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Stephen PARTRIDGE (1793-1878)

Stephen PARTRIDGE,1 son of Thomas PARTRIDGE (1770-1832) and Jane OSMOND (1770?- ), was born in January 1793 in Hermitage, Dorset.1,2,3 He was baptised on 30 June 1793 at St. Bartholomew's Parish Church in Crewkerne, Somerset.4,5,6,7 His relationship to John is Paternal Great (x3) Grandfather.

Before June 1811 Stephen was a carpenter .8

he served in the military on 6 June 1811 in the British Army in the 1st/46th (South Devonshire) Regiment of Foot . He enlisted at Tiverton, Devon. Over the next two years he served in Kingsbridge, Plymouth, Jersey (The Channel Isles where for three months he served in a recruiting role) and the Isle of Wight. In 1812 he joined the main body of the Regiment and in 1813 he was stationed on board the ship "General Hewitt" prior to it leaving England for Australia. In November 1811 he was promoted to the rank of Lance-Corporal and he held that rank when he arrived in Australia and then on 4 July 1814 he was promoted to Corporal. On 24 September 1817 he transferred to the 1st/48th Foot (the Northamptonshire Regiment) initially with a loss of rank but he quickly regained it. The 46th was moved to India but it seems he wanted to stay in Australia possibly as his wife Sarah was pregnant with their first child. He was discharged on 3 July 1818. He had been lured by an offer of a Colonial appointment (as Overseer of the lumber yard) if he would resign from the Army which he was entitled to do as he had served the required seven years.9,10,11,12,13,14,15 On 6 June 1811 he was described as 5' 6½" in height when he enlisted . Six years later he was recorded as 5' 8" tall; fresh complexion; grey eyes; light hair with a round 'visage'. Clearly he was literate and documents in his handwriting show a well developed copperplate style.11 He married Sarah COOK on 19 August 1811 in Brixham, Devon. The marriage was shortlived as Sarah died later that same year. He was granted an eight-day furlough in November probably for bereavement which was a privilege rarely extended to the lower ranks.1

Stephen and Sarah Cook didn't have any children.16

Stephen migrated from England to Sydney, NSW arriving on 7 February 1814. He arrived in Australia as a non-commissioned officer in the 46th Regiment as part of the military detail attached to the transport, "General Hewitt".1,17 His skill as a carpenter along with an entrepreneurial spirit allowed him to supplement his Army pay and made his superiors take notice of him, such that records show him receiving payments for 'repairing carts damaged during Government expeditions by Military Detachment in search of absconding prisoners' and also for 'extensive work on Sydney Hospital'.18

Stephen married Sarah WILLIAMS on 2 September 1816 at St Phillip's Church of England in Sydney.1,11,13,19

Between 1817 and 1818 Stephen was an explorer . After arriving in Australia, while still a member of the 46th Regiment, "he accompanied John Oxley on some of his explorations. In 1817 Governor Macquarie authorised Oxley to follow the Lachlan River. He surveyed and mapped the river. He discovered good grazing land west of Bathurst. When swamps blocked his way, Oxley led the explorers north and returned to Bathurst following the Macquarie River". (Oxley was the Surveyor-General of NSW and one of the early explorers of New South Wales).

"In 1818 Stephen joined Oxley who led another expedition to trace the course of the Macquarie River. As before on the Lachlan River, they were blocked by swamps and marshes. Stephen went as far as the Wellington Valley, returning to Bathurst on 3 July 1818. Oxley led his men north-east and explored the Castlereagh River and the fertile lands of the Liverpool Plains. Travelling east, the explorers crossed the Great Dividing Range, discovered the Hastings River and followed it to its mouth on the coast. Oxley named the coastal area Port Macquarie, after the Governor and then returned to Sydney"

His obituary claimed he was in charge of rations for both trips.8,20,21,22 He was commended for his trustworthiness in connection with John Oxley's expedition to the Macquarie River. The commendation gave his rank as Corporal. On 3 Jun 1818 a payment of £5 was paid to him and also John Tighe for "Services in the Interior" and this payment was published in "The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser" of Saturday 15 Aug 1818.17,23,24 On 5 September 1818 Stephen was an Overseer of His Majesty's lumber yards, sawyers and carpenters in Sydney. Regular Police Funds payments to Stephen are noted in Governor Macquarie's diary and also in "The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser" much of it for work at Sydney Hospital. He held this position for just over two and a half years.8,18,25

On 21 April 1821 Stephen was a Superintendant of Convicts and Public Works in Port Macquarie, NSW. The trip to the new penal settlement had taken a month as it had commenced on 21 March 1821, when the schooner "Prince Regent", the Brig "Lady Nelson" and the Cutter "Mermaid" (which have been called Port Macquarie's First Fleet), left Sydney to establish it. There was an advance party of 102 men, commanded by Captain Allman. Second in command of this party was Lieutenant William Earle Bulwer Wilson, who was engineer to the settlement. The party included Dr Fenton, surgeon; Mr Stephen Partridge, Superintendent of Convicts; fifty convict labourers; nine mechanics; three carpenters; two sawyers; the blacksmith; tailor; and two shoemakers. The convicts chosen were to prepare and build the settlement for the convicts to follow.

After experiencing rough seas, hoving to in Trial Bay overnight and having difficulty crossing the bar, they landed at Port Macquarie on 21 April 1821. Stephen is recorded as arriving with his wife (Sarah) and two children (Thomas and Jane). His salary on appointment in 1821 was 'quarters and rations' plus £50 per year. According to the Sydney Gazette, by January 1823 this salary had increased to £62.10s.0d (a 25% increase).

The book "Place of Banishment" tells that "By the end of October the convicts had erected weatherboard buildings and huts capable of housing 400 prisoners and soldiers; built the Commandant's house, barracks for Stephen Partridge and the Chief Constable, a provision store, granary and a guard house. The Commandant's residence had a verandah and out-offices, the soldiers' barracks and that of Mr Partridge had kitchen gardens attached and a wooden pallisade enclosed the Store and Granary."

Similiarly from the Norfolk Island internet site "In the following seven months he was able to report the construction of a residence for the Commandant, Captain Allman; four weatherboard barracks to house the Military personnel and officials attached to the settlement; large huts to accommodate three hundred convicts; a provision store; a granary and a guardhouse."

