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EARL GRANVILLE CAPTAINS REPORT
New Zealand Herald March 8th 1880

Kindly transcribed by Stuart Horton. Thanks Stuart

There was no change to report on Saturday at the quarantine station, when the steamer visited there  with provisions; everybody was settling down in their allotted quarters, as comfortable as possible, with the intention of making the best of the circumstances. We have received the official report of the ships voyage from Captain Campbell, which we append, and from which it will be seen that the voyage from Plymouth was accomplished in 96 days.

The Earl Granville was not favored with very good trades to the north of the line , but that she can sail fast is
evident from the fact that one day she did as much as 303 miles. The Barque passed final inspection on Friday
November 28th 1879, and at 7am on the following day got under way and cast of from the tug outside of Plymouth Breakwater, and made sail with moderate N.E. wind at 9am, passed Eddystone (Lighthouse) at 2pm; signaled barque Stracathro, from London to Auckland. She, at 3pm. took departure from the Lizard and had a fair run across the Bay Of Biscay.   On December 3rd 1879, in latitude 41.54N. longitude 150.W. had the lowest barometer I have ever noted in same latitude, 28.56, with light variable puffs of wind, and very heavy confused seas, but got no gale from it. Thence to Cape de Verde Islands, wind from W.to S. and wet weather but had no N.E.trades. Had to pass to the eastward of Cape Verde Islands, with strong S.W. winds, where we expected to have had the best of the N.E. trades. Had 3 days of  light N.E. wind, thence variable winds and showers to the Equator, which was crossed in 27.40W. on December 29th, 31 days out. Secured the   S.E. trades the same night, which were light, but fairly good, accompanied with very fine weather;  lost them in 35.S.  Thence to the meridian of Greenwich, light N. winds, crossed the meridian on January 20th in 41.50. S. 52 days out, passed south of Gough Island, north of Crosets, and Kerguelen. Here we had much thick weather and northerly winds. After passing Kerguelen, got into30.S, when we got fine weather and moderate westerly wind. In latitude 45.30.S. lon.153.E. lost the westerly winds; afterwards had the wind between E.S.E. and N.E. to the Three Kings, which were sighted on February 29th. Down the coast E.S.E., and had to beat up to the harbour; was boarded by the
pilot off Shearer Rock at 3pm on Thursday, and came to anchor in Rangitoto Channel at 7pm., when the ship was
ordered into quarantine. Had several concerts in the fine weather, which much enlivened the spirit of the passengers. No large days work was made, the best being 303 miles. Only one flying fish came on board, and no other fish or bird was caught.