as a 53-year old "Engineer of Machinery". His 50-year-old wife was "Keeping House". Their unmarried daughters Mary (age 25) and Anna (age 16) lived with them, along with their 10-year old son Levi who was in school. They had a 21-year old servant, Helena Schwab, whose parents came from Bavaria. [www.familysearch.org]

Children of Levi B. and Mary (Kraft) Paxson: [Names and birth and death dates (when given) from The Kirk Family, 192.]

i. Lydia K. Paxson7, b. 9 Nov. 1852;

ii. Mary A. K. Paxson, b. 7 Nov. 1854; unmarried and living at home in 1880.

iii. Emily L. Paxson, b. 30 Mar. 1856; d. 8m/1856;

iv. Robert Paxson, b. 20 July 1862; d. 20 Dec. 1868;

v. Anna Paxson, b. 27 Mar. 1864; living at home but not attending school in 1880;

vi. Levi B. Paxson, b. 10 Feb. 1870; attending school in 1880;




Descendants of Thomas3 and Jane (Canby) Paxson
Grandsons of Benjamin and his wife Deborah (Taylor) Paxson

Photograph of Edward Paxson, from Lyn Paxson, 2/2008

Edward Paxson, son of #227 Timothy5 (Benjamin4, Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and his wife Ruth (Johnson) Paxson, was born 20 June 1791 [alternatively, born in August 1790 (E mail from Lyn Paxson, 2m/8/2008.] in Philadelphia, and died 27 March 1864, age 73. Edward married Lucy Ann LONG, who was born in 1802 in New Jersey. Lucy Ann died in Philadelphia before 4 March 1881. Lucy Ann was a Presbyterian, and Edward was disowned for marrying out of unity with Friends. My thanks to Lyn Paxson for these photographs of Edward Paxson and Lucy Ann Long Paxson. [E mail 2m/9/2008.]

Edward was an attorney. The family lived at 158 North Front Street, Philadelphia. For a while his parents Timothy and Ruth lived with them, but they moved to 97 Spring Garden St. before 1849. [My thanks to Carolyn L. Allen, e mail, Oct. 16, 2006, for this information.]

Photograph of Lucy Ann Long Paxson, from Lyn Paxson, 2/2008

On 9 July 1850 a big fire broke out on the Vine Street Wharf. It burned out of control, destroying 367 houses, one of which was the Paxson's. Ruth's manuscripts were lost in the fire. A descendant has a silver spoon that was fashioned out of silver recovered from the fire; it is engraved "1850". The 1850 census, taken after the fire, shows the family living in the Spring Garden Ward. Edward is a 61 year old, with no occupation given; Lucy Ann is 48. Children include William, age 24, a clerk, Emily age 21, Julia age 18, Caroline age 16, and Joseph age 12. Also in the household were Liza LONG (probably Lucy Ann's sister), Ann CUSICK [?] a 21 year old from Ireland, Margaret MONTGOMERY, an 11 year old girl born in Penna., and Mary PAXSON (probably Edward's widowed sister-in-law, his brother Charles having died in 1823). [My thanks to Carolyn L. Allen, e mail, Oct. 16, 2006, for this information from p. 132, Spring Garden Ward 4, Phila. Co. census.]

Ten years later, the 1860 census enumerated Edward in the 13th Ward, as a 69 year old Attorney at law (he seems not to have aged a full decade), with his 58 year old wife Lucy A. Their daughter Emily was now married to William S. STAMM, and had a nine-month old son, Edward P. Stamm. William was an engineer in the US Navy, age 33. Unmarried children Julia, age 28, Caroline D., age 25, and Joseph G., age 22 (no occupation given) also lived with their parents. Two women, Mary MORRISON, age 25, born in Penna., and Marg HARRISON, 13, born in Ireland, were probably servants.

The 1861 McElroy City Directory of Philadelphia lists Edward Paxson as attorney at law, 713 Walace St. [Wallace?], and Joseph G. Paxson (his youngest son), same address, as a paperhanger. [My thanks to Carolyn L. Allen for sending me this information.]

Family members are interred in Lots 118 and 120 of Woodlands Cemetery, Section H at 40th and Woodland Ave., West Philadelphia. [My thanks to Carolyn L. Allen, e mail, Oct. 16, 2006.]

Children of Edward and Lucy Ann (Long) Paxson: [As given in the US censuses and from Carolyn L. Allen, 10/16/2006.]

1. William Johnson Paxson7, b. 15 Dec 1826 in Philadelphia; d. 4 Feb 1898, at 1709 Moyamensing Ave., Philadelphia; m. Ann Lenwell DEPUY; 11 children.

ii. Emily Paxson, b. 5 June 1829, Philadelphia; d. 20 Mar. 1882; m. 10 Feb 1857 William Seaman STAMM; he was b. 1 Dec 1825, Bern Twp., Berks Co., Pa. and d. 27 June 1897, at 3412 Race Street, Phila.; William was the son of Benjamin Seamon (1795-1873) and his wife Sarah. In the 1870 census in Phila. they were enumerated: William 45, Emily 41, Edward 11, and Norman 6, with a domestic servant, Susan C LEBARR. In the 1880 census son Edward was a medical student and son Norman was "at school". Emily and William had 5 children:
a) Paul Henry Stamm, b. June 1858; d. 3 Aug. 1858; bur. Woodlands Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pa.
b) Edward Paxson Stamm, b. 28 Sept. 1859; d. 30 Mar. 1890 in Grand Rapids, Kent Co., Mich.; m. Harriet M. KEY, daughter of Wm. H. and Mary S. Key; they had a daughter, Bertha Stamm, b. Jan. 1883.
c) Norman Leslie Stamm, b. ca. 1865; m(1) Lottie Lee KNIGHT (1868-1896); m(2) E___; he was a clerk in Merchantville, NJ, living in Camden from 1888-1889; in 1920 census he was enumerated as a civil engineer in maritime business, living at 3412 Race St.
d) Arthur Raymond Stamm, b. Jan. 1866; d. 28 Aug. 1866; bur. Woodlans Cem., Phila.
e) Alice Evelyn Stamm, b. 1872; d. 1872.

iii. Julia Paxson, b. 1831 in Phila.; d. 8 Nov 1904, Media, Delaware Co, Pa., bur. Friends South Western Burial Ground, 236 Powell Lane, Upper Darby, Delaware Co., Pa.; m. 20 Feb 1867, Newburg, NJ, Edward POTTS; he was b. 19 Dec. 1829, the son of Sidney Bonsall and Joseph Kirkbride Potts; d. 4 Jan. 1912 in Delaware Co., Pa. They had 1 child, Lucy POTTS (1867-1940; unmarried; bur. Woodlans Cem.).

iv. Caroline D. Paxson, b. 25 Sept. 1834; d. 5 Aug. 1912 at 524 N. Preston St., Philadelphia; she lived next door to her nephew, Curtis Paxson.

v. Joseph John Gurney Paxson, b. 1837; d. 15 Aug. 1864. According to McElroy's 1861 City Directory of Philadelphia, "Joseph G" worked as a paperhanger, while living at the same address with his father. He mustered in as a private in Philadelphia on 31 Aug. 1861, age 24; app't Serg. Maj. 1 Mar. 1862, then promoted to 2nd Lieut., 58th Reg., Co. D. on 31 Jan. 1863; and 1st Lieut. 20 Aug. 1863. Died 14 Aug. 1864 in Phila. (I don't know why the Civil War record says he d. Aug. 14 and family records say he d. Aug. 15; perhaps one is a typo, or he may have died during the night.)



William Johnson Paxson, son of #227 Timothy5 (Benjamin4 Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and his wife Ruth (Johnson) Paxson, .



Charles Paxson, son of #227 Timothy5 (Benjamin4 Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and his wife Ruth (Johnson) Paxson, married Mary Potts BROOKE.




Elias Ely Paxson, son of #229 Thomas5 (Benjamin4 Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and his wife Hannameel (Canby) Paxson, was born 25 October 1817, and died 28 April 1901. He married 20 March 1861Margaret Orum WILSON, the daughter of Samuel and Hannah Wilson of Buckingham. She was born 3 August 1830. The family were members of Buckingham Monthly Meeting.

In 1871 Elias E. was listed as a farmer in Solebury Township, Lahaska P.O. [1872 Bucks Co. Directory, p. 277.] In the 1880 US census for Solebury, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, Elias is listed as a 62-year-old farmer living with his 49 year-old wife Margaret W., three minor children in school, and a servant, Anna BRAHAN from Ireland, who was 30 years old.[www.familysearch.org] He was listed again as a farmer in Aquetong in 1894. [Bucks County Directory, 1894: containing the names of citizens . . . address, together with a general business directory, and appendix giving banks, churches, societies, etc. (Doylestown: James D. Scott, 1894), p. 360.]

Elias Ely Paxson was living in Solebury when the 1900 federal census was taken. [Ancestry.com]

Elias C. [sic.] died on 30 April 1901 in Solebury of "old age" after a short illness, at the age of 84. His body was buried in Buckingham. His occupation was listed as farmer. [Register of Deaths, Bucks County Courthouse, Doylestown (seen 8/1987).]

Children of Elias Ely and Margaret (Wilson) Paxson: [Buck.MM rec.]

i. Samuel W. Paxson, b. 25 Aug. 1863; may have d. before 1881.

ii. Sarah W. Paxson, b. 31 Dec. 1864; she was remembered in her aunt Deborah Paxson's will, written 1881, pr. 1893.

iii. Deborah Paxson, b. 25 Feb. 1868; may have d. before 1881.

iv. Hannah Paxson mentioned in her aunt Deborah Paxson's will, written 1881, pr. 1893. I did not see Hannah in the Buckingham MM records. However, Hannameel Canby Paxson, daughter of Elias Ely Paxson of Aquetong m. Henry Douglas Paxson.





Oliver Paxson, son of #229 Thomas5 (Benjamin4 Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and his wife Hannameel (Canby) Paxson, was born 18 March 1820, and died 15 February 1876 at "Maple Grove", New Hope. He married Ruth Anna ELY of New Hope, the daughter of Elias and Sarah M. (Wilson) Ely. Ruth Anna was born 10 June 1825, and died 18 July 1869 in New Hope. [Ruth Anna's parents given on www.pennock.ws/surnames/fam/fam36111.html; her date of death from Suzanne P. Lamborn, The Paxson Family (Morgantown, Pa.: Masthof Press, 2008), 46; it is given incorrectly as 1865, 2 years before the birth of her fourth child, on p. 43.]

I do not know if it was this Oliver Paxson who sold his 102 acre farm in Solebury to Thomas ELY for about $11,000.00 in the winter of 1858-1859. ["Land Sales" listed by state, in The American Farmer 14:7 (January 1859).] He may have been the Oliver Paxson, farmer, living in New Hope Borough in 1871. [1872 Bucks Co. Directory, p. 194.]

Oliver ran "a successful grain, lumber, and coal business" using the New Hope Canal. He lived on the family farm, "Maple Grove". [Suzanne P. Lamborn, The Paxson Family (Morgantown, Pa.: Masthof Press, 2008), 46.]

Children of Oliver and Ruth Anna (Ely) Paxson: [from gencircles.com/users/jaymac/2/data/4767 seen 3/16/2006; and Brey, A Quaker Saga, .]

i. Sarah Ely Paxson, b. 17 Feb 1862 in Maple Grove; d. 1 Feb. 1933; m. 1894 Robert MICKLE in Germantown; headstone of Caroline Paxson, wife of John C. Stine, Solebury Friends Meeting burying ground, photo taken 12m/5/2006

ii. Margaret Ely Paxson, b. 21 Dec 1863 in Maple Grove; 15 Feb 1949 in Germantown; m. 1892 Edward G. RHOADS; 5 children, including Jonathan E. Rhoads, b. 9 May 1907. Margaret was remembered in her aunt Deborah Paxson's will, written 1881, pr. 1893.

iii. Oliver Wilson Paxson, b. 24 Jan 1865 in Maple Grove; d. 10 Feb 1946; m. Mary JANNEY. It is probably this Oliver W. listed as a clerk living at 4723 Springfield Ave., Philadelphia in the Gopsill's Philadelphia City Directory for 1895, 1896, and 1897.

iv. Caroline Ely Paxson, b. 20 Jul 1867; d. 12 Aug 1957; m. 17 Aug. 1905 John C. STINE. In 1902, before her marriage, she was listed as a lady living in New Hope Borough and owning real estate. [Bucks County Directory, 1902: containing the names of all men in the county over 21 years of age . . . all women who pay tax for money on interest. . . (Doylestown: Jospeh B. Steiner, 1902), p. 144.] She was buried in the Solebury Friends Meeting graveyard. A picture of her headstone is to the right.





Richard R. Paxson, son of #229 Thomas5 (Benjamin4 #92, Thomas3 #31, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Hannameel (Canby) Paxson, was born 30 March 1828, and died in 1898. He married Eleanor ELY. She was born ca. 1831. Richard may have been trained as a physician. [Richard is given a middle name of Randolph on www.pennock.ws/surnames/fam/fam36111.html]

Richard R. Paxson and Elenor (sic) ELY of New Hope, were married in Philadelphia 25 September 1851 "by Quaker ceremony" before Mayor Charles GILPIN. [Bucks County Intelligencer.] This is somewhat confusing since a wedding under the care of a Friends Meeting has no human officiating. My guess is that the ceremony was "after the manner of Friends" but not "under the care" of a meeting, and used the Mayor to sign and thereby legalize the license.

On June 22, 1854 Richard R. Paxson was appointed post master of the Lahaska Post Office. He was reappointed March 31, 1859. [USPSA web site, http://webpmt.usps.gov/pmt005.cfm, accessed 1m/17/2010.]

In 1870 the US federal census enumerated Richard (middle initial given as K) and his family in Buckingham Township, Bucks County. Richard and Eleanor's children were Thomas E., Mary E., Harriet H., Anna L., Oliver H., Charles F., and Richard R. Richard's sister Deborah, born ca. 1815, lived with them. [1870 census as seen on Ancestry.com, 9/14/2006.] In 1872 "R. R. Paxson" of Lahaska was serving asSecretary of the Buckingham Township School Board. There were ten school houses, the school term was nine months, and the average teacher's salary was $37. [1871 Bucks Co. Directory, p. 72.]

The 1880 US census for Buckingham listed Richard (aged 52) as a "Dry Goods Merchant", with his wife Eleanor (aged 49). Also in the household were two daughters (Mary is no longer there) and three sons (Thomas was no longer at home), plus Richard's sister, Deborah, unmarried and 65 years old. [1880 census, NA Film no. T9-1106, p. 168B, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.] Richard's parents had a daughter named Deborah, born 23 April 1815, making her 65 in 1880. The change in occupation from perhaps being trained as a physician to dry goods merchant was not unusual in the nineteenth century when medical knowledge and therefore training was quite limited. In 1894 he was listed as a merchant in Lahaska. [Bucks County Directory, 1894: containing the names of citizens . . . address, together with a general business directory, and appendix giving banks, churches, societies, etc. (Doylestown: James D. Scott, 1894), p. 360.]

Richard R. died in Buckingham Township on 5 September 1898 after suffering two days with "heart disease". He was 70, a merchant. His body was buried in the Buckingham Friends burying ground. [Register of Deaths, Bucks County Courthouse, Doylestown (seen 8/1987).]

Children of Richard and Eleanor (__) Paxson (may be incomplete):

i. Thomas E. Paxson, b. ca. 1853.

ii. Mary E. Paxson, b. ca. 1855;

iii. Harriet F. Paxson, b. ca. 1856, living with her parents in 1880; she was remembered in her aunt Deborah Paxson's will, written 1881, pr. 1893.

iv. Anna L. Paxson, b. ca. 1858, living at home in 1880; she was remembered in her aunt Deborah Paxson's will, written 1881, pr. 1893.

v. Oliver Howard Paxson, b. 6 Sept. 1859 in Lahaska; m. Evalyn MATTSON; [www.pennock.ws/surnames/fam/fam36111.html]; clerk in a store in 1880;

vi. Charles F. Paxson, b. ca. 1865, attending school in 1880;

vii. Richard R. Paxson, b. ca. 1869, attending school in 1880; he may be the "R. R. Paxson, MD" living in Hulmeville Borough in 1902. [Bucks County Directory, 1902: containing the names of all men in the county ver 21 years of age . . . all women who pay tax for money on interest. . . (Doylestown: Jospeh B. Steiner, 1902), p. 22.]




Louis6 Paxson, son of #234 Charles5, (Benjamin4 #92, Thomas3 #31, William Jr.2, James1) and Mercy (Pickering) Paxson, was born 13 September 1815 in Solebury, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Louis, son of Charles, married Louise SPENCER on 15 November 1843 at London Grove. Louisa was the daughter of Asa and Hannah (__) Spencer.

Louis and Louise and their family moved to Manchester, Iowa, probably in the late 1850s or 1860s. In the 1870 census Louis is listed as Superintendent of a flour mill while his brother Charles was listed as a grain dealer.[[My thanks to Chris Erb for this information, e mail 3/31/2012.]

Children of Lewis and Louisa (Spencer) Paxson: [Suzanne P. Lamborn, The Paxson Family (Morgantown, Pa.: Masthof Press, 2008), 44 provided Mary; Chris Erb, e mail 3/26/2012 supplied the other two.]


i.      Emma Paxson,

ii.     Mary Paxson

iii.    Edward Paxson





Lydia (Betts) Paxson, from Chris Erb Fred Paxson, from Chris Erb

Frederick6 Paxson, son of #234 Charles5, (Benjamin4 #92, Thomas3 #31, William Jr.2, James1 #3) and Mercy (PICKERING) Paxson, was born 14 September 1821 and died 17 April 1886. He married Lydia BETTS on 6 December 1848 in Wilmington Meeting, Delaware. [Friends in Wilmington 1738-1938, (1938), as seen 10m/11/2007 on the web.] She was the daughter of Mahlon and Mary (SEAL) Betts. Mahlon was the son of Jesse and Hannah (Paxson) Betts. Hannah was the sister of Frederick's father, Charles Paxson.[Cope, Genealogy of the Smedley Family, 453; and information from Chris Erb, e mail 21 Mar. 2004.]

As a young man Frederick left the family farm in Bucks County and went off to the big city of Philadelphia. He visited his much older first cousin Mahlon BETTS, a wealthy, well-established businessman in Wilmington, Del. who had married Mary (SEAL) 10m/8/1818 under the care of Wilmington Meeting. While there a more than cousinly affection developed between Frederick and Mahlon's daughter Lydia. They were first cousins, once removed. She wrote to him June 17, 1845:

If thee were only here my dearest cousin, what would I not give, if thee could only spend thy one evening with me, walk with me, talk with me, or I should be almost satisfied if I could see thee if thee could not say a word to me. It does seem too hard, does it not that we must be separated & others that we are indifferent to, placed in such nearness to us, but I have often told thee, not to complain & here have I began a letter with repinings, but 'tis human nature & I feel well assured that thy kind affectionate heart will find an excuse for these longings of mine. I feel tonight as if I could not resist these feelings, the beauty & loveliness of the "moonlit eve," bring a sensation of loneliness and melancholy over me because separated from thee, if thee was by my side how I could enjoy it. I must try as it is. I know tis wrong to be so dull & stupid to my other friends . . . [My thanks to Chris Erb who transcribed this letter and sent it to me, 3/31/2012.]

Three years later, on December 6, 1848, under the care of Wilmington Meeting and in the bride's father's home, Frederick Paxson married his first cousin Mahlon's daughter Lydia Betts—who was then twenty-nine years old. Those who attended the wedding signed the marriage certificate according to Quaker custom. All of the bride's family attended, including Aunt Lydia Seal who lived with them. Lydia Betts's sister, her new husband and his mother and siblings were also present. Five of her cousins attended as well, including the children of her father's brother Benjamin Betts. The bride's grandparents Hannah and Jesse Betts (the grooms aunt and uncle), in their eighties, did not attend. The only relatives from the groom's side were two first cousins, perhaps because the wedding took place in Wilmington in winter, far from Bucks County. There were also signatures of the clearness/oversight committee: Eli HILLES who administered the Wilmington Female Boarding School on King Street in the 1820s and 1830s. Perhaps he had been Lydia's teacher. He was a staunch abolitionist. The other male overseer was David FERRIS, another prominent Wilmington Quaker. The two female overseers were Sarah R. MENDENHALL, like the bride's mother an incorporator of the Home for Aged Women in Wilmington, and its first president; and Anna C. SMYTH, the bride's sister's mother-in-law.[Information from Chris Erb, 3/31/2012.]

Fred Paxson's business card, from Chris Erb

There is a somewhat puzzling entry in Hinshaw to the effect that Frederick was received as a member of Race Street Meeting by request on 24 May 1848. In any event, he was a member of the Hicksite Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia when he wanted to marry a Friend from Wilmington Meeting. Frederick was granted a certificate to Wilmington, dated 15 November 1848. After the wedding, Lydia was granted a certificate of removal to join him in Race Street Meeting. It was received 14 February 1849. [Hinshaw 2:907.]

The 1850 Census listed Frederick as a "storekeeper and manufacturer of sewing machines". In the 1860 Census he was a merchant. Later in the 1860s he founded an early stock brokerage firm whose letterhead read "Frederick Paxson & Co., Stock Brokers, 112 Custom House Place. Execute orders in stocks, bonds, cotton, grain, provisions. Private wires to New York Stock Exchange". [My thanks to Chris Erb for this image, e mails 3/26 & 31/2012.]

text, from Chris Erb

When the Civil War broke out In 1861, women of Race Street Meeting (Hicksite) formed the Women's Association for the Relief of the Freedmen. In April 1863, their first annual report listed "2700 part-worn and 4378 new garments" packed in 27 cases, along with "uncut goods, comfortables, blankets, books, pictures, toys; medicines, farina, and dried fruit for the sick; thimbles, needles, thread, buttons, &c." These were sent to Yorktown and Gloucester Point in Virginia, and Port Royal near Fredericksburg Va., where "contrabands" had gathered. Shipments also went to Cray and St Simons Islands off the coast of Georgia, and to Cincinnati "for the west". The women also sent women Friends to teach in Virginia, and two "colored men" to serve in the "colored smallpox hospital" in Washington, which received no federal support. Letters from the women teachers and visiting Friends described desperate situations: measles, smallpox, and malaria epidemics, and starving, destitute people. Part of a report from Norfolk Va., in March 1864 is reprinted to the right. Note that "aunt" was a term for an older "colored" woman. The Association's second annual report in April 1864 listed the efforts of 34 sewing circles. Clothing, mostly for women and children, totaled about twenty thousand garments in two years. All Friends women were de facto members of the Clothing Committee, although obviously some were more active than others. On 8 November 1865 the Women's Association formally agreed to combine efforts with the Friends Association for the Aid and Elevation of the Freedmen, and took its name. Lydia B. Paxson, at that time the mother of six, and her sister Emily B. SMYTH were listed on the Forwarding Committee, responsible for collecting, packing, and recording the donated clothing and supplies. It is likely that they had been members of the Women's Association, since they immediately assumed leadership positions when the two groups combined. The annual reports note that many donations were unrecorded, and nearly all that were recorded were listed only in the name of a Meeting. Among the individuals mentioned are Frederick Paxson, 9 dozen stockings, in 1866; Lydia SEAL of Delaware, $10, in 1870, and clothing from Lydia B. Paxson in 1870. In 1869 and 1870 Sallie COOPER's School, the elementary school Alice Paxson attended, donated toys and books for Christmas. Lydia and her sister served on the Forwarding Committee and Clothing Committee until 1868. Around that time, financial support from the various Meetings had diminished considerably, from more than $9,600 in 1865 to about $1,500 in 1870, and the Association narrowed its focus to educational efforts, and the Association's last annual report was dated 1871. National interest in Reconstruction declined even precipitously.[My thanks to Chris Erb for this image and the other photos in Frederick's entry, 3/31/2012.] There is more information on the work with the Friends' work with freedmen, and on the underground railroad in Adams County.

