Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

Experience's Children

Capps Military Stories


Thanks to Marie Jeffries Capps for the Woody/Capps materials

John Woody and the Battle of New Orleans

John Woody enlisted in Capt. John Porter's company in September/October 1813 at the age of 18. He re-enlisted as a 3rd Lieutenant in Capt. John Doke's company of the 2nd Tennessee Mounted Gunman, commanded by Colonel Thomas Williamson, on the 28th of September 1814.

Woody's company went to Fort Montgomery, Alabama, Fort. Stephens and Pensacola before being ordered to the vicinity of New Orleans. John described his unit arriving at the mouth of Sandy Creek on the Mississippi. This unit was forced to cross waist deep swamps repeatedly during the 24 day battle.

These men were described by Alexander Walker in his book Jackson at New Orleans (New York, 1856): "They wore woolen hunting shirts, of dark or dingy color and copperas-dyed pantaloons, made both cloth garments at home by wives, mothers and sisters, with slouching wool hats, some of skins of raccoons and foxes. They had belts of untanned deerskin in which were stuck hunting knives and tomahawks. Their hair was long and unkempt and their faces unshaven."

As the battle has been described, when the British would approach the Tennessee line the marksmen would be standing four deep. One rank would fire and then drop down to one knee to reload as the next fired and another reloaded, creating a continual fire.

The battle lasted from 14 December 1814 to 8 January 1815. The battle began with a British naval attack on New Orleans and land battles continued on the 23rd and 28th of December and again on the 8th of January 1815. The battle ended with the British withdrawl following a loss of 4000 men either killed or wounded. The Americans had 65 men killed and another 268 wounded.

John Woody stayed at New Orleans at least until 1 March 1815 where his name appears on roll of officers. He was discharged at Fayetteville, Tennessee on 27 April 1815, and paid $120 for his seven months of service. He was also paid $84.80 for using his own horse. On 10 July 1815, he was paid an additional $84.80 subsustance pay. In order to be paid for transportation of his baggage to New Orleans, Woody filed an affidavit dated 10 July 1817, at Lincoln County, Tennessee. He claimed 300 pounds of baggage transported 1845 miles to and from Pensacola and New Orleans at 6 cents per mile, totalling $110.70.

Source: Exerpted from Logan, Roger W., Jr. "John Woody, Veteran, Battle of New Orleans," The Boone County [Arkansas] Historian, Vol. 4 #4, 1981, pg. 75-79.

Horton Cox's Civil War Tale

While Mr. Cox was on furlough during the Civil War, he and two soldiers from his unit were walking through the country and noticed that they were being followed by Confederate soldiers. They tried to hide in a nearby house but the soldiers were too close and so they ran on up to another house. They were going to hide there but a negro slave told them "No, a confederate soldier was killed not too far from here and this place is hot." While trying to escape, they managed to shoot one of the Confederate soldiers through the shoulder and off of his horse. They then made their way into the mountains and freedom for a time. Mr. Cox remembers sleeping under a tree looking up at the stars that night.

Source: This narration was taken from Mr. Carl N. Hayes' book, Neighbor against Neighbor, Brother against Brother: Tennessee in the Civil War, exerpted by Renaee Marotte

Timothy G. Sivils, 1st Tennessee Light Artillery Co. B

Rank: Pvt
Age: 19
Enlisted: Aug 20 63
Mustered: Mar 14 64
Remarks: Must out June 20 65

1st Tennessee Light Artillery Battalion, U.S.A.

Also called 1st Tennessee Light Artillery Regiment
Also called 1st East Tennessee Battery


Organized November 1, 1863; mustered out at Nashville, July and August, 1865.
Field Officers:
Lieutenant Colonels-Robert Clay Craw-ford, Albert F. Beach.
Majors-Henry W. Wells, Joseph Grigsby.
Company "B"

Captains: Robert Clay Crawford, William 0. Beebe, Co. "B". Mustered in at Lexington, Kentucky, April 16, 1863, as an independent company called. 1st East Tennessee Battery. Men from Fentress County. Mustered out at Nashville, July 20, 1865.

