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ARRIVAL OF THE RANGITIKEI
The Star September 21st 1881

The New Zealand Shipping Company's ship Rangitikei arrived from London yesterday, after a splendid passage of 86 days. The ship arrived in perfect order alow and aloft, reflecting great credit on Captain Milman and Mr Canise, her chife officer. The Rangitikei brings 51 passengers all told, amongst whom are several operatives for the Kaiapoi Woollen Factory. The care of the passengers devolved to Mr S Robinson, who ? the post of surgeon, and whose duties fortunately were reduced to a minimum, all on board enjoying excellent health on the passage out. The passengers were evidently much pleased with the kindness and attention shown them by Captain Milman and his officers, in whose praise they spoke in most feeling terms. Mr Butcher still fills the office of chief steward, and he contributed not a little to the general comfort and well-being of all on board. The passage of the Rangitikei was essentially a fine weather one, and no bad weather was met with until the Snares were made on September 16. The Equator was crossed 30 days out, the meridian of the Cape 54 days , Cape Leuwin 72 days, Tasmania 76 dyas and the Snares 81 days out. Besides a large general cargo, the Rangitikei brings nine prize sheep, but owing to the vessel not arriving until darkness had set in, we are unable to report the merits of these animals, which are described as being some of the best bred sheep that have yet reached the Colony.

The following report of the passage was kindly furnished by Captain Milman :- Left the Docks on June 25, at noon, and at 7.30am on June 27 the tug cast off from the ship off St Catherines. Westerly winds were met with until the north-east trades were fallen in with in 83 north. The latter were carried to 13 north, and proved moderate the whole time. Southerly and south-west winds were then met with to 3 north, when the south-west trades were fallen in with , and held fresh to 28 south. A spell of easterly weather then prevailed until the westerlies were met with in in 41 south. These proved very favourable, the ship averaging 230 miles a-day for 25 days, the easting being run down between the parallels of 45 and 48 south. The Equator was crossed in 22 west on July 27; the meridian of the Cape of Good Hope on August 10; the of Cape Leuwin on Sept. 7; Tasmania on Sept. 13; the Snares on Sept. 16. Made Cape Saunders on Sept. 18, and Banks Peninsula on Sept. 20; calms and north-east winds prevailing up the coast, with very fine weather. Made the Heads yesterday afternoon, and was towed in to an anchorage off Stoddart's Point at 7.30pm by the PS Lyttelton.

The following ships were signalled :- July 8: Ship Columbia, from Liverpool to calcutta, 12 days out, in lat 340 34 north long. 200 18 west. July 14: Ship Castlehaed, Liverpool to Valparaiso, 20 days out, in lat 170 45 north, long. 250 18 west. August 11: In lat 390 45 south, long 210 20 west, barque Glenlora, from London for Wellington.