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William
Ship: 596 tons
Captain: C McPhee
Surgeon Superintendent:
Sailed San Francisco January 21st 1853 - arrived Auckland April 2nd 1853

Our thanks to Jacqueline Walles for providing this list.

Arrival of the William

Name Age County Occupation
Allen Mr
S W
Baldwin E F
S E
Brown C
Caton H
Dyer J F
Eddie Mr
Hayes Mr
Mrs
Family
Hora E Daily Southern Cross has Hura
Hurles Mr
Mort J
Pigram Mr
Rawson Mr Daily Southern Cross has Bawson
Roe Mr H M
Mrs
3 children Daily Southern Cross has 2 children
Ross Mr
Sheeter Mr
Smith Mr
Spaulding Nelson Daily Southern Cross has Spalden & New Zealander has Spaldeen. Name confirmed as Spaulding by descendant.
Thompson Mr
Watkins Mr
114 passengers in steerage.
                                                            

Nelson SPAULDING:

The death, at Onehunga on Monday evening, of Mr Nelson Spaulding, aged 56 years-another of our pioneer settlers, who in the early days of the colony did much to forward colonisation here and some activities listed were being on various Juries and Mining Committees. He emigrated to California in 1849, travelling overland by way of the Salt Lake with the old fashioned mule trains. His party had several skirmishes with the Indians; but succeeded in circumventing them, and upon his arrival in the Golden State, commenced life afresh as a miner, with varying degrees of success. Upon arrival in Auckland from America Nelson entered into partnership with Messrs. Roe, Street and Co., as timber merchants. Mr Spaulding built the first American mill at Coromandel, and erected with Mr. Roe, the first tramway in the colony-20 years ago-for bringing down logs to the mills. On 13th Jun 1857 Mary Birch nee Webb (younger sister of Matilda Furley) married Nelson Spaulding at Old St. Paul’s; Onehunga. They unfortunately had one child who died when young. During his residence at Awitu-some ten years ago-Mr Spaulding had a most miraculous escape from death by drowning whilst crossing in the yacht 'Mystery' to Onehunga.

             

This article has been submitted by Elaine Mattsen, a direct descendant of Matilda Furley nee Webb. If you have a connection with Nelson Spaulding or would like to know more please contact Elaine Mattsen.

                                                            

Death notice of Nelson Spaulding:
"SPAULDING - On October 19, at Princes Street, Onehunga, Nelson Spaulding; aged 56 years. - Maine, USA, papers please copy. The funeral will leave his late residence to-morrow (Sunday) at 1pm. Friends are respectfully invited." Reference - Daily Southern Cross October 21st 1876.

                                                            

Obituary of Nelson Spaulding:
We have to record the death, at Onehunga on Monday evening, of Mr Nelson Spaulding, aged 56 years - another of our pioneer settlers, who in the early days of the colony did much to forward colonisation here. Mr Spaulding arrived at Auckland in the ship 'William', on his way to the Victorian gold fields, from California, in 1853, in company with Mr H M Roe, of the Cornwallis sawmills, and others, and upon arrival here, entered into partnership with Messrs Roe, Street and Co., as timber merchants. Mr Spaulding built the first American mill at Coromandel, and erected, with Mr Roe, the first tramway in the colony - 20 years ago - for bringing down logs to the mills. He retired from the partnership in 1860, and having purchased a farm at Awitu, he has resided there since. The deceased was an American, having been born in the State of Maine, and was engaged for some years on the railways of that state. He emigrated to California in 1849, travelling overland by way of the Salt Lake with the old fashioned mule trains. His party had several skirmishes with the Indians; but succeeded in circumventing them, and upon his arrival in the Golden State, commenced life afresh as a miner, with varying degrees of success. During his residence at Awitu - some ten years ago - Mr Spaulding had a most miraculous escape from death by drowning whilst crossing in the yacht 'Mystery' to Onehunga. The yacht was capsized by a sudden squall and ten lives were lost, the only persons rescued being the deceased and a boy, who clung to the overturned boat for eight or ten hours. There is no doubt that from such a lengthened exposure to the water he then contracted the disease which terminated his life on Thursday evening last. The deceased was highly respected by all who knew him. He was a man of probity and a most valuable colonist. He leaves a widow but no family.

                                                            

Copyright Denise & Peter 2006 - 2007

Reference:
The New Zealander April 6th 1853
The Daily Southern Cross April 5th 1853
The Daily Southern Cross October 21st 1876