"Saturday, 3 November [1821] ..... The troops of the 48th Regiment were drawn up under arms on the beach, with Captain Allman waiting at the landing place. The convicts, with Superintendent Partridge at their head, were marshalled a short distance to the left of the troops. Governor Macquarie was cheered as he stepped ashore.".8,17,18,26,27,28,29,30 In an undated historical feature press release by the Port Macquarie Historical Society, Stephen is reported as fathering the first white baby born in Port Macquarie. If the article is correct then of course Sarah was the mother. The birth of their son James occurred on 4 February 1822.31 He was commended by the Commandant for pursuing escaped prisoners. At midnight on 24 September 1822, nine prisoners escaped by boat using oars they had made and then concealed for their getaway. "Believing the gang's objective was to plunder a vessel in the Port Stephen's area, Captain Allman sent a detachment of soldiers and Superintendent Partridge overland to search for them. The pursuers, however, were unable to travel beyond Cape Hawke owing to the 'breadth and rapidity' of the Wallamba River and returned nine days later, their provisions exhausted.".24,32

Stephen's rising influence can be observed through The Colonial Secretary's Index, 1788 - 1825 which lists an application by Stephen on 29 June 1822 to have his nephew Michael Williams sent to Port Macquarie and on 11 July 1822 there is correspondence re his mother-in-law Rachael Williams' passage to Port Macquarie. Rachael and her son Michael sailed for Newcastle on the "Elizabeth Henrietta" and then on to Port Macquarie, to live with her daughter Sarah, Stephen's wife.33

On 7 April 1825 Stephen served on a jury in Port Macquarie. He was the Jury Foreman at the inquest into the death of William Elliott.24 In March 1828 he served on a jury in Port Macquarie. In March 1828 the body of a prisoner James Egan was discovered in a hole near the settlement. Stephen was one of a twelve man jury which heard the evidence. While another convict Fergus Cunningham was suspected of being involved in the death there was insufficient evidence against him and the jury brought down a finding that Egan had been wilfully murdered by a person or persons unknown.34,35,36

Governor Darling is renown as having been a strict individual and was very adept at discerning what he considered the 'general laxity and system of indulgences pertaining at Port Macquarie'. 'It appears the quantities of oil exceed very considerably those consumed in some offices in Sydney', Darling observed when he refused allowances for these items for five officers in the settlement, including Stephen.37

In 1828 Darling appointed two Commissioners, Lt-Col J T Morisset (Principal Superintendent of Justice) and James Busby (Collector of Internal Revenue) to conduct an enquiry into activities at Port Macquarie following Commandant Crotty's report of deficiencies in grain and the existence of other irregularities. They were given wide Terms of Reference to investigate agricultural operations, the sugar plantation, management of the Commissariat and the overall operations of the settlement.

At the enquiry Stephen's conduct was queried particularly in regard to him being 'a considerable dealer' in the settlement and trafficking in grain with prisoners. There also were imputations that he was feeding his own livestock with Government grain. The Commissions judgement was "Mr Partridge has always been considered very active and industrious in the discharge of his duties as Superintendent of Convicts, and is a well-meaning man. His conduct came more particularly under our review as having been at one time the most considerable dealer on the Settlement, and of having been under the suspicion of trafficking with the prisoners. Though we are not prepared to acquiesce in the high character he has received from all commandants for activity and zeal in the discharge of his duties, we are satisfied of his being a steady and well conducted man, quite undeserving of the imputations of feeding his stock with Government corn and other practices of a similar nature." In a section of their report dealing with 'abuses' uncovered by the Commissioners, "the misuse of Government boats and buildings for storage of maize and profit-making ventures on the part of free-settlers" was one such 'abuse' and Stephen was mentioned as one of at least two officers storing corn in a wing of the dormitories of the prisoners' barracks. The twenty prisoners slept in the mess rooms because their dormitories were no longer available to them.

However his good friend Richard Neave did not fare anywhere near as well being found to have "made a false statement to us" as well as a number of other negative findings.

"A Return of Livestock procured by Captain Crotty in 1828 was produced at the enquiry. Of the livestock owned privately, the return showed that, with the exception of goats, these were exclusively in the possession of free persons and were chiefly owned by Messrs. Partridge and Wilson. The seven privately owned horses on the settlement belonged to the Reverend Mr Cross, Messrs. Smith and Partridge, and Mr McIntyre".38,39 In June 1830 Stephen resigned from his position as Superintendent of Convicts in Port Macquarie. His resignation came following the enquiry but not necessarily as a result of it. He had served as Superintendent of Convicts under all twelve of the settlement's Commandants although for only half the term of the last, Captain Henry Smyth. According to a Government Return to Macquarie in 1830, Stephen's pay was quarters and rations with an annual salary of £100.

It's not known when he made the statement but he wrote and described the offenders sent to Port Macquarie as "a large body of convicts who were the refuse of the whole Colony. His duties had been highly arduous".13,40,41

From June 1830 to 30 June 1833 Stephen was an innkeeper at Allman St in Port Macquarie. When the settlement was opened to free settlers, Governor Darling ordered Commandant Smyth to select a building suitable for an Inn and another for a Public House and to nominate persons 'best qualified to conduct these places for selling spirituous liquors'. The successful nominees were to be allowed a free licence for one year but were expected to pay rent. Smyth replied, "The 2 houses I have fixed for an Inn and a Public house are now occupied, the one by the Superintendent of Convicts and his family and the other by the Chief Constable. The former house is suited for the purpose of an Inn. As Mr Partridge is desirous to establish an Inn, I beg to recommend him as most likely to do it for the benefit of the Settlement, as a man I have every confidence in. I have as yet no one to recommend to keep a Public House. I have allowed Mr Partridge to proceed to Sydney for the purpose (should the licence be granted to him) of making such purchases as he may require."

On Stephen's application, Captain Allman had testified "He has resigned as Superintendent of Convicts; ... intends to serve the public in the future in a new character but as faithfully as ever; ... had the good fortune to give satisfaction to every Commandant and was by each strongly recommended to his successor as an 'active and zealous officer which at the same time he had in an extraordinary degree of the goodwill of the prisoner population'."

On 27 August 1830, after he entered a recognisance (bond) of £25, he was granted a free Liquor Licence (Licence No.1) for the sale of wine and spirits, exempting him from any charge, including the rent of the house for one year, renewable yearly at an annual rent of £5.7.6 to be paid to the Government forever. On 20 October, William Wilson replaced him as Superintendent of Convicts. Charles Farrell was allowed to open the Public House on the same terms as Stephen's. He called it the "Settler's Arms" and was operated from his house of 'two rooms and a skillion' of which Farrell was later to complain that it was 'inadequate for me and my numerous family'.

Stephen was leasing the Government house of seven rooms in which he resided but now had been granted free use of the premises. He used part of it for the Inn which he called "The New Inn" which took in guests as well as selling alcohol. It was located near the waterfront on Hastings River in what was originally Allman St but is now part of Hay St. It consisted of two buildings, one brick measuring 37ft x 35ft and the other of slab construction measuring 24ft x 12ft. The verandah of the building was 37ft long. It had an extensive 2 acres of kitchen gardens. The building was demolished in 1834 as part of the replanning of the town.

On 29 June 1832 Benjamin Sullivan JP, first resident Police Magistrate, arrived to take up his position. A dispute arose over his accommodation and the "New Inn" was recommended to him by Captain Smyth as 'a very comfortable house'.

Stephen held the licence for three years but lost it on 16 June 1833 when a Bench of Magistrates refused to renew it as they were 'not satisfied as to his moral character'. The details on how this judgement was arrived at were not revealed. On 1 August 1834, Christopher Doyle was granted a licence to keep an Inn which was renewed in June 1835.13,42,43,44

from 1832 he owned property at Port Macquarie, NSW . He may also have rented some land in the district. On 1 September 1830, Stephen was granted 50 acres by Governor Darling. This was described as in the County of Macquarie, parish unnamed; near the confluence of Limeburners Creek with the Hastings River; bounded on the West by a line North 24 chains; commencing at the highwater mark of Limeburners Creek at 3 chains 50 links from the confluence; on the North by a line East 21 chains; on the East by a line South 22 chains and on the West by the highwater mark of the Hastings River to a point near its confluence with Limeburners Creek. He gained possession on 21 April 1831 as a primary grant (quit rent 8/4 per annum to commence 1 January 1839). Stephen sold it to Michael Fahy on 3 March 1835.

