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ARRIVAL OF THE JAMES NICOL FLEMING
Otago Witness July 17th 1875

All the immigration depots in the Province are now empty, with the exception of that of Caversham, in which the remaining immigrants are two or three females. Preparations are now being made to receive some 700 passengers who are to arrive by the James Nicol Fleming and the Aldergrove. These vessels are about 70 days out, and are expected to arrive in about 10 days hence.

ARRIVAL OF THE JAMES NICOL FLEMING
Otago Witness August 7th 1875

Our representative telegraphed from the Port, on Wednesday, the arival of this ship. The signal "Ship to the southward"  was made early in the forenoon, but it was not until the afternoon that the name James Nicol Fleming was ascertained. The Geelong went out to her , and picked her up some diistance off shore, and hence she did not fetch the lower anchorage until 7 o'clock. The Immigration and Health authorities decided not to clear the before next morningand hence we are unable to procure the report. She brings over 300 immigrants who are reported to be well, which statement recieves corroboration from the fact of the ship being brought so far up. She is commanded this time by Captain Gale, and Mr Moffatt is still chief officer of her.

ARRIVAL OF THE JAMES NICOL FLEMING
Tuapeka Times August 11th 1875

Yesterday afternoon the signals at the flagstaff announced the arrival of a ship to the southward. These being shortly after repeated, led us to believe there were two vessels at the Heads. Various conjectures were made as to who the strangers were and it was not until shortly before 5 pm that the signals announced the arrival of Messrs Patrick Henderson and Co's fine composite ship James Nicol Fleming, from London. The tug Geelong, having steam up, at once proceeded down, and towed her up to her anchorage last night, but, owing to the late hour, and her having Government immigrants on board, she was not cleared. This morning, the Customs, Health, and Immigration Officers proceeded alongside, and, having made the necessary inquiries as to the health of all on board, were satisfied with the report. They then proceeded on board, and, after the usual inspection of the immigrants quarters, cleared the ship The Fleming has made the passage from London in 87 days, and brings, in addition to 15 cabin passengers 312 immigrants under the charge of Dr Harman who was here last year in the ship Otago. The whole of the passengers appear to be of a very respectable class; and after the official visit the reporters of the Press were courteously escorted round the vessel by Captain Gale. The first part inspected was the single females' compartment which was situated in the after part of the 'tween decks, and was found to be very clean, and under the charge of Miss Partridge, matron, who spoke in high terms of the conduct of those under her care during the voyage. The married couples were berthed amidships, while the single men were forward, each compartment being remarkably clean. During the voyage the .education of the children had not been neglected, there being a school each day when weather permitted. The general health of the passengers throughout the voyage has been good, and no contagious diseases have been expenenced, there only having been three deaths of young children and three births, the following being the names of those who died:- June 29,  James Snelling, aged one year; July 23, Gertrude Herbert [Hibbert], aged one year; July 26, Albert Gardner three and a-half years. Births :- On June 20, Mrs Barnard, of a daughter; June 29, Mrs Page of a son; July 26 Mrs Turner, of a premature son. The James Nicol Fleming is under the command of Captain Gale, who has with him as chief officer Mr Moffatt, from which gentleman we are indebted for the following report of the ships passage:- Left East India Docks on May 1, and took on board her passengers at Gravesend same afternoon. Left Gravesend on the 4th, and anchored in the Downs on the 5th, owing to heavy fog. The ship Royal Charter, while getting under way, fouled her and carried away a portion of her head gear, but doing no other damage. At 7 p.m. on the 8th discharged her pilot off Beachy Head, with a light southerly breeze, which continued until the 13th, on which day she took her final departure from Start Point with light NE and NW winds, which continued until the 23rd, on which day she picked up the NE trades in 31 N., which were light, and were carried until the 2nd of June in 8 N. From thence experiencad light southerly winds to the 10th, when she got the SE trades in 1 N., and crossed the Equator same day in 21 W. The trades proved moderate, and were lost in lat 25 S., long 31 W. Then light northerly and westerly winds prevailed, and crossed the meridian of Greenwich on the 30th of June and that of the Cape on the 4th of July and ran down her eastings 43S; passed the meridian of the Leuwin on the 23rd July and sighted the Snares on the 2nd inst, with strong, squally S.W. winds, which continued until noon next day, when she was off the Nuggets, from thence light winds to arrival. The only land sighted was the Island of Antonio. The following ships were spoken :- May 30th. - Dunatraer Castle, from London to Melbourne; and spoke here again on the 17th June ; on the 1st June - SS Aconcaqua, from Liverpool to Valparasio; on the 14th June - Italian brig Geovanni, bound for Queenstown, by which vessel letters were sent Home.   We had almost forgot to mention that on board the ship there are seventeen live partridges out of fifty-four originally shipped, consigned to Mr Cargill 'Star' August.