829 N. Broad St., home of Frederick & Lydia Betts Paxson, from Chris Erb Interior of 829 N. Broad St., home of Frederick & Lydia Betts Paxson, from Chris Erb

One of Frederick's descendants has a letter written to Frederick thanking him for his kindness to the mother of a Civil War soldier. [Information from Chris Erb, e mail 21 Mar. 2004.]

The 1880 census found "Fred" Paxson as a 58 year old stock broker living in Philadelphia with his 60 year old wife Lydia B., five unmarried children and three servants. The latter were B. MCANOLLY, a 45 year old woman from Ireland, and Mary JENKINS (18) and Hannah JENKINS (15), both born in Pennsylvania of Irish parents. [1880 census, NA Film no. T9-1174, p. 598A, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.]

When their daughter Alice was born in 1857, the family was living at 111 North 16th St., Philadelphia. All six of their children may have been born there. On January 30, 1867, the family moved to 829 N. Broad St., shown to the left. Their house (no longer standing) was in the center of the photo, with the bay window on the side. The other photo shows the interior, probably taken in the 1880s or 1890s. Notice the photograph of Frederick hanging above the fireplace. It is the same image as shown above. Notice, too, the tube leading from the chandelier to the table lamp; it is probably gas lighting. The photo was probably taken in the summer as there are no drapes at the window and the fireplace is closed off.[My thanks to Chris Erb, e mail 3/31/2012.]

Lydia Betts Paxson, from Chris Erb

Frederick died of cancer of the jaw on Saturday, April 17, 1886 at his home in Philadelphia. He was in his 65th year. His body was buried in Norriton 236, West Laurel Hill cemetery in Philadelphia. [Hinshaw, 2:813; Friends Intelligencer, 43:17 (Apr. 24, 1886), 265.] His widow, Lydia B., continued to live at 829 North Broadway, where by 1895 she had been joined by her widowed daughter Anna (Paxson) SUPLEE.[Gopsill's Philadelphia City Directory, 1985, 1897.] According to the 1900 federal census the household at 829 N. Broad St. consisted of Lydia Betts Paxson, Anna Paxson Suplee and her two young sons, and Lydia's unmarried daughter Mary. By 1905, Lydia Betts Paxson was living in Swarthmore with her daughter Alice. The photo shows Lydia probably on the porch at Keewaydin, the summer home of Charles and Alice Paxson at Buck Hill, Penna., where many Quakers had summer homes. It was probably taken the summer before she died. Lydia died 14 December 1907 and was interred in Norriton 234, West laurel Hill Cemetery. [My thanks to Chris Erb for this link.]

Children of Frederick and Lydia (Betts) Paxson: [Information from Chris Erb, e mail 21 Mar. 2004; Hinshaw 2:813; and 1880 US census.]

i.       William Betts Paxson, b. 24 Sept. 1849; m. 9m/1873 Lydia "Lillie" SHOEMAKER;

ii.     Anna Pickering Paxson7, b. 6 Sept. 1852; m. Tuesday, 24 Oct. 1882 William J. SUPLEE, second son of Thomas B. and Emily J. Suplee, at her parents' home in Philadelphia, under the care of the Monthly Meeting of friends of Philadelphia, of which bride and groom were both members. [Hinshaw 2:907; Friends Intelligencer, 39:39 (Nov. 11, 1882), 617.] In the 1880 census she was unmarried and living with her parents in Philadelphia.
Alice Paxson nearly 5 years old, from Chris Erb
iii.    Charles Paxson, b. 23 Feb. 1855 in Philadelphia; d. 1 June 1926 at Swarthmore Twp., Delaware Co. [date and place of death from www.pennock.ws/surnames/fam/fam36757.html]; m. 25 Nov. 1897 at Swarthmore Meeting Alice HALL, b. 12 Nov. 1868 in West Goshen Twp., Chester Co., the daughter of Thomas Heston Hall and Lydia Harlan (Cox) Hall; [Cope, Genealogy of the Smedley Family, 453.]

iv.    Alice Coates Paxson, b. 3 Aug. 1857; m. 18 Oct. 1883 Walter C. HADLEY, son of Hiram and Hannah (deceased) Hadley, of Las Vegas, New Mex. The wedding was at 829 Broad St., Phila., her parents' home, under the care of the Monthly Meeting of Friends of Philadelphia. [Friends Intelligencer, 40:38 (Nov. 3, 1883), 601; Hinshaw 2:907] The photograph of the child to the right is Alice, nearly the age of 5, in 1862. [My thanks to Chris Erb for the photo, 3/26/2012.] Alice met Walter when she visited her brother at Haverford College, where Walter was a sophomore. In his junior year he was forced to leave college because of "incipient tuberculosis", and went to New Mexico. As a teenager Alice kept a diary; in the 1880 census she was unmarried and living with her parents in Philadelphia. After her marriage Alice moved to New Mexico, but returned home shortly before the birth of their daughter, Caroline, on 22 Jan. 1885. At the age of 3 months Caroline and her mother went out to Las Vegas, NM where Walter operated silver mines. His health failing, he sold the mines, moved to Albuquerque and died there in 1896. The following year Alice and Caroline returned to Pennsylvania, finally locating in Swarthmore. Alice died there in 1919.[In Memmorium: Caroline Hadley Robinson, memorial minute published by her husband (?)]

v.      Mahlon Betts Paxson, b. 13 Feb. 1859; m. 23 Oct. 1884 Rebecca W. FURMAN, daughter of Samuel T. and Abigail C., of Philadelphia, at the bride's parents' home.

vi.       Mary Seal Paxson, b. 15 Dec. 1860; m. 10 Oct. 1902 William Raymond FOGG, son of William W. and Maris K. of Philadelphia, at her mother's home.




Charles Paxson, Jr.6, son of Charles5 #234, Benjamin4 #92, Thomas3 #31, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and Mercy (Pickering) Paxson, was born on 16 February 1824. He died on 16 May 1894. Charles married first, in 1851, Sarah CHAMBERS and had 2 children. Sarah died in 1857. Charles then married Mary J. WILLIAMS. She was born 12 August 1835. They had 8 more children.

Probably in the late 1850s or 1860sCharles, his brother Louis and sister Mary Seeds and their families moved to Manchester, Iowa. In the 1870 census Charles was listed as a grain dealer.[My thanks to Chris Erb for this information, e mail 3/31/2012.] Charles appeared in the 1880 US census in Manchester, Delaware County, Iowa, as a 56 year old grain buyer; both his parents were born in Penna. His wife Mary J. was 46, born in Ohio, but her father was born in Wales and her mother was born on the Isle of Man. Interestingly, all her children are listed as having a mother also born on the Isle of Man. Mary J.'s mother, Margaret WILLIAMS, aged 74, lived with the family. Six minor children were living at home.[familysearch]

Children of Charles Jr. and his first wife Sarah (Chambers) Paxson:

i.      Deborah M. Paxson, b. 1 Dec. 1853; d. 4 Aug. 1854.

ii.     Lewis Paxson, b. 12 Aug. 1856;
Children of Charles Jr. and his second wife, Mary J. (Williams) Paxson:
iii.     Joseph C. Paxson, b. Jan. 1858; d. 5 May 1858.

iv.     Mary Ellen Paxson, b. 29 Nov. 1861; listed in the 1880 census as 18 years old;

v.      Sarah L. Paxson, b. 27 Jan. 1864; listed in the 1880 census as 16;

vi.     Anna Paxson, b. 11 Aug. 1865; she was not in the 1880 census.

vii.   Susan Paxson, b. 26 Mar. 1869; listed in the 1880 census as "Susie", age 12

viii.  Charles Henry Paxson, b. 14 Apr. 1871; listed in the 1880 census as 9;

ix.    Emma Paxson, b. 2 Apr. 1873; listed in the 1880 census as 7;

x.      Ruth Ann Paxson, b. 19 Nov. 1875; d. 1 Oct. 1949; listed in the 1880 census as 4 years old; she was a missionary in China, YWCA secretary, author of religious books and tracts, and a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority.





Descendants of Thomas3 and Jane (Canby) Paxson
Grandsons of Jacob and his second wife Mary (Shaw) Paxson

Dr. Jacob L. Paxson, from Smedley, History of the Underground RR, opp. p. 222

Jacob Longstreth Paxson, son of #243 Isaiah5 Paxson, (Jacob4 #95, Thomas3 #31, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Elizabeth (Longstreth), was born on 17 June 1812, and died on 12 May 1889. He may have married Caroline SHOEMAKER. [from http://www.pennock.ws/surnames/fam/fam06928.html 5/27/2005.] Alternatively, there was a Jacob S. Paxson (in nineteenth century script S and L are often very similar) who married Emma SHOEMAKER on Fifth Day, 31 Twelfth Month 1835 at Green Street. Both were from the Northern Liberties. [Atkinson's Saturday Evening Post 15:755 (Jan. 16, 1836), p. 2.] Suzanne Lamborn favors Emma over Caroline. [Suzanne P. Lamborn, The Paxson Family (Morgantown, Pa.: Masthof Press, 2008), 48.]

Jacob was a doctor, living in Norristown. Although public sentiment there in the first half of the nineteenth century was against abolition, and very few people were willing to say they favored ending the enslavement of humans, Jacob openly supported abolition, was known to help freedom seekers, and built a secret apartment in his house for hiding escaping fugitives from the south. Jacob would then take them on to the next stop on the underground railroad, perhaps to William JACKSON in Quakertown, Jonathan McGILL in Solebury, or William H. JOHNSON in Buckingham. Once when he was told that a group of men had gathered plotting to burn down his house, he said, "Tell them to burn it, and scatter the ashes to the four winds: I am a free man." His house was not burned. When three men fleeing after the Christiana "riot" reached Norristown, it was Jacob who devised the plan of hiring five closed carriages, each heading in a different direction, to get the U.S. marshalls off the scent. It worked, and the men reached Canada in safety. Additional stories of Jacob's valiant efforts have been recorded.[R. C. Smedley, History of the Underground Railroad in Chester and the Neighboring Counties of Pennsylvania (New York: Negro Universities Press, reprint 1968; orig. 1883), 222-26. The drawing of Jacob is opposite p. 222.]

Some Friends were outspoken in their denunciation of slaveholding, and tried to encourage other Quakers to join their struggle to end the heinous practice. Jacob L. Paxson joined other well-known abolitionist Friends signing a call for a General Conference of Friends to regain the spirit of primitive Quakerism against the ecclesiastical domination of the then current powerful voices within the Society of Friends. The meeting was called for 22 April 1853 at the Old Kennett meeting house. Others who signed were Beulah BORTON, James TRUMAN, Robert PURVIS, Mahlon B. LINTON, Thomas GARRETT, and Fannie SCHOEFIELD, among others. [Liberator 23:16 (Apr. 22, 1853), p. 63.]

In addition to his abolitionist activity, Jacob also was an inventor. In 1860 he applied for patent # 27,826 for an improvement in harvesters. His address was Norristown, Pennsylvania.

I claim the combination of the forked lever, Q, and yokes, RR, with shaft B, and the cutting apparatus; the parts being constructed, arranged, and operated in the manner and for the purposes specified. Also, the peculiar manner of connecting the platform frame with the main frame (which is supported by the wheels, C, D), by the bars, LL, and bolts, hi; the parts being arranged and connected in the manner and for the purpose substantially set forth. [Obviously this would have had a diagram with it, but only the verbal descriptions of patents were regularly published in Scientific American 11:17 (April 21, 1860), p. 269.]

It appears that Caroline had died by the time the 1880 federal census enumerator listed Jacob L, as a 67-year old physician boarding in E. M. BUCKWALTER's home in Philadelphia. She was also a doctor, aged 50, living with her mother, 81-year old M. PETERMAN. The household included Sarah A. McNAMEE, a 55-year old nurse, and Lena WOODING, an 18-year old servant. All were born in Pennsylvania of Pennsylvania parents, except that the elderly woman did not know (or was unable to say) where her parents were born. [1880 census, NA Film no. T9-1174, p. 483B, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.]







William Longstreth Paxson, son of #243 Isaiah5 #243, (Jacob4 #95, Thomas3 #31, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Elizabeth (Longstreth) Paxson, was born on 5 August 1817. He died 16 May 1884. William married on 25 November 1841 in Norristown Sarah Ann KIRK. She was born 8 July 1819, the daughter of Isaac and Sarah (RUSH) Kirk. [from http://www.pennock.ws/surnames/fam/fam06928.html 5/27/2005.]

Sarah A. is listed as the widow of William L., living at 22 Duval Street in Germantown in 1895 and 1896, and at 31 Duval the next year.[Gopsill's Philadelphia City Directory1895, p. 1473; 1896, p. 1518; 1897, p. 1564.] She died 11 November 1881.[Suzanne P. Lamborn, The Paxson Family (Morgantown, Pa.: Masthof Press, 2008), 48.]

Children of William L. and Sarah Ann (Kirk) Paxson:

i.      Ellwood Tyson7, b. 3 Mar. 1844; d. 29 Seventh Mo. 1881 in his 38th year in Germantown; member of Green Street Mo. Mtg. [Death notice in Friends Intelligencer, 38:25 (Aug. 6, 1881), 394.]; m. 18 May 1871 Mary N. WALLACE, daughter of William and Ellena (COMLY) Wallace, b. 18 Dec. 1837, d. 1 Nov. 1874. [Suzanne P. Lamborn, The Paxson Family (Morgantown, Pa.: Masthof Press, 2008), 48.]

ii.     Susannah Kirk, b. 26 Mar. 1845; d. 20 Aug. 1876;[Lamborn, The Paxson Family, 48.]

iii.   Elizabeth L., b. 30 Mar. 1848; unmarried;[Lamborn, The Paxson Family, 48.]

iv.   William Longstreth, b. 30 or 31 Jan., 1852 Upper Dublin, Montgomery Co.; d. 22 Mar. 1883 [FamilySearch IGI
]; unmarried;




Philip Price Paxson, son of # 244 Jonathan5 (Jacob4, Thomas3 #31, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Margaret (Price) Paxson, was born 6 August 1821 in East Bradford Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. He died on 7 April 1877. Phillip married on 5 October 1852 Phebe SPEAKMAN. She was born 26 October 1827 in Delaware County, Penna., the daughter of Nathaniel and Ann (THOMAS) Speakman. [http://pennock.ws/surnames/fam/fam32319.html 5/28/2005]

On 26 Sixth Month 1852 Philip Paxson requested a certificate from Birmingham Monthly Meeting to Concord Meeting to marry. Clement BIDDLE, Jr. and Palmer CHAMBERLAIN served as a committee to see that he was clear from other obligations to marry. The certificate was read, approved, and signed the following month. [Birmingham MM Men's minutes, 26/6m/1852; 24/7m/1852, FHL.]

Some years later Philip and Phebe Paxson with their children Howard L., Helen, Edward S., and Alfred, were listed as members of Birmingham Meeting. [Birmingham MM records, FHL.]

As a 53-year old widow "Phibe F. Paxson", living in East Bradford Township, Chester County, was listed by the 1880 federal census enumerator as having the occupation of "Lady". Her children were living with her, Howard (age 27) and Edward (age 21) farming, Hellen (age 24) keeping house, Alfred (19) and Charles (11) at school, and Maggie (15) at home. Lizzie GRIFFITH, a 16-year old African-American was servant, and Lewis G. HOFFICKER was a 16-year old laborer. All were born in Pennsylvania of Pennsylvania parents. [1880 census, NA Film no. T9-1113, p. 168A, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.]

In Boyd's Chester County Directory, 1890-91 . . . Phoebe S. Paxson, widow of Philip, was listed as living at 119 South Church Street, West Chester. With her lived four sons: Howard (no occupation listed), Edward S. (architect), Alfred (dentist), and Charles S. (clerk). [Boyd's Chester County Directory, 1890-91 . . . (Washington, D.C.: W. Andrew Boyd, 1890), p. 93.]

Children of Philip Price and Phebe (Speakman) Paxson: [http://pennock.ws/surnames/fam/fam32319.html 5/28/2005]

i.      Howard Paxson7, b. 12 July 1853; d. 27 Dec. 1917 in East Bradford Twp.; unmarried; educated at Simmontown and High Street West Chester Friends School; managed the farm for his mother. [Suzanne P. Lamborn, The Paxson Family (Morgantown, Pa.: Masthof Press, 2008), 51.]

ii.     Helen F. Paxson, b. 20 June 1855; d. 3 Nov. 1881.

iii.     Edward S. Paxson, b. 1 Sept. 1858; d. 27 Apr. 1933; an architect in West Chester;

iv.    Alfred P. Paxson, b. 3 Dec. 1860; he was a dentist, died of Typhoid fever after an illness of 11 days, 1894. [West Chester County Death Register, 1893-1907, Vol. 1, p. 201 as transcribed on http://courses.wcupa.edu/jones/his480/ seen 5/22/2009.] Unmarried.

v.      Margaret Paxson, b. 3 Dec. 1864; d. 2 Jan. 1882.

vi.     Charles Speakman Paxson, b. 12 Oct. 1868; d. 2 Nov. 1927; m. Anita Kervey HICKMAN; she was b. 4 Aug. 1874, the daughter of Franklin Sharpless Hickman and Anna Gertrude (KERVEY) Hickman; 2 children. [.pennock.ws/surnames/fam/fam40126.html]




Henry Paxson, son of Jonathan5 # 244 (Jacob4, Thomas3 #31, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Margaret (Price) Paxson, was born 5 March 1823 in East Bradford, Chester County, and died 11 October 1894 in West Chester. He married on 29 April 1852 Harriet A. HARLAN at Westtown Boarding School Farm. Harriet was born 30 June 1830 in Pottsville, Schuylkill County, the daughter of William C. and Anna C. (RIGG) Harlan. [http://pennock.ws/surnames/fam/fam32320.html]

In the 1857 West Chester directory Henry Paxson was listed as a grocer working out of his home at 105 W. Miner Street.[Directory of the Borough of West Chester, for 1857: containing a complete history of the borough from its first settlement to the present time ... by William Darlington (West Chester, PA: Wood & James, Publishers, E.F. James, printer, 1857), 63-93. Transcribed on the web at http://courses.wcupa.edu/jones/his480/notes/1857dira.htm, and seen 6m/4/2009.]

In the 1880 federal census, Henry is listed as a photographer in West Chester, Pennsylvania. The enumerator wrote his age as 50, meaning he was born ca. 1830, or about seven years later than his actual birth. Living in the house were his wife Harriett, aged 48, and his mother-in-law Annie HARLAN, aged 76. Henry, Harriet, Annie, and all their parents were born in Pennsylvania. [1880 census, NA Film no. T9-1113, p. 86B, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.]

Perhaps Henry was finally able to realize his dream; or perhaps as he aged his interests changed. Anyway, in 1890 he called himself an artist and was listed as such in the West Chester directory that year. He was living at 334 West Miner Street, along with his son, J. Charles, who was employed as a clerk. [Boyd's Chester County Directory, 1890-91 . . . (Washington, D.C.: W. Andrew Boyd, 1890), p. 93.]

Henry died in West Chester on 11 Tenth Month 1894. He was a member of Birmingham Monthly Meeting. [Death notice in Friends Intelligencer, 51:42 (Oct. 20, 1894), 670. His name is on the Birmingham Monthly Meeting list, FHL.]

Children of Henry and Harriet A. (Harlan) Paxson:

i.     Ellen M. Paxson7, b. 9 May 1853 in East Bradford Twp.; m. 29 June 1876 Arthur W. POTTER

ii.   J. Charles Paxson, b. 9 Sept. 1858 in East Bradford; m. 31 Dec. 1885 S. Lizzie HAINES, b. 6 Nov. 1863 in West Goshen Twp., Chester Co., dau of Garrett and Lavinia (JACKSON) Haines



Samuel Johnson6 Paxson, son of #246 Thomas5 (Jacob4 #95, Thomas3 #31, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Ann (Johnson) Paxson, was born 21 December 1818 in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, and died on 28 June [Davis and Reibold both say May] 1864 in Buckingham Township, Bucks County. Samuel married 15 April 1840 Mary Anna BROADHURST of Buckingham, at the Buckingham meeting house. [Marriage Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer.] She was the daughter of Joseph and Rachel H. (CARVER) Broadhurst.

Samuel was editor and proprietor of the Doylestown Democrat from 1845 to 1858 when he sold it to Wm. W. H. Davis. So in 1850 the federal census enumerator listed Samuel as a 30 year old printer in Doylestown with his 30 year old wife Mary Ann and 6 year old daughter Ellen (in school). He had two apprentice printers, Charles E. GRIFFITH (21) and Stephen Y. THORNTON (18) along with James VanSantz (16) and Wilhelmina GUNNAGAN (17), and 11 year old Irish Elizabeth CROSSLEY. [1850 federal census for Doylestown, Bucks Co., Pa., roll M432_759, p. 327B, lines 29-36.]

In 1860 Samuel was living with his two daughters, Helen M. (16) and Carrie W. (4). [1860 federal census, roll M653_1084, p. 218.]

Children of Samuel Johnson and Mary Anna (Broadhurst) Paxson:[Davis, 3:156; information on Helen and Carrie from Dorothy Marty Reibold, The Life of Matthias Harvye and Family (Baltimore,, Md.: Gateway Press, Inc. 1998), 55.]

i.       Helen Matilda Paxson7, b. ca. 1844 if she is the "Ellen" of the 1850 census; m. 9 Mar. 1864 John Hart BYE; he was b. 9 Dec. 1833 son of Thomas W. and Rachel Dungan (HART) Bye; and d. 14 Jan. 1899. In 1905 Mary Anna removed to Germantown, Philadelphia County. Had one son, Frank Paxson Bye, b. 1868.

ii.     Carrie W. Paxson, b. ca. 1864; m. Watson B. MALONE; d. by 1905; had two daughters and a son, Arthur Malone who lived in Philadelphia.

iii.   Arthur Paxson, a businessman, res. in Philadelphia.

iv.   Joseph B. b. ca. Jan. 1847; d. in Doylestown 28 Apr. 1847, aged ca. 3 months.[Death notice in Bucks County Intelligencer.
]




Albert S
.6 Paxson, son of #246 Thomas5, (Jacob4, Thomas3 #31, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Ann (Johnson) Paxson, was born 8 November 1820 in Buckingham, and died there 18 October 1902. Albert married first, in Buckingham with a Quaker ceremony on 14 November 1844 Mercy P. BEANS, daughter of Dr. Jesse Beans. [Marriage Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer.] Mercy died in Buckingham on 2 August 1849. She was 26 years old. [Death Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer.] Albert then was married on 13 April 1854 to Lavinia S. ELY, daughter of Aaron Ely of Buckingham (deceased) and his wife Rebecca (SHEED) Ely. They were married by the Rev. Reese C. EVANS. [Marriage Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer.] Lavinia was descended from Joshua and Mary (Seniar) Ely. [Davis, 3:156.]

At age 19 Albert became a teacher at a school in Montgomery County where his father had taught many years earlier. In 1840 he returned to Buckingham and taught at "Tyro Hall" and the Buckingham Friends School. From 1851 to 1856 he was local editor and general manager of the Doylestown Democrat. Davis wrote of him, "He devoted considerable time to literary pursuits and was a writer of known merit." [Davis, 3:156]

In 1856 Albert and his second wife removed to the old Ely homestead near Holicong that had been in his wife's family since 1720. In 1871 Albert S. Paxson was listed among the farmers in Buckingham Township. [1871 Bucks Co. Directory, p. 75.] He was elected justice of the peace in 1873 and served ten years. [Davis, 3:156.]

