Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   
arrow arrow arrow
Matthew Marvin
(1626-1712)
Mary Beckwith
(-Cir 1709)
James Beers
(Cir 1656-1691)
Osborn
John Marvin
(1678-1774)
Mary Beers
(Cir 1685-1720)
Captain David Marvin
(1711-Cir 1778)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
Hannah Gregory

Captain David Marvin 1 2 3

  • Born: 24 Aug 1711, Norwalk, Fairfield Co., Connecticut
  • Marriage: Hannah Gregory in 1732 in Norwalk, Fairfield Co., Connecticut 1
  • Died: Cir 1778, Sunbury, Northumberland Co., Pennsylvania at age 67 4

bullet   Cause of his death was smallpox.5

picture

bullet  General Notes:

After he was married, David settled in New Canaan (an adjoining town to Norwalk), Fairfield Co., Connecticut. By 1752, he was in Goshen Twp., Orange Co., New York with his wife and children.

David had gained the title of "Captain" by service in the militia of either Connecticut or New York.

In the summer of 1762, he and his family accompanied the first body of settlers to the Wyoming Valley in Pennsylvania, sent there by the Connecticut Susquehanna Company. The French and Indian War was nearly over. The next year, he was admitted to membership in the Company.

In October, 1763, Delaware Indians attacked the settlers, killing thirty and causing the others, including David Marvin, to flee. This was called the Pontiac War (1763-1764). The Connecticut settlers, including David accompanied by his sons Uriah and Samuel, returned to the Wyoming Valley in the spring of 1769.

Captain Marvin, and his sons Uriah and Matthew, were members of the 100-man expedition commanded by Captain Zebulon Butler which in August, 1771, marched to Wilkes-Barre and captured Fort Wyoming from the Pennsylvania militia (known as Pennamites). This was one of several skirmishes between the Connecticut and Pennsylvania settlers attempting to drive each other from the valley. This conflict was known as the Yankee-Pennamite War.

Once the Revolutionary War began in 1776, much of the militia of the Wyoming Valley was called upon to serve in the Continental Army. In the summer of 1778, while the soldiers of the valley were away, Pennsylvania British loyalist troops lead by Col. John Butler (Butler's Rangers) and their Iroquois (primarily Seneca) allies attacked the Valley. The Connecticut settlers generally rendezvoused at Forty Fort, a short distance above Wilkes-Barre.

On the 3rd of July, some 375 soldiers and civilians marched out of Forty Fort lead by Col. Zebulon Butler who was on leave from the Continental Army. The two forces met with disastrous results for the Wyoming settlers. Reports from those who survived indicate that few men were killed in the actual battle. The battle lasted for only about 45 minutes, but the following massacre lasted for some 12 hours. There were only 174 who escaped with their lives. Almost all who were captured were cruelly tortured and killed by the Indians. The Indians claimed that they took 225 scalps.

After the battle, about 1,000 homes and all of the forts in the area were burned. Most of the settlers fled the valley in fear. Countless men women and children suffered in the flight after the massacre.

Capt. David Marvin and his wife escaped the massacre. They (and perhaps other members of their family) went down the Susquehanna River to Sunbury, Pennsylvania where they died of smallpox. 1 5 6 7 8 9

bullet  Research Notes:

A history of Wilkes-Barré, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania
By Oscar Jewell Harvey, Ernest Gray Smith

DAVID MARVIN was born about 1710 at Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut, the son of John Marvin. Matthew Marvin, Sr., was one of the earliest settlers at Hartford, Connecticut, where he was an original proprietor in 1635. His eldest son was Matthew, Jr., born about 1627, who married in Hartford and removed to Norwalk, where he died in 1712. John Marvin, born September 2, 1678, third son of Matthew, Jr., was a representative in the General Assembly of Connecticut in 1734 and 1738. In 1752 he removed from Norwalk to Sharon, Connecticut, where he died February 9, 1774. He was twice married-(1st) to Mary Beers of Fairfield, and (2d) to Rachel, daughter of Matthias St. John-and had seven children by each wife. David, mentioned above, was one of these children.