On 30 October 1830, Governor Darling granted him 640 acres, located on the Oxley Highway, 10 kilometres west of Port Macquarie. He was authorised to take possession by the Governor on 21 April 1831. He retained the land for less than three years and on 2 January 1834 sold it to Major A C Innes who named it "Thrumpster" in memory of his old Scottish home. (A quit rent of £5.6.8 has been quoted on this property by the Port Macquarie Historical Society although they say it wasn't implemented until 1879).

In 1832 he was advised to apply for an allotment somewhere between Hay and Murray Sts in Port Macquarie. This was granted on 17 April 1833.

He applied to the Surveyor-General for two allotments (Numbers 1 and 3 of Section 4). He was advised on 27 July 1833 that one had been reserved for public purposes and that three was already the subject of an application from Joseph Phillips. On 20 August 1833 he replied saying he had been given the wrong numbers by the surveyor and he was actually applying for allottments 1 and 3 of Section 5. He was advised that these two had already been applied for but he would be able to bid for them at public auction. It is not known whether he did bid for them.

In the County of Macquarie, parish unnamed, on the east bank of Limeburners Creek; bounded on the North by a line bearing East for 44 chains 20 links, commencing at the creek; on the East by a line due South six chains; on the South by a line West 21 chains and again on the East by a line South 24 chains to the highwater mark of Limeburners Creek and on the West by that creek was a block of land of 50 acres which was granted to Benjamin Reed on 2 September 1830. A couple of years later (1832 (cal.)), Stephen bought this land from Reed and eventually sold it to Charles Farrell on 28 June 1834.

A parcel of land originally granted to Edward Waterton and then sold to Charles Farrell was described as follows : half an acre, County of Macquarie, parish Macquarie, Town of Port Macquarie, Allotmnet 2 of Section 5, situated at the corner of Murray St and Clarence Streets; bounded on the Northward by Clarence St bearing Westward 2 chains 50 links; commencing at the corner of Clarence and Murray Streets; on the Westward by a line at rightangles to Clarence St bearing Southward 2 chains; on the Southward by a line at rightangles to the last line Eastward 2 chains 50 links to Murray Street and on the Eastward by that street Northward 2 chains to Clarence St. Farrell sold this land to Stephen initially on 17 January 1837 with the transfer verified by 31 March 1840. Records of transactions between Stephen and Farrell are quite haphazard and it appears they were exchanging properties the full details of which cannot be determined. This block is possibly the one on which the building known as the Glasshouse now (2010) sits.

In "The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser" of Tuesday 28 May 1839 in a list of people who had been promised land, Stephen is shown as being promised 50 acres in an "unknown parish near the confluence of the Limeburner's Creek with the Hastings". Exactly what this refers to is unknown but was possibly one of the parcels previously mentioned.

He is known to have rented 50 acres on Limeburners Creek from a school teacher at a quit rent of 8s 4p although the dates are unknown. Mention has also been made of a house 'fronting onto Horton St between William and Bridge Streets' and several 'exchanges of land' but the details of these are unknown.8,17,45,46

Stephen married Julia COTTERDOWN on 18 March 1834 at St Thomas Church of England in Port Macquarie. In 1833 the Reverend John Cross applied to the Colonial Secretary on behalf of Stephen requesting permission for him to be married to Julia. The Colonial Secretary rebuked them asking for an explanation on why a female servant could be assigned to a widower. Nevertheless their banns were posted on 13 November 1833.1,47,48,49,50

Between 20 November 1835 and 31 July 1862 Stephen was a special constable in Port Macquarie. He was employed at a salary of £80 per annum or £100 if 'he does not occupy public quarters'. In March 1836 he was again appointed Superintendent of Convicts which position he held until the penal establishment closed in 1846. He requested compensation for the abolition of his office and was awarded a gratuity of 2 years salary of £200. He retired as a Constable in 1862.13,51,52,53

As was common practice in the services, Stephen and Richard Neave tried to seek private supplies for themselves so that they could retail them in the settlement. Prior to Darling becomming Governor, they sold these articles 'permission having been obtained from the Commandant at the commencement of each month', ie the trade had been regularised under succeeding Commandants. However Darling did not approve of the practice and issued instructions to Commandant Inness for it to cease. He stopped it stating "These officers, or any other persons employed in a public situation, are no longer allowed to sell or retail articles". When Lieutenant Thomas Owen, took over as Commandant in April 1827, his request to reinstate the practice was similarly refused. The Governor was consistent in his approach and even when Sarah Partridge and her friend Rebecca Neave sought permission to sell articles shipped from Sydney, he gave the curt reply "Certainly not!". Possibly Darling saw this as a ruse by the wives to get goods for their husbands to sell. These events happened between c.1826 and 1827.

The types of goods handled in these sorts of transactions were bags of sugar; chests of tea; sacks of flour; bags of shot; canisters of powder and flint; sheets of copper; white lead; paint; turpentine; etc. etc. With the profit from these activities along with his salary as Superintendent of Convicts (a reasonably good £62.10s.0d by 1825), it's plausible to believe that Stephen was able to increase his personal wealth quite substantially.

"Before leaving the settlement, Commandant Gillman sold a large number of pigs and poultry produced at the Commandant's Farm, as well as on the settlement (according to Partridge who conducted the sale) for £45, the purchasers being free persons and prisoners." Was this another of Stephen's profitable activities?

Stephen applied some of his funds to acquiring a boat. "Captain Gillman, Commandant from January 1825 to April 1827, was responsible for the first major boat building in the settlement. He ordered the building of 'a brig of 120 tons burthen', and named her "Mary Elizabeth", for his wife and daughter. It was reported that boats were also built for Lieutenant Owen and a Mr Partridge". In 1831 Stephen was using the old abandoned barracks as a place to build a boat. These are the first known reports of Stephen being involved with shipping other than as a passenger but offers evidence that he had been quite financially successful. Possibly the boat(s), if big enough, were used to transport goods to and from Sydney but it's more likely he used it to travel up and down the Hastings River, possibly for trading. In addition in an undated historical feature press release by the Port Macquarie Historical Society about Stephen fathering the first white baby born in Port Macquarie, the unknown author states "In 1847 Partridge's job was phased out but he must have had several other business enterprises to fall back on such as boat building". It is unknown what evidence generated this statement but it surely would not have been done by the Society without something to back it up. Enquiries have been unable to determine what that 'boatbuilding' evidence may have been.

The Commission of Enquiry report suggests that Stephen while not feeding his cattle with Government corn, may well still have been conducting other illicit trading activities. In April 1828, Stephen is recorded as having 39 horned cattle and 31 pigs, a significant quantity of livestock for the time. This quantity of cattle raises the question of where he had the land to run them. His land acquisitions mentioned above give some idea of how it was done.

Opening the first Inn in Port Macquarie in 1830 would have been a reasonably expensive operation but he clearly had the finances to do so. Getting one year's free licence would have increased the profit on this operation which in its nature would have been profitable. Three years of operation should have added considerably to his funds and he clearly wanted to keep going as he applied for his licence renewal in 1833. The prospect of a dark side in his operations shows up again when the licence renewal was refused by a Bench of Magistrates as they were 'not satisfied as to his moral character'. The cause of the Magistrates' concern is not revealed.