The 1880 census found him as a 59 year old retired farmer living in Buckingham, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, with his 47 year old (second) wife Lavinia S. and 18 year old son Harry D., attending school. They had a 50 year old Irish servant, Ellen BULGER. [The 1880 US census as on www.familysearch.org, as of 5/5/2005.]

Albert S. was listed as a farmer in Holicong in 1894. [Bucks County Directory, 1894: containing the names of citizens . . . address, together with a general business directory, and appendix giving banks, churches, societies, etc. (Doylestown: James D. Scott, 1894), p. 360.] He was living in Buckingham Township when the 1900 census was taken. [The 1900 US census as on Ancestry.com.] In 1902 he was listed as a farmer in Holicong. [Bucks County Directory, 1902: containing the names of all men in the county ver 21 years of age . . . all women who pay tax for money on interest. . . (Doylestown: Jospeh B. Steiner, 1902), p. 22.]

Albert died suddenly of "heart failure" at the age of 82 on 18 October 1902. His "occupation" was "gentleman". His body was buried in Buckingham. [Register of Deaths, Bucks County Courthouse, Doylestown (seen 8/1987).]

Daughter of Albert S. and his first wife, Mercy (Beans) Paxson:[Davis, 3:156]

i.     Mary Paxson7, b. 1845; d. 20 July 1887 at "Bycot House"; m. 7 Feb. 1867 [marriage date from Lamborn, p. 50] Robert Howell BROWN of Mount Holly, NJ; they had a son, T. Howell Brown, b. 22 Sept. 1868, m. 25 June 1892 Josephine Conrad PEARSON, res. in Solebury Twp.

Children of Albert S. and his second wife, Lavinia (Ely) Paxson:[Davis, 3:156]

ii.   William Ely Paxson7, b. 19 Dec. 1856 in Buckingham [FamilySearch Compact Disc #100, Pin #346993, seen 4/15/2007.]; d. 9 Sept. 1857. [Death notice in Bucks County Intelligencer.]

iii.  Edward E. Paxson, b. 7 May 1860; he was a banker in Philadelphia, with a summer residence at the old homestead;

iv.   Henry Douglas Paxson, called Harry, b. 1 Oct. 1862; m. 8 Jan. 1902 Hannameel Canby Paxson, daughter of Elias Ely Paxson of Aquetong; res. at "Elm Grove"; 3 children.




Drawing of Edward M. Paxson

Edward M. Paxson6, son of #246 Thomas5 Paxson, (Jacob4, Thomas3, William Jr.2, James1) and his wife Ann (Johnson) Paxson, was born 3 September 1824 in the old homestead in Buckingham. Edward was married on 30 April 1846 to Mary Caroline NEWLIN of Philadelphia, by the Rev. William S. SPEAR. [Marriage Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer.] She was the daughter of Nathaniel and Rachel H. Newlin of Delaware County, Penna. She died at "Bycot House" 7 June 1885. Edward then married on 1 December 1886 Mary Martha S. BRIDGES, widow of Hon. Samuel A. Bridges of Allentown. [Davis, 3:156-57.]

Edward was educated at the Friends School in Buckingham. In 1842,at the age of 18, he started the Newtown Journal in Newtown, and managed it until 1847 when he sold it and established the Daily News in Philadelphia. He sold that the following year and moved to Doylestown. There he studied law under Hon. Henry CHAPMAN. He was admitted to the bar in Bucks County 24 April 1850. The 1850 census, taken August 2, found Edward proudly labeled as a lawyer, age 28 with his wife Mary Ann [sic] living in a hotel in Doylestown Borough. [1850 federal census for Doylestown Borough, Bucks Co., Pa., roll M432_759, p. 328B, lines 5 and 6.]

After two years he moved to Philadelphia where he practiced law for 17 years. In 1869 Edward was appointed Judge of common pleas court in Philadelphia to fill out the unexpired term of F. Carroll BREWSTER, and was elected to a full term the following year. In 1874 he was elected to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. He served as chief justice for 18 years. Davis comments, "His opinions were models of terseness, clearness and appropriate diction, and showed an accurate knoweldge of the law, expressed in clearand concise language and terms that could be clearly understood."[Davis,3:157.]

Edward resigned from the Pennsylvania Supreme Court to become receiver of the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad, a position he held for four years. He was listed in this position in the 1895 Gopsill's Philadelphia City Directory; his home was 2106 Walnut Street. The following two editions (it was published annually in March) lists him as "trustee", working out of 613 Chestnut Street, with the same home address. In addition to this and his two stints on the bench, his other public position was as a member of the board of guardians of the poor of Philadelphia.[Davis, 3:157.]

Edward spent the winters in Philadephia and the summers at his estate, "Bycot House" in Bucks County. He was one of the largest landowners in Bucks County, holding nearly 2,000 acres.[Davis, 3:156-57.] In 1902 he was listed as a "gent."owning land in Buckingham Township. [Bucks County Directory, 1902: containing the names of all men in the county ver 21 years of age . . . all women who pay tax for money on interest. . . (Doylestown: Jospeh B. Steiner, 1902), p. 22.] As a "gentleman farmer" Edward was interested in improving agriculture. In 1843 he, Samuel D. INGHAM, and Dr. Phineas JENKS formed the Bucks County Agriculture Society.[The Cyclopaedia of American Biography (NY:1915), vol. 4 n.p.]

Edward and his two wives had no children.





Jacob Canby Paxson6, son of Oliver (Jacob4 #95, Thomas3 #31, William Jr.2, James1) and his wife Jane (Rankin) Paxson, was born 6 June 1840 in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, and died 2 April 1892 in Chester County. The assumption is he was named Jacob for his paternal grandfather, and Canby for his father's great grandfather, Thomas CANBY. Jacob married Eliza Ayres PAXSON, born 11 June 1842 in Lower Dublin Township, the daughter of William Laurens PAXSON and Sarah Willet COMLY Paxson. [My thanks to Richard James for all the information on Jacob and his family, e mails, 11/2006. He noted that unfortunately the Chester County Archives do not have any birth or marriage records for the years of interest.].

Jacob Canby Paxson, age 20, is listed living with with his mother and father in East Brandywine Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania, in the 1860 federal census. In the 1870 federal census Jacob Canby Paxson and his wife Eliza, and their son five-year old son Edward E. Paxson were enumerated in Tredyffrin Township, Chester County.

The deed book at Chester County shows two transactions by Jacob Canby Paxson. The first was September 1867 and the second was November 1874.

By the 1880 federal census Jacob and Eliza left Chester County, or at least Eliza did, because she was enumerated with their son and her mother in Philadelphia. Info from Richard James] I found Jacob C., age 40, enumerated as a farm laborer in the household of Charles and Anna L. COMLY in Upper Dublin, Montgomery County. Also living there were the Comly's children C. Howard, age 13; Ida M., age 11, and Albert K., age 3. Charles CRAWFORD was a 17 year old farm laborer, and Catharine REIFSNYDER was a 14 year old servant. [Family History Library Film 1255158, NA Film Number T9-1158, Page Number 93B, as seen of familysearch, 12m/1/2006.]

Only child of Jacob Canby and Eliza Ayres (Paxson) Paxson:

i. Edward E. Paxson7, b. 12 Dec. 1865; d. 26 Feb. 1899 (from his stone at the Abington Friends cemetery in Jenkintown); m. Adelaide H. MORTON; one son.




Descendants of Reuben3 and Alice (Simcock) Paxson
Grandsons of William and his wife Rachel (Johnson) Paxson


Potentially there are several men who might be included here, but I do not know if they married or had children. Samuel, (b. 5 Sept. 1794) and William (b. 1 Oct. 1798) were the sons of Reuben. Joseph and William were the sons of John.



John6 Paxson, son of #264 William5 (William4 #98, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his second wife Ann (PARLEE) Paxson, was born in 1798. He married Nancy STOUT. [from gencircles.com/users/paxlincoln] I have not researched this family myself. I would appreciate information from a descendant or cousin; please contact me at .

Children of John and Ann (Parlee) Paxson:

i.    Reuben Paxson7.

ii.   George Paxson.

iii.  William Paxson.

iv.   Ann Paxson.




Reuben6 Paxson, son of #264 William5 (William4 #98, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his second wife Ann (PARLEE) Paxson, was born 7 July 1801, and died 15 February 1826. He married Mary CASE on 19 September 1820 before Justice of the Peace Opdyke. [Hiram E. Deats, comp., Marriage Records of Hunterdon County, New Jersey, 1795-1875 (Flemington, NJ: author, 1918), 1:212.]

They had five children. But the age at death and the number of children make this scenario somewhat problematical, although not impossible. So much for unverified secondary sources!

Children of Reuben and Mary (Case) Paxson:

i.    William Paxson7.

ii.   John Paxson.

iii.  Rachel Paxson.

iv.   Mary Ann Paxson.

v.   Reuben Paxson.




William6 Paxson, son of #264 William5 (William4 #98, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his second wife Ann (PARLEE) Paxson, was born 4 November 1809. He died on 5 January 1866. William married Elizabeth LAMBERT.

Son of William and Elizabeth (Lambert) Paxson:

i. William Paxson7, b. 20 Feb. 1846 [marisgen]




James Steele Paxson, the son of #266 Jacob5 (William4 #98, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Sarah STEELE, was born 11 March 1817 in Maryland, and died on 17 March 1876. James married Mary Letitia MOORE of Little Britain. [The Smedley Family, 438.]

In the 1850 census, the family was living in Little Britain Twp., Lancaster Co., Pa. on a farm worth $4,000. James S. was 33, his wife Mary L. was 24. Living with them were two daughters, Emma, age 2, and Elizabeth 7 months, both born in Penna. Also in the house was his mother, 64 year old Sarah, labelled "insane", and 35 year old sister Rachel, both born in Maryland. There were two other Paxsons: L. Franklin (age 27, a farmer) and J. Johnson (25, a carpenter), both born in Penna. Two unrelated males were also living there: Robert Clendenin (13) and Hugh McMinimy (28). The latter was a thresher and since the enumerator came by on September 3, Hugh probably was temporary harvest help. [1850 federal census for Little Britain Twp., Lancaster Co., Pa., rollM432_787, page 6B, lines 13-22.]

Children of James Steele and Mary Letitia (Moore) Paxson (may be incomplete):

i. Elizabeth Paxson7, b. ca. 1848;

ii. Emma Paxson, b. ca. Feb. 1850;

iii. Samuel Preston Paxson, b. 1857; d. 1935; m. 11/11/1886 in Phila. Elizabeth "Lizzie" Penrose SMEDLEY; 3 children.

iv. James M. Paxson, b. 28/7m/1859; m. 5/3m/1891 Hannah SMEDLEY; 5 children, of whom 4 d. y.




Joseph F. Paxson, the son of #266 Jacob5 (William4 #98, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Sarah STEELE, was born 17 November 1821 and died 19 November 1872. He married Letitia A. NEEPER.

In 1850 "J. Franklin" was an unmarried, 27 year-old farmer, living with his brothers "J. Johnson" and James on the latter's farm in Little Britain Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. [1850 federal census for Little Britain Twp., Lancaster Co., Pa., rollM432_787, page 6B, lines 13-22.]

On June 14, 1860 the federal census enumerator listed Joseph F. Paxson, age 37, in Little Britain, (Post Office at Kirks Mills), Lancaster County, merchant, with $6,800 real estate and $4,227 personal estate. With him were Letitia A., 23, presumably his wife, born in Penna., William F. age 6 months, and Gulie E. Paxson, 48. In addition the house contained Hannah Neff, 18, domestic; Edwin M Teell, dentist, with $500 personal estate; George Millington, 23, apprentice(?) dentist; Francis Dowd, blacksmith with $350 personal estate. [1860 federal census for Little Britain Twp., Lancaster Co., Pa., roll M653_1121, page 630, lines 39-40, and p. 631, lines 1-7.][lines 39-40, 53, 55] . It would appear that Letitia, with the help of relative (?) Gulie was running a boarding house, a not uncommon way of augmenting family income in the nineteenth century.

In 1880 Joseph was a merchant in Little Britain, with wife "Letisha P." (51) and children: William F. (20, farmer), "Letisha" (12), Walker E. (8) both attending school, and two others, Laura J. TOLLINGER (24, "domestic servant") and John RILEY (17 "works on farm"). [1880 federal census for Little Britain Twp., Lancaster Co., Penna., Family History Library Film 1255144, NA Film Number T9-1144, p. 600B.]

Children of Joseph F. and Letitia (__) Paxson (from 1880 census, may be incomplete):


i.     William F. Paxson, b. ca. 1860; at the age of 20 he was working as a farmer;

ii.    Letitia Neeper Paxson "Lettie", b. 23 Nov. 1867, d. 16 Aug. 1928; m. 6m/3/1893 I[saac] Wayne REYNOLDS; had at least 1 child.

iii.   Walker E. Paxson, b. ca. 1872; at age 8 was attending school in Little Britain Twp.;




Jacob Johnson Paxson, the son of #266 Jacob5 (William4 #98, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Sarah STEELE, was born about 1827. He married ca. 1851 or 1852 Mary E. __.

In 1850 Jacob was an unmarried carpenter, living with his brothers Joseph and James on the latter's farm in Little Britain Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. [1850 federal census for Little Britain Twp., Lancaster Co., Pa., rollM432_787, page 6B, lines 13-22.]

Ten years later, he was a 33 year old master carpenter with $500 personal estate, living with his wife Mary E. (28) and children Sarah E., 7 in school; Eliza W. (3), and Ida R. 5 months. Also Alexander Turner (72) and his wife Elizabeth (69) and their daughter Margaret M. (20) a mantua maker. Kirks Mills was their Post Office. They were all born in Penna. [1860 federal census for Little Britain Twp., Lancaster Co., Pa., roll M653_1121, page 655, lines 5-12, taken June 25, 1860.]

In 1880 he was listed as a farmer, aged 56. Mary E. was 48. Their children were Sallie E (25), Elza [sic] W. (21), Alexander T. (13), James E. (11), and Roland J. (7). Perhaps Ida had died. The two girls seem to have revised their ages downwards. [1880 census as transcribed on familysearch, seen 10/17/2013.]

Children of Jacob Johnson and his wife Mary E. (__) Paxson (from the 1870 and 1880 census):


i.    Sarah E. Paxson7, "Sallie", b. ca. 1853;

ii.   Eliza W. Paxson, b. ca. 1857;

iii.   Ida R. Paxson, b. ca. Jan. 1860;

iv.   Alexander T. Paxson, b. ca. 1867;

v.     James E. Paxson, b. ca. 1869;

vi.   Roland J. Paxson, b. ca. 1873.




Descendants of Reuben3 and Alice (Simcock) Paxson
Grandsons of Jacob and his wife Mary (Webster) Paxson


Samuel Paxson, the son of #267 William5 (Jacob4 #100, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Jane GRIFFITH, was born 1 April 1793 in Loudon County, Virginia, and died 1 March 1871. He was buried in the Union Cemetery in Waterford, Virginia. On 12 March 1814 Samuel married Martha Ellen WRIGHT. She had been born on 16 August 1791.

Children of Samuel and Martha Ellen (Wright) Paxson:[from gencircles/users/marisgen/, 10/2003]

i.    Mary Jane Paxson7, b. 25 Dec. 1814; d. 27 Apr. 1898 in Loudon Co.; bur. Fairfax Friends Cem., Waterford; m. 12 Mar. 1832 Isaac S. HOUGH (b. 24 Apr. 1809); 4 children: Mary Ann Hough; Robert Barclay Hough (b. 2 Sept. 1844, d. 12 Apr. 1902, m. 9 Mar. 1869 Henrietta Chalmers PAXSON who was b. 14 Aug. 1850, 7 children), Virginia Hough, and Edgar Hough.

ii.   William Bushrod Paxson, b. 15 May 1816; d. 1 May 1899; m. 25 Feb. 1840 Henrietta C. HOUGH (b. 25 May 1817); 7 children.

iii.  Charles Edward Paxson, b. 22 Jan. 1818; d. 22 Oct. 1903; m. 18 Jan. 1842 Eleanor HOUGH (b. 26 Nov. 1823); 4 children.

iv.   Rachel Ann Paxson, b. 24 Nov. 1819;

v.    Elizabeth Susan Paxson, b. 1 Aug. 1821; d. 16 Mar. 1846 in Loudon Co., bur. Union Cem., Waterford, Va.; m. 12 Apr. 1840 in Maryland Isaac L. MOCK; 2 sons: Burr S. Paxson Mock, b. 20 Jan. 1840 [sic: should this be 1841?] and Samuel A. Mock.

vi.   George Washington Paxson, twin, b. 4 Mar. 1824; d. 8 Apr. 1907 in Iowa; m. 6 June 1855 Edith B. PRICE; 7 children.

vii.  Virginia Catherine Paxson, b. 4 Mar. 1824, twin of George;

viii.  John Coldwell Paxson, b. 3 Feb. 1826; d. 27 Apr. 1915; m. 4 Aug. 1851 Louisa R. NICHOLS; 4 children.

ix.   Martha Ellen Paxson, b. 11 Mar. 1827;

x.    Samuel Griffith Paxson, b. 30 Dec. 1829;

xi.   Sarah Frances Paxson, b. 21 Nov. 1831;

xii.  Burr Wicks Paxson, b. 14 Dec. 1833;






William Paxson, son of #267 William5 (Jacob4 #100, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Jane GRIFFITH, was born in Loudon County, Virginia and died in February 1826. He married Diademia LACEY. [from marisgen]

Children of William and Diademia (Lacey) Paxson:
i.    Jane Virginia Paxson,

ii.   Eliza Paxson, b. 22 Dec. 1822 in Loudon Co., Va.

iii.  Thomas Mason Chichester Paxson, b. 23 Nov. 1823. [Wayne Paxson on paxlincoln gives his name as Thomas Mason Chichester Paxson; I think it may be marisgen that spells his name Thompson Mason Chilchester Paxson.]




John6 Paxson, son of William5 #267 (Jacob4 #100, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and Jane (GRIFFITH) Paxson, was born ca. 1797, and had died before 1841. He married 14 Sept. 1818 Ann SHAWEN. [http:worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=jald&id=107540; more recently from marisgen and paxlincoln; the latter spells her name SAWEN; the former calls her Nancy Ann. I have not done any primary research myself.]

Children of John and Ann (Sawen) Paxson:

i.     Cornelius William Paxson, b. 11 May 1821; d. 1883; m(1) 6 Oct. 1843 Isabella ELGIN; 7 children. He m(2) 17 Apr. 1866 Sarah Frances TRUNDLE; 6 more children.

ii.   Burr Harrison Paxson7, b. Dec. 1822; d. Feb. 1862; m(1) 10 July 1844 Ann Derrozo Chalmers HOUGH; 6 children. Burr m(2) 12 June 1856 Annie E. MULLEN.




Jacob G. Paxson, son of William5 #267 (Jacob4 #100, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and Jane (GRIFFITH) Paxson, was born in 1805 in Waterford, Loudon County,Virginia, and died sometime after 1853. He married Mahala J. POTTS on 25 March 1824 in Waterford.

Children of Jacob G. and Mahala J. (Potts) Paxson:
i.    Jane E. Paxson7, b. 1825

ii.   Jacob Paxson

iii.  David Paxson




Griffith W. Paxson, son of William5 #267 (Jacob4 #100, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Jane GRIFFITH, was born 13 March 1811 in Waterford and died 16 July 1889. He was buried in the Union Cemetery in Waterford. On 26 March 1839 he married Duanna RICKARD.

Children of Griffith W. and Duanna (Rickard) Paxson:[marisgen]
i.       Marietta J. Paxson, b. 19 Jan. 1840 in Loudon Co.

ii.     George W. Paxson, b. 1841; d. 1919; m. 5 Jan. 1869 Catherine RUSSELL. [worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=paxlincoln&id=I1189]

iii.  Anne E. Paxson, b. 1842

iv.   Roberta V. Paxson, b. 20 Sept. 1844

v.    Alberta C. Paxson, b. 20 June 1846

vi.   Emily C. Paxson, b. 23 Feb. 1848

vii.  Georgiana Paxson, b. 25 Aug. 1849

viii.  John S. Paxson, b. 17 Apr. 1852; d. 7 Mar. 1925; m(1) Mary HOUGH, 4 children; m(2) 1889 Catherine COMPHER.

ix.   Rodney Paxson, b. 28 May 1855, twin

x.    Burr Paxson, twin, b. 28 May 1855; m. Mary Elizabeth VIRTS; 3 children.

xi.   Rose Ellen Paxson, b. 28 Aug. 1856




William6 Paxson, son of #268 Benjamin5 (Jacob4 #100, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his first wife Ruth (PIGEON) was disowned for marrying out of unity, 21 Eighth Month 1820.




John6 Paxson, son of #268 Benjamin5 (Jacob4 #100, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his first wife Ruth (PIGEON) married Fannie FEESE and had 8 children.





Samuel6 Paxson, son of #268 Benjamin5 (Jacob4 #100, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his second wife, Mary (Walker) Paxson, was disowned 26 Ninth Month 1833 by the Hicksite meeting for marrying contrary to discipline.




Isaac6 Paxson, son of #268 Benjamin5 (Jacob4 #100, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his second wife, Mary (Walker) Paxson, was disowned 20 Sixth Month 1833 by the Hicksite meeting for marrying contrary to discipline.




Charles6 Paxson, son of #268 Benjamin5 (Jacob4 #100, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his second wife, Mary (Walker) Paxson, was a member of the Hicksite Stillwater Monthly Meeting.




Benjamin Webster6 Paxson, son of #268 Benjamin5 (Jacob4 #100, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his second wife, Mary (Walker) Paxson, was born 1 February 1827 in Belmont County, Ohio. Alternatively, he was born 2 August. [FamilySearch Compact Disc #60, Pin #97207, as seen 4/15/2006] He died in December 1865 near Huntsville, Alabama. Benjamin married 24 February 1854 Beulah STEWART at Rich Square, Henry County, Indiana. ["Descendants of Luke Dillon and Susannah Garrett", as seen on http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~lukedillon/ , 5/2005.]

Children of Benjamin Webster and Beulah (Stewart) Paxson (may be incomplete)

i. William E. Paxson7, b. 22 Feb. 1859 in Hopewell, Henry Co., Ind. [FamilySearch Compact Disc #60, Pin #97275, as seen 4/15/2006.]



James A. Paxson, son of John5 #269 (Jacob4 #100, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his second wife, Elizabeth (Griffin), was born 21 December 1805and died between 1890 and 1900. He married in 1835 Elizabeth OLIVER in Dalton,Whitfield County, Georgia. Elizabeth was born in June 1818 in South Carolina. She died after May 1900.

The information I have on this family was kindly sent to me by Rollie Taylor in May 2005 and is and used by permission. James and his family can be tracked in three federal censuses. Just before the Civil War, in the 1860 Georgia census for Whitfield County, Dalton Post Office [ Dwg 748, Microfilm page 616, line 14.], James A. Paxson, age 54, and Elizabeth, age 42, were enumerated with one son, Jno. T., age 23, in their home. Two decades later, in the 1880 census, [Whitfield Co, Dalton, page 85C] James A. Paxson, age 75, and Elizabeth Paxson, age 62, lived alone. Their only son, John T. Paxson and family lived nearby. Then twenty years later in the 1900 census, Johnson County, Arkansas, [ED39/SH3/LN67] Elizabeth Paxson, age 82, the widow of James A. Paxson was living with her son and his family.

Child of James A. and Elizabeth (Oliver) Paxson:
i. John Tyler Paxson7, b. 31 Mar. 1837 in Ga.; m. ca. 1868 in Ga. Nancy Elizabeth BINKLEY; 2 children.