This company was raised by Captain R. C. Crawford at Lexington, Kentucky, composed of refugees from East Tennessee, and was mustered into service April 16, 1863. It moved to Nicholasville, Kentucky, for drill and instruction where, on May 14, it reported 121 effectives. Later in May it moved to Camp Nelson, Kentucky, on July 19, 1863 to Somerset, Kentucky, and was attached to Brigadier General S. P. Carter's Division. On July 29, Colonel W. P. Sanders, 5th Kentucky Cavalry, in command of all mounted troops near Lexington, Kentucky, with orders to drive the Confederates (under Colonel Scott) from the state, listed Crawford's Tennessee Battery as part of his force.

On August 31, the battery was listed in Brigadier General James M. Shackelford's Brigade and was engaged at London, Tennessee, on September 2, 1863. It then moved to Cumberland Gap, and took part in the siege of that place resulting in its surrender on September 9, 1863. It then moved to Knoxville, and remained in East Tennessee for the balance of the war. On October 15, it was at Jonesboro, with Colonel W. A. Hoskins' Brigade, and moved to Cumberland Gap November 18, 1863. On December 31, Lieutenant James A. Childress was reported in command; on January 31, 1864, Lieutenant Isaac P. Knight was in command; on April 30, Captain William O. Beebe; on May 31, Lieutenant David M. Nelson; on August 31, Lieutenant Isaac P. Knight; on September 30, Lieutenant Peter J. Doremas; on October 31, Captain William O. Beebe; on December 31, Lieutenant William G. Bewley; on February 28, 1865, Captain William O. Beebe; on March 31; Captain Beebe. During all this time it was at Cumberland Gap, and was still reported there on April 30, 1865. It remained in East Tennessee until June 26, 1865, when it was ordered to Nashville, to be mustered out of service.

Company "B"
Also called 1st East Tennessee Battery

This company was raised by Captain R. C. Crawford at Lexington, Kentucky, composed of refugees from East Tennessee, and was mustered into service April 16, 1863. It moved to Nicholasville, Kentucky, for drill and instruction where, on May 14, it reported 121 effectives. Later in May it moved to Camp Nelson, Kentucky, on July 19, 1863 to Somerset, Kentucky, and was attached to Brigadier General S. P. Carter's Division. On July 29, Colonel W. P. Sanders, 5th Kentucky Cavalry, in command of all mounted troops near Lexington, Kentucky, with orders to drive the Confederates (under Colonel Scott) from the state, listed Crawford's Tennessee Battery as part of his force.

On August 31, the battery was listed in Brigadier General James M. Shackelford's Brigade and was engaged at London, Tennessee, on September 2, 1863. It then moved to Cumberland Gap, and took part in the siege of that place resulting in its surrender on September 9, 1863. It then moved to Knoxville, and remained in East Tennessee for the balance of the war. On October 15, it was at Jonesboro, with Colonel W. A. Hoskins' Brigade, and moved to Cumberland Gap November 18, 1863. On December 31, Lieutenant James A. Childress was reported in command; on January 31, 1864, Lieutenant Isaac P. Knight was in command; on April 30,

Captain William O. Beebe; on May 31, Lieutenant David M. Nelson; on August 31, Lieutenant Isaac P. Knight; on September 30, Lieutenant Peter J. Doremas; on October 31, Captain William O. Beebe; on December 31, Lieutenant William G. Bewley; on February 28, 1865, Captain William O. Beebe; on March 31; Captain Beebe.

During all this time it was at Cumberland Gap, and was still reported there on April 30, 1865. It remained in East Tennessee until June 26, 1865, when it was ordered to Nashville, to be mustered out of service.

Source: http://www.tngenweb.org/civilwar/usaart/usa1art.html

Stories:

Capps family:

Infos:

Copyright © 1999-2005 T.K. Painter, All Rights Reserved