In its 2001 publication summarising Stephen's life, The Port Macquarie Historical Society takes a different view to this and claims "Stephen's venture as a publican could be regarded as one of the regressive phases of his life." They suggest that the realigning of the streets where Stephen lost a deal of his rental property led to the "New Inn" being declared bankrupt. Certainly the loss of his premises would have been a setback to him but if the Society is correct, why was he applying for a renewal of his licence? The Society notes that Stephen applied to the Government for a grant in compensation which included such comments as "... the profits of one hotel would hardly meet the expenses of one moderate family ..."; " ... 18 months since the death of my wife ..."; " ... I have seven children ..."; " ... the little capital I have accumulated by my industry and economy, which I had hoped to set up my offspring in a respectable sphere of life, diminished". Of course he would apply for compensation if he thought he could get it and all these things are what one would say if applying for a compensation grant. It is not known whether he received any compensation but several positions were proposed for him but they were not taken up.

Selling the 640 acre property to Major Innes, would have added to his funds and may have provided the initial finance for trading in property.

It is plausible to believe that when Stephen retired in 1862 he was in a reasonable financial position. How and where he and wife Julia lived in the sixteen years from his retirement until his death in 1878 is not known but they probably were able to live in relative comfort. Greville's directory of 1872 lists a Stephen Partridge (without an occupation) at Murray St which may be him.54,55,56,57,58,59

Stephen died (aged 85) on 18 July 1878 in Port Macquarie. The cause was decay caused by old age. An obituary for Stephen was published in the Sydney Evening News on 12 September 1878.1,8,13,22,60,61 He was buried on 21 July 1878 in St Thomas Cemetery which is now known as the Historic Pioneer cemetery in Port Macquarie. Stephen and Julia shared the same tomb which survived until the late twentieth century when it was destroyed by vandals.13,62,63,64

 

Port Macquarie Historical Society comments about Stephen "Once, in his own defence when threatened with exposure of his own dubious activities, in an altercation with a surveyor over re-alignment of land and illegal labour, he is recorded as declaring 'You may do as you think proper, for my part, if all the people in the Colony were watching me, I should do as I act now. I care for nobody.' This could be his epitath".65

 

Thomas Partridge (b. 17 May 1817) and Stephen Partridge (b. 24 May 1817) were twins born seven days apart to Stephen Partridge and Sarah Partridge (nee Williams). However they were baptised four months apart, Stephen on 2 June 1817 and Thomas on 5 October 1817. Under normal circumstances one would expect them to have been baptised at the same time. Although no record of his death has been found, it is suspected that Stephen either died some time between his birth and his baptism, presuming he actually was alive when born. Being the second born child in what may have been a difficult labour **, he was possibly in a very poor condition at the time of birth. His baptism at only nine days old compared to his brother's four months later, is seen as a probable indication of a crisis which may have been his death.

** [Enquiries with a midwife suggest that a labour of between five and seven days which is what is suggested by the birth dates, is probably unlikely, even in 1817. What has been suggested as more likely, is for there to have been dual conceptions three or four days apart with the subsequent births some days apart. This sort of event while not common is also not that rare].

When Stephen's parents departed to help establish the new penal settlement at Port Macquarie (21 March 1821), Stephen was not with them. They only had Thomas and his later born sister Jane. Some years later when making a compensation claim, his father noted in that claim " ... I have seven children ..."; if Stephen was still alive, this statement would have noted eight children. Both of these facts point toward Stephen having died before the family left Sydney. Accordingly, Stephen has been recorded as dying about 2 June 1817.

Thomas' baptism was carried out under the name Thomas with no second name. However later records show him as Thomas Stephen. Is this a case where the parents decided to append the second name Stephen in honour of his twin brother's memory? While it can never be known for certain, it's a pleasant thought even if it isn't the case.66

 

APPENDIX A

"A 'Return' of servants, employed by free individuals at Port Macquarie, at the expense of the Government (in February 1828), showed that Stephen Partridge, had three servants". One of them was possibly William Belcher but it is not known who the other two were. Other convicts known to have been assigned to Stephen were Frances (Fanny) Murray and the woman who was to be his third wife, Julia Cotterdown but both of these were assigned to him long after 1828.

Stephen had associations with convicts in his private life. Known convicts are :

- William Belcher; a male convict assigned to Stephen. From the Police Office of Port Macquarie on 16 July 1834 he was charged with 'Defaming the character of Elizabeth Fulford (Free)'

Thomas Constant Pagget Morton, Lieutenant in the Royal Navy being sworn states "On Monday morning last 14th inst. I was informed by my servant Elizabeth Fulford, that a report was in circulation that she had been seen the previous afternoon in thick scrub in the Brickfields in an indecent posture with Charles Lewis, Clerk at the General Hospital. On my tracing this report I found that it had originated with the prisoner at the Bar." Signed T C P Morton

Sworn before us 16 July 1834

Signed Benjamin Sullivan JP and W H Geary JP

Seven or eight various sworn statements were submitted including one from his Master Stephen Partridge. "The prisoner at the Bar is my Assigned servant; he has been with me for six or seven years; his general conduct has been good. I should not think him a man likely to raise reports prejudicial to the character of any person. I have never heard of his having done so." Signed S. Partridge

Sworn before us 16 July 1834; Signed Benjamin Sullivan JP and W H Geary JP

William Belcher was found Not Guilty.

William Belcher died on 1 October 1841

- Ann Jordan (nee Coates); a female convict who arrived on the "Mary III" (5) on 6 September 1835. She was on a bond and employed by a Mr Partridge, who was probably Stephen. It is not known if she was assigned to him;

- Frances (Fanny) Murray; a female convict who was assigned to Stephen. She was originally tried at Roscommon, Ireland in July 1833 for stealing clothes and was sentenced to 7 years transportation. She arrived on the "Andromeda" (3) on 17 September 1834 aged only 16. She was described as "not educated, single, Roman Catholic, 5 ft ½in tall, a 'Nurse's Girl' with a fair, ruddy and freckled complexion, red hair and grey eyes". She was tried on 11 October 1836 for "absenting herself from her Master's house". She was reprimanded at the request of Stephen and then returned to the Government. Nine months later on 16 July 1837, she had a daughter Frances whose father was not named on the birth registration (V18371320 21/1837) and who was baptised on 8 October 1837. Fanny died on 25 July 1837 aged 20 and was buried by Rev Cross. There was only nine days between the birth of her daughter and her death which suggests she possibly died from complications with the birth.

- Charles Wilkins (No. 5515) from Somersetshire was a labourer assigned to Stephen as reported in "The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser" on Thursday 7 February 1833. Charles possibly married Margaret Fahey (b. Port Macquarie 1831) daughter of Corporal Michael Fahey (48th Regiment) in 1846 and he was at that time described as a Government Carpenter. They had 5 children. On 24 April 1867, a Charles Wilkins was the undertaker at the funeral of Thomas Ryan in Port Macquarie.