Benjamin Franklin, son of John5 #269 (Jacob4 #100, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his second wife, Elizabeth (Griffin), was a twin born 10 September 1818 in Morgan County, Georgia. He died 28 May 1902 in Monroe, Walton County, Georgia. He married 23 January 1844 in Walton County, Georgia, Sarah Elizabeth CARTER. She was born 30 November 1825, the daughter of John and Judith F. Carter. Sarah died 6 May 1898. [Information on this family has been received with much gratitude from Rollie Taylor, 5/2005, and used by permission. Rollie's source for the marriage is Walton County, GA. Book D, p. 174.]

In the 1850 federal census for Georgia, "Benj. F.", age 31, and Sarah E. age 24, were enumerated with three children, John C., age 5, Frances L., age 3, and Joseph T., age 2. Benjamin was a farmer with real estate valued at $1,200. [US census, 1850 GA return, Walton Co, 88th Division, Dwelling 569. (sent to me by Rollie Taylor)]

In the 1860 census, on the eve of the Civil War, Benjamin F., age 41, and Sarah, age 35, had eight children. These were listed as John, age 15, Frances, age 13, Joseph, age 11, Robert, age 8, Sarah, age 7, William C. age 3, Emma, age 1, and Charles, age 4 months. Benjaimin F. was a farmer, with real estate valued at $1,800 and a personal estate valued at $305. [US census, 1860 GA return, Walton Co, Northern Division, Dwelling 265. (kindly sent to me by Rollie Taylor)]

Benjamin served in Company C, 25th Battalion, Georgia Infantry in the Confederate army. He applied for a pension in his final years. [A manpower survey of Dec 1863-early 1864 was taken in Walton Co, GA. In this survey is listed Paxton, Benjamin F. (416th militia district), 46, farmer, b. Ga. My thanks to Kay Walton, e mail 1/15/2007, for this information.]

As a child Sarah was a member of the Methodist church, but in 1870 she was baptized into the Christian church by Dr. M. B. Doster, uniting at Corinth. She afterwards transferred her membership to Mt. Vernon. ["1898 Memorium" by Elder T. M. Foster (from an unknown publication) transcript sent to me by Rollie Taylor. Rollie points out that Sarah Elizabeth Paxson had a son-in law named T. M. Foster. This memoriam was saved by Martha Paxson Park's daughter or granddaughter, because the deceased was a relative of Martha Paxson Park. Sarah Elizabeth Carter Paxson was a sister-in-law of Martha Paxson Park.]

Photograph of Benjamin F. Paxson and family from Kay Walton, 1/2007

The federal census supplies a snapshot of the family once a decade. In 1870, five years after the end of the war, Benjamin, now age 50, and Sarah E. age 44, had six children in the home. Joseph T. was 21, Robert was 18, Jane was 17, William was 12, Charles was 10, and Mattie was 8. Benjamin had real estate valued at $2000, and a personal estate valued at $1000. [US census, 1870 GA return, Walton Co, Page 408, Brooks District 421 G. M., Subdivision 129, Dwelling 7. (sent to me by Rollie Taylor)] In 1880 Benjamin F. Paxson, age 62, and Sarah E., age 55, had 3 children living in the household. Charles D. age 20, Mattie O. J. age 15, and Addie age 13. Another son, Robert J., and his family lived in a nearby dwelling. [1880 US census, Walton Co, Ga., ED117/SH11/LN10. (sent to me by Rollie Taylor)]

Sarah died 6 May 1898 and on "a cold day in May" was buried in Mt. Vernon Cemetery, Walton County. "Bro. J. H. Wood preaching the funeral sermon." ["1898 Memorium" by Elder T. M. Foster (from an unknown publication), transcript kindly sent to me by Rollie Taylor.]

As an elderly widower, Benjamin was living with one of his daughters in the 1900 federal census. The head of the household was his son-in-law, William M. WRIGHT, age 36, married to Mattie O. Paxson, age 36. [1880 US census, Walton Co, Ga., ED104/SH20/LN45. (sent to me by Rollie Taylor)] This photograph is the elderly Benjamin with three (unnamed) grandchildren. I am indebted to Kay Walton for sending me the picture. [e mail 1/2007]

Benjamin died two years later, on 28 May 1902 in Monroe, Walton County, and was buried in Walton County, Georgia.

Children of Benjamin Franklin and Sarah Elizabeth (Carter) Paxson: [Data generously sent to me by Rollie Taylor, and used by permission.]

i. John C. Paxson7, b. Nov. 1844 in Walton Co., Ga.; d. 1919; m(1) 1870 Lanora NIBLOCK (b. 1855 in Fla.); m(2) ca. 1899 Mary J. __ (b. Feb. 1852); apparently they had no children.

ii. Frances Laura Paxson, b. 20 Dec. 1846 in Walton Co.; d. 25 July 1885 in the same Co.; m. 5 Nov. 1868 Samuel I. MOBLEY, son of James Lyle and Mary T. (AMMONS) Mobley. Samuel was b. 2 Mar. 1847 and d. 22 Oct. 1895 in Walton Co. In the 1870 census for Monroe Post Office, Walton Co., Ga. S.I. Mobley was 23, as was F. L., with no children. [Microfilm page 434, Line 14, from Rollie Taylor.] In the 1880 census they had two children, Deame age 10, and Claud age 7. [Enum. Dist 118, Sheet 26, Line 14, from Rollie Taylor.]

iii. Joseph Taylor Paxson, b. 15 Jan. 1849 in Walton Co.; d. 3 Aug. 1908 in Conway Co., Ark.; m. Mathilda Agnes KELLY; 14 children.

iv. Robert Junnius Paxson, b. ca. 1852 in Walton Co.; d. 19 Aug. 1899 in Ga.; m. 30 Sept. 1875 Angie Orrin ROBINSON; 7 children.

v. Sarah Jane Paxson, called "Janie", b. 19 July 1853 in Walton Co.; d. 4 Aug. 1896 in Oconee Co., Ga.; bur. Mt. Vernon, Walton Co.; m. 22 Sept. 1874 in Walton Co., Ga., Thomas Mason FOSTER (b. 17 Mar. 1844 in Pembroke, Christian Co., Ky.; d. 19 Feb. 1910 in Atlanta, Fulton Co., Ga.) Thomas was a classmate of her brother, Joseph, at the College of the Bible in Lexington, Ky. 1869-70. His home was in Hopkinsville, Ky. After Janie died, Thomas married a second wife, Sarah Popia THOMPSON of Oconee Co. Thomas and Janie's two oldest children (Ernest and Henry FOSTER) died of diphtheria one week apart in 1880. Their father bought land across the road from the Mt. Vernon Christian Church where he had recently become the minister. This land became the cemetery where many of the Paxson family are buried, including Janie (Paxson) and Thomas FOSTER, Addie (Paxson) and Thomas HALE, and Mattie (Paxson) and William WRIGHT. [Thanks to Kay Walton, who also sent me some data taken from William Omer Foster, The Foster Family (Clearwater, Fla.)] They had nine children in all.

vi. William O. Paxson, b. in Sept. 1856; d. 19 Aug. 1924 in Atlanta; m. ca. 1880 Rosa GRAHAM (b. Mar. 1858 in Ga.); at least 2 children.

vii. Emma Paxson, b. ca. 1858; d. before 1870.

viii. Charles D. Paxson, b. in Mar. 1860; d. 1933; m. 14 Nov. 1889 Lena HALE; 5 children.
Tombstone of Thomas Andrew Hale, 1859-1922, Mt. Vernon Christian Church Cemetery, Walton Co., Ga.
ix. Mattie O. J. Paxson, b. 2 Nov. 1862; d. 17 Sept. 1914; m. 12 Dec. 1888 William M. WRIGHT (b. 1 Aug. 1863; d. 12 Mar. 1935 in Walton Co.; no children. Mattie's widowed father was living with them in 1900.

x. Addie A. Paxson, b. 15 Sept. 1870 in Walton Co., Ga.; d. 9 Mar. 1945 in Columbia Co., Fla.; m. 8 Nov. 1888 Thomas Andrew HALE (b. 6 July 1859; d. 5 Oct. 1922); Addie was his second wife; they had 3 children (he had 2 by his first wife). Thomas died in 1922 and was buried in the Mt. Vernon Christian Church cemetery in Walton Co., along with his first wife, Florence Tillman Hale, Florence's son Emory Hale, and Addie's son Thomas A. Hale, Jr. [My thanks to Kay Walton for this information and the photograph of Thomas Hale, Sr.'s tombstone.] According to her brother William's obituary, Addie was living in Valdosta, Ga. in 1924. She was buried in Oak Lawn Cemetery, Lake City, Columbia Co., Fla. [My thanks to Roy Martin for bringing this to my attention and supplying the link to Addie's gravemarker. E mail 1/20/2010.]





Joseph Griffin Paxson, son of John5 #269 (Jacob4 #100, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his second wife, Elizabeth (Griffin), was a twin born 10 September 1818 in Morgan County, Georgia, and died in 1859. Joseph married 6 February 1840 Martha S. DEANE in Clarke County, Georgia. Martha was born in July 1820 in Georgia, and died in 1901. [Information on this family has been kindly sent to me by Rollie Taylor (except where otherwise noted), and used by permission.]

Joseph died in 1859 in Keatchie, De Soto Parish, Louisiana, and his remains were buried in Fullalove Cemetery, Four Forks, Caddo Parish, Louisiana. Martha survived him by many years, and died in 1901. [This information from findagrave.com; my thanks to Kay Walton for passing it on to me, 5m/2013.]

It is unclear when the family moved to Louisiana. In 1870 Martha and two daughters were living in DeSoto Parish, Louisiana. Martha was listed as 50 years old, "E.V." as 18, and "M.E." was 13. Also in the house was 23 year old farmer J. T. Freserson (?), from Georgia. His relationship to Martha (if any) was not given. [This census, Microfilm page 404, line 30, was sent to me 5/15/2005 by Rollie Taylor.] In 1880 the federal census enumerated them there, in DeSoto Parish. M. S. Paxson, age 60, marked as a widow, had two daughters in the home who were now adults. Lizzie (age 28), and "Light" (age 22). Both of them were teachers. [US census, 1880 LA return, ED23/SH02/LN39, Microfilm page 208B. There are 3 columns for civil condition (marital status); single, married, and widowed/divorced. Unmarried individuals have a slash mark in the first column. Married individuals have a slash mark in the second column. It appears that in the 1880 census heading, a slash mark in the third column indicates a widow, whereas a "D" in the third column would indicate divorce. It appears that Martha was a widow. (My thanks to Rollie Taylor for the initial data and also the clarification, 5/15/2005.).]

In the 1900 census, Martha S. Paxson, age 79 was listed as a widow, the mother of 11 children. Two of the 3 surviving children lived with her. Lizzie was 48, and Lite was 42. Both Lizzie and Lite were milliners. [US census, 1880 LA return, DeSoto Parish, ED48/SH03/LN45. (Sent to me by Rollie Taylor.)]

Children of Joseph G. and Martha S. (Deane) Paxson, of whom eight died before 1900 (obviously incomplete):
i.    Elizabeth "Lizzie" PAXSON, b. in Dec 1851 in Ga. Apparently unmarried, lived with her mother. She was a school teacher in 1880 and a milliner in 1900.

ii.   Lite PAXSON, b. in Sep 1857 in Ga. Apparently unmarried, lived with her mother. She was a school teacher in 1880 and a milliner in 1900.

iii.
iv. - xi. nine more children of whom only one survived past 1900.




James Paxson, son of #271 Reuben (Jacob4 #100, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his first wife, Mary, was born in Ohio.


Elijah Paxson, son of #272 Arthur (Jacob4 #100, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife, Mary (Webster), was married 15 February 1827 to Elizabeth NORWOOD. [My thanks to Janet Paxson Stepp for this information.]





Descendants of Reuben3 and Alice (Simcock) Paxson
Grandsons of John and his wife Mary (__) Paxson


James6 Paxson, son of Reuben #274 (John4 #102, Reuben3, William Jr.2, James1) and Mary (__) Paxson, married Ruth RICHARDS (__). Both of them had been born in Ohio.

Although it is not yet proved, it may be that in the 1880 census James was a 66-year old drayman in Marcellus, Cass County, Michigan. James was born in Ohio, and his parents were born in Virginia, which is accurate for our man. Living with James was his 69 year old wife, Ruth, born in Ohio; her father was born in New Jersey and he mother in South Carolina. Rounding out the household was 35 year old unmarried daughter Mary E. Paxson, also born in Ohio. [1880 census, NA Film no. T9-0575, p. 490D, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.]

Children of James and Ruth (Richards) Paxson: [as given in Wayne Paxson's gencircles]

i.  Sarah Paxson

ii. Anna Paxson

iii. Charles Paxson

iv. Mary Paxson

v. Reuben Elwood Paxson, b. 1846 in Logan Co., Oh.; d. 29 Nov. 1902 in Cass Co., Mich.; m. 8 Mar. 1874 in Cass Co. Susan Alda WRIGHT; had 3 children: Giles, Willard, and Jennie.

vi. Carnelia Jane Paxson,



Reuben6 Paxson, son of #276 Jacob5 (John #102, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2, James1 #3) and his wife Sitnah (RICHARDS) Paxson, was born 27 October 1807. He died on 18 August 1862 in Champaign County, Ohio. [Unless he is the 72 year old appearing in the 1880 census.] On the 14th of December 1831 Reuben married Rachel THOMAS.[Data on this family is from Wayne Paxson's website on gencircle, 9/2003, unless otherwise noted.]

Reuben appeared in the 1880 census in Monroe, Logan County, Ohio [unless he had died in 1862, in which case this is some other guy]. He was listed as being 72 years old, born in Ohio, and still engaged in farming. His father was born in Virginia, his mother's birthplace was left blank. Rachel, age 66, also born in Ohio, was keeping house. Her father was born in Penna., her mother in North Carolina. With them was 22 year-old Burleigh Paxson, listed not as "son", but as "other".[familysearch]

Children of Reuben and Rachel (Thomas) Paxson:

i.    Mary Ann Paxson, b. 11 Nov. 1832; d. 29 Apr. 1901; m. 9 Apr. 1854 Griffe D. BRUCE. They had children:[Roberta Lake, "Chandler, Bell, Paxson Descendants", typescript, 1954. My thanks to Candi McDonald for sending me a copy, 7m/2/2009.]
a) Rachel Bruce, m. __ JOHNSON;
b) Irma Bruce, m. __ COOKSON and lived at West Liberty, Ohio
ii.   Cyrus T. Paxson

iii.  Emily C. Paxson




John Townsend6 Paxson, son of #276 Jacob5 (John #102, Reuben #32, William Jr. #16, James #3) and his wife Sitnah (RICHARDS) Paxson, was born 19 December 1816 in Logan County, Ohio. He died on 2 March 1890 in Pleasant Plain, Jefferson County, Iowa. He married Hannah BELL on 4 May 1842 in Pleasant Plain. She was the sister of John's brother Joel's wife Nancy Bell.[Some data on this family is from Wayne Paxson's website on gencircle, seen 9/2003.] Hannah was born 20 July 1820 in Ross County, Ohio, the daughter of Alexander and Rebecca (CHANDLER) Bell and died 23 March 1895 in Jefferson County, Iowa.[Roberta Lake, "Chandler, Bell, Paxson Descendants", typescript, 1954. My thanks to Candi McDonald for sending me a copy, 7m/2/2009. Also information from Debbie Musselman, e mails, Aug. 1, 2011.]

John Townsend and Hannah supposedly went west in a covered wagon, their two oldest children followed the oxen to make them go. "They had quite a time when they went by a watering place to keep them from just going into the water."[Debbie Musselman, quoting Della Fortune, a granddaughter of John and Hannah.] Townsend's brother Joel went with them in 1840. [Hand-written note from M. L. Paxson, Seibert, Colo., as cited by Debbie Musselman.] But this doesn't compute as Townsend was married in 1842 and Joel in 1843 in Pleasant Plain; all their children were born in Iowa. See also the entry for Joel, below.

Photograph of Cyrus, Milton, and Ida and their spouses and some children and grandchildren from Debbie Musselman

The family lived near Pleasant Plain, Iowa. [Roberta Lake, "Chandler, Bell, Paxson Descendants", typescript, 1954.] Here are three of their adult children and some grandchildren. Standing, right to left: Elma (Paxson) Kobler (daughter of Cyrus and Sibby), Melvin Paxson (Cyrus and Sibby's son), Sadie (Hadley) Paxson (Jay T's first wife), Elmer Parks, Ida (Paxson) Parks, Jessie (Jobes) Paxson (Melvin's first wife), Sibby (Hadley) Paxson (Cyrus's wife), Cyrus Paxson, Milton Paxson. Seated from left: Jay T. Paxson (Cyrus and Sibby's son) holding his daughter Elma, Carl Kobler holding his daughter Olive, Clide Parks (Ida and Elmer's son). My thanks to Debbie Musselman for all these photos.

The 22 July 1856 census for Penn Township shows John, a 39-year old farmer, land owner, and native voter, living with his wife Hannah, who was 36. Both were born in Ohio, but Hannah had come to Iowa two years before John. With them lived five children, all born in Iowa: Rebecca (age 13), Cyrus (12), Milton (9), Jane (3), and William (1). They lived near John's brother Joel, who had come to Iowa 17 years earlier, two years before John arrived. [usgenweb/ia/jefferson/census/1856, transcribed from p. 866, lines 1-7, microfilm H Q #V221-19, FHL #1021302, 1HS# Roll 9. John's middle initial is mistakenly given as "L" instead of "T".]

Children of John Townsend and Hannah (Bell) Paxson, all born in Jefferson County, Iowa:

i.    Rebecca Paxson, b. 20 Apr. 1843; d. 8 Apr. 1911 in Jefferson Co.; m. 15 June 1861Samuel MACY;

ii.   Cyrus Paxson, b. 4 Dec. 1844; d. 24 Oct. 1925 in Penokee, Kansas; m. 1 Aug. 1864 Sabina HADLEY; 5 children.

iii.  Milton Paxson, b. 25 Sept. 1846; d. 11 May 1929 in Long Beach, Calif.; m. 29 Sept. 1866 in Jefferson Co. Mary Elizabeth FRAZIER; 6 children.
Photograph of Achsah Paxson from Debbie Musselman

iv.   John Townsend Paxson, b. 2 Oct. or 10 Feb. 1850; d. 13 Feb. 1855 in Jefferson Co.

v.    Sitnah Jane Paxson, b. 25 May 1852; m. 7 Aug. 1869Elijah ROBERTS;

vi.   William Chandler Paxson, b. 12 Dec. 1854; d. 24 Jan. 1926 in Richland, Iowa; m. 4 Mar. or May 1875 in Jefferson Co. Deborah Ann KENDALL; 6 children.

vii. Achsah Paxson, b. 19 Dec. 1856; d. 19 Mar. 1945 in Selma, Calif.; m. 27 June 1875 in Jeff. Co. William Almando or Alamando MOORE; her photo is to the right.

viii. Zane Paxson, b. 8 Oct. 1858; d. 12 Oct. 1889 in Penokee, Kansas; m. 17 July 1881 in Jeff. Co. Rachel HADLEY; she was b. 18 July 1858 in Jeff. Co., d. 30 Sept. 1913, daughter of Jonathan and Jane (HOLLIDAY) Hadley; Rachel married 3 times: William HOWARD and Nathan HOBSON. Rachel was the sister of Sabina "Sibby" Hadley who m. Cyrus Paxson. Zane was a farmer. His tombstone spells his name Paxton, his father as Townson, and his birthdate as 1858.

ix.   Achilles Paxson, b. 22 Oct. 1860; d. 1908; m. Martha Elizabeth BERRY, who was b. in 1867 and d. in 1913. She was remembered by Cyrus's son "J.T." as being a "high class" lady, very "top drawer". They went to Wallace, Kansas.[Letter from Pat Bean Paxson, wife of Leonard Paxson, as cited by Debbie Musselman.]

x.     Ida May or Mary Paxson, b. 9 May 1863; d. 11 Jan. 1941 in Reno, Nev.; m. 25 Feb. 1883 in Jeff. Co. Elmer PARKS; he was b. in 1861, son of William and Rebecca (FRASHER) Parks; he was a farmer.




Joel Cheshire Paxson, from Candi McDonald, June 2009

Joel Cheshire6 Paxson, son of #276 Jacob5 (John #102, Reuben #32, William Jr. #16, James #3) and his wife Sitnah (RICHARDS) Paxson, was born 15 March 1819, and died 7 July 1891 in Jefferson County, Iowa. He was married twice, first in November 1843 to Nancy BELL, and then in October 1875 to Leah J. HINSHAW. It is because of Joel's middle name that some genealogists propose Cheshire as his grandmother's maiden name. I have not yet seen any proof of this.

Joel was born and grew up on a farm near Pickrelltown, Logan County, Ohio, ten miles from Bellfontaine. In 1839, at the age of twenty, he decided that digging a livelihood from the stony soil of Pickrelltown was not for him, and he set out on horseback for Iowa. On the way he overtook a family named HUMPHREY that was driving wagons to the same destination. Joel drove one of the wagons for them the rest of the way, and the Humphrey family became life-long friends. Phoebe Humphrey, the mother in the family, sewed for Joel. Their farms were near each other, separated only by a single farm where Joel's brother-in-law William PICKARD lived with his wife Mary (Bell) Pickard. Joel bought his farm from the U.S. government for $1.25 an acre. It was three quarters of a mile north of Pleasant Plain, Jefferson County, Iowa. The farm buildings were constructed south and east of a grove which provided some protection from winter winds. [From a home-made typed booklet titled "Chandler, Bell, Paxson Descendants" by Roberta Lake 1954 given to Maude (Brady) Hoskins, the granddaughter of Joel C. Paxson. My thanks to Candi McDonald for sending me a copy, June 2009.]

Since his mother grieved that her son had moved so far away, Joel rode horseback back to Ohio in 1840 to visit her. She gave him a coverlet, which has been passed down in the family. [Roberta Lake, "Chandler, Bell, Paxson Descendants" (1954). My thanks to Candi McDonald for sending me a copy, June 2009.]

Joel married first, on 1 November 1843 in Jefferson County, Iowa Territory, at Pleasant Plain Friends Meeting Nancy BELL. A transcription of their wedding certificate has been made. It follows the traditional/standard form, and was signed by the groom's brother, John T. Paxson (who had married the bride's sister Hannah in May the year before; Hannah was at home with their 6-month old baby), as well as the bride's parents and two siblings (John and Martha), and eighteen other witnesses. Phoebe Humphrey is said to have made Joel's wedding shirt, in exchange for a sheep. Nancy was born 14 August 1822, the daughter of Alexander and Rebecca (CHANDLER) Bell. Nancy Bell Paxson's tombstone in Pleasant Plain church graveyard, from Candi McDonald, June 2009She died 51 years later, 31 August 1873, according to her tombstone in the Pleasant Plain Church graveyard. It is very frustrating that the carver misspelled her name. Nancy's is in the front row, on the left, Joel's is next to her.[Roberta Lake, "Chandler, Bell, Paxson Descendants" (1954) includes a much more complete Bell line. My thanks to Candi McDonald for sending me a copy, June 2009. The story of the shirt is attributed to Carrie Humphrey Whitacre. The photograph is from Candi, 7/14/2009.]

Pleasant Plain Church graveyard, from Candi McDonald, July 2009

Joel and his family appear on a 22 July 1856 census of Penn Township. Joel and Nancy were both born in Ohio, and had lived in Iowa 17 years. Joel was a farmer, land owner, and native voter. Living with them were children Mary Jane (11 years), Setnah (8), Jacob and Sarah (6), and Malisa (2), all born in Iowa. [usgenweb/ia/jefferson/census/1856, transcribed from p. 850, lines 13-19, microfilm H Q #V221-19, FHL #1021302, 1HS# Roll 9.]

Joel married secondly, on 13 October 1875 Leah J. HINSHAW. She had been born 28 December 1833. [Data on this family is from Wayne Paxson's website on gencircle, 9/2003.]

