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ARRIVAL OF THE QUEEN OF THE WEST
The Evening Post June 13th 1877

This vessel, under the command of Captain Dalrymple, came to an anchor inside the Heads last evening, but owing to the heavy N W gale blowing; she was unable to make the inner anchorage. Some little anxiety was felt in town for her safety, it being thought she would be unable to ride the gale out. However, a telegram received from the Heads this morning announced her as still at anchor, and all well. The Queen Of The West has a general cargo, consigned to Messrs Levin & Co, and left London on the 23rd February, passing Deal on 27th of same month.

The wind changed to the southward about 1 o'clock this afternoon, and shortly after the barque weighed anchor, and was coming up the harbour when we went to press.

ARRIVAL OF THE QUEEN OF THE WEST
The Evening Post June 14th 1877

The barque Queen of the West, after safely riding out the heavy N W gale on Tuesday night and yesterday morning, came into harbour with the southerly change of wind in the afternoon, and anchored at the powder ground (having 2 tons of powder on board) just after we went to press. Her passage out was protracted to 105 days by a continuance of calms and light baffling winds. She sailed from Gravesend on 24th February, and on 17th march, in lat. 19deg. N., caught the N E trades, which proved light and variable, and were lost in 6 days. The S E trades, which were caught in 3deg. N., on the 25th March, were light and southerly, forcing the ship (after crossing the Equator on the 26th) towards the Brazilian coast, which was sighted on 1st April. Adverse winds were met with until the meridian of Greenwich was crossed on the 29th April. Moderate westerly winds then set in, and the Cape of Good Hope was passed on the 5th May. The easting was run down in lat. 43deg. and 44deg., with moderate N and N W winds; Tasmania was sighted on the 4th inst., and Cape Farewell on the 11th, after a fair run of 36 days from the cape. The barque ran through Cook Strait before a strong N W breeze, increasing to a hard gale off the Heads, where she came to an anchor, as already stated, on Tuesday.