- Julia Cotterdown; a female convict assigned to Stephen and whom he married within a couple of months of her arrival in Port Macquarie.13,67,68,69

 

APPENDIX B

Cases in which Stephen was involved because of his work include :

(1) In December 1828, Thomas Slater was tried at Port Macquarie for 'Counterfeiting and passing Dumps'. Mr Superintendent Partridge being sworn informs the court that "A child, Mary Ann Callaghan came to his house to purchase some milk which Mrs Partridge is in the habit of selling. The child said it was for Slater, he had a Dump to pay for it. The milk was given and change for the Dump - shortly afterwards a man came for two pennyworth of milk; he also brought a Dump which was sent to me; knowing the man who had brought the Dump was employed by Slater, he suspected something wrong; he examined the Dump and found it to be bad and desired the man to take it back from where he got it.

Evidence (sic) direted a Constable to see if the man did not go back to Slater, who, reporting he did, Evidence (sic) went to Slater's house and found them there together, he demanded the Dump that had been sent for milk and, after pretending to search for a considerable time, Slater produced the Dump from his own pocket.

A Black Native brought the note now before the Court this morning stating it was from Slater; immediately afterwards a Constable brought another Dump. Chief Constable took Slater into confinement."

Mary Wilson being sworn states "That the prisoner Slater owed her two shillings and six pence for washing and yesterday evening he sent her some tea and a Dump in payment; she sent the Dump by the same little girl that had brought it to mrs Matthews to whom she was indebted one Dump; the Dump was brought back this morning to change; it was a bad one. Constable Simpson was in the house and took the Dump into his possession."

Constable Edward Simpson sworn states that "A little girl came to his house this morning with a Dump saying 'Mrs Wilson must change it, for it was a bad one'. Evidence took the Dump which is now before the court and showed it to Mr Partridge who told him he had two others of the same sort."

Slater was then sent to Gaol.

Prisoner's Defence "Prisoner denies making the Dumps in question, acknowledges writing the note before the court addressed to Mr Partridge." H J Smyth JP. Commandant

"Remanded". Sentence : Incarcerated in the gaol as an unsafe character to be in the Camp or Barracks.

(2) On 14 February 1837 at Port Macquarie, John (or William) Hayes was charged with 'Absconding'

Mr Stephen Partridge, Superintendent of Convicts, sworn states "The prisoner absconded from the Department of Works on the 6th inst. and was brought back yesterday by an Overseer of Mr Ackroyd. Signed S Partridge.

Sworn before us 14 February 1837; W H Geary JP; Robert Andrew Waugh JP

Sentence : 18 Lashes, 18 Inflicted

15s 0p reward granted.

John Hayes died in the hospital on 10 April 1841 and was buried on 11 April 1841

(3) At Port Macquarie on 11 September 1837, Convict John Smith along with William Delaforce was charged with "Absconding and taking their Government Blankets".

Mr Stephen Partridge, Superintendent of Convicts, having been sworn states "In the latter end of last month the prisoners absconded from a Road Party and took with them their blankets and about 20 pounds of flour. They have both absconded before." Signed Stephen Partridge.

John Bontard, Special constable, having been sworn states "On Wednesday last I apprehended the prisoners at the Bar at the Manning River."

Remanded for a Court of Petty Sesions. 15s 0d reward granted for each of the prisoners. Foung Guilty of absconding a second time; 12 calendar months in Irons from 11 September 1837.

Signed W M Geary JP, Robert Andrew Waugh JP.

John Smith died 13 November 1837 and was buried by Rev Cross on 24 November 1837 while Delaforce lived until 1900

(4) At Port Macquarie on 10 August 1837, Convict James Freeman was charged with 'Neglect of Duty'. Mr Stephen Partridge, Superintendent of Convicts being sworn states "The prisoner is emplyed as a Stockman and he is continually losing three or four of the best bullocks. This morning three of the best of the bullocks are missing and the prisoner did not go out all this morning. I enquired of the other stcockman where the prisoner was, and he told me that he complained of illness and had not been out. Signed : Stephen Partridge. Sworn before me, 10 August 1837. W N Gray JP.

Found guilty with a sentence of Seven days in the Cells.

James Freeman died 27 January 1841 and was buried by Rev Cross.70

 

APPENDIX

A petition requesting formal recognition of The Historic Cemetery in Port Macquarie was worded as follows :

Port Macquarie

November 28th 1857

To The Surveyor-General

Sir,

We the undersigned Heads of Families and Members of the Church of England, residing in and around the Township of Port Macquarie beg to state that: We have never found the Burying Ground adjacent to the town, and known as the Church of England Burying Ground in any way objectionable; and further beg that it may be alienated for the purposes for which it is at present allowed, that so it may be preserved from the desecration which has befallen other unalienated Burying Grounds in the Colony

We are Sir your Obedient Servants

It was signed by 85 individuals including Stephen Partridge; Julia Partridge; John W Partridge; Susannah Partridge.71

 

Sarah WILLIAMS72 was the daughter of James WILLIAMS (1760?-1820) and Rachael WATKINS (1760?-1840). She and Stephen PARTRIDGE had the following children:

 

Thomas PARTRIDGE (1817-1879?)

Stephen PARTRIDGE (1817-1817?)

Jane PARTRIDGE (1819- )

James PARTRIDGE (1822- )

Joseph PARTRIDGE (1823-1898)

Susannah PARTRIDGE (1825-1891)

Rachel Frances PARTRIDGE (1827-1828)

Stephen William PARTRIDGE (1829-1918)

 

Julia COTTERDOWN1 and Stephen PARTRIDGE had the following children:

 

John William PARTRIDGE (1835-1884)

Richard Stephen PARTRIDGE (1836-1881)

Margaret Marion PARTRIDGE (1838-1842)

Sarah Julia PARTRIDGE (1839- )

Ann Caroline PARTRIDGE (1842-1901)

Margaret Marion Susannah PARTRIDGE (1844- )