Joel appears as a 60-year-old farmer in the 1880 US census for Penn Township, Jefferson County, Iowa, with his second wife Leah, who was 43 years old. Two minor children were living with them (Chandler and Annette), and a 16-year-old Swedish laborer named August Laydon.[www.familysearch.org]

Joel Cheshire Paxson, from Candi McDonald, June 2009

Joel died Seventh Month 7, 1891, and his tombstone is beside his first wife's in the Pleasant Plain Church graveyard. [My thanks to Candi McDonald for the photograph of the tombstone and the graveyard, July 14, 2009.]

Children of Joel Cheshire and his first wife, Nancy (Bell) Paxson: [from Joel C. Paxson's Bible, copied by Very Maude (Brady) Hoskins]

i.      Mary Jane Paxson, b. 26 Jul. 1844; d. 27 Mar. 1927; m. 4 Sept. 1862 Henry ECROYD, 2nd son of John Howarth Ecroyd and Sarah W. (Warner) Ecroyd, b. July 19, 1837, in Lycoming County, Penna.; Henry d. 23 July 1909, in Arkansas City, Kansas. Both he and Mary Jane were buried at Riverview Cemetery, Arkansas City, Kansas. Henry was from Muncy Meeting, Lycomong Co., Penna. The Ecroyd family came to Kansas in 1876 in a covered wagon and homesteaded on a section north of Canton, McPherson Co., Kansas. 5 children.[Information from Sarah McCray, e mail 2 Oct. 2006, and Lake, "Chandler, Bell, Paxson Descendants".]
a) Libbie Ecroyd, d. in young womanhood.
b) John Howarth Ecroyd, b. 9 Dec. 1867; d. Feb. 1922; m. 25 Feb. 1890 Eldora EMMONS, daughter of Ephraim and Elizabeth (JONES) Emmons; lived in Arkansas City, Kansas; 3 children.
c) Nancy Bell Ecroyd, b. 27 Aug. 1869; d. 11 Apr. 1918; m. Chas. WUENCH; 2 children.
d) a son, d. in infancy
e) a daughter, d. in infancy
ii.     Sitnah Paxson, b. 1 Jan. 1848; d. 11 Apr. 1917; m. 2 Dec. 1866 Pleasant McNEES (b. 8 Dec. 1834, d. 1 Feb. 1894, son of John and Rebecca (HOWARD) McNees from New Market, Jefferson Co., Tenn., and went to Richland, Keokuk Co., Iowa before the Civil War); Pleasant served in Company F, 33rd Iowa Infantry under Capt. John Bell; discharged 17 July 1865 at New Orleans. Came in a covered wagon to McPherson Co., Kansas with the Ecroyd family in 1876, and homesteaded on the southeast quarter section 9, Canton Twp, a mile north of the present city of Canton. 13 children.
a) Cora McNees, b. 15 Feb. 1868; d. 9 Jan. 1939; m. 30 May 1889 Fred LAKE (b. 7 Feb. 1867, d. 9 Feb. 1938) son of Jasper and Susan (COTTINGHAM) Lake; had children;
b) Harley McNees, b. 28 Mar. 1869; d. 27 Aug. 1869.
c) John McNees, b. 3 Apr. 1870; d. Jan. 1952; m. 17 Feb. 1909 Elizabeth JOHNSON, daughter of Jonus and Cordelia (CANTLEN) Johnston [not sure which is correct, Johnson or Johnston]; lived near Norwich, Kingman Co., Kansas; 3 children.
d) Mattie McNees, b. 27 Dec. 1871; d. 16 Dec. 1951; m. 17 Sept. 1893 Elmer HARTRONFT (d. June 1935), son of William and Louise (STONER) Hartfront [again, two spellings]; lived in Naperville, Ill.; no children.
e) Allen McNees, b. 5 Nov. 1873; d. 1941; m. 7 Oct. 1897 Edith MADDOX, daughter of Jefferson and Jane (WILES) Maddox; lived in Norwich, Kansas until Allen died. 3 children.
f) Clara McNees, b. 3 Dec. 1875; m. 4 Sept. 1901 Allen BARNHART, son of Henry William and Josephine (GARFIELD) Barnhart; lived in Downers Grove, Ill.; 2 children.
g) Warren McNees, b. 25 Oct. 1878; d. 22 Feb. 1943; m. 18 May 1904 Kate BEDFORD (b. 19 July 1877, d. 25 Feb. 1952); homesteaded a farm northeast of Granfield, Okla.; 2 children.
h) Laura McNees, b. 15 Mar. 1880; d. Apr. 1855; m. 8 May 1907 Herman Alvin KLINKERMAN, son of Herman A. and Louise (KUHLMEIR) Klinkerman; 5 children.
i) Lottie McNees, b. 22 July 1882; m. 28 Oct. 1906 Leonhart SOMMERFELD, son of Heinrich and Anna (SCHROEDER) Sommerfeld of South Alexanderwhol, Russia; 2 children.
j) Eva McNees, b. 10 July 1884; m. May 1911 Roscoe H. EVANS, son of Charles and __ (BERRY) Evans; 3 children.
k) Joel McNees, b. 1 Feb. 1886; d. of cancer Feb. 1950; m. April 1906 Clara JONES, daughter of Mitchell and Sarah (ELMORE) Jones; lived near Canton, Kansas; 6 children. young Jacob Paxson, tintype from Candi McDonald, June 2009 l) Harvey McNees, b. 16 Dec. 1888; d. 21 Mar. 1947; m. Marie ZARLEY, daughter of Charles and Lida (NUNMAKER) Zarley; 3 children.
m) Ildra McNees, b. 7 June 1891; m. 22 Feb. 1909 Cloyd C. KALB (d. Oct. 1963), son of Clinton and Lucy B. (POWELL) Kalb; livd in Canton, Kansas; 5 children.
iii.  Jacob Paxson, twin, b. 20 Jan. 1850; d. 1865, bur. at Pleasant Plain, Iowa. The tintype to the right, courtesy of Candi McDonald, shows Jacob. This is probably the only image of him, as he died at the age of 15.

iv.    Sarah Paxson, twin, b. 20 Jan. 1850; m. 1 Jan. 1874 William STOTTLER; no children.

v.      Melissa Paxson, or Malisa, b. 22 Aug. 1853; d. 17 June 1934; m. 26 Nov. 1873 Charles Harvey WAY (b. 27 July 1851, d. 5 Mar. 1933), the son of John and Hannah (WOOD) Way; Charles moved with his parents from Washington Co., Ohio to Keokuk Co., Iowa when he was 10; he taught school, then in spring 1873 took a homestead near Canton, McPherson Co., Kansas, returned to Iowa to marry, and they took a prairie schooner out to their homestead. There is a photograph of Charles, Melissa, five of their eight children, and five friends of the family on the front porch of the Way house. Charles is in the light suit reading the newspaper; Melissa is the second from the right in the back row, between daughters Hannah Leota "Maggie" and Rena Maude (called Maude); son Charles Alburtus is seated in front of Maude (is that a potted cactus he's holding?); and son Purl Benjamin and daughter Lillie Lois are sitting together in front. The third from the left in the back row, one of the aforementioned five friends, is Irene A. "Rena" Martin, who would marry Charles Alburtus.
Charles retired and they moved to Garden City in 1907 where Charles owned and operated the Peoples State Bank until 1912 when they moved to Lakeland, Fla. At one point daughter Maude was in a carriage accident and broke her ankle badly. She is shown here in the center, with Melissa in coat and hat on the left. Viola Bunyan, on the right, cared for Maude. Viola's sister Rosetta Bunyan married Maude's brother Marion McPherson Way. 8 children. [Roberta Lake, "Chandler, Bell, Paxson Descendants", typescript, 1954. My thanks to Candi McDonald for sending me a copy, 7m/2/2009. Thanks, also, to descendants who sent Photo from Rosemary Wormington, e mail 5/23/2010me some corrections for some of the children: Mark Kellerman, e mails May 2010, January & March 2011, and Rosemary Wormington, e mails 5/22/2010 and 1/29/2011, including information contributed by Roberta Lake to "The Way West with the Ways" by Dorothy Dresher Richards, Florence Dresher Wachholtz, and Rosemary Wachholtz Wormington. My thanks to Rosemary for sending this photograph and the links to others, e mail 5/23/2010.]
a) Evalena Way, b. Nov. 1874; d. 1875.

b) Marion McPherson "May" Way, b. 27 Jan. 1876; d. 1949; m. 1901 Rosetta BUNYAN (1883-1958), daughter of William and Josephine (REAME) Bunyan; lived near Fowler, Kansas; 2 children.

c) Hannah Leota "Maggie" Way, b. 1 Aug. 1877; d. 1972; m. 1903 Gunerien THOMPSON, son of Thomas and Gettie (HANSON) Thompson; lived near Fairview, Okla.; 3 children.

d) Charles Alburtus Way, b. 7 Oct. 1879; d. 1953; m. 13 Apr. 1904 Irene A. "Rena" MARTIN, daughter of Sylvanis and Mary Ellen (IRVIN) Martin; lived in Lakeland, Fla.; 3 children.

e) Rena Maude Way, called "Maude", b. 31 Aug. 1881; d. 1949; m. 12 Apr. 1905 Golden Charles "Golie" DRESHER, son of John N. and Sarah Jane "Sadie" (FRANTZ) Dresher; lived near Canton, Kansas; 4 children. Golie took many photographs and in 1999 his children donated the glass negatives to the Kansas Historical Society.

f) John Sherman Way, b. 1885; d. 1887.

g) Purl Benjamin Way, "P.B.", b. 9 Feb. 1889; d. 1961; m. 25 Oct. 1916 Lillian YOUNG, daughter of W. J. and Annie (BOWLING) Young; 2 children.

Grave markers of Melissa Paxson Way and her daughter Lillie Way, by, e mail 5/23/2010 h) Lillie Lois Way, b. 22 July 1891; d. 9 Oct. 1914. Her granite marker in the Canton Township Cemetery, Canton, Kansas, with that of her mother, is shown here. My thanks to Mark Kellerman for the photograph, sent 1m/2011.
vi.   Anna Paxson, b. 5 May 1858; d. Dec. 1915; m. 8 Mar. 1877 Albert Chalmers BRADY, called "Chal" (1856-1917), son of Thomas and Margaret (TRACY) Brady; lived near Pleasant Plain, Iowa. Below is a ca. 1910 photograph of Chal and Anna's family. Left to right, the 2 back rows: Albert Chalmers, Anna Paxson Brady, Gertrude Brady Kann, baby Clifford Brady on father Thomas Brady's arm, Nellie Stanley Brady (Clifford's mother), Miley Yates Brady (wife of Lance), child Orville Brady, Lance Brady (holding Orville); front row: Hobart Brady (son of Lance), Maude Brady Hoskins (daughter of Chal & Anna B.), Hazel Brady Collier (daughter of Lance), and Ralph Brady (son of Chal & Anna B.) Although their married names are given, Maude and Hazel were not yet married when the photo was taken. [Identification from the back of another copy of the photo and e mailed to me 7m/28/2009 by Candi.] Family of Chal and Anna (Paxson) Brady, from Candi McDonald, June 2009
a) Lance Bowen Brady, b. 24 Jan. 1878, d. 27 Sept. 1964; m(1) 20 Sept. 1899 Miley Etta YATES (d. 7 Sept. 1912), daughter of James and Margaret (WHITE) Yates; 4 children. Lance m(2) 7 Dec. 1921 at Haviland, Kansas, Effie L. COX Rash, daughter of James and Elizabeth Cox; lived in Wichita.
b) Thomas Joel Brady, "Tom" b. 11 Dec. 1881, d. 24 Nov. 1935; m. 23 Feb. 1905 Nellie C. STANLEY (b. 24 Nov. 1882, d. 20 June 1936); 1 son.
c) Gertrude Brady, b. 2 June 1884, d. 10 May 1916; m. 8 Dec. 1909 Fred KANN, son of John Kann; no children.
Annetta Paxson Conrad d) Ralph Brady, b. 1 Oct. 1891, d. 1966; m(1) Oct. 1921 Frances FLATHER; m(2) May 1949 Olga SPRAIN; lived in Washington, D.C.
e) Vera Maude Brady, "Maude", b. 29 July 1895, m. 28 Aug. 1919 Seth Edwin HOSKINS (b. 17 May 1893, son of Joel Hoskins); 3 children. Maude is in the white blouse in the front row in the photograph above.
vii.  Chandler Paxson, b. 12 Sept. 1865 in Iowa; d. 19 Oct. 1938; m(1) 13 Oct. 1886 Elizabeth EMERY; m(2) Eva Lena STONE; 11 children. [Joel C. Paxson Bible only has Elizabeth Emery, although later family records include Eva.]
Child of Joel Cheshire and his second wife, Leah J. (Hinshaw) Paxson:
viii. Annetta Paxson, "Nettie", sometimes spelled Annette, b. 7 Sept. 1876 in Iowa; m(1) Dr. Albert CONARD; had a daughter Ardath Conrad (b. 1896, m. Nick SAMUELSON and had 4 boys); m(2) __ TALCOTT. Nettie's photograph is to the right, taken at Henning Studio, Decorah, Iowa. [My thanks to Candi McDonald, July 9, 2009.]




Roland R.6 Paxson, son of #276 Jacob5 (John4 #102, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Sitnah (RICHARDS) Paxson, was born 5 May 1821 and died on 14 April 1885 in Logan County, Ohio. Roland married Phebe B. WOOD at Gilead Meeting on 25 June 1845. She was the daughter of David and Esther Wood of Marion County, born on 23 October 1822. Phebe was granted a certificate of removal a year later to join her husband in Goshen Meeting. This is not to suggest that they lived apart for the first year, but only that it took a while for Phebe to request the certificate. The Orthodox Gilead Meeting was formed in 1838 in Morrow County. Originally it was called Northern Monthly Meeting.[Data on this family is from Wayne Paxson's website on gencircle, 9/2003, and Hinshaw, 4:1199, 1219.]

Children of Roland R. and Phebe (Woods) Paxson (may be out of order):
i.    David Paxson, b. 14 July 1846 (but note date of birth of brother Darius)

ii.   Darius Paxson, b. 14 July 1846.[Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1289.]

iii.  Mary Paxson

iv.   Cinthia Paxson, or Cynthia;

v.    Della Paxson

vi.  Esther Ann Paxson, b. 13 Nov. 1849; [William Wade Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy (Richmond, Ind., 1946), Vol. IV, The Ohio Quaker Genealogical Records, 1289.]


Milton6 Paxson, son of #276 Jacob5 (John4 #102, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Sitnah (RICHARDS) Paxson, was born 18 April 1827. He married Hannah RICHARDSON.[Data on this familyis from Wayne Paxson's website on gencircle, 9/2003.]

Milton and Hannah and three children, Portius, Sarah, and Princess, were received by request into membership in (Orthodox) Goshen Meeting, a mile east of Zanesville, Logan County, Ohio, on 20 February 1875. Their son "Franklin", as a 16-year old, was also received into membership that day. Sitnah and Elizabeth joined a year later, 19 February 1876.[Hinshaw, 4:1289.]

In the 1880 US census Milton is listed as a farmer, 52 years old, in Bokes Creek, Logan County, Ohio. His wife, Hannah, was 45, and they had four children at home: B. Frank (21 years old), "Portios" (16), Sallie (13), and Princess M. (10). The younger two girls were in school. [1880 census, NA Film no. T9-1041, p. 21A, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.]

Children of Milton and Hannah (Richardson) Paxson (may be out of order; the first spelling is from Hinshaw, the second from Wayne Paxson, with 1880 census data added):
i.     Sitnah Paxson, or Sidney, m. Ed WILLIAMS [Lake]

ii.    Elizabeth Paxson, "Lizzie" joined Goshen Meeting 19 Feb. 1876; m. Joe FRY and was dropped from membership 10 May 1890 [Hinshaw, 4:1289.]

iii.   Benjamin Franklin Paxson, b. ca. 1859; m. Luvenia WILLIAMS.

iv.    Portius/Portia Paxson, b. ca. 1864. "Portios" was 16, living at home in 1880.

v.     Sarah Paxson, "Sallie" b. ca. 1867, in 1880 was 13 and in school; m. __ MARMON.

vi.    Princess Paxson, "Prinney" b. ca. 1870. "Princess M." was 10, in school, in the 1880 census; m. Charles BYRD.


Mahlon6 Paxson, may be the son of #276 Jacob5 (John4 #102, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Sitnah (RICHARDS) Paxson, was born 6 May 1830. On 31 October 1850 he married Eliza LOUDON in Logan County, Ohio. [Data on this family is from Wayne Paxson's website on gencircle, 9/2003.] However this has not yet been verified by me.

Daughters of Mahlon and Eliza (Loudon) Paxson (may be out of order):
i.    Mary E. Paxson

ii.   Sarah Paxson




James6 Paxson, son of #278 John5 (John4 #102, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and Anna (BRIEN) Paxson, was born 20 June 1814. [Hinshaw, 4:1288.] I do not have any other information about him yet.




Reuben6 Paxson, son of #278 John5 (John4 #102, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and Anna (BRIEN) Paxson, was born 10 February 1823 in Logan County, Ohio. [Hinshaw, 4:1288.] He married Sarah GREEN, contrary to Friends' discipline, for which they were condemned 20 Sixth Month 1846 by their respective Monthly Meetings: Fairfield for Reuben, and Goshen as well as Fairfield for Sarah. However, they were not disowned, and the next year they were granted certificates of removal to Goshen (on 19 Second Month 1847 for Reuben, and 18 Ninth Month for Sarah). [Hinshaw 5:242, 269.]

Since Friends had a careful procedure for transferring from one monthly meeting to another, it is easy to track the family's movements around Ohio. This process involved informing the meeting of their intent to move, at which time the meeting appointed a small committee to see if their outward affairs were in order. If the committee ascertained that they had left no outstanding debts and had lived upright lives, then upon reporting this to the following monthly meeting, a certificate would be granted. This certificate was then handed to the clerk of the new meeting to which they moved. Reuben moved from Goshen meeting to Fairfield Meeting in 1843; then he and Sarah, as mentioned above, removed back to Goshen meeting in 1847. On 21 Fifth Month [May] 1864 Reuben and Sarah with their eight children were granted a certificate of removal from the Orthodox Goshen Monthly Meeting to Fairfield Monthly Meeting, where it was received 16 Seventh Month [July]. This was only a short stay, however, for the next year they were granted a certificate of removal to Newbury Monthly Meeting on 15 Fourth Month [April] 1865. For one reason or another, they found their way back to Fairfield, with a certificate received 17 Fifth Month [May] 1873 for the family minus Elias (who had already returned two years earlier) and James. [Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1289; 5:270, 425.]

Perhaps Reuben died, then, because on 17 Ninth Month [September] 1881 Sarah and her children Rachel G., Elias G. and his wife and children, Margaret A., Jonathan G., and Ruth A. were granted certificates of removal to Rose Hill Monthly Meeting in Kansas. [Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, 5:270.]

Children of Reuben and Sarah (Green) Paxson:

i.   Rachel G. Paxson, b. 22 Jan. 1846, recorded in Goshen Meeting, Logan Co., Ohio; unmarried in 1881 when she removed with her mother to Rose Hill Monthly Meeting in Kansas. [Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1288, 1289; 5:270.]

ii.  Elias G. Paxson, b. 16 Jan. 1848 in Logan Co., Ohio recorded in Goshen Meeting, [Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1288, 1289.]; d. 17 Jan. 1925 in Sumner Co., Kans.; m. Mary Elizabeth SMITH (she was b. Nov. 1848); 9 children (names and birth dates given on Wayne Paxson's gencircles web page).

iii. James Paxson, b. 18 Feb. 1850, recorded in Goshen Meeting, Logan Co., Ohio. [Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1288.]

iv. John Paxson; m. Elizabeth SIMMONS; had 2 children.

v.  Margaret Ann Paxson, unmarried in 1881 when she removed with her mother to Rose Hill Monthly Meeting in Kansas. [Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1289; 5:270.]

vi. Mary Jane Paxson [Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1289.]

vii. Jonathan G. Paxson, b. Oct. 1859; d. 25 Nov. 1925 in Payne Co., Okla.; m. Estelle A. __ (b. Apr. 1867); 7 children with names and some b. dates on Wayne Paxson's gencircles web site).

viii. Ruth Alice Paxson, unmarried in 1881 when she removed to Rose Hill Monthly Meeting in Kansas; [Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, 5:270.]




John and Amy Ellen (Smith) Paxson

John6 Paxson, son of #278 John5 (John4 #102, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and Anna (BRIEN) Paxson, was born 4 April 1828 in Logan County, Ohio. He died 30 September 1893 in Jewell County, Kansas. John married Amy Ellen SMITH on 24 October 1849 at Fairfield Monthly Meeting, Highland County, Ohio.[Data on this family is from Wayne Paxson's website on gencircle, 9/2003. The photo of John and Amy Ellen (Smith) Paxson was sent to me by Wayne, 11/2003.]

Their first eight children were born in Ohio, so they lived there at least through 1865, the end of the Civil War. The next two were born in Michigan, so the family lived there at least from 1867 to 1870. Finally, they lived in Marshall, Iowa, where daughter Alice died and the youngest child, Emma, was born. Wayne remembers in the 1940s visiting John and Amy Ellen's descendants who were living in Jewell County, Kansas. [info from Wayne Paxson's web page, citing Dean Paxson's Family Tree; also e mail 2/18/2005.]

However, to make the story more interesting (or confusing) it appears that John was granted a certificate of removal from the Orthodox Goshen Monthly Meeting, a mile east of Zanesville in Logan County, Ohio, on 23 May 1868. On 18 December 1869 Amy Ellen was granted a certificate of removal by Goshen Meeting for herself and eight children. [Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1289.] It is quite possible that all of the family had already moved to Michigan, and they were late in requesting the certificates.

Children of John and Amy Ellen (Smith) Paxson:[information from Wayne Paxson who got it from an interview with Molly (Modlin) Paxson; and from Dean Paxson. Children's names and birth dates from Hinshaw, 4:1289.]

i.    Eliza Paxson, b. 2 Aug. 1850, in Highland Co., Ohio [her name is recorded as Elizann in Goshen Meeting, Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1288.]; d. 10 Nov. 1903 in Jewell Co., Kansas; m. 4 Apr. 1875 in Marshal Co., Iowa, Joseph BURGESS. Eliza died in a fire. Wayne's notes say it was a house fire; Dean's notes say it was a prairie fire; of course it could be both.

ii.   Hannah Paxson, twin of Elizabeth, b. 13 Oct. 1853, in Highland Co., Ohio; d. the same day.

iii.  Elizabeth Paxson, twin of Hannah, b. 13 Oct. 1853, in Highland Co., Ohio; d. the same day. The twin girls are recorded as one, named Hannah Elizabeth, in the records of Goshen Meeting, b. 13/10m and d. 24/11m/1853, but bur. 13/11m/1854 in Westland, so if this was not a reinterment there may have been some mistake in the copying. I have not checked the original records. Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1289.

iv.   Asaph Paxson, b. 30 Nov. 1854, Highland Co., Ohio [given as Asaph Elwood, b. 30/11m/1855 in Goshen Meeting records, Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1288.]; d. 31 Oct. 1934, Jewell Co., Kansas; may have been unmarried.

v.    Enos Paxson, b. 1 Oct. __, in Highland Co., Ohio [given as Enos Eddy, b. 1/10m/1857 in Goshen Meeting records, Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1288.]; d. 31 Aug. 1937 in Adams Co., Nebraska; may have been unmarried.

vi.   Jesse Paxson, b. 10 July 1859 in Logan Co., Ohio [given as Jesse G., same b., in Goshen Meeting records, Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1288.]; d. 20 July 1941 in California; m. Lydia HURST on 2 June 1898.

vii.  Alice Paxson, b. 9 Mar. 1862 in Ohio; d. 10 Mar. 1872 in Marshal, Iowa.

viii.  Charles Paxson, b. 12 Jan. 1865 in Logan Co., Ohio; d. 12 Apr. 1950 at Martin, South Dakota; m. Mary "Molly" MODLIN on 14 June 1894 in Jewell Co., Kansas; had 5 children.

ix.   John Paxson, b. 16 Mar. 1867 in Michigan; d. 9 Dec. 1948 in York Co., Nebraska; m. 8 June 1890 Mattie HOCKETT; 6 children.

x.    Ella Paxson, b. 23 Feb. 1870 in Michigan; d. 17 July 1952 in Inman, Neb.; m(1) John RENNER; m(2) William Arthur "Art" Renner, brother of John.

xi.   Emma Paxson, b. 10 July 1875 in Marshall, Iowa; d. 24 June 1951 in Inman, Neb.; m. 29 Apr. 1896 George KIVETT in Douglas Co., Kansas.




