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Monarch
Ship: 1450 tons
Captain: John Paddle
Surgeon Superintendent: Thomas Dry
Sailed London May 25th 1870 - arrived Lyttelton September 6th 1870

The Monarch, at one time a fine frigate-built ship of 1450 tons, was launched from Green's yard at Blackwall in 1844, and tathat time was owned by R Green. She was in theAustralian tradefor many years. Early in the 'sixties she was purchased by MrSavill, and was one of thefirst ships owned by Shaw Savill. The Monarch made two voyages to New Zealand. She came to Auckland in 1866, in command of Captain Macey, arriving on July 26, to the great relief of friends of passengers and consignees, after an eventful passage of 151 days.  In 1870 the Monarch, commanded by Captain John Paddle, for many years sailing the barque Strathallan, arrived at Lyttelton on September 6, after a very fine passage of 104 days, or 89 land to land. The weather during the voyage was unusually fine, a few ordinary gales only having been experienced in running down the easting. On this occasion there was no trouble with the crew [reference to the sailing of 1866], and the 200 hundred immigrants arriving by the vessel spoke in high praise of the treatment they had received during the voyage. In 1876 the old Monarch sailed from Bombay to Rangoon, and was never heard from again.
White Wings - Sir Henry Brett

Our sincere thanks to Melda Brunette for providing us with this passenger list.

Arrival of  the Monarch

Name Age County Occupation
Cabin Passengers
Ashburn Mr
Clabburn Mr
Graver Mrs
Hay Dr
Wheeler Mrs
Miss
Steerage Passengers
Families and Children
Alfrey Alfred Sussex Coach Builder
Mrs
3 children
Biltcliffe Joseph Middlesex Millwright
Mrs
Bilton Robert Yorkshire Farm Labourer
Mrs
2 children
Bond Hector Millwright
Mrs
Boyle John Forfar Engineer
Mrs
Brunett (Brunette) John Middlesex Schoolmaster
Mrs
5 children
Burns John Lanarkshire Millwright
Mrs
Cooper Edward Henry Middlesex Ironfounder
Mrs
Child
Farant Thomas Midddlesex Farm Labourer
Mrs
Freeman Henry Sussex Farm Labourer
Mrs
Gifkins James Ploughman
Mrs
Harband Josiah Warwickshire Coachbuilder
Mrs
Jenkins Henry Gloucestershire Farm Labourer
Mrs
Kingsford Shrewsbury Kent Saddler
Mrs
4 children
Lane William Devonshire Bootmaker
Mrs
5 children
McFedries Thomas Ayrshire Engineer
Mrs
Povey Alexander Berkshire Farm Labourer
Mrs
Prior Edward Norfolk Farm Labourer
3 children
Mrs
Raisbeck Henry Yorkshire Engineer
Mrs
2 children
Read William Leicestershire Wheelwright
Mrs
Roberts William Henry Cornwall Pattern Maker
Mrs
Child
Seager Robert Devonshire Pattern Maker
Mrs
5 children
Smith William Northamptonshire Groom
Mrs
3 children
Sopp George Middlesex Groom
Mrs
Spence James Oxfordshire Ploughman
Mrs
Whickham William Ben Hamptonshire Millwright
Mrs
2 children
Single Men
Brown Charles Somersetshire Farm Labourer
Buttle William H Yorkshire Ploughman
Cormack Alexander Caithness Farm Labourer
Forster George Ploughnab
Freeman George Hertfordshire Labourer
William Hertfordshire Labourer
Frederick Hertfordshire
Ganatt Robert Somersetshire Ploughman
Gluckin John Tyrone Ploughman
Gray Joseph Somersetshire Labourer
Haliburton John Moulder
Joyce John Cork Gardener
Jud Frederick Farm Labourer
Lloyd George Kent Farm Labourer
McCluie Nathaniel Donegal Ploughman
Milne John Forfar Millwright
Morling Joseph Yorkshire Labourer
Mudford Henry Somersetshire Labourer
Osborn William Devonshire Millwright
Ponsford John Devonshire Wheelwright
Prior Alfred Norfolk
Ramsay William Fermanagh Ploughman
Seager Henry John Lancashire Labourer
Soanes Mark Farm Labourer
Standen Ambrose Oxfordshire Farm Labourer
Stemford John William Norfolk Labourer
Stockbridge Thomas Kent Farm labourer
William Kent Shepherd
Thatcher John Middlesex Shepherd
Tolan Neil Donegal Ploughman
Single Women

Allen

Eliza

Servant

Andrews

Clara

Servant

Devonshire

Baker

Mary

Dairymaid

Waterford

Barlow

Fanny M.

Servant

Herefordshire

Breeze

Elizabeth

Servant

Durham

Breeze

Hannah

Nurse

Durham

Burleigh

Henrietta

Servant

Cassin

Amelia

Cook

Yorkshire

Cosgrove

Kate

Servant

Lancashire

Crowe

Ellen

Housemaid

Staffordshire

Foard (sic)

Emma

Housemaid

Middlesex

Foster

Mary Ann

Servant

Freeman

Emily

Servant

Herts

Harvey

Margaret

Servant

Antrim

Jenry

Olive

Servant

Middlesex

Jones

Bridget

Servant

Clare

Kelly

Mary

Cook

Queen's

King

Martha J.

Servant

Helena

Servant

Kent

Knowles

Eliza

Servant

Larkin

Eliza A.

Servant

Loader

Amelia H.

Servant

Middlesex

Mason

Elizabeth

Nurse

Middlesex

M'Bride

Margaret

Servant

Down

M'Nutt

Margaret

Servant

Moore

Susan

Housemaid

Antrim

Moore

Sarah

Cook

Somersetshire

Mottlee?

