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Crusader
Ship: 1059 Tons
Captain: Lewellyn  Davis
Surgeon Superintendent:
Sailed London February 17th 1882 - arrived Wellington May 22nd 1882

Built in 1865 by C. Connell and Company of Glasgow, the Crusader was an iron ship- rigged vessel of 1058 tons. Launched in March 1865 she was originally owned by Patrick Henderson and then became the property of Shaw Savill & Albion Co. Ltd following the merger of Patrick Henderson and Albion. She was applied to the England - New Zealand immigrant trade between 1871 and 1898 and, making 28 voyages to various ports in New Zealand was probably the busiest of the immigrant ships in those heady days. In this role she made four voyages to Auckland, three to Wellington, seven to Port Chalmers, thirteen to Lyttelton and a solitary visit to Bluff in the deep south. Crusader was a great favourite with New Zealand immigrant passengers and was always described as a smart and well turned out ship. Small though she was, Crusader made some excellent times on the voyage out, her best being 74 days land-to-land. Indeed so popular was she that group was formed of those who had travelled in her called The Crusader Association who would continue meeting until around 1925. When steam began to make serious inroads into the domain of the sailing ship, Crusader was sold to Norway and was eventually broken up in 1915.
Source White Wings Sir Henry Brett

Arrival of the Crusader

Name Age County Occupation
Saloon Passengers
Bullock Mr G
Capps Mrs
Cooper Mr E
Evett Henry
Fitzherbert Mr H
Harker Reginald
Robinson Mr K
Second Cabin Passengers
Biss Mr A
Murphy Mr
Mrs
Henry
Emily
William
George
John
Parnall Mr E
Third Cabin Passengers
Catz Leo
Chesson William
Doyle Matthew
Harris John
Edward
Heap Thomas
Knox James
Lambert Edward
Mrs
Edward
Annie
William
Lilian
Lucas Richard
McCurdy Mr
Elizabeth
Archibald
Christina
Ada
Gertrude
Margaret
Denis
Penny John
Salter Charles
Shield Charles
Simpson J
                                 

Copyright Denise and Peter 2007

Reference:
  Evening Post May 22nd 1882