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EARLY WELLINGTON SHIPPING ARRIVALS
from newspapers of the day

ARAB
New Zealand Gazette & Wellington Spectator
Wednesday October 20th 1841

Oct 16th; ship Arab, 484 tons, Captain Sumner, from London; Passengers Messrs Wilkinson, G W Blathwayt, H Martineau, W S Butler, F Woods, F Simon and 200 steerage.

The Arab left London on the 1st June, but she lost her topmasts and bowsprit in the Channel, which made it necessary for her to put into Dartmouth, from which she did not depart until the 15th June; and Captain Sumner has kindly furnished us with London papers to the 11th June.

The emigrants by the Arab have voted Dr Butler, the surgeon of the ship, a letter of thanks, for his humane conduct towards them during their passage from England to Port Nicholson. It was signed by the whole of the passengers.

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BOLTON
New Zealand Gazette & Wellington Spectator
Wednesday March 2nd 1842

Feb 28th; barque Bolton, 541 tons, Captain Robinson, from London; With immigrants for Port Nelson, and merchandize. Passengers Messrs T Underwood, T B Tichener, and W Byng; and 254 in the steerage. Dr Morgan, Surgeon Superintendent.

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BIRMAN
New Zealand Gazette & Wellington Spectator
Wednesday March 2nd 1842

March 1st; barque Birman, 545 tons, Captain John Cleland, from London via Cape of Good Hope; with 234 immigrants, and merchandize for Port Nicholson. James Motherwell Esq, Surgeon Superintendent.

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LORD WILLIAM BENTINCK
New Zealand Gazette & Wellington Spectator
Saturday May 22nd 1841

The barque Lord William Bentink, Captain Crow, arrived on Wednesday last from London, whence she sailed on the 2nd, and from the Downs on the 8th of January. She brings 240 immigrants, chiefly of the agricultural classes, and eight Cabin passengers

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AGRA
New Zealand Spectator & Cooks Strait Guardian
Wednesday March 3rd 1852

The Agra arrived on Monday from England direct after a favourable passage of ninety three days. She has forty six Cabin and Intermediate passengers, and 145 in steerage, the greater part of whom we understand intend remaining in this settlement. She brings English dates (newspapers) to 25th November....

ARRIVAL OF THE AGRA
New Zealander April 3rd 1852

(as published in the Wellington Independent March 3rd 1852)

The Agra arrived on Monday from England direct after a favourable passage of ninety-three days direct. She has forty-six cabin and intermediate passengers, and one hundred and forty-five in steerage, the greater part of whom we understand intend remaining in this settlement. She brings English dates to 25th November.

DINNER TO THE CHIEF OFFICER OF THE SHIP AGRA
New Zealand Spectator & Cooks Strait Guardian April 10th 1852

On Thursday evening last Mr. Leith, chief officer of the ship Agra, now in port, was treated to a sumptuous dinner at Barrett's Hotel, by several of the passengers from London to this place and Otago, in token of their respect and admiration of his character as a gentleman and an officer during the passage from England. Mr. John Barr, engineer, late of Paisley, in the chair. Dinner was on the table at six o'clock, when the company, amongst whom were Messrs. J. H. Wilson, R Hanson, D. Borrie, J. Wilkie, J. Sinclair, J. and H. Inglis, sat down to a splendid repast embracing all the delicacies of the season, got up in the usual recherché style for which the house is justly celebrated. Ample justice having been done to the good cheer and the cloth removed, the usual, loyal toasts, the Queen, Prince Albert, the Army and Navy were drunk and cordially responded to. The Chairman then, in an eloquent and very humorous speech, proposed the health of their friend Mr. Leith, the guest of the evening, and "success to him in his profession," which was drunk with all the honours. Mr. Barr took that opportunity of publicly expressing his own and fellow passengers' heartfelt thanks to Mr. Leith for his kindness and attention to them whilst on board the Agra, for which their entertainment of him that evening was meant as a sincere and homely, although he confessed a very inadequate, acknowledgment. Mr. Lieth, in a neat and appropriate reply, returned his best thanks for the unexpected honour they had done him that evening, and the very warm manner in which his health had been drunk. He said that if he had fortunately succeeded in giving them satisfaction in the discharge of his duties on board, it was no doubt in a great measure owing to the ready co-operation and goodwill he had ever met with at their hands, and which rendered his . task a comparatively easy, if not indeed a pleasant one. He concluded by expressing a hope that one and all of his kind entertainers might find their brightest anticipations of this their adopted country more than realized, and that none of them might have reason to regret the important step they had taken in leaving their native land to form new homes here. This great change in their life having led to his acquaintance with most of them, as well as to their happy meeting that evening, he was the more anxious that their fondest hopes in this respect might be fulfilled. In separating from them, as he soon must, he should not readily forget the pleasant times they had spent together, more especially the gratifying circumstances under which they were met on the present occasion so flattering to himself both personally and professionally. The health of Capt. Maclean and success to the good ship Agra was then drunk with great applause and suitably acknowledged by Mr. Leith, after which "The feast of reason and the flow of soul" went on enlivened by song and sentiment until a late hour. It being Good Friday eve however the company was obliged to break up much earlier than they otherwise would have done. Shortly before twelve o'clock the health of their excellent Chairman, with thanks to him for his conduct in the chair, was proposed and applauded to the echo, soon after which the party separated highly delighted with the evening's enjoyments, and apparently fully determined that "come weel, come wae," auld acquaintance should not be forgot "for the sake of auld lang syne."

ARRIVAL OF THE AGRA
Otago Witness April 17th 1852

We are informed that the "Agra" has 50 passengers on board for this port, and that she may be expected here shortly. She made the passage from England to Wellington in 93 days.