Citations

1{S0199}, Internet : General. http://genealogy.wikia.com/wiki/Stephen_Partridge_%281793-1878%29. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
2{S0288}, Port Macquarie Historical Society. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: "War Office records show he was born at 'Armitage' in the Dorset Parish". Maybe this should have read Hermitage
His birthplace has also been listed as Crewheren, Crewkerne, Somersetshire and Cookham, Berkshire but Armitage (from his army records) is regarded as the most reliable
3{S0199}, Internet : General. http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~garter1/partridg.htm. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Questionable.
Text From Source: "Where Born : Cookham Berkshire"
4{S0380}, Parish Registers : Crewkerne, Somerset : St. Bartholomew's Parish Church : Baptism : PARTRIDGE, Stephen (1141) (http://www.crewkerneopc.com/Baptisms/bap-1783.Mar-1795.Apr.html). Cit. Date: 6 December 2009. Assessment: Primary evidence.
5{S0543}, Parish Registers (FreeREG) : Baptism : Partridge, Stephen (1141). Cit. Date: 2 April 2012. Assessment: Primary evidence.
6{S0379}, Researcher : COLLUMBELL (nee PARTRIDGE), Debbie re PARTRIDGE/OSMOND. Custom Id: SUB023. Cit. Date: 21 November 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: "Stephen Partridge was baptised in Crewkerne, Somerset,England. It's not Cookham because while holidaying in England I called in to Taunton Somerset Records office to check on Stephen's baptism and the Crewkerne is correct."
7{S0288}, Port Macquarie Historical Society. Page 1. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Unreliable.
Text From Source: "His birth certificate gives this date of 30 June 1793 for his Baptism (probably) at Cookham, Somersetshire"
Due to evidence from Debbie Collumbell, Cookham as indicated by the Society is not accepted as his place of Baptism
8{S0276} 3rd Revised Edition, Book : "The History of Port Macquarie" (First Published 1957 by C. T. Uptin for "Port Macquarie News"; revised by Hastings District Hiostorical Society and published in conjunction with "Port Macquarie News" in 1964 and 1973. Revised edition --- 1983 --- in conjunction with Hastings District Historical Society, . Copyright : Hastings District Historical Society 1983. Reprinted by Uptin Print, September 1995). Custom Id: ISBN 0 9599886 2 9. Page 11. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
9{S0199}, Internet : General. http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~garter1/partridg.htm. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
10{S0455}, Book : "Port Macquarie; A History to 1850" (Edited by Frank Rogers; Illustrations by Ruth Edwards.
First Published 1982 for Hastings District Historical Society, PO Box 82, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia 2444 by
Child & Henry Publishing Pty Ltd, 27 King Rd, Hornsby, NSW, Australia 2077
National Library of Australia Cataloguing in Publication data ISBN 0 86777 176 3.
994.4'202). Page 25. Cit. Date: 28 April 2011. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: "He came to New South Wales in 1814 as a non-commissioned officer in the 46th Regiment "
11{S0288}, Port Macquarie Historical Society. Page 1. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
12{S0276} 3rd Revised Edition, Book : "The History of Port Macquarie" (First Published 1957 by C. T. Uptin for "Port Macquarie News"; revised by Hastings District Hiostorical Society and published in conjunction with "Port Macquarie News" in 1964 and 1973. Revised edition --- 1983 --- in conjunction with Hastings District Historical Society, . Copyright : Hastings District Historical Society 1983. Reprinted by Uptin Print, September 1995). Custom Id: ISBN 0 9599886 2 9. Page 11. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Questionable.
The date of the promotion is probably incorrect
13{S0258}, Mailing List Summary (Norfolk Island Ancestors & their Families) : General (http://www.greenaus.com/aus-norfolk-is/). Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
14{S0276} 3rd Revised Edition, Book : "The History of Port Macquarie" (First Published 1957 by C. T. Uptin for "Port Macquarie News"; revised by Hastings District Hiostorical Society and published in conjunction with "Port Macquarie News" in 1964 and 1973. Revised edition --- 1983 --- in conjunction with Hastings District Historical Society, . Copyright : Hastings District Historical Society 1983. Reprinted by Uptin Print, September 1995). Custom Id: ISBN 0 9599886 2 9. Page 11. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
re discharge
15{S0288}, Port Macquarie Historical Society. Page 2. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
re discharge
16{S0199}, Internet : General. http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~garter1/partridg.htm. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: "Where Born : Cookham Berkshire"
17{S0199}, Internet : General. http://freepages.history.rootsweb.com/~garter1/partridg.htm. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
18{S0288}, Port Macquarie Historical Society. Page 2. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
19{S0199}, Internet : General. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~latijan/8322.htm (Text From Source : St Phillips C Of E, Sydney). Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
20{S0455}, Book : "Port Macquarie; A History to 1850" (Edited by Frank Rogers; Illustrations by Ruth Edwards.
First Published 1982 for Hastings District Historical Society, PO Box 82, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia 2444 by
Child & Henry Publishing Pty Ltd, 27 King Rd, Hornsby, NSW, Australia 2077
National Library of Australia Cataloguing in Publication data ISBN 0 86777 176 3.
994.4'202). Page 25. Cit. Date: 28 April 2011. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: "During his army service he had accompanied Oxley and others on expeditions into the interior ..."
21{S0199}, Internet : General. http://www.kidcyber.com.au/topics/oxley.htm. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
22{S0813}, Newspaper : Sydney Evening News - PARTRIDGE, Stephen (1141). Cit. Date: 23 August 2014. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
picture