David Marvin was married about 1738, and settled in New Canaan (an adjoining town to Norwalk), Fairfield County, Connecticut. A number of years later he removed with his wife and children to Goshen Orange County, New York. He was one of the body of New Englanders who in 1762 and '63 attempted to establish a settlement at Mill Creek (see page 404, Vol. I), and was there at the time of the massacre in October, 1763. Prior to 1762 he had gained the title of "Captain" by service in the militia of either Connecticut or New York. Accompanied by his sons Uriah and Samuel he returned to Wyoming with the body of settlers led by Major Durkee in the Spring of 1769, and they continued here during the Summer of that year. (See pages 498 and 510.) Captain Marvin and his sons Uriah and Matthew were members of the expedition commanded by Captain Butler which in July, 1771, marched to Wilkes-Barre and besieged and captured Fort Wyoming (see pages 691 and 694); and the original receipts of David and Uriah Marvin, given for the "bounty ' of five dollars (see page 710) paid to each of them for their services on that occasion, are now in the possession of The Wyoming Historical and Geological Society. Captain Marvin settled in Plymouth Township, where he died in 1778, prior to June. He was the father of the following-named children:

(i) Matthew Marvin, who died prior to April 8, 1782, when Timothy Hopkins of Plymouth was appointed administrator of his estate.

(ii) David Marvin. He was baptized at Ridgefield, Fairfield County, Connecticut, August 5, 1739. He was married to Sarah ______. He was a member of the 24th Regiment, Connecticut Militia, and his name appears in the list of the men of that regiment in service under Colonel Butler at Wyoming in the Autumn of 1778. (See Chapter XVI.) David Marvin died before April, 1782, being survived by his wife and the following-named children: David, Nathan (who in 1800 was living in Orange County, New York) and Isaiah (who died prior to March, 1801. leaving a son Ira, a youth under age).

(iii) Isaiah Marvin. He was baptized at Ridgefield, Fairfield County, Connecticut, May 29, 1737. He left Wyoming after the battle of July 3. 1778, and never returned to the valley again. He was dead in 1801.

(iv) Sarah Marvin, who became the wife of Amariah Cleveland, and, with her husband, removed from Wyoming prior to July, 1778.

(v) Hannah Marvin. She was living in 1790, unmarried.

(vi) Ruah Marvin. She was baptized at Ridgefield, Connecticut, June 4, 1738. She became the wife of _______ Allison, or Ellison, and in 1800 was living at Goshen, New York.

(vii) Mary Marvin. She was baptized at New Canaan, Connecticut, November 16, 1735, and was, undoubtedly, the eldest child of Captain Marvin. She was living in 1790, unmarried.

(viii) Samuel Marvin. He settled in Plymouth Township, and, according to testimony produced before the Compromise Commissioners (see page 25, Vol. I), left Wyoming "immediately after the Indian battle [July 3, 1778] and returned in about three years, when he took out letters of administration on the estate of his father." In 1800-'02 Samuel Marvin was living in Northmoreland, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania.

(ix) Either Marvin. She was married (1st) about 1770 to _______ Taylor, to whom she bore one child - Ebenezer Taylor (born about 1773). After the death of her husband Mrs. Esther (Marvin) Taylor became the wife of Ephraim McKay, or McCoy, of Plymouth, to whom she bore a daughter, Sarah, who. prior to March, 1797, became the wife of James Marvin. Mrs. Esther (Marvin) McKay died before 1801. Ephraim McCoy was a member of the 24th Regiment, Connecticut Militia, and his name appears in the muster-roll of the detachment commanded by Colonel Butler at Wyoming in the Autumn of 1778. (See Chapter XVI.) He was wounded while in the military service, and became a pensioner. He was one of the earliest settlers within the bounds of the present township of Dallas, and several references are made to him in the history of Dallas printed in the "Proceedings and Collections of The Wyoming Historical and Geological Society." VI: 146, &c.

