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Clifford
Ship: 460 tons
Captain: Joseph Sharp

Surgeon Superintendent: Dr Thomas Hughes
   Sailed from London, Gravesend 18th December 1841 - arrived Nelson 11th May 1842.

Name Age Occupation Comments
Cabin Passengers
Crumpton Mrs 51 Mother of Priscilla Saxton
Hughes Dr Thomas 34 Surgeon
Saxton Rev Charles Waring 35 Minister
Mary 21
Clifford Infant Born on board
Saxton Miss Lucy 23 Cousin of Charles & John Saxton
Saxton John Waring 34 Gentleman
Pricilla 30
Conrad 8
Edward 6
Charles 4
Priscilla 2
George 8 months
Wakefield Emily 15
Steerage Passengers
Alexander Edward 18 Gardener & Labourer
Alexandeer Augusta 15 Strawbonnet & Dressmaker
Badman Samuel 29 Agricultural Labourer
Emma 34
Kezia 10
Charles 9
Jemina 7
Clifford 2 days
Baigent Edward 30 Sawyer
Mary Ann 30
Edward 9
Alfred 8
Elizabeth 6
Arthur 4
Samuel 1
Batey Jacob 30
Blincoe Francis 45 Farmer & Bricklayer
Ann 38
Ann 16 Servant
Sarah 13
Francis 11
John 7
William 5
James 10 months
Clarke David 30 Agricultural Labourer
Elizabeth 28
Elizabeth 12
Lucy 7
Isabella 5
Emily 3
Ann 3 months
Cook John 33 Tailor
Elizabeth 27
Eleanor 9
John 6
Edmond 4
Elizabeth 1
Cording Edmund 48 Carpenter
Ann 47
Sarah 13
Susan 12
Dench James 38 Sawyer
Elizabeth 37
Quince Hannah 27  Laundress Sister to Mrs Dench
Ford Charles 41 Agricultural Labourer
Hannah 35
Marianne 16 Servant
Henry 15 Agricultural Labourer
Thomas 12
John 10
Daniel 6
Elizabeth 2
Gapper Bernard 35 Farm Labourer
Mary 39
Francis 13
Edward 11
Mary 7
Eunice 1
Amelia 6 weeks
Gibson Sandy Robert 29 Farm Labourer
Susannah 29
Elizabeth 4
Higgins William 35 Sawyer
Mary Ann 38
Mary 6
Matthew 7 months
Hyde James 20 Painter
Lusty Benjamin 22 Carpenter Joiner
Eliza 23
Macisaac Richard 32 Soap, Candlemaker & Baker
Jean 30
Robert 13
Richard 10
Jean 8
Ann 6 weeks
Mansell William 24 Gardener
Matilda 25
Plumridge James 39 Gardener
Maria 38
Eliza 11
Sarah Ann 9
Ratt (Wratt) George Snr 41 Joiner
Sarah 36
Ann 18 Servant
William 15 Joiner
Hannah 14 Sempstress
Julia 11
John 7
Jane 4
Josiah 2 months
Ratt (Wratt) George Jn 20 Joiner
Hannah 24
Richard Mary Ann 27 Servant
Rodgers William 32 Gardener
Mary Ann 33
Mary Ann 8
Roughton Gervas 14 Joiner
Salt William Bates 24 Agricultural Labourer Engaged by Rev Saxton. His wife and children would not embark.
Sloss John 30 Farm Labourer
Esther 22
Smith George 20 Agricultural Labourer
Harriet 19
Spanton James 37 Sawyer
Susan 38
Stanton William 37 Bricklayer Labourer
Mary 35
William 13
Phoebe 10
Elizabeth 7
Mary 5
Richard 2
Hannah 7 months
Stratford Charles 23 Farm Labourer
Sarah 24
Kezenhappuch (?) 5 months
Timms Charles 30 Agricultural Labourer
Selina 35
Samuel 9
Richard 7
Ann 3
Trant Myra 23 Dressmaker
Trounce Thomas 28 Carpenter Joiner
Jane 26
Truss Robert 28 Farm Labourer
Elizabeth 27
Tunnicliffe Thomas 33 Agricultural Labourer & Shepherd
Hannah 32
Henry John 14 Labourer
Sarah 10
Thomas 8
Mary Ann 6
Joseph 3
Caroline 8 months
Verry Thomas 40 Sawyer
Mary 45
Charles 20 Sawyer
John 18 Sawyer
Mary Ann 12
Charlotte 10
George 8
Walker Charles 30 Agricultural Labourer
Winifred 30
William 2
Watson Jacob 23 Mason
Alice 18
Wilson George 25 Sawyer
Margaret 28
Susannah 18 Sempetress Servant

Mr Shepherd (ex London) and Mrs Laughlin and family came from Port Nicholson.