Stephen Partridge's obituary in the Sydney Evening News, 12 Sep 1878

23{S0296}, Newspaper : The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Government and General Orders published Saturday 15 August 1818
24{S0261}, Colonial Secretary Index 1788 - 1825 : PARTRIDGE (Various) (NSW State Records : http://www.records.nsw.gov.au/indexes/colsec/p/f43c%5Fpa%2D12.htm). Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
25{S0296}, Newspaper : The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: (a) "For Bridge Work done at General Hospital"
(b) "For Sundry Work performed at the General Hospital £36 5s 6d"
(a) Government and General Orders published Saturday 12 June1819
(b) Government and General Orders published Saturday 20 February1819
26{S0275} Iaen McLachlan, Book : "Place of Banishment - Port Macquarie 1818 - 1832" (Copyright 1988 by Iaen McLachlan. First printing by Southwood Press Pty Limited, 80 - 92 Chapel St, Marrickville NSW. Second Printing, June 2002 by Uptin Print, 16 - 20 Milton Circuit, Port Macquarie NSW 2444. For the Publisher, Hale & Iremonger Pty Limited, GPO Box 2552, Sydney NSW). Custom Id: ISBN 0 86806 316 9 and 317 7 (pbk). Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: Page 48 : "... with a salary of £50 sterling per annum"
Page 60 : "By the end of October the convicts had erected ......"
Page 68 : Log of Governor Lachlan Macquarie's tour of Port Macquarie in 1821
Page 82 : "The Harbour-Master Pilot (Richard NEAVE) and Convicts' Superintendent, Stephen PARTRIDGE, each received £62.10s.0d"
27{S0296}, Newspaper : The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Government and General Orders published Saturday 8 September 1821 reports his wage for 1 April to 30 June as £12 5s 0d (i.e. £50 per annum)
28{S0258}, Mailing List Summary (Norfolk Island Ancestors & their Families) : General (http://www.greenaus.com/aus-norfolk-is/). Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: "In the following seven months ....."
29{S0199}, Internet : General. http://www.hastings.nsw.gov.au/www/html/946-local-studies.asp. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
30{S0199}, Internet : General. http://www.aussieheritage.com.au/listings/nsw/Port%20Macquarie/PortMacquarieGovernmentHous.... Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
31{S0288}, Port Macquarie Historical Society. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
32{S0275} Iaen McLachlan, Book : "Place of Banishment - Port Macquarie 1818 - 1832" (Copyright 1988 by Iaen McLachlan. First printing by Southwood Press Pty Limited, 80 - 92 Chapel St, Marrickville NSW. Second Printing, June 2002 by Uptin Print, 16 - 20 Milton Circuit, Port Macquarie NSW 2444. For the Publisher, Hale & Iremonger Pty Limited, GPO Box 2552, Sydney NSW). Custom Id: ISBN 0 86806 316 9 and 317 7 (pbk). Page 80. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: "Believing the gang's objective was to plunder a vessel ......"
33{S0260}, Colonial Secretary Index 1788 - 1825 : WILLIAMS (Previously WATKINS) (1160), Rachael (NSW State Records : http://www.records.nsw.gov.au/indexes/colsec/w/f61c%5Fwil%2D09.htm). Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Primary evidence.
34{S0275} Iaen McLachlan, Book : "Place of Banishment - Port Macquarie 1818 - 1832" (Copyright 1988 by Iaen McLachlan. First printing by Southwood Press Pty Limited, 80 - 92 Chapel St, Marrickville NSW. Second Printing, June 2002 by Uptin Print, 16 - 20 Milton Circuit, Port Macquarie NSW 2444. For the Publisher, Hale & Iremonger Pty Limited, GPO Box 2552, Sydney NSW). Custom Id: ISBN 0 86806 316 9 and 317 7 (pbk). Page 139. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
35{S0289} Gwendoline Griffin and Ronald Howell, Book : "Port Macquarie The Winding Sheet" (Port Macquarie Historical Society, PO Box 82, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia 2444). Page 44. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
36{S0258}, Mailing List Summary (Norfolk Island Ancestors & their Families) : General (http://www.greenaus.com/aus-norfolk-is/). Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: "February 1828. However EAGAN's body was discovered in March 1828 so this reference is not correct"
37{S0275} Iaen McLachlan, Book : "Place of Banishment - Port Macquarie 1818 - 1832" (Copyright 1988 by Iaen McLachlan. First printing by Southwood Press Pty Limited, 80 - 92 Chapel St, Marrickville NSW. Second Printing, June 2002 by Uptin Print, 16 - 20 Milton Circuit, Port Macquarie NSW 2444. For the Publisher, Hale & Iremonger Pty Limited, GPO Box 2552, Sydney NSW). Custom Id: ISBN 0 86806 316 9 and 317 7 (pbk). Pages 134. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
38{S0275} Iaen McLachlan, Book : "Place of Banishment - Port Macquarie 1818 - 1832" (Copyright 1988 by Iaen McLachlan. First printing by Southwood Press Pty Limited, 80 - 92 Chapel St, Marrickville NSW. Second Printing, June 2002 by Uptin Print, 16 - 20 Milton Circuit, Port Macquarie NSW 2444. For the Publisher, Hale & Iremonger Pty Limited, GPO Box 2552, Sydney NSW). Custom Id: ISBN 0 86806 316 9 and 317 7 (pbk). Pages 169, 172, 174. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Findings of the Commission of Enquiry
39{S0455}, Book : "Port Macquarie; A History to 1850" (Edited by Frank Rogers; Illustrations by Ruth Edwards.
First Published 1982 for Hastings District Historical Society, PO Box 82, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia 2444 by
Child & Henry Publishing Pty Ltd, 27 King Rd, Hornsby, NSW, Australia 2077
National Library of Australia Cataloguing in Publication data ISBN 0 86777 176 3.
994.4'202). Page 71 - 72. Cit. Date: 28 April 2011. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: "A Return of Livestock procured by Captain Crotty in 1828 was produced at the enquiry. Of the livestock owned privately, the return showed that, with the exception of goats, these were exclusively in the possession of free persons and were chiefly owned by Messrs. Partridge and Wilson. The seven privately owned horses on the settlement belonged to the Reverend Mr Cross, Messrs. Smith and Partridge, and Mr McIntyre".
40{S0276} 3rd Revised Edition, Book : "The History of Port Macquarie" (First Published 1957 by C. T. Uptin for "Port Macquarie News"; revised by Hastings District Hiostorical Society and published in conjunction with "Port Macquarie News" in 1964 and 1973. Revised edition --- 1983 --- in conjunction with Hastings District Historical Society, . Copyright : Hastings District Historical Society 1983. Reprinted by Uptin Print, September 1995). Custom Id: ISBN 0 9599886 2 9. Page 11. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: "resigned from that position in June 1830"
41{S0455}, Book : "Port Macquarie; A History to 1850" (Edited by Frank Rogers; Illustrations by Ruth Edwards.
First Published 1982 for Hastings District Historical Society, PO Box 82, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia 2444 by
Child & Henry Publishing Pty Ltd, 27 King Rd, Hornsby, NSW, Australia 2077
National Library of Australia Cataloguing in Publication data ISBN 0 86777 176 3.
994.4'202). Page 84. Cit. Date: 28 April 2011. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: "It was not again to be the repository of the worst offenders, who were described by Superintendent Partridge in later years as 'a large body of convicts who were the refuse of the whole Colony'. His duties, he wrote, had been highly arduous" and "Government officials, military and civil, stationed at Port Macquarie during 1830 as listed in a Government Return were .... Mr S Partridge, Superintendent of Convicts, quarters, rations, annual salary £100"
42{S0275} Iaen McLachlan, Book : "Place of Banishment - Port Macquarie 1818 - 1832" (Copyright 1988 by Iaen McLachlan. First printing by Southwood Press Pty Limited, 80 - 92 Chapel St, Marrickville NSW. Second Printing, June 2002 by Uptin Print, 16 - 20 Milton Circuit, Port Macquarie NSW 2444. For the Publisher, Hale & Iremonger Pty Limited, GPO Box 2552, Sydney NSW). Custom Id: ISBN 0 86806 316 9 and 317 7 (pbk). Pages 185, 224. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Page 185 : Licence for New Inn plus description of the premises
Page 224 : "New Inn" recommendation
43{S0276} 3rd Revised Edition, Book : "The History of Port Macquarie" (First Published 1957 by C. T. Uptin for "Port Macquarie News"; revised by Hastings District Hiostorical Society and published in conjunction with "Port Macquarie News" in 1964 and 1973. Revised edition --- 1983 --- in conjunction with Hastings District Historical Society, . Copyright : Hastings District Historical Society 1983. Reprinted by Uptin Print, September 1995). Custom Id: ISBN 0 9599886 2 9. Pages 11, 54. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
44{S0288}, Port Macquarie Historical Society. Page 3. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
45{S0288}, Port Macquarie Historical Society. Page 5. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
46{S0296}, Newspaper : The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
"The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser" of 28 May 1839
47{S0615}, Certificate - Marriage : PARTRIDGE, Stephen (1141) and COTTERDOWN, Julia (1144). Cit. Date: 6 September 2012. Assessment: Primary evidence.