(x) Uriah Marvin, born in Connecticut about 1742, and married at Plymouth, Pennsylvania, in 1774 to Phebe (born February 18. 1759), daughter of James and Phebe (Harrison) Nesbitt of Plymouth. Uriah Marvin died at Wilkes-Barre in 1779. For further references to him and his family see "The Harvey Book," page 296, et seq.

(xii) Daniel Marvin, who died prior to January, 1794, leaving several children.

_________________________________________________________________________

Capt. David Marvin's son, David Marvin, said about July, 1778; "our whole settlement was burnt and destroyed we then left the fort and descended the River about Sixty miles to Sunbury where my Father and Mother both took the small pox and died".

__________________________________________________________________________

Capt David Marvin, Samuel Marvin, Uriah Marvin, David Marvin, Jr., Matthew Marvin, and Seth Marvin were mentioned frequently in the papers of the Susquehanna Settlement. Daniel Marvin was infrequently mentioned.

Seth was born in Lyme, New London Co., Connecticut, July 12, 1783, was the eldest child of Capt. Matthew and Mary (Beckwith) Marvin. 4


picture

David married Hannah Gregory, daughter of Matthew Gregory and Hannah Keeler, in 1732 in Norwalk, Fairfield Co., Connecticut.1 (Hannah Gregory was born circa 1713 in Norwalk, Fairfield Co., Connecticut and died circa 1778 in Sunbury, Northumberland Co., Pennsylvania.) The cause of her death was smallpox.5


picture

Sources


1 George Franklin Marvin & William Theophilus Rogers Marvin, Descendants of Reinold and Matthew Marvin of Hartford, Ct., 1638 and 1635, sons of Edward Marvin, of Great Bentley, England (T. R. Marvin and Son
Boston, 1904
<http://books.google.com/books?id=Gc81AAAAMAAJ>), <http://books.google.com/books?id=Gc81AAAAMAAJ&pg=PA337>.

2 12,000+ Descendants of Thomas Marvin b1450 England (<http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=SHOW&db=leericmarvin&surname=Mervyn%2C+Thomas+Merveyn>
LeEric Marvin <leeric@ak.net>), <http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=leericmarvin&id=I231>.

3 Sylvester S. Marvin, A portion of the war record of the Marvin family, 1775-1921 (privately printed, 1921
<http://www.archive.org/details/portionofwarreco00marv>), <http://www.archive.org/stream/portionofwarreco00marv#page/16>.

4 Oscar Jewell Harvey, Ernest Gray Smith, A history of Wilkes-Barré, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania (Raeder Press
Wilkes-Barré
1909
<http://books.google.com/books?id=rEYVAAAAYAAJ>), <http://books.google.com/books?id=rEYVAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA763>.

5 Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files (<http://www.footnote.com/browse.php#10936943>

This collection is taken from NARA microfilm publication M804, which includes an estimated 80,000 pension and bounty-land warrant application files based on the participation of American military, naval, and marine officers and enlisted men in the Revolutionary War. The files are part of Record Group 15, Records of the Veterans Administration.), <http://www.footnote.com/image/23507394/#23507391>.

6 Some Early History of Wilkes-Barre (<http://www.pagenweb.org/~luzerne/patk/wb.htm>).

7 4th Connecticut Militia Regiment, Military History (<http://www.24cmr.org/mil_history.html>).

8 Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page), <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lazarus_Stewart>.

9 Luzerne County PAGenWeb (<http://www.pagenweb.org/~luzerne/>), <http://www.pagenweb.org/~luzerne/patk/wyoming.html>.


Table of Contents | Surnames | Name List

This Web Site was Created 12 Jan 2013 with Legacy 7.5 from Millennia