William6 Paxson, son of #278 John5 (John4 #102, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and Anna (BRIEN) Paxson, was born 10 August 1830 in Ohio. He married on 14 April 1853 Ruth GREEN, in Chester Meeting house, Clinton County, Ohio. Ruth was the daughter of Robert and Mary, both deceased at the time of the wedding. William presented a certificate from Goshen Meeting to Center meeting on 13 Fourth Month 1853 stating his clearness to marry Ruth. The next month Center minuted that the marriage had been accomplished. On 13 Seventh Month Ruth was granted a certificate of removal to Goshen Monthly Meeting to join her husband there.[Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, 523, 544g.]

The family moved around within Ohio, with proper certificates of removal from their Orthodox monthly meetings. Ruth and her three first children were received by certificate from Goshen Monthly Meeting dated 21 First Month 1860 at Green Plain Meeting. Then on 14 Ninth Month she and her now four children were granted a certificate to Fairfield Meeting. It looks like William simply neglected to transfer his membership to Green Plain. William transferred from Goshen to Fairfield in 1864, joined by Ruth G. and four children from Green Plain Meeting. On 1 First Month 1866 William and Ruth with their first four children were granted a certificate of removal from Fairfield Monthly Meeting to the Orthodox Goshen Monthly Meeting. [Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1289; 5:270, 957, 963e.] In a not uncommon pattern they were following family members. Finally they removed to Bangor, Iowa, on a certificate for them and their now five children dated 18 December 1869.[Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1289. Data on this family is from Wayne Paxson's website on gencircle, 9/2003, except where Hinshaw is cited.]

Children of William and Ruth (Green) Paxson (names from certificates of removal):
i.     Mary Ellen Paxson, d. 7 Aug. 1907; m. Enos L. NILES (he was b. 27 Sept. 1847); m. 20 July 1887 Lavina CONGER; had 3 daughters: Myrtle Conger, b. May 1888; Violet Conger, b. 1892; and Pearl Conger, b. 1894.

ii.    Anna Elizabeth Paxson, b. 4 August 1856 in Ohio; d. 3 Jul. 1934 in Clay Co., Kansas; m. 4 Aug. 1878 in Clay Co., Albertus TOMLINSON (he was b. 29 Mar. 1856 in Grant Co., Wisc.).

iii.   Florence N. Paxson,

iv.   Thomas W. Paxson, b. 15 Apr. 1862, Hardin Co., Ohio

v.     Israel Paxson, b. 6 Jan. 1866, in Ohio; d. 9 Nov. 1931 in Jasper Co., Mo.; m(1) 6 Jan. 1900 Versa CASEBOLT, and had a daughter; m(2) 24 Feb. 1904 Laura STRONG; had 3 children.

vi.    Alvin Paxson, b. ca. 1868 in Iowa; m. Nellie JENSEN and had 2 children. Alvin is thought to have founded the town of Paxson in Alaska.




Asaph6 Paxson, son of #278 John5 (John4 #102, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and Anna (BRIEN) Paxson, was born 2 May 1833, and died 11 Eleventh Month 1901, aged 68 years, six months, and 9 days. Asaph married on 18 Fifth Month 1854 Margaret LUNDY, in Chester, Ohio. She was the daughter of Jesse and Abigail, both deceased, of Clinton County. Asaph presented a certificate from Goshen Meeting to Center meeting on 17 Fifth Month 1854 granting his clearness to marry Margaret. The next month Center Friends minuted that the marriage had been accomplished. On 12 Seventh Month "Margaret L. Paxton" was granted a certificate of removal to Goshen Monthly Meeting. [Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 5:523, 544h.]

The family were members of the Orthodox branch of Friends, Goshen Meeting, one mile east of Zanesville, in Logan County, Ohio. The Meeting granted a certificate 19 March 1870 to Asaph and Margaret and three sons, James Hamilton, Elias G., and Nelson W. to move to Center Monthly Meeting, three miles northwest of Wilmington in Clinton County. Then 17 Seventh Month 1870 Center Meeting granted a certificate of removal for Asaph and Margaret to Sabina Meeting. Margaret returned as a widow on 17 Fifth Month 1905.[Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1289; 5:523.]

In the 1880 census for Union Township, Clinton County, Ohio, "A. H." was enumerated as a 46 year old laborer while his wife Margaret was the same age and engaged in "housekeeping". Only their son Elias, 17, was living with them. He was attending school. [1880 federal census film # T9-1001, p. 157B, as transcribed on FamilySearch.org, and seen 1m/15/2008.]

Children of Asaph and Margaret (Lundy) Paxson: [as given in Goshen Meeting records, Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy 4:1288; 5:522.]

i. Elroy Paxson, b. 21/7m/1855; d. 9/2m/1856; bur. Westland.

ii. James Hamilton Paxson, b. 16/3m/1858 in Center Meeting records;

iii. Jesse Leonides Paxson, b. 8/11m/1860; d. 5/2m/1861; bur. Westland.

iv. Elias G. Paxson, b. 8/8m/1862 in Center Meeting records; m. Nora I.

v. Nelson W. Paxson [Newton W., b. 22/5m/1865 in Center Meeting records]

vi. Eldora A. Paxson, b. 19/5m/1873 in Center Meeting records;




Henry6 Paxson, son of #282 William5 (John4 #102, Reuben3 #32, William Jr.2 #16, James1 #3) and his wife Margaret Jenkins RICHARDSON, was born 1 December 1827. He married Mollie PRINCE and they had three children.

Henry may be the 54-year old plasterer, living in the 3rd ward, Kenton, Hardin County, Ohio at the time of the 1880 US census. He is listed with a 45 year old wife, Mary who was keeping house, and 27 year old son Elwood, a carriage trimmer and 22 year old daughter Jennie "at home". [1880 census, NA Film no. T9-1031, p. 234A, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.]

If this is the right Henry, these are the children of Henry and Mary "Mollie" (Prince) Paxson (from the 1880 census):

i. Elwood Paxson, b. ca. 1853
ii.
iii. Jennie Paxson, b. ca. 1858



Descendants of Henry3 Jr. and Elizabeth (Lupton) Paxson
Grandson of Mahlon and his wife Jane (Parry) Paxson


Howard H.6Paxson, son of #284 Asher5 (Mahlon4, Henry3, Jr. #43, Henry2 #18, James1) and his wife Martha (Harding) Paxson, was born 20 September 1810 in Solebury, and died there 17 March 1888. He married first on 24 March 1842 Elizabeth F. ELY, daughter of John Holcombe Ely and his wife Elizabeth (POWNALL) Ely of Solebury. The newspaper reported that it was a Quaker ceremony in Trenton before Mayor Charles Burroughs. [Marriage Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer.] Elizabeth was born 17 August 1817, and died in Solebury on 12 February 1847, aged 30 years. [Davis, , 3:1092. Death Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer.] Howard married a second time, 5 November 1862 to Mary P. ELY, the daughter of Mark and Rachel (HAMBLETON) Ely.

In 1871 Howard Paxson was listed as a farmer in Solebury Township. [1871 Bucks Co. Directory, p. 278.]

A Sixty-nine year old Howard appears as a laborer in New Hope, Bucks County, in the 1880 US census. He is shown living with his wife Mary P. [sic] age 56. Their 16 year old daughter Mary Ann [sic] is living with them. [1880 census, NA Film no. T9-1106, p. 454A, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.] This might be someone else altogether.

Children of Howard H. and Elizabeth (Ely) Paxson:

i.    Alfred Paxson, b. 30 June 1843; m. 1896 Mary Emma Todd WHITE; no issue.

ii.   Rose Ellen Paxson, twin, b. 3 Feb. 1847; d. 19 June 1847. [Death Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer, that called her Rose Eleanor.]

iii.  Martha Elizabeth Paxson, twin, b. 3 Feb. 1847; d. 31 Mar. 1895, unmarried. She was remembered in her uncle Hugh P. Paxson's will, pr. 4 Jan. 1894.

Children of Howard H. and his second wife Mary P. (Ely) Paxson:

iv.    Mary Anna Paxson, b. 18 June 1863; m. 16 Oct. 1884 Harvey WARNER;




Hugh P.6Paxson, son of #284 Asher5 (Mahlon4, Henry3, Jr. #43, Henry2 #18, James1) and his wife Martha (Harding) Paxson, was born 31 March 1813, and died 17 November 1893, of "old age" after a 3-month illness. He was a farmer, unmarried. Hugh was born, died, and buried in Solebury Township. [Register of Deaths, Bucks County Courthouse, Doylestown (seen 8/1987).]

Hugh Paxson was enumerated in the 1880 census as a 65 year old farmer in Solebury, living with his unmarried sister Sarah H. Paxson (age 69), and nephew Alfred Paxson (35, a farmer) and niece Martha E. Paxson (31, "at home"). All of them had been born in Pennsylvania of Pennsylvania parents. [NA Film Number T9-1107, p. 95C, as transcribed on familysearch, seen 7m/3/2005.]

Hugh wrote his will 27 May 1876 and it was proved 4 January 1894. He left a bequest to his nephew Alfred Paxson, who was named co-executor (with Benjamin S. RICH). He also remembered his nephew Joseph R. WILDMAN, and siblings Sarah H. PAXSON, Alice P. WILDMAN, and Howard H. Paxson; and niece Martha Elizabeth Paxson. [Thomas G. Myers, Bucks County Pennsylvania Will Abstracts, 1870-1900 (Westminster, Md.: Willow Bend Books, 2002), 427, citing Bucks Will Bk. 26, page 276, file #19156.]



Descendants of Henry3 Jr. and Elizabeth (Lupton) Paxson
Grandsons of Henry and Matilda (Kimble) Paxson

Henry Paxson6, son of #289 Joseph5 (Henry4 #106, Henry3 Jr. #43, Henry2 #18, James1#3) and his first wife Hannah (Harlan), was born in 1804. He was of Colerain Township in Lancaster County when he and Rachel JOB were married on 17 October 1827 in Eastland Meeting. Rachel was the daughter of Jacob and Letitia (COULSON) Job, members of Little Britain Meeting. [Information kindly sent to me 10/13/2005 by Jan Hall from her research in monthly meeting records at the Friends Historical Library, Swarthmore College. Marriage in http://www.pa-roots.com/~lancaster/church/little/littlebritmariages.html]

(Tentative) Children of Henry and Rachel (Job) Paxson, all born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania: [Information kindly sent to me 10/20/2005 by Jan Hall with the caveat that her research in monthly meeting records at the Friends Historical Library, Swarthmore College has not been completed in regard to Henry and his children.]

i.    Hannah Letitia Paxson, b. 5 May 1831; d. 4 April 1836;

ii.   Eliza Ann Paxson, b. 15 Mar 1834, married Isaac MASSEY 30 Sept. 1852; died 6 Nov. 1896.

iii.  Sarah Matilda Paxson, b. 28 Mar. 1837; d. 9 Mar. 1862;

iv.   Joseph Henry Paxson, b. 4 Mar. 1839; d. 9 Mar. 1855;

v.    Mary Louisa Paxson, b. 16 Apr. 1842; d. 27 Nov. 1890;

vi.   Letitia Paxson, b. 6 Nov. 1844 NFD

vii.  Alice Paxson, b. 1847;

vii.  Elwood Paxson, b. 18 June 1849; m. Jennie M. SWISHER (aka Mary Jane) 14 Mar. 1872. Presumably he is the 30-year old saddler enumerated in the 1880 federal census in Colerain, Lancaster Co., Pa., with his wife: Mary Jane, age 28 (b with parents in Penna); children: Bertha (7), Harry (5), Warren (4), Clara (2), John R (5 mo), all b in Pa., none in school.[NA Film Number T9-1144, p. 550D, as transcribed on familysearch, seen 7m/3/2005.]




Elwood Paxson6, son of #289 Joseph5 (Henry4, Henry3 Jr., Henry2, James1) and his second wife, Sarah (Walter) Dutton Paxson, was born in 1811, and died in 1858. He was married to Elizabeth M. WHITE on 25 July 1833 by James WILSON, Esq. She was the eldest daughter of Job White. Both bride and groom were from Little Britain, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. [Atkinson's Saturday Evening Post 13:631 (Aug. 31, 1833), p. 3.]



James W. Paxson6, son of #289 Joseph5 (Henry4, Henry3 Jr., Henry2, James1) and his second wife, Sarah (Walter) Dutton Paxson, was born in 1813, and died in 1851.



William Paxson6, son of #289 Joseph5 (Henry4, Henry3 Jr., Henry2, James1) and his second wife, Sarah (Walter) Dutton Paxson, was born in 1822, and died sometime after 1880.




Henry M. Paxson6, son of John5 #292 (Henry4 #106, Henry3 Jr. #43, Henry2 #18, James1 #3) and his wife Abigail (MERCER) Paxson, was born 7 September 1811. He died 17 August 1908 at Ocean Grove, New Jersey. His remains were buried at Friends' Burial Ground, West Chester, Penna. Henry and Jane PYLE were marrried 18 May 1837. Jane was born 4 December 1809, the daughter of Robert and Hannah (Clark) Pyle. She died 24 February 1875 and was also buried in the Friends' Burial Ground in West Chester.

Henry worked first in the "mercantile trade" in West Chester, then later as a "collecting agent" for the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad. In the 1895, 1896, and 1897 Gopsill's Philadelphia City Directory Henry M. is listed living at 2527 Continental Avenue. At other times they lived at 1112 Mount Vernon Street, Philadelphia, then moved to 2527 Aspen Street in Phila. [My thanks to Tom O'Connor, e mail 2/24/2008, for this information.]

Henry M. Paxson was enumerated in the 1880 census for Philadelphia as a 68 year old man employed as a "collector". Living with him were daughters Hannah, 42 years old, "keeping house"; Sarah J., two years younger, also keeping house; and Anna R., a 35-year old school teacher. The household had an African-American live-in servant, 25 year old Clara HAWKINS, born in Maryland of Maryland parents. [1880 census, NA film # T9-1175, page 504B, as transcribed on FamilySearch.org, seen 2/23/2008.

Around 1910 the three daughters kept a boarding house in the summer at Ocean City, New Jersey. In the winter they lived at their late parents' home at 2527 Aspen Street, Philadelphia. [Lewis Palmer, A genealogical record of the descendants of John and Mary Palmer of Concord, Chester (now Delaware) Co., Pa., 2 vols. (1910), as cited by Tom O'Connor, e mail 2/24/2008; I'm grateful for this information.]

Children of Henry M. and his wife, Jane (Pyle) Paxson:

i.     Hannah A. Paxson7, b. 16 Feb 1839; in 1890 living with her sister Rachel at 10 E. Barnard St., West Chester [Boyd's Chester County Directory, 1890-91 . . . (Washington, D.C.: W. Andrew Boyd, 1890), p. 93.]; unmarried as late as 1910;

ii.    Sarah J. Paxson, b. ca. 1840; not unmarried by 1910;

iii.   Henry Clay Paxson, b. 22 Jul 1842; d. 22 Apr. 1843.

iv.   Henry C. Paxson, b. 24 Feb 1844; d. 5 Oct. 1856.

v.    Anna Rachel Paxson, b. ca. 1845; in 1890 living with her sister Hannah at 10 E. Barnard St., West Chester [Boyd's Chester County Directory, 1890-91 . . . (Washington, D.C.: W. Andrew Boyd, 1890), p. 93.]; unmarried as of 1910;




John S. Paxson6, son of John5 #292 (Henry4 #106, Henry3 Jr. #43, Henry2 #18, James1 #3) and his wife Abigail (MERCER) Paxson, was born 27 March 1821, and died in 1891. He married Lavina JAMES on 16 October 1843. She was the daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Richardson) James, born in 1823 and died in 1906. [Bart Anderson, The Sharples-Sharpless Family (1966), as cited by Tom O'Connor, e mail 2/24/2008. My thanks to Tom for this information.]

In the 1850 census John S. and his family were enumerated in East Marlborough Township. In 1859 the family moved to West Chester, and was there for the 1860, 1870, and 1880 censuses. John's occupations were listed as merchant, retired grocer and provision dealer. He also owned a slaughterhouse. [My thanks to Tom O'Connor, e mails 2/23, 24/2008 for this data, as well as "Profile Piece On Sharpless M. Paxson", Daily Local News (West Chester: August 13, 1927), as excerpted in http://courses.wcupa.edu/jones/his480/notes/z-govt.htm, seen 2/2008.]

John S. Paxson served in the Civil War, in Co. A, 10th Pennsylvania Infantry Militia of 1862. He enrolled on 14 September 1862 at West Chester, and was discharged on 26 September 1862. His age was given as 40. [Pennsylvania State Archives (ARIAS) database, as cited by Tom O'Connor, e mail 2/24/2008. My thanks to Tom for this information.]

John S. Paxson appeared in the Chester County Business Directory for 1870-1871 at 59 East Market Street, West Chester, the address of his Paxson & Son, grocery. [Samuel Alexander, comp., Chester County, Pennsylvania, Business Directory, . . . (Albany, N.Y.: Andrew Boyd, 1870-1871), p. 79.] His son Sharpless was in business with him.

In 1890 he was employed as a clerk, living at 131 E. Magnolia St., in West Chester. [Boyd's Chester County Directory, 1890-91 . . . (Washington, D.C.: W. Andrew Boyd, 1890), p. 93.];

Children of John S. and Lavina (James) Paxson: [Gilbert Cope, Genealogy of the Sharpless Family: descended from John and Jane Sharples, settlers near Chester, Pennsylvania, 1682, as cited by Tom O'Connor, e mail 2/24/2008.

i.     Anna M. Paxson7, b. 28 Feb. 1845 in Westtown, Chester Co.; d. in West Chester 25 Aug. 1880; m. Nov. 1867 Jacob H. DARLINGTON, the only child of Joshua and Martha T. (Haines) Darlington, b. in West Goshen Twp. 16 Aug. 1843, and d. in West Chester 6 May 1884. Jacob was a farmer, later clerk in Prothonotary's Office, Chester Co. They had children: [John Wesley Haines, comp., Richard Haines and his Descendants: A Quaker Family of Burlington County, New Jersey since 1682 (1961) 2:55, citing Cope, Sharpless Family, 572; and Cope, Darlington Family, 247, 248.]
a) Llewellyn Darlington, d.y.
b) Arthur Darlington
c) Marion Darlington
ii.    Sharpless M. Paxson, b. 20 May 1846; d. 4? May 1930; m. Annie MAQUIRE; was in the grocery business with his father in West Chester.

iii.   Levis J. Paxson, b. 4 Nov. 1848; d. 23 Mar. 1864;

iv.   Harry L. Paxson, b. 26 Nov. 1854; d. 6 Jan. 1857.

v.    Sally J. Paxson, b. 15 Oct. 1860; d. 16 Mar. 1864.




John Milton Paxson, son of Isaac5 #297 (Henry4 #106, Henry3 Jr. #43, Henry2 #18, James1 #3) was born 1825; mar. (1) 1847 Nancy WARREN; mar. (2) 1860 Elizabeth BATTERY;




Isaac Harlan Paxson, son of Isaac5 #297 (Henry4 #106, Henry3 Jr. #43, Henry2 #18, James1 #3) and his wife Sarah (Harlan) Paxson, was born 15 October 1834 in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, the youngest of seven children. He married Ellen C. THOMAS on 27 October 1857. [Unless otherwise noted, the information on this family comes from Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana (Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1899), kindly sent to me by Tom O'Connor, e mail 2/25/2008.

When Isaac was an infant his family moved west to Richmond, Indiana, and his mother died there when he was less than a year old.

When he grew older Isaac learned his father's trade of butcher, by which he supported himself and his family. He married Ella or Ellen C. Thomas in 1857. From 1863 to 1868, and again from 1870 to 1872 they lived in Iowa. But they always returned to Richmond. There Isaac was known as "the proprietor of one of the neatest and best kept markets in the city, and has been longer engaged in this line of business than any other man here. He received the patronage of the leading families, hotels and restaurants, as he keeps the choicest cuts of meat and pays particular attention to the wants of his customers."

Like most of his family at that time Isaac identified himself as a Republican.

In the 1870 federal census for Ward 5, Richmond, he was enumerated as 35, Ellen 37, and children Iona 11, Willie 10, George 8, and Susan 3. They must have left for Iowa relatively soon thereafter.

Isaac was enumerated in the 1880 census in Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana as a 45-year old butcher, born in Pennsylvania, with his wife Ellen, 47 year old dress maker, born in Delaware. With them were their children Iona (21), William (20, a machinist), George (19) and Suzie (13). Suzie was born in Iowa, the rest in Indiana. [1880 census, NA Film # T9-0322, page 337B, as transcribed on FamilySearch.org, and seen 2/26/2008.]

Children of Isaac H. and Ellen C. (Thomas) Paxson:

i.     Iona M. Paxson7, b. ca. 1859;

ii.   William T. Paxson, b. ca. 1860; assisted his father in the meat market; described in 1899 as "a young man of considerable business ability";

iii.  George L. Paxson, b. ca. 1862; at the end of the century was employed as a "stenographer to the superintendent of the Logansport (Indiana) asylum";

iv.  Susan S. Paxson, called Suzie, b. ca. 1867; m. __ POLGLOSE, and resided in Chicago ca. 1899;




Henry and Mariah (Leader) Paxson, from Marvin Paxson, 7/2012

Henry Paxson6, son of Ely5 #302 (John4 #114, Henry Jr.3, Henry2, James1#3) and Ann/Nancy (BENNETT) Paxson, was born 7 October 1823 in Solebury Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and removed with his family to Findlay Township, Hancock County, Ohio in 1833. Henry married Mariah LEADER 18 April 1855 in Findlay. She was the daughter of Barnhard(t) Frederick and Mary (Van der Mark) Leader, born in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania 6 May 1833. A marriage license had been issued to them the day before, and the marriage between Henry "Paxton" and "Maria Leeder" was registered on the 19th. I. D. Oviatt, Minister of the Gospel, officiated. [A xerox copy was obtained from the County Clerk's Office in Findlay, March 1976; a typed transcript was included by Twila Jean Gunn in her mms "The Paxson Family", a copy of which was kindly given to me 7/2012 by Marvin Paxson.]

Sometime around 1880 Henry, Mariah, and their children removed via covered wagon from Findlay to Morgan County, Missouri, settling a half mile west of the village of Akinsville (it no longer exists). Then thirteen-year old daughter Letitia recalled years later how the children played tag behind the wagon when they were tired of riding. A twelfth child was born after their arrival in Missouri. [Gunn, "The Paxson Family", 14-15.]

The 1880 federal census enumerated Henry, age 56, Maria 48, and their children Lambert 22, Ellen 16, Letitia 14, Eliza 9, William 7 and Eli 5, living in Mill Creek, Morgan County, Missouri. Henry was listed as a farmer. [United States Census, 1880," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M6XY-C7K : accessed 27 July 2012.]

