Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

ARRIVAL OF THE TAUNTON
The Star September 7th 1874

This vessel, which has for some time past been looked for, was signalled on Friday afternoon, and having some twenty tons of powder on board, anchored below Ripa Island, after a passage of 117 days from the start; having no immigrants on board, she was quickly cleared on Saturday morning. On going on board we found that owing to the number of sheep on board, the decks were lumbered up with pens, spare masts, and yards. The following is the Captain's report:- Left May 10. Crossed Equator 32 days out; N E Trades were very light, and the S E were moderate to far south, the latter were lost in 17deg 43min S., 36deg 41min W. The Island of Tristan D'Achuna was sighted on July 9. The eastings were run down with N E and S E. Running to eastward, The Nuggets were sighted on September 2, having light and variable winds up the coast until Thursday night, when it blew a heavy gale from S W, accompanied by terrific squalls. The ship had 72 sheep on board on starting, eleven of which have died. They look a fine lot.

ARRIVAL OF THE TAUNTON
The Press September 7th 1874

On Saturday we proceeded on board the Taunton, and found on nearing her that she was a nice little ship, rather deeply loaded, and reminded us greatly of the ?. She is a composite ship and was built in Hartlepool in 1868. Her decks were fitted with sheep pens containing some sheep imported by Mr J T Ford, a detailed account of which will be found in another portion of our columns. The following is the report of the vessel furnished by the Captain: - The ship Taunton left on May 10th; crossed the Equator when 32 days out. Had very light N E trades and very moderate S E, which were caught in 4 south and left us on the 18th June in latitude 17.43 South, longitude 36.41 West. Sighted Tristan D'Acuna on July 9th. From thence had light baffling winds. In running down the easting had strong N E and S E. Had very variable winds along the coast till Friday, when there was a heavy southerly gale, with snow, hail, and rain. It was the stormiest passage experienced by the Captain since 1849, and never saw such a continuation of easterly weather. Did not speak one vessel during the passage. The passage occupied 117 days from land to land.

IMPORTED SHEEP
The Press September 7th 1874

By the Taunton Messrs J T Ford and Co import a very valuable addition to our stock, in the shape of 61 pure Lincoln sheep, bred in Lincolnshire, from the flocks of Messrs Clarke, Dudding, Kirkham, and other well-known breeders. They seem in fair health, but are in low condition, no doubt owing to the very long and stormy passage the ship has experienced. The new arrivals show all the leading characteristics of true Lincoln's and the majority possess heavy lustrous fleeces, that we doubt have never been equalled in New Zealand before. 72 started, but of these 11, viz, 2 ewes and 9 rams, died during the passage. One of the rams that died was a prize animal. They are all two and four tooth sheep. We think the greatest thanks of the colony are due to gentlemen who, at great risk to themselves, import valuable stock to improve the colonial breeds, and are sure all breeders will concur with us in these sentiments.