Harriet E

Servant

Surrey

Seager

Emma

Dairymaid

Devonshire

Smith

Elizabeth

Servant

Staffordshire

Smith

Agnes

Matron

Staffordshire

Spillitt

Mary

Dressmaker

Kent

Stephens

Helen

Servant

Oxfordshire

Stephenson

Eupha

Servant

Taylor

Hannah M.

Servant

Middlesex

Thompson

Jane

Servant

Donegal

Tretalin?

Mary A.

Servant

Kent

Wheeler

Emma

Dairymaid

Devonshire

Williams

Caroline

Nurse

Wingyet

Kate A.

Servant

Wiseman

Ann

Servant

Wollams

Jane A.

Servant

                             

Brunet (BRUNETTE) family:
The account below was written by Herbert Brunette in 1948 at the age of 80yrs.
"My Grandfather was also a jeweller and worked in London for the firm Lexer and Harker in Clerkenwell for fifty years and for a long time as foreman of the factory. John, his eldest son, my father, was born in 1837. Correctly, he was baptised as Jean Simeon Brunette, but preferred the plain John. He was apprenticed to this same firm and at the termination of his apprenticeship went to Coventry and Birmingham to gain further experience. Whilst still working with his father, the firm had had the privilege of making articles for Queen Victoria, amongst which was the Albert Medal for bravery at sea. My father was put to this special work and produced the medal which was accepted by the Queen, and a similar medal is issued to this day, but with a slight alteration. The medal was made of gold and blue enamel

Crown at the top
V. for Victoria at the centre over an anchor
Raised gold lettering around
"For gallantry in saving life at sea"
All spaces in blue enamel
In commemoration of the life of Prince Albert

I have a plaster cast mould (a model) of the original medal taken when finished in 1867. Dad had taken care of it.

As a first class jeweller, he commanded a good salary on his return to London. By the death of the Queen's Consort, Prince Albert (1861) and the trade depression after the war in the Crimea (1853-1856) the jewellery trade was seriously affected and there was extreme unemployment, so the Government set all those jewellers to the unusual job of building the Marble Arch at the entrance to Hyde Park. There were 300 employed and they completed a beautiful edifice.

Business generally continued to remain bad (as after any war, as we know to our cost) and people became unsettled and endeavoured to find release by leaving the country and London in particular. John, too, caught the fever, though he was steadily employed, but he had a wife and five children to face possible adversity in the near future. So he made up his mind to leave the country for pastures new. He chose to go to Newfoundland or to New Zealand and applied for a position in the first, but he did not succeed because the position was filled. He was chosen for New Zealand by Coates and Company, Christchurch, on a contract for three years.

Mother told me it was exciting and a great effort to get away to sail the high seas. Everything in the household was disposed of, and all her treasures, nick nacks and silver were sold to pay passage money etc. Having said goodbye to their parents and all the rest of the relatives, they set sail on the frigate built ship Monarch (Captain Paddle) on 24 May 1870 from Victoria Docks on the Thames. It was a fine day and being also the Queen's Birthday, Dad said he heard the guns firing the salute from Hyde Park as the ship was leaving London. It was a three masted ship and not a big one, and a full complement of passengers, mostly immigrants. On the voyage, my father acted as schoolmaster to the children for which he was paid the handsome sum of forty pounds. The Monarch arrived in Lyttelton on 21 September 1870. I was two and a half years when we left London and can just remember the incident of looking through the portholes of the ship.

On arrival, my father installed himself in his new position and at five pounds a week everything seemed to be paradise, but house accommodation and furniture were difficult to procure. Yet all our troubles were overcome to some extent. After three years with Coates and Company, he set up in business on Cathedral Square for himself, where he manufactured the Bishop's Crozier and Cross for the new cathedral in 1876. This cross for some reason or other is not used now, but has been laid to rest. It can be seen in a glass case in a room of the cathedral. The price paid for these two items was about one hundred and forty pounds. Whenever you are in Christchurch, call on the cathedral verger to show you the exhibit.

After a few years in business, in the years 1880-1882, trade was so poor that my father went to Taranaki - Hawera in particular - where he established a business which eventually became well known throughout the province. He also took a great interest in municipal, public and social affairs and received an appointment as Justice of the Peace. He died on 16 October 1912, leaving the business to his wife. She died on 26 July 1918 and the business passed to me, Herbert Antony."

Both Herbert and his father were at different times Town Councillors in Hawera, and John senior was a prominent Mason. There is an account of his life in the vanity Cyclopoedia for ?Wellington/Taranaki pub. late 1900's. Herbert married, but had no children. The Brunette family was quite large (eight children), my husband John is descended from the second of the four sons. The descendants are scattered throughout New Zealand, NSW, Queensland and Great Britain. The five children who came on the Monarch ranged in age from Bessie who was 12 to Herbert almost 3. Another three were born in Christchurch. If you have a connection with this family or would like to know more please contact Melda Brunette.

Just as an aside, John's younger sister Emily Brunette also emigrated to New Zealand. She had married a Norwegian (Mr Myhre) in London, but he died. With her two children (August and Emily aged 10 and 14) she was a colonially sponsored immigrant on the Atrato, one of the first steam vesesls to come to NZ . After a terrible trip, during which a large number of the children died, the ship arrived in Lyttelton 20 June 1874. Emily served as the matron on the voyage. Charles Myhre, her son by her first husband, married his cousin Amy Brunette, daughter of John Simeon. If you have a connection with this family or would like to know more please contact Melda Brunette.

                             

Copyright Denise & Peter 2001 - 2005

Reference:
Lyttelton Times September 8th 1870