The photograph of Henry and Mariah was taken by P. F. Ross in Tipton, Mo., so presumably sometime after 1880. [My thanks to Marvin Paxson for the the photo, 7/2012.]

In addition to farming, Henry was a shoemaker and cabinetmaker as the need arose. Each year he made a pair of shoes for each child, while Nancy knit each one a new pair of woolen stockings and put new toes and heels into the old ones. [Gunn, "The Paxson Family", 15.

Henry and Mariah were members of the Akinsville Baptist Church, and after their deaths their remains were interred in the Akinsville Cemetery. For the last three years of her life Mariah had "failing health" and "suffered intensely". She died "of paralysis" 10 September 1905. [Obituary clipped from an unnamed newspaper, a copy of which is included in Gunn, "The Paxson Family", 14.]

Henry, described as an "old and highly respected citizen of north Morgan" died at his home 24 February 1906. Three sons and two daughters survived him. ["Death of Henry Paxton", obituary clipped from an unnamed newspaper, a copy of which is included in Gunn, "The Paxson Family", 14.]

Paxson brothers Lambert, Ely Morris, and William Henry Morris, from Marvin Paxson, 7/2012

Children of Henry and Mariah (Leader) Paxson, taken from the family Bible in the possession of Twila (Paxson) Gunn, granddaughter of Ely Morris Paxson. [Gunn, "The Paxson Family", 15-20.]

i. Penbrook7, b. 21 Oct. 1855; d. 11 Nov. 1864.

ii. Lambert, b. 31 Dec. 1857; returned to Ohio to m. Jennie SEARFOSS, 15 Nov. 1880; res. in Elwood, Ind. The three brothers, Lambert, Ely Morris, and William Henry Harrison are shown in the photograph. [My thanks to Marvin Paxson for the the photo, 7/2012.]

iii. Mary Jane, b. 12 Mar. 1860; d. 22 Apr. 1893; m. 25 Dec. 1879 in Findlay Charles E. KINNEY. They did not go to Missouri. [Hancock Co., Oh., Probate Court Rec. Vol. 7, p. 89, #260.] They had children:
a) Ollie M. Kinney, b. 6 July 1880
b) Myrtia Kinney, b. 26 Feb. 1884;
c) John M. Kinney, b. 24 Oct. 1889;
iv. Julia Ann, b. 10 Jan. 1862; m. in Mo. 11 Mar. 1880 Alexander THOMAS, who also came from Ohio; later they returned to Findlay, Ohio; had children:
a) Daisy Viola Thomas, b. 11 Dec. 1880 in Mo.; d. 7 Jan. 1972; m. in Ohio 20 Nov. 1907 James M. SHEPARD, M.D.; res. in Newton, Ohio
b) Grange Harvey Thomas, b. 10 Nov. 1882; d. 23 Apr. 1968; unmar.
v. Flora Ellen, b. 10 Nov. 1863; d. in the home of her son Lloyd in the late 1940s; m. 12 Dec. 1884 in Morgan Co., Mo. Cyrus Leven WILKINSON, from Bucks Co., Penna. via Hancock Co., Ohio; res. in Burlingame, then Wellington, Kansas. They had two sons:
a) Cloice Wilkinson, m. __ ; res. in California;
b) Lloyd Wilkinson, m. __; res. in Ottawa, Kansas;
The photo below shows four aged siblings: Orpha Paxson McDaniel, Ely Paxson, Will Paxson, and Flora Paxson Wilkinson. [My thanks to Marvin Paxson for the the photo, 7/2012.]

vi. Elysbeth M., b. 22 Aug. 1865; d. 19 Oct. 1865 in Findlay, Oh.

vii. Letitia or Lutishey, b. 2 Sept. 1866; d. 1 Aug. 1942 in Springfield, Greene Co., Mo.; m. 31 Mar. 1885 Sidney Lee HARRISON at Tipton, Moniteau Co., Mo., b. ca. 1867; Sid d. 22 July 1911 in Clinton, Mo; both are bur. in Englewood Cemetery, Clinton. In 1908 Sidney and Letitia rented a railroad car with her sister Orpha and her husband Robert McDANIEL and moved to Medicine Lodge, Kansas. Because of failing health, the Harrisons returned to Clinton. They had 6 children:
a) Goldie Clair Harrison, b. 3 Sept. 1887; d. 30 June 1969; m. 22 Dec. 1906 Frederick Louis DIEHL in Amarillo, Tx (he d. in 1946); both are bur. in Englewood Cemetery; had 2 children.
b) Grover Ormond Harrison, b. 4 Feb. 1889; d. 4 Nov. 1984; m. 4 Oct. 1911 Violet May WARD; had 4 children.
c) Sylvia Jennie Harrison, b. 6 Apr. 1890; d. 5 Jan. 1966; m. 10 Jan. 1912 Oscar William BLUMHOST in Clinton (he d. June 1966); both bur. in Englewood; 4 children.
d) Melva Leola Harrison, b. 26 Aug. 1891; d. 4 Dec. 1895; bur. Bethlehem Cemetery, Henry Co., Mo.
e) Lambert Elmo Harrison, b. 10 Feb. 1893 in Henry Co., Mo.; d. 27 May 1939 in Filer, Idaho; m. 27 Mar. 1921 Ruth MURDOCK in Colorado Springs, Colo.; 3 children.
f) Winifred Paxson Harrison, b. 12 Sept. 1907; m. 23 Oct. 1928 Arlie Ray BUTRICK in Springfield, Mo.; one daughter
Paxson siblings, Orpha Paxson McDaniel, Ely Morris, William Henry Morris, and Flora Paxson Wilkinson, from Marvin Paxson, 7/2012 viii. William Maris, b. 25 July 1869; d. 26 Aug. 1869.

ix. Orpha Elizabeth, b. 7 Sept. 1871; m. 22 July 1888 Robert Lee McDANIEL in Morgan Co., Mo. In 1908 they rented a railroad car with her sister Letitia and husband Sidney HARRISON and moved to Medicine Lodge, Kansas, where Orpha and Robert remained. They had 9 children:
a) Myrtle Pearl McDaniel, b. 11 Dec. 1890; s. 26 Jan. 1949; m. 11 Nov. 1911 Ray RUCKER;
b) Ola Tishey McDaniel, b. 27 Feb. 1892; d. 9 Sept. 1972; m. 27 Nov. 1918 Roy WILSON;
c) Ely Benton McDaniel, b. 26 Nov. 1893; d. 5 Apr. 1978 in LaCygne, KS; m. 3 Sept. 1919 Julia DONLEY;
d) Elmer Lee McDaniel, b. 11 May 1896; d. 5 Mar. 1968; m. Ruth HARRIS;
e) Maggie May McDaniel, b. 28 Feb. 1898; m. 3 Aug. 1919 Ervan Raymond DONLEY; in 1978 she was a widow res. in LaCygne, Kansas;
f) Wilber J. McDaniel, b. 6 Apr. 1900; d. 13 Feb. 1966; m. Rachel HARRIS;
g) John Henry McDaniel, b. 21 Feb. 1902; m. Helen EBERSOLE; res. in Girard, Kansas in 1978;
h) "Oma" Leila McDaniel, b. 28 Dec. 1905; m. Ray McKEEVER; in 1978 res. in Salem, Oregon;
i) Elva Elsea McDaniel, b. 1 Jan. 1908; d. 31 Jan. 1976 in Beaver, Ore.; m. Glenn COLE;
x. William Henry Harrison, b. 2 Apr. 1873; d. 8 Mar. 1966 at Tipton; m. 20 Dec. 1903 Letha Bell SNORGRASS; 4 sons.

xi. Ely Morris, b. 15 May 1875; d. in 1953; m. 30 Mar. 1902 Alpha IREY; 3 sons.

xii. Daisy, b. 11 June 1880 in Akinsville, Mo.; d. y. and probably bur. there without a tombstone.




Morris Paxson6, son of Ely5 #302 (John4 #114, Henry Jr.3 #43, Henry2 #18, James1 #3) and Nancy, was born 26 September 1825 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. He died in January 1893. Morris married in Findlay, Ohio, on 12 March 1846 Mariah SHIPMAN, also born in Pennsylvania.

Morris was about eight years old when he went with his family to Findlay, in Hancock County, Ohio. [Information on this family, unless otherwise cited, is from Twila Jean Gunn, typewritten mms "The Paxson Family", 9, a copy of which was kindly given to me 7/2012 by Marvin Paxson.]

In the 1850 census Morris Paxson was enumerated as a 24 year old blacksmith in Findley, with his 28 year old wife Maria, with their sons Eli (3) and Charles (1) both born in Ohio. Maria's 68 year old mother, Elizabeth SHIPMAN, was with them. [1850 federal census for Findley, Dist. 48, Hancock Co., Oh., rollM432_692, page 33A, line 42 and p. 33B, lines 1-4, taken Sept. 20, 1850.]

After the Civil War Morris, Mariah, and their four surviving children removed from Ohio to Greene County, Missouri, in about 1867. The 1880 federal census enumrated Morris "Paxton", a 55 year old blacksmith with his wife Mariah age 59, and their daughter Martha, age 20 in Springfield, Greene County. [United States Census, 1880," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M6X3-G3X : accessed 27 July 2012.]

The family is buried in Maple Park Cemetery, Springfield, Missouri.

Children of Morris and Mariah (Shipman) Paxson, all born in Ohio:


i.     Ely, b. ca. 1847; m. Belle __; was Greene County's first undertaker, serving in this capacity until his death in March 1926. In the 1880 census Ely and Belle, age 29, were living with Hannah REED, age 57, and her daughter Hattie S. Reed, 25, in Springfield. [United States Census, 1880, index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/M6X3-T4N, accessed 27 July 2012).]
ii.    Charles, b. ca. 1849;
iii.   Ellis
iv.   Martha, b. ca. 1858 in Ohio;
v.




William6, son of Ely5 #302 (John4 #114, Henry Jr.3 #43, Henry2 #18, James1 #3) and Ann/Nancy (BENNETT) Paxson, was born in 1828 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. He married in Findlay, Ohio, Elizabeth Ann LEADER. She was a sister of Mariah, the wife of Will's brother Henry. Will and his family remained in Ohio. [Information on this family is from Twila Jean Gunn, typewritten mms "The Paxson Family", 9, a copy of which was kindly given to me 7/2012 by Marvin Paxson.]

"William M. Paxon", age 51, and his wife "Elesabeth Paxon", age 52, were listed in the 1880 census in Marion, Hancock County, Ohio with their 24 year old son William B. Both men were farmers. [ U.S. 1880 census, NA Film no. T9-1021, p. 421D, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 27 July 2012.]

Children of William and Elizabeth Ann (Leader) Paxson:

i.     Phoebe Jane
ii.    Nancy
iii.   William Burley, b. ca. 1856; unmar. in 1880 farming with his parents in Ohio;




Bennett6 (1840- ), son of Ely5 #302 (John4 #114, Henry Jr.3 #43, Henry2 #18, James1 #3) and Bennett was married twice, first to Hannah HANNIBLE, and secondly to Emilie YOCUM. [Information on this family is from Twila Jean Gunn, typewritten mms "The Paxson Family", 10, a copy of which was kindly given to me 7/2012 by Marvin Paxson.]

In 1880 Bennett was 39, not married, living with his mother Nancy and son Firmin who was 18. Bennett was a teamster in Findlay. [ U.S. 1880 census, NA Film no. T9-1021, p. 585C, as indexed on familysearch.org, seen 27 July 2012.] This census would suggest that Firman was the son of Bennett's first wife, and that Bennett married for a second time after 1880.

Children of Bennett and his second wife(?), Emilie (Yocum) Paxson:

i.     Firman, b. ca. 1862 in Ohio, listed as an 18-year old laborer living in Findlay in the 1880 census;
ii.    Aaron
iii.   Amos



Descendants of Thomas3 Jr. and his first wife Sarah (Harvey) Paxson
Grandsons of Abraham and his wife Elizabeth (Brown) Paxson


Abraham Paxson
, son of #306 Elias Paxson, (Abraham4 Thomas3, Henry2, James1) and Catherine (Rice) Paxson, was born 17 July 1802, and died 29 May 1852 at the age of 49. [Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer.] He married on 15 March 1825 in Solebury Meeting Evelina WALTON, daughter of Jacob and Hannah (ARMITAGE) Walton. They were members of Solebury Meeting.

Children of Abraham and Evelina (Walton) Paxson:[Penna. Hist. Soc. microfilm Friends Mo. Mtgs, v. 2, 1680-1870.]
i.      Martha Paxson7, b. 18 June 1826; m. Elias P. HARTLEY;

ii.    Elizabeth Paxson, b. 10 Sept. 1828; d. 25 Oct. 1832.

iii.   Marietta Paxson, b. 29 Dec. 1830; d. 18 Sept. 1836.

iv.    Elias Paxson, b. 8 Apr.1833; m. 9 Feb. 1860 Mary Jane GOOD, daughter of Nathan, by Friends ceremony at the home of Nathan Good.

v.     Eliza Paxson, b. 4 Oct. 1835; in the 1880 census Eliza and Elvira were living with their brother Harvey S.; she and "Elvina" were living together in Solebury in 1894. [Bucks County Directory, 1894: containing the names of citizens . . . address, together with a general business directory, and appendix giving banks, churches, societies, etc. (Doylestown: James D. Scott, 1894), p. 360.]

vi.    Elvira Paxson, b. 25 Mar. 1838; in the 1880 census Elvira and Eliza were living with their brother Harvey S.; "Elvina" and Eliza were living together in Solebury in 1894. [Bucks County Directory, 1894: containing the names of citizens . . . address, together with a general business directory, and appendix giving banks, churches, societies, etc. (Doylestown: James D. Scott, 1894), p. 360.] Elvira, listed as Elmyra in 1900, and again in 1910 as Elvira, was living alone in Solebury. [1900 and 1910 census, Ancestry.com.] Elvira was listed as a lady in Solebury in 1902.[Bucks County Directory, 1902: containing the names of all men in the county over 21 years of age . . . all women who pay tax for money on interest. . . (Doylestown: Jospeh B. Steiner, 1902), p. 200x.]

vii.  Walter Paxson, b. 23 Nov. 1840; m. Susannah G. ENOCH; he may be the carpenter, with an address in the Lumberville P.O. in 1871. [1872 Bucks Co. Directory, p. 277.]

viii.  Thadeus Paxson, b. 8 Jan. 1843; d. 11 Jan. 1863 in the Union Army. He was not married.

ix.     J. Warren Paxson, b. 25 June 1845; d. 27 June 1905; m. 1879 Caroline "Carrie" R. BEANS.

x.      Harvey S. Paxson, b. 21 Mar. 1848; m. Lizzie MURFIT;




Howard Paxson

Howard6Paxson, son of #306 Elias5 (Abraham4, Thomas3,Henry2, James1), was born 30 September 1808, and died 5 April 1886. Howard was seven years old when his father died; he was 30 when he inherited part of his grandfather Abraham's farm. On 14 May 1835 he married at Solebury Meeting Mary SMALL, the daughter of the late Jonas [or Jonah] and Ann (WILSON) Small of Oxford Township, Philadelphia County. Mary was born 28 February 1815 and died 17 May 1896.

Howard Paxson tintype 1839Mary Small Paxson tintype 1839

Sometime in the 1980s a couple in Montpelier, Vermont attended a garage sale and purchased two framed tintypes. Eventually one by one the pictures fell and exposed the names and dates on the back of the images: Howard Paxson and Mary Small Paxson, both in 1839, four years after their marriage. I am very grateful to Andrea Warnke for sending me images of these two tintypes so that we can see Howard and Mary as a young married couple, parents (at the time) of two small children. [E mail May 2011.] One can only wonder how the tintypes got to Vermont.

By 1871 Howard was retired, living in New Hope Borough. [1872 Bucks Co. Directory, p. 194.]

In the 1880 US census for Solebury, Howard was listed as a 74 year old farmer living with his 67 year old wfe Mary S. who was keeping house. With them lived their son Oscar, 24 year old farmer, Mary's sister, 72 year old P. P. Small, and 12 year old Lewis Smith, servant. All births listed were in Pennsylvania.[familysearch census]

The Howard Paxson farm in  Solebury,

The homestead (pictured to the left ca. 1857) contained a two-story farmhouse with a rear wing where son Oscar lived after he grew up. In 1941 the farm was owned and operated by Sam Paxson. The farmhouse sits on a hillside about a mile above the Delaware at Lumberton. Grandchildren would come out to the homestead during the summer. Howard and Mary had a Golden Wedding celebration in 1885, the year before Howard died. After his death Mary lived for a while with her son Joseph A. on Oxford Street in Philadelphia.

Howard wrote his will 24 July 1879, with a codicil added 9 March 1886, giving his "beloved wife Mary" the use, occupation, and income of his plantation in Solebury, which was about 75 acres of the farm which had belonged to his grandfather. Howard excluded a small woodlot in which his grandfather had given a life interest to Cyrus LIVEZEY. Mary was to have all "moveable property" for two years, then whatever she did not want was to be sold, and she was to be paid $100. Arrangements were spelled out by which son Charles was to pay $200 to his sister Catherine. Youngest son Oscar would inherit the farm after Mary's death, provided he pay cash to various siblings, including $300 to Catherine. Howard bequeathed the 8-day clock to Wilson, his gold spectacles to daughter Emeline, one share of stock in Swarthmore College to grandson J. Horace Walter, and several other specific bequests.

Mary (Small) Paxson

Howard died in his 78th year on 6 Fourth Month 1886 at his home in Solebury. He was an elder in Solebury meeting. [Death notice in Friends Intelligencer, 43:17 (Apr. 24, 1886), 265.]

On her 68th birthday Mary had a big party with 60 guests. There is a small confusion over the date of her birth: 28 or 29 February, 1815. The latter being impossible as 1815 was not a leap year. Gifts included enough black alpaca to make a dress from her son Watson, and a new table cloth from Watson's wife Ruth.

Mary's will directed that the family Bible go to son Charles S., and all books were to be divided equally. Daughter Catherine was to get the "best bureau, Brussels carpet in Parlor (Brussels step carpet) and carpet in little room (Ingram)". To Catherine and her sister Emeline went all "the linen, bed blankets, bed quilts, menth [sic] ornaments and little funny articles to share and share alike".

Children of Howard and Mary (Small) Paxson:

i.      Charles S. Paxson7, b. 8 Mar. 1836; m. 12 Mar. 1863 Sarah B. MICHENER; 1 son: J. Howard.

ii.     Emeline Paxson, b. 19 June 1838 or 1839; m. 4 Mar. 1869 William H. WALTER; 2 sons: J. Horace Walter and Elliott P. Walter.

iii.    Watson F. Paxson, b. 18 Aug. 1840; m. 28 Sept. 1869 Ruth SHAW; 2 daughters, Margaret S. and Mary Scarborough, who wrote Her Book.

iv.     Joseph Armitage Paxson, b. 11 Dec. 1842; d. 5 Apr. 1888; m. 13 Feb. 1873 Ada FELL; 3 children: Emma Fell, the historian Frederic Logan, and Grace.

v.       Eugene Paxson, b. 8 Jan. 1845; m. 23 Nov. 1869 Martha LIVEZEY; 8 children: Samuel L., Elizabeth C., M. Anna, Ruth (d.y.), Watson (d.y.), Edward M., and W.Henry ("Harry"), and Emeline (d. before 1887).

vi.     Wilson S. Paxson, b. 14 Mar. 1847; m. 1 Nov. 1871 Jennie HALL; 3 children: George S., R.Ella, and Watson.

vii.     Elliott Paxson, b. 11 May 1850; d. 1928; m. Mary HAINES; no children.

viii.   Catherine Paxson ("Kate"), b.24 June 1853; d. 22 Feb. 1912; m. 30 Apr. 1874 William Rodman PAXSON. Three children: Charles S., Marion, and Anna.

ix.     Oscar Howard Paxson, b. 16 Apr. 1858; d. 20 Sept. 1935; m. 22 Nov. 1881 Laura BUSBY; 4 children: Joseph A., Catherine, William W., and Herbert.



Descendants of Thomas3 Jr. and his first wife Sarah (Harvey) Paxson
Grandsons of Aaron and Letitia (Knowles) Paxson


Amos C. Paxson, son of #316 Eliada5 Paxson, Jr., (Aaron4 #116, Thomas3, Henry2, James1) was born 17 September 1805 in Solebury, and died there 20 March 1888. His body was buried at Solebury Meeting. Amos was married twice. His first wife was Rachel ELY, married 9 April 1826 by Samuel Atkinson, Esq. She was the daughter of Mark and Hannah (JOHNSON) Ely. [Dorothy Marty Reibold, The Life of Matthias Harvye and Family (Baltimore,, Md.: Gateway Press, Inc. 1998), 396.] They had nine children. Rachel died in Solebury on 30 June 1857, aged 49 years. [Death Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer.] Amos married secondly on 30 April 1860 in Trenton Rebekah SMEDLEY, daughter of Eli and Elizabeth (HAMBLETON) of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. According to the newspaper account, the wedding took place in Trenton by Quaker ceremony before Mayor Franklin S. Mills. [Marriage Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer.] Rebekah was born 13 December 1822. Her maternal grandmother was Elizabeth Paxson, wife of James Hambleton.

Amos and Rebekah settled on Amos's farm in Solebury, and they were enumerated there in the 1860 federal census. Amos C. was a 53 year old farmer owning real estate worth $10,000 and personal estate of $1,000. Rebecca, his (second) wife, was 37, and Beulah, his daughter by his first wife, was 27. They also housed Absalom WORMAN, age 15, born in Pennsylvania. [1860 Federal Census for Solebury Twp., Bucks Co., Penna., p. 40; taken 20 June 1860. My thanks to Jim Flack for sending me this, e mail, 12/12/2007.]

The snapshot of the household captured by the 1870 census noted Amos, now 64, a retired farmer with real estate valued at $12,500 and personal estate of $8,125. "Rachel" [sic] S. was 47, with her own personal estate of $2,300. Amos's daughters by his first wife, Beulah (38) and Carrie C. (28) were both school teachers. Rachel's daughters were Elizabeth (6) and Dora (4). [1870 Federal Census for Solebury Twp., Bucks Co., Penna., p. 30; taken 17 Aug. 1870. My thanks to Jim Flack for sending me this, e mail, 12/12/2007.]

The family appeared again, in the 1880 census, but with some slight shading of Rebekah's age—a not uncommon finding in the census. He is listed as Amos B, 74 years old, retired farmer. His wife is listed as Rebecca S., still keeping house at age 55. Their two daughters living at home are Elizabeth age 16 and Dora age 14. The only non-Pennsylvania birth listed was Amos's mother, born in New Jersey.[familysearch census, Enum. Dist. 165, p. 28.]

Amos C. Paxson died in Solebury on 20 Third Month 1888, in his 83rd year. [Friends Intelligencer 45:31 (Mar. 31 1888), 200.] He wrote his will 3 June 1871 and it was proved 5 April 1888. He made bequests to his wife Rebecca S., and the children of his first wife: Hannah WORTHINGTON, Leetitia [sic] WEST, Beulah PAXSON, Mary Ellen UPDYKE, Lewis C., Martha CONRAD, and Caroline Paxson. He also remembered Bella SMITH, child of daughter Sarah Ann SMITH. The executors were his sons Moses and Lewis. The witnesses to both the will and a codicil dated 25 August 1884 were George A. COOK and Charles PHILLIPS. The codicil noted that Amos's daughter Caroline was now married, and named PRICE. [Thomas G. Myers, Bucks County Pennsylvania Will Abstracts, 1870-1900 (Westminster, Md.: Willow Bend Books, 2002), 297, citing Bucks Will Bk. 23, page 504, file #17268.]