48{S0065}, BDM (NSW) Online Indexs : Marriages (NSW Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages Marriages Index : http://www.bdm.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/Index/IndexingOrder.cgi/search?SessionID=&event=...). Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
(1) Registration nos : V18341323 18 / 1834 and V183430 44B / 1834. District CK which is St Thomas C of E.
(2) Julia is registered as Julia C DOWN
49{S0288}, Port Macquarie Historical Society. Page 5. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
From the Booklet : Stephen Partridge; 1793 - 1878; Soldier - Settler by the Society
50{S0455}, Book : "Port Macquarie; A History to 1850" (Edited by Frank Rogers; Illustrations by Ruth Edwards.
First Published 1982 for Hastings District Historical Society, PO Box 82, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia 2444 by
Child & Henry Publishing Pty Ltd, 27 King Rd, Hornsby, NSW, Australia 2077
National Library of Australia Cataloguing in Publication data ISBN 0 86777 176 3.
994.4'202). Page 166. Cit. Date: 28 April 2011. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: "Also in the year 1833, Mr [John] Cross made application to the Colonial Secretary on behalf of Mr. Stephen Partridge, requesting that Partridge be given permission to marry his assigned servant. [Magistrate] Mr Sullivan, rebuked by the Colonial Secretary, was asked to explain why a female servant could be assigned to a widower. The banns of marriage between Stephen Partridge and his assigned servant, Julia Cotterdown, were posted at Port Macquarie on 13 November 1833."
51{S0455}, Book : "Port Macquarie; A History to 1850" (Edited by Frank Rogers; Illustrations by Ruth Edwards.
First Published 1982 for Hastings District Historical Society, PO Box 82, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia 2444 by
Child & Henry Publishing Pty Ltd, 27 King Rd, Hornsby, NSW, Australia 2077
National Library of Australia Cataloguing in Publication data ISBN 0 86777 176 3.
994.4'202). Page 138. Cit. Date: 28 April 2011. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: "On 2 April 1847 Governor Fitzroy submitted to Earl Gray a memorial dated 8 October 1846, of Stephen Partridge, Superintendent of Convicts at Port macquarie, in which Mr Partridge asked for pecuniary compensation on the abolition of his office, which occurred at the close of 1846. He was awarded a gratuity of two years' salary, amounting to £200."
52{S0276} 3rd Revised Edition, Book : "The History of Port Macquarie" (First Published 1957 by C. T. Uptin for "Port Macquarie News"; revised by Hastings District Hiostorical Society and published in conjunction with "Port Macquarie News" in 1964 and 1973. Revised edition --- 1983 --- in conjunction with Hastings District Historical Society, . Copyright : Hastings District Historical Society 1983. Reprinted by Uptin Print, September 1995). Custom Id: ISBN 0 9599886 2 9. Page 11. Cit. Date: 28 April 2011. Assessment: Questionable.
This source records 2 years salary as £88
53{S0309}, Census : NSW 1841 : District of Port Macquarie re PARTRIDGE family. Cit. Date: 29 March 2012. Assessment: Primary evidence.
Stephen is recorded as Superintendant of Convicts in the 1841 Census
54{S0275} Iaen McLachlan, Book : "Place of Banishment - Port Macquarie 1818 - 1832" (Copyright 1988 by Iaen McLachlan. First printing by Southwood Press Pty Limited, 80 - 92 Chapel St, Marrickville NSW. Second Printing, June 2002 by Uptin Print, 16 - 20 Milton Circuit, Port Macquarie NSW 2444. For the Publisher, Hale & Iremonger Pty Limited, GPO Box 2552, Sydney NSW). Custom Id: ISBN 0 86806 316 9 and 317 7 (pbk). Pages 129 - 134, 140, 172, 232. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Page 133 : Details of DARLINGS refusal to allow trade
Page 172 : Conducting sale for Captain Rolland
55{S0288}, Port Macquarie Historical Society. Page 3 of booklet. Also press release re shipping. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
56{S0199}, Internet : General. http://www.timbertown.com.au/pages.asp?code=113. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
57{S0322}, Greville's Post Office Directory : 1872 Port Macquarie (http://www.family.joint.net.au/index.php?cid=418&mid=1). Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
58{S0275} Iaen McLachlan, Book : "Place of Banishment - Port Macquarie 1818 - 1832" (Copyright 1988 by Iaen McLachlan. First printing by Southwood Press Pty Limited, 80 - 92 Chapel St, Marrickville NSW. Second Printing, June 2002 by Uptin Print, 16 - 20 Milton Circuit, Port Macquarie NSW 2444. For the Publisher, Hale & Iremonger Pty Limited, GPO Box 2552, Sydney NSW). Custom Id: ISBN 0 86806 316 9 and 317 7 (pbk). Page 133. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Details of DARLINGS refusal to allow trade
59{S0455}, Book : "Port Macquarie; A History to 1850" (Edited by Frank Rogers; Illustrations by Ruth Edwards.
First Published 1982 for Hastings District Historical Society, PO Box 82, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia 2444 by
Child & Henry Publishing Pty Ltd, 27 King Rd, Hornsby, NSW, Australia 2077
National Library of Australia Cataloguing in Publication data ISBN 0 86777 176 3.
994.4'202). Page 53 and Page 95. Cit. Date: 28 April 2011. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: "Boatbuilders were also in demand and those employed on the vessel "Mary Elizabeth" ..... were, after working for several Sundays, given a week off. Lieutenant Owen and Mr Partridge also had boats built on the Settlement."
"The early barracks which stood beside Kooloonbung Creek were referred to in 1831 by Mr Gilbyan, the army veteran who produced castor oil at the settlement, as being vacant in 1828 and being used as a boat shed by Mr Partridge in which he was building a boat"
60{S0389}, Certificate - Death : PARTRIDGE, Stephen (1141). Custom Id: NSW 1878 / 9095. Cit. Date: 17 February 2010. Assessment: Primary evidence.
61{S0066}, BDM (NSW) Online Indexs : Deaths (NSW Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages Deaths Index : http://www.bdm.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/Index/IndexingOrder.cgi/search?SessionID=&event=...). Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Registration no : 9095 / 1878
62{S0389}, Certificate - Death : PARTRIDGE, Stephen (1141). Custom Id: NSW 1878 / 9095. Cit. Date: 17 February 2010. Assessment: Primary evidence.
Text From Source: "St Thomas Cemetery Port Macquarie "
St Thomas Cemetery Port Macquarie is now known as the Historic Pioneer Cemetery
63{S0021}, Researcher : OWEN, John Edward (0001). Cit. Date: 28 April 2011. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
On a visit to Port Macquarie, John established that the tomb had been destroyed by vandals when he visited the Historic Cemetery and Port Macquarie Historical Society
64{S0210}, Photos : Various. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Primary evidence.
See photo of Stephen and Julia's tomb in their biography page. Photo obtained from Port Macquarie Historical Society
65{S0288}, Port Macquarie Historical Society. Page 6. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
66{S0289} Gwendoline Griffin and Ronald Howell, Book : "Port Macquarie The Winding Sheet" (Port Macquarie Historical Society, PO Box 82, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia 2444). Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
67{S0289} Gwendoline Griffin and Ronald Howell, Book : "Port Macquarie The Winding Sheet" (Port Macquarie Historical Society, PO Box 82, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia 2444). Pages 113, 122, 175, 263, 307. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
68{S0296}, Newspaper : The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Return of all male Convicts assigned in the period 1 - 31 December 1832 as published in "The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser" of 7 February 1833.
69{S0275} Iaen McLachlan, Book : "Place of Banishment - Port Macquarie 1818 - 1832" (Copyright 1988 by Iaen McLachlan. First printing by Southwood Press Pty Limited, 80 - 92 Chapel St, Marrickville NSW. Second Printing, June 2002 by Uptin Print, 16 - 20 Milton Circuit, Port Macquarie NSW 2444. For the Publisher, Hale & Iremonger Pty Limited, GPO Box 2552, Sydney NSW). Custom Id: ISBN 0 86806 316 9 and 317 7 (pbk). Cit. Date: 31 August 2010. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: Page 172 : "A 'Return' of servants, ....." and further down the page "..... (according to PARTRIDGE who conducted the sale} ....."
70{S0289} Gwendoline Griffin and Ronald Howell, Book : "Port Macquarie The Winding Sheet" (Port Macquarie Historical Society, PO Box 82, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia 2444). Pages 118, 164 - 165, 167, 237 - 238. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
71{S0289} Gwendoline Griffin and Ronald Howell, Book : "Port Macquarie The Winding Sheet" (Port Macquarie Historical Society, PO Box 82, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia 2444). Page 379. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
72{S0199}, Internet : General. http://genealogy.wikia.com/wiki/Sarah_Williams_%28c1796-1830%29. Cit. Date: before 1 July 2009. Assessment: Secondary evidence.

Compiler of this family history is : John Owen

              

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Thanks for looking
Ellen & John

Updated : 23 August 2014