ARRIVAL OF THE JAMES NICOL FLEMING
Otago Witness August 14th 1875

Shortly after the arrival of the first train from Dunedin yesterday the health and immigration officials boarded the good ship James Nicol Fleming, and the inspection that followed was attended by truly gratifying results. The condition of the ship was admirable throughout, and rebounded to the credit of Captain Gale, Dr Hannon, the surgeon-superintendtnt in charge, and last, but not least, to our indefatigable friend Mr Moffatt, the chief officer. It was the first time we had had the pleasure of meeting Captain Gale, but we recognised old acquaintances in the doctor and chief officer, the former having come out last year in the ship Otago, whilst Mr Moffatt retains the position he has some time held on board the J. N. Fleming. As we said before, the ship was in good order, and the immigrants compartments were everything that could be desired in the way of cleanliness and tidiness. The single women's place was especially clean, and we were pleased to observe that its occupants were young and, to all appearances, healthy and respectable. There was no mistaking the respectbility of some of them, whilst all received a very good character from the doctor and the matron Mrs Partrige. The latter stated that a great many of the girls were of the domestic servant class, whilst not a few had been brought up to shop businesses. The appearance of the married people was also in their favour, and their compartment was of more than average cleanliness. The single men's place was also clean, and the men themselves were not wanting in bone and sinew, and healthy looks. The health of the immigrants is best attested by Dr Harman's report, which gives a minimum of sickness, and only three deaths, all from bronchitis. This also reflects creditably upon the doctor, for such a very satisfactory sanitary condition where so many folks were confined in restricted space, could only have been maintained by constant and careful medical surveillance. Strict but kindly discipline was preserved on board, and as a consequence the passengers had much to say in favour of Captain Gale and his officers. We are sure the insubordination and dissatisfaction on the part of immigrants are in the majority of instances the after effects of undue unbending of those who have them in charge. The Fleming's passengers number 312 of all classes, equal to 168 statute adults. They are classified as 46 married couples, 86 single men, 50 single women, 30 male and 37 female children between the ages of 1 year and 12 years, and 4 male and 3 female infants. Arranged according to their nationalties they stand thus : —English, 75 males, 80 females ; Scotch, 25 males, 21 females ; Irish, 71 males, 40 females : total, 171 males and 141 females. The names of the cabin passengers are Mr and Mrs Saunders and 5 children, Mr and Mrs Gibbs, Mrs Wilkinson, Messrs Houston, Elliot, Cooper (2), and Bailey. There were three deaths during the passage, viz. : June 29 James Snelling, 1 year, bronchitis ; July 23— Gertrude Hibbard, 1 year, bronchitis; July 26— Albert Gardiner, 3 years, bronchitis. The births balanced the deaths, and were as follows : June 20— Mrs Barnett, of a daughter ; June 29 Mrs Page, of a son ; July 26— Mrs Turner, prematurely confined of a son, which died on August 4th. As was reported in yesterday's issue, the Albion Company's ship Jamea Nicol Fleming arrived in port late on Wednesday evening, and so was not inspected and cleared until yesterday morning. She has made a good passage of 86 days from the Downs, a day for difference of time being allowed. We thank Mr Moffatt for a succinct account of the passage, from which we glean the following particulars:- The J. N. Fleming hauled out of the East India Dock on May 1st, shipped passengers in the afternoon, was inspected on the 3rd and left Gravesend next day. As it came down thick as a hedge she anchored in the Downs on the 5th, and on the same day was fouled by the ship Royal Charter whilst the latter was getting under weigh, and lost her flying jibboom and port whisker. Repairing the damage detained her until the 8th, when she up anchor and proceeded to sea in tow of the tug. Dropped the latter off Beachy Head, and stood down the Channel with a light southerly breeze. The wind took westing that night and held so, and hence she was five days working clear of the land, finally taking her last departure from the Start Point on the 13th, and there squared away to a light N.E. breeze. Light northerly and N.E. winds held until the 23rd, when she took the Trade in lat. 31. It proved very light throughout, and left her on the 2nd June in lat. 8. Two days previously she passed within sight of the Island of San Antonio, one of the De Verdes. She worked across the Doldrum Belt against light southerly winds, and met the S E. Trade in l deg north on the 10th June, and crossed the Equator the same day in long. 21 west. The S.E. Trade was strong and steady, but hung much to the southward, and breaking once, and that for a few hours only, held to the 25 south long. 35 west, the furthest westerly point made. The southern passage winds favoured her the same day, and thence she made uninterrupted running right across the Southern Ocean, with strong steady northerly and westerly winds. Crossed the meridian of Greenwich on the 30th June, and the meridian of the Cape July 4th; run her easting down on a mean parallel of 43; crossed the meridian of the Leuwin on the 23rd July in 44 south; and on the 2nd August sighted the Snares, the wind then being S W and squally, and so held until next day, when she was abreast of the Nuggets. Thence she had light baffling winds to the Heads, reaching them on the 4th, and the anchorage off the Port at 7pm. The passage was essentially a fine weather one the upper-topsails not once being taken off the ship, and were only reefed two or three times. No ice was sighted. The following vessels were spoken :— May 30th, off San Antonio, the ship Dunnottar Castle, from London to Melbourne - a new vessel, on her maiden voyage. The two ships kept together several days, and finally parted company south of the Line on the 17th June. June 1st, the steamer Aconcagua, from Liverpool to Valparaiso; and on June 16th, the Italian brig Giovanni, from Rio Uruguay, bound to Queenstown. A mail bag was made up and sent home in her.

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The immigrants per James Nicol Fleming met with ready engagements at the Caversham Barracks on the 9th, receiving current rates of wages.

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Amongst other freight shipped at London by the James N. Fleming was a coop of partridges, 54 in number, for Mr E. B. Cargill. Eight of the birds died the day they were put on board, and of the others 29 died on the passage. Seventeen healthy birds survived the voyage, and we daresay will give a good account of themselves in the course of a season or two.

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The engagement of immigrants by the Aldergrove and J. N. Fleming was proceeded with rapidly at the Immigration Barracks, Caversham, on Monday and Tuesday, good rates of wages being obtained by the immigrants. A number are still open for employment, comprising labourers, ploughmen, and farm servant. All the female servants but three have been engaged.

ARRIVAL OF THE JAMES NICOL FLEMING
Otago Witness September 4th 1875

The number of immigrants recently received at the Caversham Immigration Barracks, ex Aldergrove and James Nicol Fleming, comprised 213 males, 152 females, and 99 children. On Saturday there were in the depot 21 males, 16 females, and 39 children, so that during the month 328 adults and 60 minors have proceeded to various parts of the Province.