After Amos's death the family moved to Morrisville in Bucks County, and six years later to Philadelphia, living at 1951 N. 31st Street. [Gilbert Cope, comp., Genealogy of the Smedley Family Descended from George and Sarah Smedley . . . (Lancaster, Pa.: Wickersham Printing Co., 1901), 438; Gopsill's Philadelphia City Directory, 1895, 1896, and 1897 editions.] Rebecca Smedley Paxson died in 1908 and was buried in the Little Britain Meeting Burial Grounds in Fulton Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. [http://www.rootsweb.com/~paslchs/pennhillcem2.html.]

The children of Amos C. and Rachell (Ely) Paxson: [from Wayne Paxson's website, http://www.gencircles.com/users/paxlincoln/1/data/1381]

i. Hannah Paxson, twin, b. 14 June 1826; m. Andrew C. WORTHINGTON;

ii. Letitia Paxson, twin, b. 14 June, 1826; m. 21 Jan. 1852 William A. WEST of Buckingham in Philadelphia by Quaker ceremony before Mayor Charles Gilpin. [Marriage Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer.]

iii. Moses Paxson, b. 20 July 1830; d. 21 Apr. 1905; m(1) 17 Feb. 1853 Mary CROASDALE; m(2) Addie Elizabeth BETTSON; 2 children with each wife; co-executor of his father's will; res. Makefield.

iv. Beulah Paxson, 26 Dec. 1832; unmarried when her father wrote his will.

v. Sarah Ann Paxson, twin, b. 9 Aug. 1834; m. Horace SMITH: presumably d. before her father wrote his will, as she is not mentioned in it, although her daughter Bella SMITH was named instead.

vi. Mary Ellen Paxson, twin, b. 9 Aug. 1834; m. ca. 9 Aug. 1855 Charles M. UPDYKE (he was b. ca. 1830 in New Jersey); Charles was a miller in Mercer Co., NJ until the 1870s when the family removed to Solebury, Bucks Co., Penna.; in 1860 17-year old Henry Paxson was listed as a miller living with the Updykes. In 1860 at age 24 Charles was a miller and farmer, with personal estate valued at $2,185. A decade later he was living in Trenton, with only $100. Mary Ellen and Charles had six children:[my thanks to Jim Flack, e mail 12m/4/2007, for bringing this to my attention. See his Flack Genealogy that provides data from the 1860, 1870, and 1880 federal censuses.]
a) Augusta M. Updyke, b. 19 May 1856 in NJ;
b) Lewis Updyke, b. ca. 1858 in NJ;
c) Amos Updyke, b. Nov, 1859 in NJ;
d) Annabel Updyke, b. ca. 1866 in Mercer Co., NJ;
e) Minnie Updyke, b. ca. 1869 in Mercer Co., NJ
f) Flora Updyke, b. ca. 1873 in Penna.
vii. Lewis C. Paxson, b. 25 Oct. 1836; co-executor of his father's will;.

viii. Martha Paxson, b. 23 Apr. 1838; m. Robert CONARD. He was b. 19 July 1825, the son of Abraham Conard (1798) and Euphemia FLACK (1802); Euphemia was the daughter of Joseph Flack (1739) and Euphemia STEVENS (b. ca. 1760?). [I am indebted to Jim Flack, e mail 11m/9/2007, for bringing this to my attention. For more information on the Flack Genealogy, see the webpage of Jim Flack, Carol Temlin, and Rich Flack, which summarizes the census data. Children of Martha and Robert:
a) Anna R. "Annie" CONARD, b. Aug 1862; d. after 1920; m. William HELLYER (b. May 1865 in Plumstead, Bucks Co.;
b) Caroline "Carrie" Paxson CONARD, b. 12 Dec. 1872; d. after 1930; m. Edward KINSEY (b. 12 Apr. 1871);

ix. Caroline Paxson, called "Carrie", b. 6 Jan. 1842; m. before 25/8/1884 R. P. PRICE when her father made a codicil to his will mentioning her changed name;

The children of Amos C. and Rebekah (Smedley) Paxson:

x. Elizabeth Smedley Paxson, b. 16 Dec. 1863 in Bucks Co.; d. 1948; unmarried; telegraph operator, lived with her mother; buried in the Little Britain Meeting Burial Grounds with her mother.

xi. Dora Paxson, b. 3 Feb. 1866, m. 10 Oct. 1894 Joseph Edward FABIAN, son of James L., ex Rep. of Bucks Co. After mar. they settled in Phila., living with her mother. Not members of any religious society; no children. Dora taught school; was a member of the Women's Auxiliary of Bucks Co., connected with the World's Fair.[Cope, Genealogy of the Smedley Family, 438-39.]




Aaron Phillips Paxson, son of Aaron Jr.5 #317, (Aaron4, Thomas3, Henry2, James1) was born 26 September 1813, and died 4 May 1862. He married Sarah Ann PICKERING on 2 February 1843. She was the daughter of George and Hannah Pickering of the Northern Liberties. The marriage took place at her father's house by Friends ceremony. [Marriage Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer.]. Sarah Ann died 4 March 1856, age 34, in Newark, Illinois, leaving a husband and six children.[Death Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer.]

Aaron sold his half of his father's farm in 1847 to his brother-in-law Simeon P. Hampton, and removed first to Cecil County, Maryland, and then to Kendall Co., Ill., where he had a grocery store. Aaron was a soldier in the Union army during the Civil War.

Children of Aaron P. and Sarah Ann (Pickering) Paxson [from Wayne Paxson's website, http://www.gencircles.com/users/paxlincoln/1/data/1381]

i. Elizabeth Paxson, b. 25 Dec. 1843; d. 21 Dec. 1867; m. 30 Nov. 1863 Richard P. DINGEE; 1 child, Charles Dingee, b. 29 July 1864 at Newportville, Bucks Co., Pa.

ii. George P. Paxson, b. 1845; m. Louisa Boileau and had 3 children: James B. (b. 20 May, 1872); George (b. 20 Jun 1874); and Richard F. (b. 15 Jan. 1876).

iii. Louisa Paxson, b. 15 Dec. 1849;

iv. Ella Paxson, b. 14 Aug. 1852;

v. Alva Cecil Paxson, b. 1 July 1854; m. Frances D. MATHEWS; had 3 daughters: Ella N. Mathews (b. 18 Dec. 1878); Agnes H. Mathews (b. 4 Sept. 1881); Mary A. Mathews (b. 26 June 1891).

vi. William Paxson, b. 18 Feb. 1856;




Ezra Paxson, son of Aaron P.5 #317, (Aaron4 #116, Thomas3 #45, Henry2 #18, James1 #3) and his wife Elizabeth (Phillips) was born 28 February 1820, and died 30 April 1855 in Kansas City, Missouri. He married in 1849 Jane W. EASTBURN, the daughter of Bezaleel Eastburn. The Marriage Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer described the wedding as a Quaker ceremony at Watson's Barley Sheaf Hotel in Philadelphia, before Alderman J. Mitchell. She was born 4 November 1828 and died 1 June 1856[?]. They lived in New Hope.

Ezra (or perhaps it was his brother Aaron) sold the part of the Pike Tract that he inherited from his father, to his brother-in-law Simeon Hampton, in 1847. [Dorothy Marty Reibold, The Life of Matthias Harvye and Family (Baltimore,, Md.: Gateway Press, Inc. 1998), 398.]

Ezra's obituary, "recently of Bucks County" died in Kansas City on 29 April 1847, aged about 35 years. [Bucks County Intelligencer.]

After Ezra's death, widowed Jane W. moved to the residence of Samuel ATKINSON, Jr. in Upper Makefield. She died there 1 May 1856., aged 28. [Bucks County Intelligencer.]

Children of Ezra and Jane W. (Eastburn) Paxson:

i. Zooanna or Zoeanna, b. 28 Jan. 1850; m. 8 Sept. 1870 Almarine BRIGGS in Wrightstown Meeting. They had at least one daughter, Jennie BRIGGS. Zoeanna was remembered in her aunt Mary Paxson's will, pr. 12/1899.

ii. Mary Paxson, b. 18 Feb. 1851; m. 16 Nov. 1870 Joseph SMITH; had at least two children: George SMITH (b. 11 Jan. 1873) and Edith W. SMITH (b. 9 Sept. 1881). Mary was remembered in her aunt Mary Paxson's will, pr. 12/1899.

iii. Rebecca Paxson, b. 1853; d. 1853.

iv. William H. Seward Paxson, b. 18 Feb. 1855; unmarried as of 1903; executor of his Aunt Mary Paxson's will.




William Wallace Paxson, son of #318 John K.5 (Aaron4, Thomas3, Henry2, James1) and Achsah DENNIS, was born 11 May 1829 in Solebury. On 17 January 1855 he was married to Mary BRITTAIN by the Rev. Dr. STUDDIFORD. Mary was the daughter of John C. and Sarah (QUINN) Brittain of Holland, New Jersey.

William purchased lot #10 of the Pike Tract in Solebury from his father. [Dorothy Marty Reibold, The Life of Matthias Harvye and Family (Baltimore, Md.: Gateway Press, Inc. 1998), 399.]

William W. Paxson was appointed post master of Point Pleasant Post Office in Bucks County on February 2, 1861. [USPSA web site, http://webpmt.usps.gov/pmt005.cfm, seen 1m/17/2010.] As post masters were political appointments, and Abraham Lincoln had not yet been inaugurated, presumably William was acceptable to the previous administration.

The 1880 federal census enumerator listed "W.W. Paxson" as a 51-year old farmer in Solebury, Bucks County, living with his 44 year old wife, born in New Jersey of Jerseyite parents. Their two younger daughters lived with them, Sallie B. (22), and Lizzie (13, at school). They also had Hiram SMITH, a 23-year old farm laborer, born in Penna. of Pennsylvania parents. [1880 census, NA Film no. T9-1107, p. 92B, as transcribed on familysearch.org, seen 5 July 2005.]

In 1894 W. Wallace Paxson was listed as a farmer in New Hope. [Bucks County Directory, 1894: containing the names of citizens . . . address, together with a general business directory, and appendix giving banks, churches, societies, etc. (Doylestown: James D. Scott, 1894), p. 360.] However, by 1902 he was listed as a "gent." of New Hope, perhaps because he had retired. He owned real estate. [Bucks County Directory, 1902: containing the names of all men in the county over 21 years of age . . . all women who pay tax for money on interest. . . (Doylestown: Jospeh B. Steiner, 1902), p. 200x.]

Children of William Wallace and Mary (Brittain) Paxson (may be incomplete): [from the 1880 census, and Wayne Paxson's website, http://www.gencircles.com/users/paxlincoln/1/data/1381]

i.    Achsah Paxson7, b. ca. 1856; m. William HURLY;

ii.   Sallie B. Paxson, b. in New Jersey ca. 1858;

iii.  Lizzie Paxson, b. in Pennsylvania, ca. 1867;




John Lambrt Paxson, photo from Tom Paxson, Jan. 2012

John Lambert Paxson, son of #318 John K.5 Paxson (Aaron4, Thomas3, Henry2, James1) and Achsah DENNIS, was born 29 March 1833, and died in 1929 in Osceola County, Florida. In 1872 he married Jennie Celina MANN. This photo of John is courtesy of Tom Paxson.

John enlisted as a private in Company K, 1st Regiment Iowa Cavalry Volunteers on 13 August 1861. He was promoted Quarter Master Sergeant in October, served for a while as Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, and was mustered out 17 August 1864 at the expiration of his term. He was described as five feet six and a quarter inches tall, dark complexion, blue eyes, dark hair, and his occupation when he enrolled was lumberman. Later John joined the GAR and in 1908 the Alabama Society of the Sons of American Revolution. [Document from the Iowa Adjutant-General's Office, his discharge paper dated 26 June 1864 at Little Rock, Ark., as well as documents from the GAR and Sons of the Am. Rev., as posted by Tom Paxson on his "Paxson Family Tree" at http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/34437606/person/18641176981/media/2?pgnum=1&pg=32814&pgpl=pid%7cpgNum Tom has posted additional military documents for John there, as well.]

After the war, in 1872 John married Jennie C. MANN, twenty years his junior. She had been born in Alabama 7 January 1853. Her father was also born in Alabama, although her mother had been born in New York. The couple lived in Mobile Co., Alabama for a while; their first son was born in 1874 in Alabama.

Eight years later, in 1880, the census taker found them in Solebury, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, where "John L." was a 47-year old laborer, Jennie was 27, keeping house, and presumably caring for their six-year old son, Edward E. [NA Film Number T9-1107, p. 91D, as transcribed on familysearch, seen 7m/4/2005.]

In 1880 John L., of New Hope, patented "an improved register adapted especially to the tallying of lumber, but applicable also to indicating the speed of machinery, or for adding a column of figures, or for measuring distances, etc." It is frustrating that this brief description holds no clue what it looked like or how it worked. [Scientific American Vol 43, no. 3 (July 17, 1880), p. 38.]

In the 1910 federal census John, age 75, and Jane C., age 56, were enumerated in Red Store, Mobile, Alabama. Their 28 year old unmarried son Lambert T. Paxson lived with them. [1910 US Federal Census, Precinct 21 Red Store, Mobile County, Enumeration Dist. 76, Sheet 2B, lines 74-76. Roll T624_26.

On 12 January 1920 the census once more provides a snapshot of John and Jennie. This time they were living in Turlock City, Stanislaus County, California. They owned their own home. John gave his age as 86 and Jennie as 66. Neither had an occupation. [Fourteenth Census of the US, 1920, California, Enumeration Dist. #188, Sheet No. 11 B, lines 74-75. Roll T625_152.]

John died in January 1929 in St. Cloud, Florida. Jennie received a receipt from Grissom Funeral Home in Florida for $200 for the funeral held Jan. 24, plus $15 for a quarter cemetery lot and $5 for opening the grave. Jennie applied for a widow's pension 29 December 1929 in the state of Alabama. [Several documents relating to jennie's pension application have been posted by Tom Paxson on his "Paxson Family Tree" at http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/34437606/person/18641176981/media/7?pgnum=1&pg=32814&pgpl=pid%7cpgNum Tom has posted additional military documents for John there, as well.]

Children of John L. and Jennie (Mann) Paxson (may be incomplete):

i.    Edward Eugene Paxson7, b. 23 Nov. 1874 in Mobile Co., Ala.; d. 4 Jan. 1955 in Stockton, San Joaquin Co., Calif.; m. 14 June 1899 Zota Hesteltina LLOYD (1876-1975); had 5 children.

ii.   Lambert Thomas Paxson, b. 4 Sept. 1882 in Mississippi; d. Mar. 1960 in St. Petersburg, Fla.; in 1910 census he was a bookkeeper in a jewelry company, unmarried, living with his parents in Red Store, Mobile Co., Ala.




Stephen S. Paxson, son of #319 Charles Paxson5 Paxson (Moses4, Thomas3, Henry2, James1) and his wife Ann Smith



 
Unidentified Paxsons

Finally there are these Paxson roots that are disconnected from the main tree.
Is there a reader who can help find where they should be attached?



Amos Paxson was enumerated in the 1880 census living in Roberts, Marshall Co., Illinois. He was 37 in June, 1880, so born ca. 1843. His wife Sarah A. Paxson was 30, born in Mass. Their three sons were born in Ill.: Clarence P. 10; William T., 7, and an infant not yet named. With them lived Amos's brother Thomas Paxson, age 26, born in Ohio. [1880 US Federal Census, p. 358A, nara film no. T9-0235, as seen on FamilySearch, 1/3/2013.] Can anyone tell me the names of the parents of Amos and Thomas?




James William Paxson was born in Ohio on 14 December 1866, but I have not yet discovered the names of his parents. Is there a descendant who can help? He died at his home in Wilson, Oklahoma, of a heart attack on 6 February 1938. He married __. She died after several years of ill health on the last Wednesday in January 1945, at 2:30 p.m.

Information comes from several obits, kindly sent to me by Anna Heath: the Wilson [Okla.] Post Democrat, 2/10/1938 and 2/2/1950; and The Healdton Herald, 2/1/1945.

For many years the family lived at the Pure Oil camp west of Healdton. When James retired, they moved to Wilson.

Children of James William Paxson and his wife:

i. Chester Bertram Paxson, b. 11 Sept. 1890 in Wapakoneta, Ohio; d. 26 Jan. 1950 at Fairfield, Ill. with the funeral in Wilson at the Biptist Church, conducted by the Rev. J. P. Dane; buried in Hewitt cemetery; m. Esther or Ester; as a child moved with his family to Okla.; he moved from Electra, Texas to Wilson, Okla. ca. 1920; survived by 5 children: James (of Okla. City), Maxine (Paxson) Lansford (of Wilson- had 3 children), Betty (Paxson) Wilkinson (of Tulsa- had 2 children), LaWana (Paxson) Burns (of Okla. City) and Joyce Paxson (of Wilson)

ii. daughter
iii. daughter




John S. Paxson, was born in Hunterdon County, New Jersey 4 June 1827, but so far the names of his parents remain a mystery to me. He died 26 June 1895 in Columbus Junction, Louisa County, Iowa, and was buried the same day in lot 30, Columbus City cemetery, Louisa County. [lot 30 WPA records 1930. The information on John S. Paxson and his descendants has been kindly sent to me by Carol Berry, e mails 1 and 3 July 2005, and 4 Dec. 2006. The sources cited are those she has given to me with the data.] John married Eliza Harriett UTT, perhaps in Union Township, Pennsylvania. Eliza was born 20 June 1828 in Bangor, Northampton County, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Elias and Elizabeth (BUTZ) Utt. Eliza died 8 January 1921 in Columbus Junction, Iowa, and was buried in Columbus City, Iowa. [Civil War pension records state date of Eliza's birth was 2 Sept. 1848 in Northampton Co., Penna., which is incorrect; this may have been their wedding date; also obit. from Betty Duncan, of Burlington, to Carol.]

By 1856 the family had moved to Louisa County, in Iowa. The Utt family came with them to Iowa. Louisa County is next to Jefferson County, where other Paxsons, such as John Townsend Paxson and his brother Joel Cheshire Paxson settled. The relationship between these two branches is not yet known to me.

Children of John S. and Eliza Harriett (Utt) Paxson:

i. Rebecca Ellen Paxson, b. 1 Nov. 1852 in Penna.; d. 15 Dec. 1887 in Columbus City, Iowa, and bur. there; m. Henry V. SMITH (b. 24 July 1843 in England; d. 3 Feb. 1920 in Columbus Junction); had a daughter: Lillie Smith (b. 15 May 1873 in Louisa Co., Iowa; d. 8 Feb. 1947 in Muscatine, Muscatine Co., Iowa; bur. 11 Feb., 1947 Greenwood cem., Muscatine; m. Louis M. WORLEY; 3 children). [Record A, Page 349, Muscatine, Iowa courthouse (Carol found it on 8-11-1999).]

ii. Robert James Paxson, b. 1859 in Elm Grove Twp., Louisa Co., Iowa; d: 1925; m. 15 Oct. 1883 Anna B. PIERSON at Wapello, Iowa; 4 children.

iii. John Franklin Paxson, b. 7 July 1862 in Cairo, Oakland Twp., Iowa; d. 3 June 1924 in Columbus Junction, Louisa Co.; m. 2 Nov. 1880 Maryland 'Mollie' Alice FLEAGLE (b. 14 July 1861 in Jefferson Twp., Henry Co, Ia., the daughter of Jacob H. and Ann Rebecca HAIFLEY-HAIFFEYGH-HAIFLY) Fleagle/Fleegel; d. 23 Feb. 1943); 5 children.

iv. Hannah Paxson, b. 1868; d. 1873 Columbus City, Iowa.

v. Minnie Matilda Paxson, b. 10 Feb. 1869 in Spring Run, Elm Grove Twp., Louisa Co.; d. 17 Dec. 1899 Columbus Junction, Louisa Co. [the Wapello Tribune, 22 Dec. 1899 page 8, says Min died previous Sunday]; bur. 19 Dec. 1899 Columbus City. [cem lot 30 WPA records 1930]

vi. unnamed male infant




Louis S. Paxson died in Lambertville on 18 November 1857, aged 43 years and 8 days. [Death Notice in the Bucks County Intelligencer.]




Louis Paxton was boarding at 89 Jackson in Trenton, employed as a clerk, in 1881. [Trenton City Directory 1881, as transcribed on the web at trentonhistory.org/Directories/1881dirNZ.htm, seen 8/28/2009.]




Ruben Paxson (Reuben?) was 54 years old in Harmony, Warren Co., NJ, when enumerated in the 1880 census. He was b. ca. 1826 in New Jersey, as were his wife and son. The former was Catharine Paxson, age 47. The latter was John I. Paxson, age 27, single, a plasterer. [1880 US Federal Census, p. 409 C, nara film no. T9-0799, as seen on FamilySearch, 1/3/2013.] Can anyone tell me the names of Ruben/Reuben's parents? Is he the son of John and Nancy (Stout) Paxson?




Samuel Paxson, 38 years old in June 1880 (b. ca. 1842) when he and his family were enumerated in the federal census in Odenweiler, Northampton Co., Pa. He and his wife Eliza M., age 35, were both born in New Jersey. Their five children, however, were all born in Pennsylavnia. [1880 US Federal Census, p. 223D, nara film no. T9-1163, as seen on FamilySearch, 1/3/2013.] Can anyone tell me the names of Samuel's parents?

i. Ida M., age 14 in 1880 census;
ii. Lillie B., age 10 in 1880 census;
iii. William H., age 8 in 1880 census;
iv. Harry I., age 5 in 1880 census;
v. Ruth J., age 4 in 1880 census.



Thomas Paxson was born about 1830, probably in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. At least he was "of Bucks County" when he married in Trenton. A Mercer County, New Jersey marriage record for 24 September 1856 lists "Thomas Paxton, 26 yrs. old, of Bucks Co., Pa. and Catherine PERDON, 19 yrs. old, of Ewing, N.J." [My thanks to Nancy for sending me all the information on this man and his family, e mail 4/18/2007.]

The 1860 federal census for the 2nd Ward of Trenton, Mercer Co., N.J. enumerated "Thomas Packerson" a 43 year old laborer, his wife "Kate Packerson", 25 years, and two children: Charles Packerson, 3 yrs. and Mary F. Packerson, 2/12 mos.

There is a Civil War record showing a Thomas Paxson, part of Co. K of the 5th Reg. N.J. Infantry.

On 3 July 1863, Catherine married in Trenton to Jonathan READING on 3 July 1863. After the marriage of their mother to Jonathan Reading, Charles and Joseph Paxon used the Reading surname.

Children of Thomas and Catherine (Perdon) Paxson: (spelling from records)

i. Charles Paxon b. 1857/58 in Trenton, Mercer Co. No birth record found. His great grandson is alive and well and wondering where Charles fits on to the larger Paxson tree.

ii. Mary Frances Paxon b. 11 May 1860 Trenton, Mercer Co., N.J. , daughter of Thomas, laborer; died 22 May 1861 in Trenton, N.J.

iii. Joseph Packson born 14 April 1862 Trenton, N.J.



Paxton is he one of ours?
The Lafayette Courier tells the following story of a desperate "lovyer" in a little town in Montgomery county: "A young man named Paxton, having received the 'mitten' from a young lady at Darlington, in Montgomery county, to whom he had been paying his 'distresses,' met her at church on last Sabbath, and drawing a revolver, snapped it three times in a vain attempt to shoot her. A gentleman came to the rescue of the lady, and Paxton leveled the revolver at him, but fortunately it again missed fire. He was immediately disarmed, and was yesterday arrested and taken to Crawfordsville, where he was lodged in jail. Strange to say, the pistol was recapped, and every barrel which had before missed fire was discharged on the spot." [Harper's Weekly, Volume: 1858, Issue: 08/21, Page 535a, at the very end of a column labelled "PERSONAL."





Habitat for Humanity work day in Cleveland This page is obviously still under construction.


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This page was updated most recently on 11m/21/2013.















  



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