                                
SAXTON, CRUMPTON and SALT
Charles Waring SAXTON and John Waring SAXTON were brothers from a family of 13 children from Whitchurch in Shropshire. Charles' first wife Mary (née LAUGHLIN) gave birth to a son Clifford during the voyage to Nelson. Mary died just 3 months after arriving in Nelson, Charles having to take the funeral service. On 20 May 1842 Charles left Nelson with son Clifford on 'Essex" for England via Valparaiso, then became a school headmaster in Newport, Shropshire. A son from Charles' second marriage, Henry Waring SAXTON, emigrated to New Zealand in 1876, took up residence in New Plymouth where he worked as a civil engineer.

Miss Lucy, a cousin, daughter of Charles' & John's uncle John, married Edward SWEET and returned to Hampshire. John Waring SAXTON remained in Nelson and has many descendants. Parts of his diaries are held at the National Library in Wellington. Mrs Eleanor CRUMPTON was mother of John's wife Priscilla. If you have any connection with the SAXTON families or wish to share information please contact Joanna Broad
                                

John COOK:
John Cook was born Johan Koch in February 1807at Deissel, Hesse Cassel (in modern-day Germany). Johan was from a military village in the forest that supplied soldiers to the 'Hessian' troops (thus, members of his family fought in the 'American war'; and his sisters all married and allegedly emigrated to America). Johan was too weakly to be a soldier and became a tailor. He followed an older brother to London (the brother sub- sequently returned to Deissel). In London in 1831Johan married Elizabeth Cording (London, 1814-December 1882, Wellington). [Her parents appear to have been the Edmund Cordings, also migrated aboard the Clifford, but she had been adopted by her mother's sister, Jane Hemmings. Her mother's maiden name was Mitford, from Newcastle on Tyne.] Johan became known in London as John Cook, owing to a mistake in his marriage banns, which had been posted by an English friend on his behalf. The family emigrated to New Zealand in 1841 aboard the Clifford, having been persuaded to this by his his 'parents-in-law' the Edmund Cordings, who already had a son and a daughter in the colony. The Cooks embarked with three children and another, Robert Clifford, was born off Van Diemen's Land. According to a family letter, of which I have a copy:
"
The Clifford got on the shoal off Ward Island (Wellington Harbour) and from thence went to Nelson, her final port. The Cook family left the Clifford in Wellington in boats on the 5th May 1842 and landed on the beach under Akawie Pa (Cotterville Tce). Their first home was part of a large Maori built hut in which the Buckridges [another Cording daughter and her family] and a family named Bignals were residing. In three months they all left the pa in some groundless fear of the Maoris, the Cooks going into part of a mud hut built on a parcel of land reached by a fenced of (sic) foot-way blocked by foot styles off the lane now called Frasers (Aitken Street). This lane should be called Hornibrooks. There great trouble met the family during the twelve months of their residence. The settlement was practically burnt down and the people deprived of  their belongings in consequence."
Some of John's sons followed him into business as tailors and he later ran J Cook and Son with his son John Herman (John Cook Jr) for many years. Others of the family became farmers, farming at Makara. John Cook
died in Wellington, NZ, on 29 May 1892. If you have a connection with this family or would like to know more please contact Christine O'Brien.

                                

CORDING Family:
I have no official papers for them but this information appears in a family letter written by John Cook Jr: The Cordings were from Wales [amended by hand on the copy to 'Wells'].  In 1841 they persuaded their 'daughter' Elizabeth and her husband John Cook / Johan Koch to migrate with them and their two youngest daughters Sarah and Susan to New Zealand....
"...whither Edmund their son and Ann Buckridge their daughter had preceded them - two daughter (sic) Jane and Mary staying behind in  prospect of marriage. Jane married a Mr Blaker and proceeded to New Zealand. Mary followed long after. Sarah married Thomas Hoggard and Susan married his brother John. The Cooks and the Cordings left England in the barque Clifford in December (1841) Christmas seeing them in the Bay of Biscay. . . their [Cooks and, I believe Cordings] first home was part of a large Maori-built hut in which the Buckridges [married daughter of the Cording family] and a family named Bignals were residing. In three months they all left the pa in some groundless fear of the Maoris . . . And later: The [Cook] family moved on to Lambton Quay, opposite the Central Club, at the corner of Gray Street, living in part of a house with the Cordings who had built it. Cordings had also built a double house in front which was let as a shoe store. There the families had better times which gave more hope to the parents and less sorrow to the children."
If you have a connection with this family or would like to know more please contact Christine O'Brien.

                                

Copyright Denise & Peter 1999 - 2006

Reference:
Archives New Zealand NZC 34/2 p289