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Robert SAXBY (bef1807-1886)

picture

Mary Ann Reeves

Robert SAXBY1 was born before 30 December 1807 in Battle, Sussex.1,2,3 He was baptised on 30 December 1807 in Battle.1,3 Robert's parents were Edward SAXBY (b. c.1766 Battle,Sussex; d. 15 Aug 1832 at Battle, Sussex) and Martha BARHAM (b. c.1776 Mountfield, Sussex; d. 16 Mar 1853 at Battle, Sussex) who married 10 March 1789 at Battle, Sussex. Martha is claimed to be a descendant of Sibyl de Falaise, the illegitimate daughter of King Henry I.1,2,3,4

In 1827 Robert resided in St Leonards, in England. Robert was resident here at the time of his marriage.1,3 He married Mary Ann REEVES on 4 December 1827 in Hollington, Sussex. Their marriage was by Banns. Mary was a spinster and Robert was a bachelor.1,3 In 1841 he was a follower of the protestant faith . The denomination is not known.

he migrated from Plymouth, Devonshire to Sydney, NSW arriving on 31 May 1841. He travelled to Australia with his wife and five children Harriett, Thomas, Elizabeth, Edward and Susannah on the "Moffatt" which departed 12 February 1841 and during which the vessel is said to have "touched at no port". According to the shipping records, Robert was one of the "Teachers, Overseers and Hospitals Assistants" and was "perfectly deserving of his gratuity".

A common comment found by researcher Philip Pawley at the Lewes Record Office in 2006 was "Sydney seems to have been a favourite place for the emigrants to be sent; on 3rd December 1841 at Battle, the Vestry decided to send James King and his family and also Robert Saxby and his family to Sydney 'to which place they are anxious to Emigrate".1,3,5 At the time of his migration, he was described as unable to read or write.1

In June 1841 Robert was a farm labourer . He was brought out by Nicholas James and Co., agriculturists of Sydney.3

he died in January 1886 at the Upper Hunter in Salisbury, NSW. The cause was paralysis.3 He was buried in January 1886 in the Upper Hunter in Salisbury. Their farm passed down to Fred Saxby who owned it until 2001 when he sold it.3

 

The Saxbys along with the Rumble family were reportedly the first two families in the Upper Hunter, Salisbury, NSW area.1

 

Mary Ann REEVES1 and Robert SAXBY had the following children:

 

Harriett Susanna SAXBY (1828-1903)

Thomas William SAXBY (1830-1907)

Elizabeth SAXBY (1834-1863)

Edward SAXBY (1836-1917)

Susannah SAXBY (1839-1898)

John SAXBY (1841-1931)

Robert SAXBY (1843-1926)

Ann SAXBY (1846-1927)

Martha SAXBY (1848-1917)

Henry SAXBY (1850-1906)

Citations

1{S0187}, Internet (Cawthorn) re SAXBY (R Cawthorn : Site : http: //www.roncawthorn.com/8031(no longer valid).htm). Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
2{S0199}, Internet : General. http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/a/g/Barbara-Saggus-NSW/PDFBOOK1.pdf. Cit. Date: 18 August 2010. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
3{S0331}, Internet (WCP) General. The Beney-Miller, & extended families, Tree : http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=beney-miller&id=I356. Cit. Date: 3 August 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
4{S0217}, Mailing List (Genforum) : SAXBY/BARHAM (Genforum : http://www.genealogyboard.com/cgi-bin/print.cgi?saxby::21.html). Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
5{S0217}, Mailing List (Genforum) : SAXBY/BARHAM (Genforum : http://www.genealogyboard.com/cgi-bin/print.cgi?saxby::21.html). Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: "PS - I found the following extract from the records when I was at the Lewes Records Office recently:
'Sydney seems to have been a favourite place for the emigrants to be sent; on 3rd December 1841 at Battle the Vestry decided to send James King and his family and also Robert Saxby and his family to Sydney "to which place they are anxious to Emigrate". This phrase and others like it occur time and time again; in each case the parish concerned makes it quite clear that the emigrants are being sent at their own request to these foreign places and unknown chances.'"

Compiler of this family history is : John Owen

              

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Thanks for looking
Ellen & John

Updated : 23 Mar 2014